Hudlin Entertainment Forum

Hudlin's Huddle => Hudlin's Huddle => Topic started by: Reginald Hudlin on October 03, 2009, 08:37:13 pm

Title: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on October 03, 2009, 08:37:13 pm
GOOD HAIR review

I donít normally review stuff, because I donít want to put down project by dear friends, or alienate someone I might need something from in the future.  But sometimes a project must be spoken on.  In my world, there are Must Sees; Should Sees, Could Sees and Donít Sees.  GOOD HAIR is a Must See.

GOOD HAIR is not just a tremendously entertaining film, itís an Important Film.  Usually Important Films are ponderous and dry, but this film is anything but.  Thatís because itís also the first time that Chris Rockís comedic sensibility has be successfully translated to film.  Sure, heís starred, written, produced, even directed movies before, but this is the first true CHRIS ROCK movie; the Chris Rock that you love in his stand up specials BRING THE PAIN and BIGGER AND BLACKER; the Chris Rock you loved to see interview Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson on his HBO talk show; the Chris Rock who inherited the role of Americaís social critic from Dick Gregory and Richard Pryor.

It was inevitable that someone would do a ďblack Michael Moore movieĒ.  We should all be glad it was Chris Rock.  His comedic style is built for this kind of essay, and through a seemingly mundane subject he explores identity, self-hate, the global economy and much more.  Itís also a love letter to black people, and black women in general.  He doesnít preach a solution, as much as we long to hear one, but thatís on us. 

Some might say itís tragic that Chris Rock is the leading black intellectual of our generation.  You could focus on the failure of all those folks with PhDs to match his insights and ability to communicate subtle nuances to the public, or you can applaud that a guy with a GED can articulate class and gender issues with such aplomb.  In any case, Chris Rock is the Man and GOOD HAIR is the movie.  Special shout out to GOOD HAIR producer Nelson George, who has been one of Chrisí mentors for decades and having one hell of a career run of his own right now.  Nelson has been one of the key members of Chrisí team for a while, and his presence is felt throughout the project. 

GOOD HAIR Ė itís a Must See, so go see it.  And tell me what you think.

Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: BarbaraB on October 03, 2009, 10:23:38 pm
I can't wait.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Magic Wand on October 04, 2009, 04:25:49 am
Planning to make a Girls night of it when in opens in ATL on Friday!

Thanx for the endorsement, Reg!
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on October 04, 2009, 04:45:15 pm
I'm going to be very interested in the opening weekend of this film.

The usual suspects are always ready to criticize; I hope they show up and put their money where their loudmouths are.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Magic Wand on October 06, 2009, 06:56:24 am
HA!

Good Hair opens this weekend in ATL suburbs with predominantly white populations.
Not ONE cinema inside the Perimeter screens this weekend!
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Battle on October 07, 2009, 06:30:35 am
Go Chris!

Chris Rock is one of my entertainment heroes that can make lemonade out of rotten tomatoes!
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: BarbaraB on October 09, 2009, 03:35:19 pm
Its not playing in the entire state of f'ing AZ.  :'(
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on October 09, 2009, 03:41:35 pm
Its not playing in the entire state of f'ing AZ.  :'(

I'm so sorry, Barbara.

Now if you'll excuse me; I have to go over the PLETHORA of theaters showing GOOD HAIR here in Brooklyn and decide which one I'll go to. 8)
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Magic Wand on October 09, 2009, 11:49:23 pm
More than a dozen of us sista friends, representing three generations, three ethnicities and three continents descended upon a packed cinema to giggle in this movie.  What a treat!  
The docu-comedy was more insightful than any of us expected!
Some of us are on the creamy crack, (one in rehab) one wears the lace-front wig and there was one weave.  Most of us sport tresses in different grades of sometimes greying natural.  (Dreds, braids, curly fro, Angela Davis fro and general naps)
We debriefed at an area cantina over sushi and sake where the tragic/comical hair stories ensued.  Our laughter infected neighboring tables of people who had not even seen the movie, allowing them to join in the festive discussion!

Having never partaken in weavonomics/weavonometrix/weavonics or any other such weavology, I learned that the weave is not to be handled.  More importantly, men around the cantina were unanimous in knowing not to touch a Black woman's hair.  EVER!

Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on October 10, 2009, 12:05:09 pm
I knew the movie would cause spontaneous church sessions.  Sounds like you had one.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 10, 2009, 06:13:44 pm
Its not playing in the entire state of f'ing AZ.  :'(


It's only playing in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta and DC for now. Worldwide release isn't until the end of the month.

I'm ambivalent to this film. What I've seen so far has left me rolling my eyes and reminding myself that Chris Rock isn't exactly a champion for black women. (Ask Michelle Obama.) And the Oprah interview left me cold. I'll catch it, but it's not exactly a must-see for me. I don't know any women like the ones in the film, and I went to a black college. Are some of them on that creamy crack? Sure. Do they blow thousands of dollars on a single weave job? No. And does Chris talk about the pressure that WHITE AMERICA puts on women of color, especially in the work place? Or is it more of "ha ha ha look at those silly black bitches and their weave!"

As for not being able to put your hands in a black woman's hair - fukk you, Chris. You can pull my hair any time you want to, but we BOTH know you wouldn't want to put your hands all up and through my nappy sh*t - and if your wife took her weave out tonight, you'd sh*t yourself with rage. So maybe a reason why all these black women are going crazy over hair is because of YOU, Chris, and the rest of the brothas.

(http://i36.tinypic.com/117h5z4.jpg)

But I'm sure that was addressed in the movie, right? Those who have seen this film, feel free to set my mind at ease.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 10, 2009, 07:03:23 pm
Hmmmmmm.

Quote
The film is filled with sadly telling moments, like a black beauty student telling Rock that sheíd have a hard time taking a job applicant seriously if he had an afro, yet its tone is one of amusement rather than indignation...(i)n chronicling the permutations of black hair, the filmmaker ends up making a breezy statement on the universality of narcissism.


Quote
...he's content to avoid the issue's knottier roots. Why is straight white or Asian hair so popular? Black hair less so? Answers will have to be teased out elsewhere. Good Hair isn't selling anything but a good time.


Quote
Rock works harder to find out what's happening than why it's happening, doing little to explore why society stigmatizes black hair and how fake hair compares to any other fake enhancements in terms of self-image.


Quote
He conveys a lot of information, but also some unfortunate opinions and misleading facts...[t]he movie has a good feeling, but why do I know more about this subject than Chris Rock does?


Quote
Good Hair is a slipshod doc about a fascinating subject: the loaded history and current complications of African-American hairstyling...our tour guide through this sociopolitical miasma, Chris Rock, merely sees it as an opportunity to crack wise. It doesnít matter if Rock is in a Harlem barbershop or an Indian hair-weave factoryóthereís always a punch line or a snooty eye-roll to be had.


Gee, color me surprised. And the first four quotes are from critics who gave the film POSITIVE reviews.

See also:
Good Hair Doesn't Get to the Root of the Issue (http://jezebel.com/5378076/good-hair-doesnt-get-to-the-root-of-the-issue)
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on October 10, 2009, 10:31:57 pm
Or, you could see it yourself.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 10, 2009, 11:35:29 pm
If I wanted to waste money on half-assed misogynist garbage, I'd read Black Panther.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Magic Wand on October 11, 2009, 08:23:37 am
Jenn,

That's a pretty harsh opinion for someone who hasn't even seen the film.

The following excerpts from the reviews I read, are right on point:

Quote
New York Times
The film's only misstep is its fixation on the competitors in a flamboyant Atlanta hair show.

Quote
Washington Post
If the audience misses anything in Good Hair, it might be more testimony from African American women who have let their hair grow naturally

In short,

Quote
LA Times
[Good Hair] is a documentary that weaves as much comedy as fact into the narrative, making the experience a satisfying entertainment







Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 11, 2009, 12:12:00 pm
Interesting how nobody will answer my question.

Quote
does Chris talk about the pressure that WHITE AMERICA puts on women of color, especially in the work place? Or is it more of "ha ha ha look at those silly black bitches and their weave!"

*whistles the Jeopardy! theme*
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: BarbaraB on October 11, 2009, 12:41:37 pm

Quote
Washington Post
If the audience misses anything in Good Hair, it might be more testimony from African American women who have let their hair grow naturally


Wow, that's disappointing. I was thinking that it would have a nice share of that.

 
Interesting how nobody will answer my question.

Quote
does Chris talk about the pressure that WHITE AMERICA puts on women of color, especially in the work place? Or is it more of "ha ha ha look at those silly black bitches and their weave!"

*whistles the Jeopardy! theme*


I'm curious too. I thought this would be a film about the beauty standard, and many black women's futile attempts to conform to it.  At least that's what I got from Chris Rock's story about his little daughter. Does he come to any conclusions at the end besides "black hair is good business?"
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on October 11, 2009, 07:33:34 pm
Interesting how nobody will answer my question.

Quote
does Chris talk about the pressure that WHITE AMERICA puts on women of color, especially in the work place? Or is it more of "ha ha ha look at those silly black bitches and their weave!"

*whistles the Jeopardy! theme*
It talks about something more important - the pressure black people put on EACH OTHER to look a certain way.  When a group of teenage girls say they would not hire their friend because her natural hair means she's not serious about success, then that's a hundred times more devestating that once again blaming the white man. 

The movie documents how straightening your hair will damage you physically, financially, emotionally....it's brutal, but not preachy.  That makes it effective.  I've seen it with two different audiences and spurs discussion that will hopefully lead to black folks letting that bullsh*t go.  I remember when Spike Lee made the jheri-curl joke in the end credits of SHE'S GOTTA HAVE IT;  that was the beginning of the end of that bullsh*t.  Hopefully this film can do the same.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 11, 2009, 07:34:48 pm
It talks about something more important

In other words, NO.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on October 11, 2009, 07:44:07 pm
I love people who debate confidently without knowing what they are talking about. 

I'm not here to convince you Jenn.  You've in full hater mode, have fun.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 11, 2009, 08:12:19 pm
I love people who debate confidently without knowing what they are talking about. 

A debate requires a minimum of two people with opposing viewpoints.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Tahdigga on October 12, 2009, 03:29:28 am
I have dreads and most of my girlfriends have their natural hair in either locks, twists or braids. So we decided to pass on this one.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Curtis Metcalf on October 12, 2009, 07:03:53 am
It talks about something more important

In other words, NO.
Prolly doesn't cover the effect of hair products on global warming either...  :o
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 12, 2009, 07:54:13 am
I have dreads and most of my girlfriends have their natural hair in either locks, twists or braids. So we decided to pass on this one.

I think I'm with you. Everything in me says to go, but my heart just isn't in this. And "just watch/read it anyway" has become such a mantra here at HEF that I feel like screaming. Hell, I could write a review for this flick right now if I felt like it and be as spot on as I'll be two weeks from now. When white people are chastising you for not delving deep enough into the issues...I mean, geez! Fortunately, Chris' audience will be overwhelmingly black, and it's not like we watch movies for silly things like accuracy or depth. That's whitepeoplesh*t!
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Curtis Metcalf on October 12, 2009, 09:21:12 am
I think I'm with you. Everything in me says to go, but my heart just isn't in this. And "just watch/read it anyway" has become such a mantra here at HEF that I feel like screaming.
FWIW, I don't think you should go. Unless you want to. It will be on DVD, etc. soon enough. It's entertainment. If you don't think you'll be entertained, don't go.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Godheval on October 12, 2009, 02:56:43 pm
...once again blaming the white man.  

I'm sorry, but this line is such a cop out.  Acknowledging the wide and varying effects of discrimination, including having everything you do be measured against a certain standard (i.e. the "white standard") is not the same thing as casting blame.  However, it IS likely white men who make the decisions daily on which images they'll use for marketing (and this is just business, albeit business predicated on the assumption that their target audience is at least somewhat racist), in effect determining the American beauty standard.

Quote
...will hopefully lead to black folks letting that bullsh*t go.  I remember when Spike Lee made the jheri-curl joke in the end credits of SHE'S GOTTA HAVE IT;  that was the beginning of the end of that bullsh*t.  Hopefully this film can do the same.

Purely out of curiosity, Reggie, does your wife let her hair grow out naturally?  My girlfriend, BarbaraB just started doing it in February, and I have to honestly say that I like it better than when she permed it.  Contrary to what SHE thinks, it does NOT look like a sheep's ass.

Also, it is very easy for a man - like Chris Rock - to ridicule African-American women, or others - perhaps like you Reggie? - to take the beauty standard for granted, since it doesn't affect us to the same degree.  To whatever extent black men are allowed within the general standard, they are allowed to maintain their natural hair.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on October 12, 2009, 04:04:00 pm
30 years ago, black people decided that wearing their own hair was beautiful. We expressed our own aesthetic in such a powerful way that even some white people started rockin' 'fros.  So I don't want to hear about what the white people did.  Black people put their mental chains BACK on and decided that natural hair on a black woman was wack and straight hair by any means necessary was good.  Why can't we accept responsibility for sh*t? 

I also agree with Chris that it's black women making these choices.  When it comes to judging a woman, hair is way down on the list for men.  Her body, her face, yes even her personality are more important....guys are not passing on Amber Rose because she has practically no hair.

Conversely, an unattractive woman may say men (or black men) aren't attracted to her because she has natural hair, but that may not be the most honest answer. 

I don't think the film is there to supply the answer...it's there to frame the discussion so the conversation in the culture will generate the next (hopefully positive) step. 
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Battle on October 12, 2009, 04:10:17 pm
I'm reading an article on page 55 written by Jenee Desmon-Harris in the September 7th TIME magazine, Why Michelle's Hair Matters. She remarks:

"The choice many black women make to alter their hair's natural texture has undeniable historical and psychological underpinnings.  It has been attributed to everything from a history of oppression and assimilation to media-influenced notions of beauty and simple personal aesthetics. But one thing is for certain. For the many who wear straightened styles like Michelle's, the decision is deliberate, and the maintainance is significant. A stylist hypothesized in the Inquirer article about the steps taken to attain her look, and a firestorm of online comments followed, including these two:

1st Comment:
"Chemicals, hot comb, round brush and dryer...  same effect, different methods.  I could see it being a big deal or inspirational if she were natural and wore it in natural styles."

2nd comment:
"Girl, ain't no braids, twists, afros, etc. getting into the White House just yet... LOL."
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 12, 2009, 04:53:26 pm
Purely out of curiosity, Reggie, does your wife let her hair grow out naturally?

I was actually wondering the same thing about Chris's wife. I mean, you wonder where your daughter got the idea from? How about her mother?

Black people put their mental chains BACK on and decided that natural hair on a black woman was wack and straight hair by any means necessary was good.

Gee, I wonder where that idea came from. People act like black people just woke up in the crack post black-is-beautiful era.

I also agree with Chris that it's black women making these choices.  When it comes to judging a woman, hair is way down on the list for men.  Her body, her face, yes even her personality are more important....guys are not passing on Amber Rose because she has practically no hair.

And this is why I can't be bothered with this film. That is such a blatant lie that anything other than the most vicious of mocking - preferably of the pointing-and-laughing-in-a-circle type - isn't strong enough.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Vic Vega on October 13, 2009, 12:00:48 pm

Gee, I wonder where that idea came from. People act like black people just woke up in the crack post black-is-beautiful era.


Whoís to blame? Prince? The Jacksons? Lisa Bonet? ;D

I do know the eighties is where the natural died for Black folk who had money, if T.V. was anything to judge by(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

I do affirm that females are more unforgiving judges of other females that any man could be.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 13, 2009, 12:14:20 pm
(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

You don't call that triangle fro Vanessa was wearing a natural?  :P
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Magic Wand on October 13, 2009, 12:31:32 pm
Just a few days ago, I was pretty weave naive.
Well today, I observed a real tumble-weave!
 ;D
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 13, 2009, 12:33:42 pm
Weaves ain't all bad, you know. Sometimes they can be very useful (http://www.nbcactionnews.com/news/local/story/Cops-Hair-Weave-Stops-Bullet/x6Lq5NPwxUSMhiY0QSyqRA.cspx)!
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Vic Vega on October 13, 2009, 12:34:17 pm
(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

You don't call that triangle fro Vanessa was wearing a natural?  :P

Decorative shapes ainít natural. See also Larry Blackmon circa 1986. ;D
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 13, 2009, 12:41:42 pm
See also Larry Blackmon circa 1986. ;D


OWWWWWW!!! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAsHSeyK_7A)
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on October 13, 2009, 03:15:52 pm
(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

You don't call that triangle fro Vanessa was wearing a natural?  :P

Decorative shapes ainít natural. See also Larry Blackmon circa 1986. ;D

You can't win this one, Vick.

I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.

Oh, and the shapes do count! You can't rob Mr. Cameo from his pop-culture hairstyle.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Mastrmynd on October 17, 2009, 05:34:55 pm
i.loved.good hair.

wife and i had a black dbl feature (black dynamite then good hair).
i enjoyed good hair better than BD!
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Jenn on October 23, 2009, 12:25:34 pm
I love people who debate confidently without knowing what they are talking about.  

I've seen the movie now, and somebody owes me $9.50 and 90 minutes of my life back. Next time I'm 100% right, just tell me so.

Does he come to any conclusions at the end besides "black hair is good business?"

Nope! Unless you consider "black bitches are conceited as sh*t and dumb as bricks" to be a conclusion.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Tahdigga on October 27, 2009, 12:51:17 am
I love people who debate confidently without knowing what they are talking about.  

I've seen the movie now, and somebody owes me $9.50 and 90 minutes of my life back. Next time I'm 100% right, just tell me so.


I'm so glad I followed my mind and kept it movin.


I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.


I think the twists and dreads styles are still relevant. Many of my friends have them. Plus I rock em  ;)
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on October 27, 2009, 08:18:34 pm
[

I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.


I think the twists and dreads styles are still relevant. Many of my friends have them. Plus I rock em  ;)

I like the way you rock the dreads, Tah. 8)


Now you and your friends can make the response movie to GOOD HAIR.

Namely, OUR HAIR.
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Tahdigga on October 30, 2009, 09:20:46 pm
[

I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.



I think the twists and dreads styles are still relevant. Many of my friends have them. Plus I rock em  ;)




I like the way you rock the dreads, Tah. 8)


Now you and your friends can make the response movie to GOOD HAIR.

Namely, OUR HAIR.


Thanks JS...I'll have to look into getting a backer to distribute the flick ;)

It'll have to wait, this weekend I'm gonna rock a wig for Halloween (http://i576.photobucket.com/albums/ss206/ladylight/2h32dc2.gif)  ;D
Title: Re: GOOD HAIR review
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 01, 2009, 06:07:19 am
An open letter to African-American women about "Good Hair"
Syndicated columnist

An open letter to African-American women:

It's about the need to be beautiful, I know.

As goals go, that one is neither extraordinary nor gender-specific. But it's different for women, isn't it? A man's sense of self worth is seldom endangered by crow's feet. On him people will say they convey "character." On a woman, they convey wear.

And if it's different for women, it's different and then some for women like you, saddled not just with the need to be beautiful, but also with 400 years of racial baggage, 400 years of ginormous Jemimas, shrill Sapphires, ugly Aunt Esthers and angry Angelas seared into the public mind, 400 years that say you "cannot" be beautiful if your lips are too proud, or your skin too dark or you don't take that nappy hair God gave you and make it look like the hair he gave somebody else.

As you may have guessed, our subject is "Good Hair," Chris Rock's new documentary on the industry of African-American hair care. The comedian has called it the "blackest" movie he's ever made. Truth is, it may well be the blackest movie "anybody's" ever made.

That's not to say other people would not get the jokes or the thesis: that in the search for "good hair" ó i.e., hair that is straight and fine like white people's ó black women burn their scalps with corrosive chemicals, buy thousand-dollar weaves on teachers' salaries, and support, according to Rock, a $9 billion industry of which black folks own virtually nothing.

But being black, having been inculcated with that sense of lowered worth they feed you right along with your strained peas, will enable you to nod knowingly when Rock recounts the moment one of his young daughters asked him why she doesn't have "good hair." It will allow you to laugh in recognition when women describe the elaborate rituals of protecting their hair once it has been straightened or weaved. It will require you to wince in pain when Rock tries to sell black hair at a weave shop (weaves are often human hair from India) and is refused because "nobody" wants that kinky African stuff.

The very notion of "good hair" springs from that same wellspring of self-denigration that offers the N-word as a fraternal greeting and once filled our newspapers with ads for skin-lightening creams. It suggests the difficulty of loving oneself when one uses as a yardstick of worth another culture's physical standards. As in an old episode of "M-A-S-H" where a Korean boy wanted the doctors to fix his eyes and make them look "American."

But of course, there was nothing at all wrong with his eyes. And "good hair" ó I preached this to my curly-haired son who grew up mystified that his hair fascinated so many people ó is any hair that covers your head.

Unfortunately, saying this is like shouting in a hurricane. A million media images tell us beauty looks like Paris Hilton ó and "only" that.

So go on, sister, do what you do. I ain't mad at'cha. But neither am I fooled by your chemicals and weaves.

I am your brother, your father, your husband and your son. I've seen you in church with big hats on, giving children the evil eye. And at the jail on visiting day, shoring up that wayward man. And at the bus stop in the rain on your way to work. And at the dining table with pen and paper, working miracles of money. When I was a baby, you nursed me, when we were children, I chased you through the house; when we were dating, I missed half the movie, stealing sugar from you. I saw you born; I took you to your prom; I glowed with pride when you went off to school. I have married you and buried you. I love your smile. A million times, you took my breath away.

You are the rock and salvation of our people, the faith that remains when all hope is gone. So if it's about the need to be beautiful, maybe it's time somebody told you:

You already are. You always were.

Miami Herald columnist Leonard Pitts Jr.'s column appears regularly on editorial pages of The Times. His e-mail address is: lpitts@miamiherald.com

2009, The Miami Herald