Hudlin Entertainment Forum

Show Bizness => Latest Flicks => Topic started by: Mastrmynd on October 22, 2009, 07:44:49 pm

Title: PRECIOUS
Post by: Mastrmynd on October 22, 2009, 07:44:49 pm
My wife and I just came back from watching "Precious."
  This amazing movie is heavy...thought provoking, unflinchin' in its rawness, unnerving and disturbing and well written and directed.
  I'm glad that Mr. Perry and Ms. Winfrey put their names and money behind this film so it could be released nationwide.
  Go see it when it hits theaters nationwide Nov. 6th.
  That is all. Mastrmynd out.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: JLI Jesse on October 22, 2009, 08:01:24 pm
AP,

I'll just copy and paste what I said on facebook (with a few minor changes).

Really? I have to say I am surprised. I saw the preview for this movie and it made me want to jump off a building. In addition, Mo'Nique is usually enough to make me jerk the wheel.  I just find her very obnoxious and she is usually a very big turn off.  When I saw the trailer,  knew this movie was not for me. But you are the man, so I am happy you enjoyed it :)

However, and I feel like a real ass saying this, but watching the trailer, Gabourey Sidibe needs help. It is disturbing to look at her, knowing how her health must be. I hope she gets the help she needs after this movie.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on October 23, 2009, 01:05:14 am
I don't think I was supposed to laugh at the trailer. Mo'nique (whom I DESPISE) was so over-the-top that I couldn't take her seriously even if I wanted to.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Mastrmynd on October 23, 2009, 06:11:37 pm
i feel ya, jenn, but i have new respect for her after this role.
honest.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on October 23, 2009, 10:56:55 pm
Please! I'm surprised she didn't twirl her mustache as she tied Precious to a railroad track while old-timey piano music played in the background.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Mastrmynd on October 29, 2009, 09:08:00 pm
Please! I'm surprised she didn't twirl her mustache as she tied Precious to a railroad track while old-timey piano music played in the background.

lol.

speakin' of mustaches, Mariah Carey was rockin' a faint mustache when she decided to go sans makeup and flowing in the breeze weave. au natural... but it worked for her in a "this is a vintage 80s new york like i'm rockin'" sortaway.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Hypestyle on November 02, 2009, 05:40:08 pm
However, and I feel like a real ass saying this, but watching the trailer, Gabourey Sidibe needs help. It is disturbing to look at her, knowing how her health must be. I hope she gets the help she needs after this movie.

I had similar thoughts after seeing Monster's Ball, and observing the boy who played Halle/Puffy's son.. extremely overweight, loudly badgered by his mom, finding comfort in food.. maybe it was my own oversensitivity, but I was thinking it was skirting the edge of exploitation in casting a kid who in real life clearly had a serious weight problem..

..with this film, I wonder if it deals with "i'm not fat i'm big-bone-ded" issues in African-American culture..
Title: Agree or disagree?
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 05, 2009, 08:23:11 pm
Wednesday, November 4,2009

Pride & Precious
You can thank media titans Oprah Winfrey and Tyler Perry for much of the hype surrounding Lee Daniels’ film Precious. ARMOND WHITE calls it the ‘Con Job of the Year.’
By Armond White . . . . . . .


SHAME ON TYLER PERRY and Oprah Winfrey for signing on as air-quote executive producers of Precious. After this post-hip-hop freak show wowed Sundance last January, it now slouches toward Oscar ratification thanks to its powerful friends.Winfrey and Perry had no hand in the actual production of Precious, yet the movie must have touched some sore spot in their demagogue psyches. They’ve piggybacked their reps as black success stories hoping to camouflage Precious’ con job—even though it’s more scandalous than their own upliftment trade. Perry and Winfrey naively treat Precious’ exhibition of ghetto tragedy and female disempowerment as if it were raw truth. It helps contrast and highlight their achievements as black American paradigms—self-respect be damned.

Let’s scrutinize their endorsement: Precious isn’t simply a strivers’ message movie; Perry and Winfrey recognize its propaganda value. The story of an overweight black teenage girl who is repeatedly raped and impregnated by her father, molested and beaten by her mother comes from a 1990s identity-politics novel by a poet named Sapphire. It piles on self pity and recrimination consistent with the air-quotes’ own oft-recounted backstories. Promoting this movie isn’t just a way for Perry and Winfrey to aggrandize themselves, it helps convert their private agendas into heavily hyped social preoccupation.

But Perry and Winfrey aren’t all that keep Precious from sinking into the ghetto of oblivion like such dull, bourgie, black-themed movies as The Great Debaters or The Pursuit of Happyness. That’s because the film’s writer-director Lee Daniels works the salacious side of the black strivers’ street. Daniels knows how to turn a racist trick. As producer of Monster’s Ball, Daniels symbolized Halle Berry’s ravishment as integration; Kevin Bacon titillated pedophilia in Daniels’ The Woodsman and Daniels’ directorial debut, Shadowboxing, hinted at interracial incest between stepmother and son Helen Mirren and Cuba Gooding Jr.

Winfrey, Perry and Daniels make an unholy triumvirate.They come together at some intersection of race exploitation and opportunism. These two media titans—plus one shrewd pathology pimp—use Precious to rework Booker T. Washington’s early 20th-century manifesto Up From Slavery into extreme drama for the new millennium: Up From Incest, Child Abuse,Teenage Pregnancy, Poverty and AIDS. Regardless of its narrative details about class and gender, Precious is an orgy of prurience. All the terrible, depressing (not uplifting) things that happen to 16year-old Precious recall that memorable All About Eve line, “Everything but the bloodhounds nipping at her rear-end.”

It starts with the opening scene of Precious’ Cinderella fantasy. Tarted up in a boa and gown, walking a red carpet light years away from her tenement reality, Precious (Gabourey Sidibe) sighs, “I wish I had a light-skinned boyfriend with nice hair.” Her ideal smacks of selfhatred—the colorism issue that Daniels exacerbates without exploring. He casts light-skinned actors as kind (schoolteacher Paula Patton, social worker Mariah Carey, nurse Lenny Kravitz and an actual Down syndrome child as Precious’ first-born) and dark-skinned actors as terrors. Sidibe herself is presented as an animal-like stereotype—she’s so obese her face seems bloated into a permanent pout.This is not the breakthrough Todd Solondz achieved in Palindromes where plus-size black actress Sharon Wilkins artfully represented the immensity of an outcast’s misunderstood humanity. Instead, Sidibe’s fancy-dressed daydream looks laughable; poorly photographed, its primary effect is pathetic.

Daniels employs the same questionable pathos as the family banquet scene at the start of Denzel Washington’s also condescending Antwone Fisher. This cheap ploy of tortured daydreaming uses black American deprivation for sentimentality. It sells materialist fantasy as a universal motivation—no wonder Perry and Winfrey like it. Precious embodies an unenlightening canard.That fantasy opening—depicting the girl’s Obama-like ascension—tantalizes thoughts of advancement and triumph. It ought to be satirical to undercut the norms she aspires to just as Palindromes’ misfit teens subverted MTV’s ideas of youth.

Perry and Winfrey may think Precious is serious, but Daniels is hoisting his freak flag. He gets off on degradation. Flashbacks to Precious’ rape contain a curious montage of grease, sweat, bacon and Vaseline. Later, he intercuts a shot of pig’s feet cooking on a stove with Precious being humped while her mother watches from a corner. Another misjudged scene recreates De Sica’s B&W Two Women—a half-camp trashing of motherhood that compounds the problem of cultural alienation. So does the film’s Ebonics credit sequence and the scene of Precious rotating amidst a bombardment of success icons—Martina Arroyo, MLK, Shirley Chisholm—to which she either relates or is ignorant.This incoherence should not pass for sociology.

Not since The Birth of a Nation has a mainstream movie demeaned the idea of black American life as much as Precious. Full of brazenly racist clichés (Precious steals and eats an entire bucket of fried chicken), it is a sociological horror show. Offering racist hysteria masquerading as social sensitivity, it’s been acclaimed on the international festival circuit that usually disdains movies about black Americans as somehow inartistic and unworthy.

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The hype for Precious indicates a culture-wide willingness to accept particular ethnic stereotypes as a way of maintaining status quo film values. Excellent recent films with black themes—Next Day Air, Cadillac Records, Meet Dave, Norbit, Little Man, Akeelah and the Bee, First Sunday, The Ladykillers, Marci X, Palindromes, Mr. 3000, even back to the great Beloved (also produced by Oprah)—have been ignored by the mainstream media and serious film culture while this carnival of black degradation gets celebrated. It’s a strange combination of liberal guilt and condescension.

Birth of a Nation glorified the rise of the Ku Klux Klan as a panicky subculture’s solution to social change. Precious hyperbolizes the class misery of our nation’s left-behinds—not the post- Rapture reprobates of Christianity’s last-days theories, but the Obama-era unreachables—including Precious’ Benetton-esque assortment of remedial school classmates. One explanation is that Precious permits a cultural version of that 1960s political controversy “benign neglect”—its agreed-upon selection of the most pathetic racial images and social catastrophes helps to normalize the circumstances of poverty and abandon that will never change or be resolved.You can think: Precious is just how those people are (although Cops and the Jerry Springer and Maury Povich shows offer enough evidence that white folks live low, too).

Precious’ plot is so outrageous (although the New York Times Magazine touts it as “The Audacity of Precious,” a telling link to Obama’s memoir The Audacity of Hope) that its acclaim suggests an aftershock of all that Hurricane Katrina weeping and lamentation about America’s Others. This movie finally puts the deprivations of Katrina on the big screen—not as smug, political fingerpointing, nor the inconsequential way superliberals Brad Pitt and David Fincher shoehorned Katrina into Benjamin Button, but as sheer melodramatic terror. (Poor Precious endures the most brutal home life since Lillian Gish in the 1918 Broken Blossoms.)

Precious raises ghosts of ethnic fear and exoticism just like Birth of a Nation. Precious and her mother (Mo’Nique) share a Harlem hovel so stereotypical it could be a Klansman’s fantasy. It also suggests an outsider’s romantic view of the political wretchedness and despair associated with the blues. Critics willingly infer there’s black life essence in Precious’ anti-life tale. And the same high-dudgeon tsk-tsking of Hurricane Katrina commentators is also apparent in the movie’s praise. Pundits who bemoan the awful conditions that have not improved for America’s unfortunate are reminded that they are still on top.

This misreading of blues sensibility probably has something to do with the disconnect caused by hip-hop, where thuggishness and criminality romanticize black ghetto life. Director Daniels’ rotgut images of aggressive cruelty and low-life illiteracy aren’t far from gangster rap clichés.The spectacle warps how people perceive black American life— perhaps even replacing their instincts for compassion with fear and loathing.

Media hype helps pass this disdain down to the masses. Precious is meant to be enjoyed as a Lady Bountiful charity event. And look: Oprah,TV’s Lady Bountiful, joins the bandwagon. It continues her abusefetish and self-help nostrums (though the scene where Precious carries her baby past a “Spay and Neuter Your Pets” sign is sick).


Problem is, Perry,Winfrey and Daniels’ pityparty bait-and-switches our social priorities.

Personal pathology gets changed into a melodrama of celebrity-endorsed self-pity. The con artists behind Precious seize this Obama moment in which racial anxiety can be used to signify anything anybody can stretch it to mean. And Daniels needs this humorless condescension (Hollywood’s version of benign neglect) to obscure his lurid purposes.

Sadly, Mike Leigh’s emotionally exact and socially perceptive films (Secrets and Lies, All or Nothing, Happy Go Lucky) that answer contemporary miserablism with genuine social and spiritual insight have not penetrated Daniels,Winfrey, Perry’s consciousness—nor of the Oscarheads now championing Precious. They’ve also ignored Jonathan Demme’s moving treatment of the lingering personal and communal tragedy of slavery in Beloved. Both Leigh and Demme understand the spiritual challenges to despair and their richly detailed performances testify to that fact. Sidibe and Mo’Nique give two-note performances: dumb and innocent, crazy and evil. Monique’s do-rag doesn’t convey depths within herself, nor does Mariah Carey’s fright wig. Daniels’ cast lacks that uncanny mix of love and threat that makes Next Day Air so August Wilson- authentic.

Worse than Precious itself was the ordeal of watching it with an audience full of patronizing white folk at the New York Film Festival, then enduring its media hoodwink as a credible depiction of black American life. A scene such as the hippopotamus-like teenager climbing a K-2 incline of tenement stairs to present her newborn, incest-bred baby to her unhinged virago matriarch, might have been met howls of skeptical laughter at Harlem’s Magic Johnson theater. Black audiences would surely have seen the comedy in this ludicrous, overloaded situation, whereas too many white film habitués casually enjoy it for the sense of superiority—and relief—it allows them to feel. Some people like being conned.
Title: agree or disagree pt.2...from Stanley Crouch
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 07, 2009, 12:17:20 pm
There is a radical humanity to the new film “Precious” that is equaled by the radical humanity of Tyler Perry. As you should know by now, “Precious,” directed by Lee Daniels, is a film about an eggplant-dark literal whale of a teenager whom we discover is more than just a 300-pound barrel of blubber impregnated twice by her own father.

Like so many of the vulgar, obnoxious and hostile young inner-city kids, she is actually no more than a blowfish. The name comes from the marine creature that blows itself up into a terrible, distorted sight, hoping to frighten things that terrify it. Precious blows herself up into an apparently dangerous force in order to spook those who have successfully frightened her.

That she learns how to deal with the things that have traumatized her into self-pity and insipid fantasies, and being hypnotized into emotional paralysis, is what the film is about. It is successful because, for all its rawness, it does not exploit all of the terrible things in the movie for nothing other than profit. In short, it is not a hip-hop movie of brittle minstrelsy. It does not dehumanize by exploiting vice and violence for cartoon displays intended to open the way to the bank.

“Precious” avoids all of that because everything is human, be it good or bad. It is a criticism told in terms so infused with humanity that its deeply Negroid style becomes universal. Universality is achieved only by communicating things we know so well or believe so deeply because they are so human in their portrayal.

“Precious” could only happen in our time, but it is an old fairy tale of a girl prevailing through the cruelties of a mother close to being a witch and a world close to being hell. What makes it so important is that it underlines the importance of literacy.

Since Oprah Winfrey has consistently chosen to play the part of America’s godmother of good will, we are not surprised that the film broke her heart and that she chose to use her remarkable power to do for it whatever she could.

The surprise to those who do not understand Tyler Perry’s particular brilliance is the unexpected fact that he brought the film to Winfrey knowing that she would respond with deep feeling.

Perry knows what the real deal is. He gets to his audience with the honey of broad comedy without a doubt, but there is always something else there. The broad comedy is a setup for a vast belief in the power of spiritual devotion and morale whenever one is between a rock and a hard place. Or raised in the barrel of butcher knives that we know as extreme poverty or the chaos wrought by criminal knuckleheads.

Precious gets through because those who actually want to help her have the will necessary to change the way she thinks and the way she lives. They do this by showing her the only thing we can ever show children trapped in the barrel: actual feeling and actual concern for them.

That is why Perry went to Winfrey about the film. It is actually about one of the few things both of them know works: love so tough it reminds one of how anybody, family or not, stands up for a child in danger.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 07, 2009, 12:49:20 pm
I'll support this film, if for no reason than to put my money where my mouth is. Even if I have to sit through the tragedy that is Mo'Nique. Even if it puts money in Tyler Perry's pocket.

But one thing is really bugging me. IIRC, the book describes Precious as being around 5'9" or 5'10" and over 200 pounds. Gabby Sibide, on the other hand, is over 300 pounds. Don't get me wrong - 300 pounds is technically over 200 pounds. But it seems to be that for Daniels (whom I've never liked) didn't think 200 pounds was tragic enough. Precious couldn't just be overweight, but obese, because it makes the story that much more heartbreaking. Even if they're trying to pass it off as pregnancy weight, it still rubs me the wrong way.

One of the problems I have the criticism, however, is the idea that this story shouldn't be told because it's too depressing or too tragic or too unreal, and that nobody's mother can be 'that bad'. Anybody who has worked with children - particularly low income children - know that Precious's story, while tragic and enraging, isn't all that uncommon. Why shouldn't it be told? What, does the idea of young girls being raped and impregnated f*ck up YOUR universe, Mr. White? Well, I'm so sorry to hear that! We may not want to admit it, but I dare suggest that nearly all of us have known a Precious at one point or another. If you've lived in an all-female environment - such as a women's dorm or barracks - you've met a few. It's my opinion that Daniels is giving us little more than emoporn, as he's been known to do. But is he wrong? Harlem sh*tholes, illiterate teenagers and psychotic mothers bother you? BAWWWWWWWW, cry moar (http://encyclopediadramatica.com/Cry_moar).

Quote
A scene such as the hippopotamus-like teenager climbing a K-2 incline of tenement stairs to present her newborn, incest-bred baby to her unhinged virago matriarch, might have been met howls of skeptical laughter at Harlem’s Magic Johnson theater. Black audiences would surely have seen the comedy in this ludicrous, overloaded situation


Right, like they howled and applauded when Sanaa Lathan was slapped so hard that she flew OVER a bar in The Family That Preys? That's not exactly a ringing endorsement of black people.

And they way they describe Gabby is flat out insulting. "Barrel of blubber"? "Literal whale"? "Eggplant"? Mr. Crouch, have you looked at yourself at any time w/i the past 30 years?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on November 07, 2009, 03:41:07 pm
White is comparing PRECIOUS to BIRTH OF A NATION!

Talk about melodrama, I have to see this film now after that sort of rhetoric.

On another note, I have to brace myself for the avalanche of you/your mother looks like Precious jokes that are soon to fill the air.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Vic Vega on November 07, 2009, 04:23:25 pm
White is comparing PRECIOUS to BIRTH OF A NATION!

Talk about melodrama, I have to see this film now after that sort of rhetoric.

On another note, I have to brace myself for the avalanche of you/your mother looks like Precious jokes that are soon to fill the air.

White is a frustrated failed filmmaker turned embittered reviewer. If a film isn't making an uplifting moralistic point to him it is bad movie craft-This is a man who thinks Spielberg can do no wrong.His opinon is valueless.

Well if you saw everything he hates you'd be in for some pretty good movie-watching so maybe he is not utterly useless.

Haven't seen this movie yet but-some will shun it for its Perry connection and some will shun it for its Oprah connection. Even more will shun it for its subject matter-will Black folk be willing to pay to see depressing stuff like this? It is no coincidence that nearly everybody in Tyler Perry's flicks are Buppies.

The folks in Slumdog were poor as hell but grew up to be cute and there was a happy ending.Where is the escapism here?

I'll check it out-It be interesting to see how it does.
Title: Re: Agree or disagree?
Post by: BmoreAkuma on November 07, 2009, 08:46:41 pm

The hype for Precious indicates a culture-wide willingness to accept particular ethnic stereotypes as a way of maintaining status quo film values. Excellent recent films with black themesNext Day Air, Cadillac Records, Meet Dave, Norbit, Little Man, Akeelah and the Bee, First Sunday, The Ladykillers, Marci X, Palindromes, Mr. 3000, even back to the great Beloved (also produced by Oprah)—have been ignored by the mainstream media and serious film culture while this carnival of black degradation gets celebrated. It’s a strange combination of liberal guilt and condescension.

Hold up let me get this straight. This guy thinks these were great films where these films had the mixture of the very same huge black girl in the film,  the "evil big dark skin" vs "good slim light skin", stereotypes of the black churches & gangs and finally with the naivete white character. And these films still considered "excellent"?


One of the problems I have the criticism, however, is the idea that this story shouldn't be told because it's too depressing or too tragic or too unreal, and that nobody's mother can be 'that bad'. Anybody who has worked with children - particularly low income children - know that Precious's story, while tragic and enraging, isn't all that uncommon. Why shouldn't it be told? What, does the idea of young girls being raped and impregnated f*ck up YOUR universe, Mr. White? Well, I'm so sorry to hear that! We may not want to admit it, but I dare suggest that nearly all of us have known a Precious at one point or another. If you've lived in an all-female environment - such as a women's dorm or barracks - you've met a few. It's my opinion that Daniels is giving us little more than emoporn, as he's been known to do. But is he wrong? Harlem sh*tholes, illiterate teenagers and psychotic mothers bother you? BAWWWWWWWW, cry moar ([url]http://encyclopediadramatica.com/Cry_moar[/url]).
Exactly based on the short time I have worked in section 8 I have seen some of "tragic" circumstances where at times the only income is child support if the father is actually working.
Title: Re: Agree or disagree?
Post by: BarbaraB on November 08, 2009, 09:47:52 am

The hype for Precious indicates a culture-wide willingness to accept particular ethnic stereotypes as a way of maintaining status quo film values. Excellent recent films with black themesNext Day Air, Cadillac Records, Meet Dave, Norbit, Little Man, Akeelah and the Bee, First Sunday, The Ladykillers, Marci X, Palindromes, Mr. 3000, even back to the great Beloved (also produced by Oprah)—have been ignored by the mainstream media and serious film culture while this carnival of black degradation gets celebrated. It’s a strange combination of liberal guilt and condescension.

Hold up let me get this straight. This guy thinks these were great films where these films had the mixture of the very same huge black girl in the film,  the "evil big dark skin" vs "good slim light skin", stereotypes of the black churches & gangs and finally with the naivete white character. And these films still considered "excellent"?



That's where I stopped reading. Meet Dave? uuuh no. Norbit really? REEEAALLLYY? What was the black theme in The Ladykillers? Would that be the two black people with significant roles? The f*ck?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: bluezulu on November 08, 2009, 10:17:42 pm
Later, he intercuts a shot of pig’s feet cooking on a stove with Precious being humped while her mother watches from a corner.



Da f$ck?

Anyway, yea the subject matter does not surprise me, but I'm not sure this is the type of thing I want to spend money to see to be "entertained".
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 11, 2009, 02:35:54 pm
Da f$ck?

Apparently "molested" is too hard for manly men like Crouch to say.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Catch22 on November 11, 2009, 03:03:21 pm
I think I'll pass on this one.  Personally, I go to the movies to be entertained...and I like to check my brain at the door when I do it most times.  I'm in the minority here, but IMO, there's enough F'd up stuff to deal with in real life that I don't want to pay $19 to sit through something that's gonna depress the hell out of me. 
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Redjack on November 11, 2009, 07:02:08 pm
There is no way, whatsoever, under any circumstances in this life or the next that I will ever see this film.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 11, 2009, 08:04:49 pm
I've been asleep all day (note: NEVER take sleeping pills after four consecutive days w/no sleep!), and our theater is showing it at 12:01 a.m. Since I'm right up the street and chances are that I'll be awake in two hours, I'll go see it and report how things go.

*edit* Apparently 12:01 Thursday means 12:01 FRIDAY. Freaking bastards.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 13, 2009, 12:26:34 am
Saw it this morning. Wasn't a bad movie. Wasn't a good movie. Last 15 minutes destroyed two hours of any good will I had. Mo'Nique is still a hack, but she'll get an Oscar anyway.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on November 13, 2009, 05:37:08 am
Saw it this morning. Wasn't a bad movie. Wasn't a good movie. Last 15 minutes destroyed two hours of any good will I had. Mo'Nique is still a hack, but she'll get an Oscar anyway.
the problem with mo'nique is she fits the ghetto hood fat chick too well at times in some of these roles.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Mastrmynd on November 13, 2009, 10:24:02 am
glad u liked it for the most part jenn.
monique definitely deserves to be nominated.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 13, 2009, 11:44:41 am
monique definitely deserves to be nominated.

For WHAT? Sitting around in that Jokerface makeup? The mom from "The Loneliest Runner" was scarier than her - and far more poignant.

*edit* And now I remember why I see movies alone and as early as I can whenever I can. All the laughing and talking last night drove me NUTS!!!
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on November 13, 2009, 02:38:44 pm
I agree with Jenn why should another black actress have to literally be a strong image of negativity to get an Oscar nod?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 13, 2009, 02:50:30 pm
I agree with Jenn why should another black actress have to literally be a strong image of negativity to get an Oscar nod?


Oscar loves hysterical, crying black women - the fatter, the better. But that's not the problem here. The problem is that Precious (the movie) promotes itself as one thing but turns out to be another. Contrary to what we see in the trailers and the commercials, Precious is NOT some abused, retarded puppy that gets kicked around, complete with a hangdog look on her face. She IS smart and funny. She's not stupid by any means. But that's not good enough for promotions, so we only see Precious in the promotions as quiet and crying and with her head down. I also hate how Mary (the mother) is such a one-note character. Mo'Nique's delivery at the end was so forced and pathetic that I whipped out my phone and started texting in the middle of all the laughter. I couldn't even take anything she was saying seriously for the simple fact that I didn't believe a single thing she was saying. Hello? Welfare cheats have a tendency to lie about sh*t. (In this case, I mean Mary was *literally* cheating the system, not that she's a cheat because she's on welfare.) IMO, the welfare slant was the worst part of the entire film. These people speak WAY too freely for those who are supposed to be flying under the radar. A girl as old as Precious would have NEVER told a complete stranger (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFoy3QX49qg) that she'd been impregnated twice by her father. Precious would've had a lie memorized front, back and sideways, mainly because she would've already told this lie 40 billion times to every teacher, social worker, counselor who asked. (Remember, she already has one child and they were on the system.) Precious wasn't even caught off-guard or anything! And Mary's "confession" at the end? Complete bullsh*t. (Additionally, any competent social worker knows to never jump on a point like that. And last I checked, a social would've been required by law to turn Mary in to the police, making a good chunk of this story irrelevant anyway.)

I'm getting really sick of people pulling the Black Stereotype Card, though. Ask black folks, and the ONLY stories that can be hold are where we uplift and overcome as noble Negroes. There was far, FAR too much familiar territory in this film - as flawed and hackneyed as it is - for me to take anybody seriously who gets upset at the NERVE of showing incest and abuse in a black household. Far too many people (especially black people) are angrier at the concept of rape than rape itself. Rather than being mad about these kinds of households, we're mad at the people who show them. Get an effing grip, please.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on November 13, 2009, 04:04:14 pm
Oscar loves hysterical, crying black women - the fatter, the better. But that's not the problem here. The problem is that Precious (the movie) promotes itself as one thing but turns out to be another. Contrary to what we see in the trailers and the commercials, Precious is NOT some abused, retarded puppy that gets kicked around, complete with a hangdog look on her face. She IS smart and funny. She's not stupid by any means. But that's not good enough for promotions, so we only see Precious in the promotions as quiet and crying and with her head down.


I like how they focused on the negatives but I guess if she came out to smart it wouldn't be "controversial"  ::)



I also hate how Mary (the mother) is such a one-note character. Mo'Nique's delivery at the end was so forced and pathetic that I whipped out my phone and started texting in the middle of all the laughter. I couldn't even take anything she was saying seriously for the simple fact that I didn't believe a single thing she was saying. Hello? Welfare cheats have a tendency to lie about sh*t. (In this case, I mean Mary was *literally* cheating the system, not that she's a cheat because she's on welfare.) IMO, the welfare slant was the worst part of the entire film. These people speak WAY too freely for those who are supposed to be flying under the radar. A girl as old as Precious would have NEVER told a complete stranger ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFoy3QX49qg[/url]) that she'd been impregnated twice by her father. Precious would've had a lie memorized front, back and sideways, mainly because she would've already told this lie 40 billion times to every teacher, social worker, counselor who asked. (Remember, she already has one child and they were on the system.) Precious wasn't even caught off-guard or anything! And Mary's "confession" at the end? Complete bullsh*t. (Additionally, any competent social worker knows to never jump on a point like that. And last I checked, a social would've been required by law to turn Mary in to the police, making a good chunk of this story irrelevant anyway.)

Well put out and that i do agree with you that your average teen girl wouldn't just flat out admit that their father has abused them so willingly. Also when you are caught lying on a government subsidy you have to pay it back or you will lose it. So are you saying that wasnt addressed as well?

I'm getting really sick of people pulling the Black Stereotype Card, though. Ask black folks, and the ONLY stories that can be hold are where we uplift and overcome as noble Negroes. There was far, FAR too much familiar territory in this film - as flawed and hackneyed as it is - for me to take anybody seriously who gets upset at the NERVE of showing incest and abuse in a black household. Far too many people (especially black people) are angrier at the concept of rape than rape itself. Rather than being mad about these kinds of households, we're mad at the people who show them. Get an effing grip, please.
The thing that is grinding my gears is that this film is getting the Oscar nod for Mo'nique. Nothing about her character stood out to me that I don't see differently at times where I work. One thing I do agree about being mad at the households. I'll admit that at times so many of these households is an embarrassment to not only black families but all American families in general. When a person comes in and is complaining about why "their rent is too high" but it is at $175 a month boggles my mind at times. These would be the same one where 2 adults living in 4 bedroom house with a basement and wondering why they have a high utility bill and the only income is child support. Even with the Utility check it still doesn't cover it all. 
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 13, 2009, 08:08:01 pm
Well put out and that i do agree with you that your average teen girl wouldn't just flat out admit that their father has abused them so willingly. Also when you are caught lying on a government subsidy you have to pay it back or you will lose it. So are you saying that wasnt addressed as well?

Not at all. In fairness, this was before welfare "reform". But last I checked, learning that a girl has two babies by her father still warrants police intervention. That bullsh*t "up by the bootstraps" ending could've at least been salvaged w/the police walking into the welfare office as Precious was walking out of it.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on November 18, 2009, 05:16:17 pm
Just saw this. I got mixed feelings about it. I thought it was a well written and well acted film. I thought Monique did a good job, playing the role of the heavy (pun intended) and most of the other actors did pretty good as well, though I'm not sure I can include Lenny Kravitz in that. He was just sort of there. But I guess it's nice he's stretching his wings too.

I felt the movie went a little too far in kicking Precious when we learned she was HIV positive. Damn, that was too much of a pile on. And I felt the ending was just there. I thought there should've been more. I wanted to see more of a resolution. The end didn't inspire or uplift me, it just made me feel more depressed. Now she's HIV positive, with two kids, and still has an uncertain future.

My major issues with the film perhaps aren't necessarily about the film itself, but the whole light is good and dark is bad. Even though Precious is a dark skinned woman, her fantasy self is white, her fantasy boyfriend is light skinned, and pretty much every adult who cares or tries to help her is white or light skinned. It just reinforces this idea, and the film never challenges it or turns it on its ear. There was also the size issue, with Precious's saviors all being trim, in contrast to Precious-who had severe body-image problems, Monique, that other welfare mom, and the largely unsympathetic Sherri Shepard (at least I thought that was Shepard as the school's receptionist).

The movie was like a list of black pathologies, or should I say so-called black pathologies. I know there are black people like this in the world, but it seems like this small group gets their story told a lot more than other black people and it creates the impression IMO that the nightmarish world of Precious is the norm and not the exception. The film Precious alone doesn't do that, but when coupled with various movies, TV shows, books, and music about hood life it all becomes too 'representative' of what being 'black' is, and I think this kind of negative self-image is killing us. I don't believe in censorship, but I would like to see more stories than Precious out there. I would like to see a wider range of the black experience.

I do think Precious will net some Oscars because it allows Hollywood liberals to score diversity points while showing black people at their worst or most tragic again.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 26, 2009, 07:06:06 am
Here's a review from the Christian Science Monitor:

Review: 'Precious: Based on the Novel "Push" By Sapphire'
Sixteen-year-old Precious – illiterate, overweight, and pregnant again – is a study in quiet courage despite her nightmarish family life.
By Peter Rainer | Film critic of The Christian Science Monitor
from the November 6, 2009 edition


"Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' By Sapphire" is an ungainly title for a powerfully ungainly movie. Boxers like to say that a punch hurts less if you see it coming. I saw just about every punch coming my way in "Precious" and yet it still packs a hurtful wallop. It melodramatizes everything and yet its overall effect is something more than melodrama.

Gabourey Sidibe plays Claireece "Precious" Jones, a 350-pound near-illiterate 16-year-old who is pregnant for a second time by her father, who turns out to be HIV positive, and lives with her nightmarishly abusive single mother Mary (Mo'Nique) in a dingy two-floor apartment in Harlem.

This litany of woe is laid on awfully thick. Director Lee Daniels and his screenwriter Geoffrey Fletcher periodically showcase Precious's fantasies of dancing with a studly beau at the Apollo, or gazing into the mirror and seeing the reflection of a slim, blonde, white girl. You can cut the pathos with an Exacto knife. Much more egregious is how Daniels intercuts Precious being raped by her father with shots of eggs being fried in bubbly grease. Here is a filmmaker who does not trust his material to speak for itself.

What rescues "Precious" is that Daniels also has a sharp documentarian's eye for realism. As overblown and coercive as his movie often is, it also has admirable feel for the workaday struggles of its people, especially Precious's. It's a bizarrely bifurcated movie, alternately realistic and garishly hyperbolic.

Both Tyler Perry and Oprah Winfrey came on board as executive producers after the film won awards and standing ovations at Sundance (a response duplicated in Cannes and Toronto). It's easy to see what appealed to them: The heartbreak in this movie is never so abject that it cannot be overcome.

But this inspirationalism is what I liked least about "Precious."

Making Precious an Everygirl whose struggle becomes an advertisement for uplift feels false to the mood and tragedy of the piece. The horrors in this movie are not so easily dispelled. (It opens with the onscreen words "Everything is a gift of the universe." Some gift, some universe.)

Sidibe is an untrained actress but in some ways this works to the film's advantage. Her flat line readings and inexpressive features carry the conviction of someone who has closed herself off from empathy. Thrown out of school for being pregnant, Precious is nevertheless intelligent enough to realize she won't survive without an education, so she enrolls, much against her mother's boozy protestations, in an alternative school. Her rowdy classmates become friends, perhaps her first, and a teacher with the improbable name Blu Rain (Paula Patton) becomes a kind of surrogate mother. (At least she wasn't named Blu Ray, but then again, the film is set in 1987.)

Ms. Rain is in a long line of movie "teachers-who-just-won't-give-up," and her angelic gumption is the movie's most conventional trope. Compare her with Mo'Nique's Mary, who is like no one else I've seen in the movies. This monster is fiercely, intensely human, which only serves to heighten the monstrousness. Known as a bawdy comic, Mo'Nique once again proves the truism that comic actors have the ready-made chops for drama. (Think of Bette Midler in "The Rose.")

Mary is unfathomable, and when she delivers her big self-justifying monologue at the end to Precious's social worker (an almost unrecognizably dour Mariah Carey), she only seems more so. Mo'Nique doesn't go in for a lot of special pleading. She plays it hard right to the finish, so much so that the upbeat addendum that closes out the film seems, unintentionally, like a good-time fantasia.

Precious moves from a girl who refers to herself as "ugly black grease to be washed from the street" to a young woman who becomes the mother she never had. In the rush of overheated praise for this movie's power, would I be a spoilsport to ask what the sequel might look like? From the looks of it, Precious is en route to "Oprah." Grade: B+ (Rated R for child abuse including sexual assault, and pervasive language.)
 
 
 
Title: Byron Crawford on Precious
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 26, 2009, 07:13:08 am
Here's a review (well, really a critique of the whole PRECIOUS phenomenon without actually seeing the film) by the always hilarious Byron Crawford:

November 24, 2009
Where should I see Precious?

Because I'm constitutionally incapable of trying hard, I live about equal difference from both white and black movie theaters. Where should I go see Precious?

I usually try not to support anything associated with either Oprah Winfrey or Tyler Perry, and Precious is somehow associated with both of them. But I knew I'd have to see it, when I read in Armond White's much-discussed review of the film that it includes a scene where the title character steals and eats an entire bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Lee Daniels, the teh ghey coke-sniffer who directed Precious, is obviously just a troll, out to shock people. Like a black, less talented Lars von Trier. Daniels is the same guy who brought us Halle Berry's Oscar-winning turn in Monster's Ball - and god bless him for it!

Seeing Precious in a theater full of black people would be sweet, because you know black people aren't gonna shut the f*ck up during a movie, and this might be the rare occasion when the unwarranted call and response actually adds to the experience. Like at a horror movie. It's not like I need to concentrate on the subtle themes and visual motifs. One time I made the mistake of seeing Dreamgirls at a white theater (two mistakes, really), and the only three black women there kept standing up and clapping every time Jennifer Hudson got done singing. It was embarrassing to watch. I had to slouch down in my seat a little bit. And lord knows a man of my size struggles just to sit like regular people.

I'm sure I hardly even need to list the downsides of seeing Precious at a black theater, to you racist sacks of sh*t. But I will anyway, for my own personal amusement. First of all, there's the fact that someone's gonna show up 15 minutes after the movie (not the previews, mind you) already began. And it's not just gonna be one person - it's gonna be a church group, who all want to sit together, and they're gonna have the sheer balls to ask someone else, probably you, if you could move down a few seats. And then you know how, any time more than two black women are in the same room it starts to reek of black hair care products. I'd suggest science get to work on afro sheen that doesn't smell like my grandma's funeral, but I think that's part of the appeal for some people. Finally, there's always the outside chance someone will get shot. Precious doesn't necessarily seem like that kind of movie, but lest we forget, last year someone got shot at the Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

Going to a white theater, as I usually would anyway, would resolve many, if not all of these issues. Only thing is, there wouldn't be that added benefit of people shouting at the screen. White people won't say sh*t during a movie, regardless of what happens on screen. A white man could see his own mother getting rape-raped on film, and he'd save it for the ride home. White people are courteous like that. They might lack any and all concern for human suffering (as long as it's not a dog), but they know better than to ruin another person's filmgoing experience. That's why you don't hear about white women going to jail for 15 years for cutting in line at Wal-Mart.

I've spent enough time watching movies with white people to know that the best way to find out what they thought about a movie is to catch them in the lobby outside the movie, or in the john (nullus), once it's over. Several years ago, I had the hilarious experience of seeing the movie Closer, one of the best movies of all time (of all time!) in a theater with no one but a couple of white people, their young kids, and their elderly parents. As they were exiting the theater, I overheard the mother say that was the worst movie she'd seen in her life. She probably went home and fired off an angry letter to Julia Roberts.

Similarly, I can only imagine how white people will react to Precious. And you know, regardless of what they think about it, they're not gonna tell you. You'd have to catch them right when they're exiting the theater, when they're too offended to maintain their usual sense of decorum. That's a lot of work, just to witness white people express their disgust with black pathological behavior. But the payoff might be worth it. We already know how black people are gonna respond to Precious. Black people would yell at Twilight. Hmm... Maybe I'll watch Precious in a black theater, then drive to a white theater, stand in the lobby and compare and contrast people's facial expressions with that time I saw the Pianist at Plaza Frontenac. Nhjic.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 26, 2009, 07:47:28 am
Quote
Byron Crawford

*clicks back button*
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 28, 2009, 05:21:22 am
Just dawned on me that Mo'Nique's sniveling ass will be nommed for an Oscar, but Nicole Beharie (American Violet) probably won't.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 28, 2009, 07:30:43 am
Just dawned on me that Mo'Nique's sniveling ass will be nommed for an Oscar, but Nicole Beharie (American Violet) probably won't.
DEFINITELY won't. Even I didn't see that movie, and it looked fantastic.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 28, 2009, 07:36:12 am
What's stopping you? Limited release is a mother, but it's been on DVD for a month.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on November 28, 2009, 09:05:28 am
Those two damn kids who want attention from daddy.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on November 28, 2009, 01:26:01 pm
Go get their real daddy and take your ass to Blockbuster!  ;D
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Seven on November 30, 2009, 02:58:36 pm
There is no way, whatsoever, under any circumstances in this life or the next that I will ever see this film.

Ok, I agree with you totally. I was going to see it, but after reading all the reviews...I think I will pass...forever.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Seven on November 30, 2009, 03:11:02 pm
Bryron C is funny. LOL :D
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 01, 2009, 09:02:45 pm
So interesting that so many men balk at the idea of seeing depictions of the lives young women live every hour of every day of the week. It seems that the concept of rape is more horrifying than rape itself.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: bluezulu on December 01, 2009, 11:38:53 pm
So interesting that so many men balk at the idea of seeing depictions of the lives young women live every hour of every day of the week. It seems that the concept of rape is more horrifying than rape itself.
--------------------------------

I know it's hard out here for women. I personally raised about 100 of them during my time as a youth counselor but I guarantee you even with how misogynistic and sexist this world is,  the far majority of men on this planet detest rape as much as women. For every victim of rape there is a brother/husband/father of a rape victim. Come on now.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 01, 2009, 11:57:44 pm
As evidenced by the rape laws and penalties in this country, written and carried out overwhelmingly by men across America.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 02, 2009, 04:48:19 am
So interesting that so many men balk at the idea of seeing depictions of the lives young women live every hour of every day of the week. It seems that the concept of rape is more horrifying than rape itself.

Most people, regardless of race, age, etc...go to the movies for escape and uplift, not dark, depressing themes. That's why the box office success of PRECIOUS is very impressive.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 02, 2009, 07:06:03 am
Okay, but black people are bitching about The Blind Side, too. So WTF do black people WANT, exactly, and why should anybody in Hollywood listen to us?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 02, 2009, 07:50:21 am
Okay, but black people are bitching about The Blind Side, too. So WTF do black people WANT, exactly, and why should anybody in Hollywood listen to us?
I don't see any difference between PRECIOUS and THE BLIND SIDE. Both are about overweight black people with learning problems and dysfunctional backgrounds.  But if the folks who help them are black it's okay, but Black folks get offended when white folks do the same?  Insane. 

And what Hollywood listens to is profitability.  Both movies are making money, so there will be more of them.  Especially BLIND SIDE, since that's making real money.  It's made over a hundred million.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Seven on December 02, 2009, 07:52:17 am
So interesting that so many men balk at the idea of seeing depictions of the lives young women live every hour of every day of the week. It seems that the concept of rape is more horrifying than rape itself.


I just don't like depressing movies. If it had a happy ending then I would have watch the movie.
I'm also not a Daniels fan.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Vic Vega on December 02, 2009, 08:26:40 am
Okay, but black people are bitching about The Blind Side, too. So WTF do black people WANT, exactly, and why should anybody in Hollywood listen to us?
I don't see any difference between PRECIOUS and THE BLIND SIDE. Both are about overweight black people with learning problems and dysfunctional backgrounds.  But if the folks who help them are black it's okay, but Black folks get offended when white folks do the same?  Insane. 

And what Hollywood listens to is profitability.  Both movies are making money, so there will be more of them.  Especially BLIND SIDE, since that's making real money.  It's made over a hundred million.

It is not so much that there are white people in The Blind Side it is that they are playing the whole “Black Gentle Giant Aided By Kindly White Folk” card.

They could very well have made the focus of the movie about the brother’s life on the streets. It was good enough for Manchild In The Promised Land. But the film is not even about him. It about the good feeling White Folk get when they help out messed up brothers.   

It’s as bad as making a Steven Biko movie that is more about the Reporter that is inspired by meeting Biko than the guy who actually got shot.

Some folks see movie for pure escapism rather than edification or entertainment. Maybe folks don’t want to escape TO a world of broke ass overweight Black folk with learning disabilities. They want to escape FROM that mess.

At least the characters in Why Did We Get Married are financially solvent and live in nice houses even if they treat each other like crap.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 02, 2009, 10:02:23 am
It is not so much that there are white people in The Blind Side it is that they are playing the whole “Black Gentle Giant Aided By Kindly White Folk” card.

They could very well have made the focus of the movie about the brother’s life on the streets. It was good enough for Manchild In The Promised Land. But the film is not even about him. It about the good feeling White Folk get when they help out messed up brothers.  

The family has said that they flat out DON'T KNOW very much about Michael Oher's past. He doesn't discuss it with anybody, including his own family. I believe Oher himself said something to the effect of how that person no longer exists and how it has no effect on him whatsoever. (No offense, but I fear for the woman who marries this man.) I agree that the story is more about the Tuohys than about Michael Oher, but the only other alternative was to just make up sh*t. And let's be honest - if we HAD seen Michael's back story (one of 13 children, crackhead mama, etc.), we'd be bitching about that as well. It's a true story, so what do you want to do? Make the Touhys Mexican?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: bluezulu on December 02, 2009, 12:30:54 pm
I was going to post this in the BET thread but this comment can apply here. What the hell happened to Matty Rich? The Ink Well is on BET and looking at this movie years later it wasn't as bad as I first thought when I watched when it first came out. This movie very much could have been about a white family in the Hamptons. Why can't more movies with black folks be made with the fact that they are black be the major issue of the film. Hey Reg was Matty black balled or something?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Vic Vega on December 02, 2009, 02:59:47 pm
I was going to post this in the BET thread but this comment can apply here. What the hell happened to Matty Rich? The Ink Well is on BET and looking at this movie years later it wasn't as bad as I first thought when I watched when it first came out. This movie very much could have been about a white family in the Hamptons. Why can't more movies with black folks be made with the fact that they are black be the major issue of the film. Hey Reg was Matty black balled or something?

See, I just figured that the audience for a period piece of that nature didn't exist yet.

Straight out of Brooklyn was made for pocket change and made money. 

When Inkwell didn't do likewise that was aboout all she wrote for Matty.

A damn shame too because if that movie had hit, others like if would have been made and things like PRECIOUS and THE BLIND SIDE would not be an issue.

Ah well I'll just watch 'Mo 'Betta Blues over and over again til I feel better.  ;D
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: voodoochild on December 02, 2009, 05:27:35 pm
Haven't seen The Inkwell since it's theatrical run, but from what I remember, it was a schizophrenic joint with half of the characters doing some wack-ass jivey bullsh*t with bad afros.  Like Rich told all the actors to research the 70's by watching Jimmy Walker and Antonio Fargas.  :D
I think Matty Rich got caught up in his own hype after Straight Out of Brooklyn, proudly proclaiming that he didn't go to or even need film school.  Then Inkwell dropped and his technique hadn't really improved.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on December 03, 2009, 05:19:04 pm
1.) I don't see any difference between PRECIOUS and THE BLIND SIDE. Both are about overweight black people with learning problems and dysfunctional backgrounds.  But if the folks who help them are black it's okay, but Black folks get offended when white folks do the same?  Insane. 

And what Hollywood listens to is profitability.  Both movies are making money, so there will be more of them.  Especially BLIND SIDE, since that's making real money.  It's made over a hundred million.
1.) I see where you are coming from but for some odd reason the movies that have these "black teen dysfunctional backgrounds" always have someone white assisting. Or that news will hit the airwaves on the national scale very quickly. What about the Brothers and Sisters of America where countless people of color are helping dysfunctional teens. Where is the national news for that? What makes Blind Side so unique in comparison to other dysfunctional teens of color whom are poor and someone cared?

Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 03, 2009, 09:13:24 pm
ITA. Remember all those white people in Lean on Me? And all those white saviors in To Sir, with Love? And the slew of white people in Precious? Can't forget A Piece of the Action - it was like a snowstorm up in there.

Quote
What makes Blind Side so unique in comparison to other dysfunctional teens of color whom are poor and someone cared?

You must be unfamiliar w/the story of Michael Oher.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on December 04, 2009, 04:30:05 pm
You must be unfamiliar w/the story of Michael Oher.
Actually, I'm very familar with his story but honestly I just don't like these movies. Supposedly they are "feel good" but honestly I think it is just a cash-in for the producers over another person struggle. It is sickening to me. I have seen and encountered families that done exactly what the family has done in Blind Side and these families is also on Section 8 trying to maintain a household with low income and raising a foster child. So that is nothing new to what I encounter.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: bluezulu on December 04, 2009, 04:39:38 pm
I kind of see what you are saying. Here in Columbus there is a weekly meeting of a support group entitled Grandparents raising grandchildren. This cuts across racial lines in all, however I bet a good size of that group belongs to minority grans. Lord knows and I bet Reg can relate I'm 37 and I have to go outside and play cops and robbers with my 5 year old. Teenage parenting might not be that bad. Go ahead and get this stuff out the way. Lol. Jenn you kicking running back numbers by now aint ya. Girl if you plan on it you better go ahead and knock it out. 30 something and coloring and putting puzzles is cute for the first 30 minutes or so.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 04, 2009, 05:29:29 pm
I was going to post this in the BET thread but this comment can apply here. What the hell happened to Matty Rich? The Ink Well is on BET and looking at this movie years later it wasn't as bad as I first thought when I watched when it first came out. This movie very much could have been about a white family in the Hamptons. Why can't more movies with black folks be made with the fact that they are black be the major issue of the film. Hey Reg was Matty black balled or something?
The original draft of THE INKWELL was a much better script.  I don't think Matty Rich was the right director for the material. 

Any director who doesn't make a hit is blackballed.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 04, 2009, 05:59:59 pm
I have seen and encountered families that done exactly what the family has done in Blind Side and these families is also on Section 8 trying to maintain a household with low income and raising a foster child.

Did any of them wind up in the NFL? Because that's the hook, not that good white folks took him in. Why stories like this piss black people off so much, I don't know. If I was in Hollywood, I wouldn't listen to sh*t black people had to say about anything.

And I'm going to kill bluezulu if I ever get my hands on him!
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Curtis Metcalf on December 04, 2009, 07:17:59 pm
I have seen and encountered families that done exactly what the family has done in Blind Side and these families is also on Section 8 trying to maintain a household with low income and raising a foster child.

Did any of them wind up in the NFL? Because that's the hook, not that good white folks took him in. Why stories like this piss black people off so much, I don't know. If I was in Hollywood, I wouldn't listen to sh*t black people had to say about anything.

And I'm going to kill bluezulu if I ever get my hands on him!
Now that's a Post of the Week contender!
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on December 04, 2009, 07:20:26 pm
Jenn,

From most of the product I see coming out of Hollywood I don't think too many of them do listen to black folks. As for the Blind Side, I too have no desire to see this film. It seems its more about white folks saving us than us doing it for ourselves. I read the Washington Post review of the film and though it was largely positive, it also questioned the POV. Perhaps these type of stories wouldn't bother me so much if the POV was different.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on December 04, 2009, 07:27:43 pm
I have seen and encountered families that done exactly what the family has done in Blind Side and these families is also on Section 8 trying to maintain a household with low income and raising a foster child.

Did any of them wind up in the NFL? Because that's the hook, not that good white folks took him in. Why stories like this piss black people off so much, I don't know. If I was in Hollywood, I wouldn't listen to sh*t black people had to say about anything.

And I'm going to kill bluezulu if I ever get my hands on him!
Well my problem isn't really the race thing however at least do some consistency. My problem with these "sad but makes you feel good that you didn't go through the main character struggle" films are just cashing in on this "struggle". The premise of some poor black teen making the pros isn't an unique story anyway. I could have swore that there are a number of players in the major league in each sport that had something similar especially ones coming from countries in South America where they don't have as many advantages as US citizens. The only difference is some didn't have as many siblings as he had.


NINJA EDIT: sorry for derailing the thread but maybe it can be changed to uh.... "struggling black teens films" LOL
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Seven on December 15, 2009, 05:43:54 am
I have seen and encountered families that done exactly what the family has done in Blind Side and these families is also on Section 8 trying to maintain a household with low income and raising a foster child.

Did any of them wind up in the NFL? Because that's the hook, not that good white folks took him in. Why stories like this piss black people off so much, I don't know. If I was in Hollywood, I wouldn't listen to sh*t black people had to say about anything.

And I'm going to kill bluezulu if I ever get my hands on him!

I agree Jenn. Dude was a FIRST ROUND DRAFT CHOICE.... that's the whole point of the movie...he DID DO IT HIMSELF.

As for PRECIOUS, what was the point of this movie?

I mean, there was no message beyond ‘gay people not being bad’ and the really sick light skin and white people are good… I left the theater like wtf…and even the people who talked me into going…and paid for the movie (my wifey and her friends) also had a wtf look on their faces.

Any message you got; you would have to *reach* really hard personally to get one. I thought that was incredibly clumsy on Daniels part. He blew the movie in my opinion.

Second, the whole colorism and color complex that was typical of the pre-1980’s and early 1990’s was fine. What wasn’t fine was the fact that every positive image or person in the film was either white or light skinned, while every negative image had dark skinned people portraying those roles. It seems that Daniel has a lot of self hate. I had no issue with Precious having a color complex, but it seems that the director also has this issue.

Third, I can’t believe that Perry and Oprah would put their name on this stereotypical, self loathing, dark skin people hating garbage.


Also the chicken sceen is confirmed.

Armond White, hater or not has some very vaild points...

and I thought it was a good movie,  great acting, but fails becasue there is no message. Nothing positive, and has some twisted self hating images.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: moor on December 15, 2009, 06:31:01 am
I kind of see what you are saying. Here in Columbus there is a weekly meeting of a support group entitled Grandparents raising grandchildren. This cuts across racial lines in all, however I bet a good size of that group belongs to minority grans. Lord knows and I bet Reg can relate I'm 37 and I have to go outside and play cops and robbers with my 5 year old. Teenage parenting might not be that bad. Go ahead and get this stuff out the way. Lol. Jenn you kicking running back numbers by now aint ya. Girl if you plan on it you better go ahead and knock it out. 30 something and coloring and putting puzzles is cute for the first 30 minutes or so.

QFT.  You're staying in shape just to stay up with your kids.  Fun Stuff! 


Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Seven on December 15, 2009, 11:21:33 am
Great review of this movie

http://smallmediumlarge.wordpress.com/2009/11/09/precious/ (http://smallmediumlarge.wordpress.com/2009/11/09/precious/)


Also another one
http://www.mail-archive.com/scifinoir2@yahoogroups.com/msg35404.html (http://www.mail-archive.com/scifinoir2@yahoogroups.com/msg35404.html)
Quote
"I'm prejudiced against people who are darker than me...When I was young, I
went to a church where the lighter-skinned you were, the closer you sat to the
altar".  --Lee Daniels, director of "Precious".

Sad stuff.



Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 15, 2009, 12:54:18 pm
Golden Globe noms for Mo'Nique and Gabby - no shock there.

http://news.lalate.com/2009/12/15/monique-golden-globe-nomination/
http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20327348,00.html

I don't see Gabby taking it over Sandra Bullock or Helen Mirren, but Mo is pretty much a lock in her category. How tragic. Coonery wins again.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Vic Vega on December 15, 2009, 01:43:53 pm
Golden Globe noms for Mo'Nique and Gabby - no shock there.

[url]http://news.lalate.com/2009/12/15/monique-golden-globe-nomination/[/url]
[url]http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20327348,00.html[/url]

I don't see Gabby taking it over Sandra Bullock or Helen Mirren, but Mo is pretty much a lock in her category. How tragic. Coonery wins again.


Look on the bright side.

Mo winning the GG makes its all the more easier for the Oscar to go to Penelope Cruz.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on December 16, 2009, 04:43:46 am
Golden Globe noms for Mo'Nique and Gabby - no shock there.

[url]http://news.lalate.com/2009/12/15/monique-golden-globe-nomination/[/url]
[url]http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20327348,00.html[/url]

I don't see Gabby taking it over Sandra Bullock or Helen Mirren, but Mo is pretty much a lock in her category. How tragic. Coonery wins again.

(http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/transformers/images/thumb/3/34/Number_one_wink.jpg/200px-Number_one_wink.jpg)Thumbs up Soldier

Quote
"I'm prejudiced against people who are darker than me...When I was young, I
went to a church where the lighter-skinned you were, the closer you sat to the
altar".  --Lee Daniels, director of "Precious".
Hold up so why the same hill in this movie the lightskinned are the good guys?
(http://i299.photobucket.com/albums/mm299/Blankstares_2008/thumbs_down.gif)
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 16, 2009, 07:06:04 am
May I just point out again that Nicole Beharie was NOT nominated? You watch clips like this and tell me if that's right.

http://tinypic.com/m/6qlgeq/4
http://tinypic.com/m/6qli0n/4

And may I point out that Negroes didn't exactly flock to this movie, either. So when I get to Hollywood and get rich on my Coony McShuffles the Tap Dancing Nigger films, I don't want to hear anything from anybody.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Vic Vega on December 16, 2009, 09:32:38 am
May I just point out again that Nicole Beharie was NOT nominated? You watch clips like this and tell me if that's right.

[url]http://tinypic.com/m/6qlgeq/4[/url]
[url]http://tinypic.com/m/6qli0n/4[/url]

And may I point out that Negroes didn't exactly flock to this movie, either. So when I get to Hollywood and get rich on my Coony McShuffles the Tap Dancing Nigger films, I don't want to hear anything from anybody.


NOBODY saw this movie, it seems.

http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?page=weekend&id=americanviolet.htm (http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?page=weekend&id=americanviolet.htm)

Precious had a better ad campaign than American Violet did. Posters and T.V. Commercials.

I’m not sure American Violet had an ad campaign at all. And its not a film like Black Dynamite that can get away with e-marketing.   

We can fault the brothers for their viewing habits all we like (and I have) but you can’t watch a flick you don’t know exists.

http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=akeelahandthebee.htm (http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=akeelahandthebee.htm)

That American Violet didn't even break 10 Mil tells me nobody knew about the thing.






Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 16, 2009, 11:30:51 am

And may I point out that Negroes didn't exactly flock to this movie, either. So when I get to Hollywood and get rich on my Coony McShuffles the Tap Dancing Nigger films, I don't want to hear anything from anybody.

Oh, you'll be hearing from me.

Protests in front of your Bel-Air mansion.

Check.

Accusations of stealing MY intellectual property.

Check.

P.S.- Halle Berry and Lauryn Hill will be the headliners at my protesst rallies!
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Jenn on December 16, 2009, 12:19:02 pm
Uh, excuse me? Who do you think I'm hiring to be Coony's loyal sidekick, Bitch n' Moan?

Precious had a better ad campaign than American Violet did. Posters and T.V. Commercials.

Right, and that's my point. Why Precious? Why did they latch onto THAT film, which isn't even all that great? I mean, the main character has four children by three different men - and is one of three generations living in the projects. What, is that not ghetto ENOUGH? Or is because she's a Christian mother who raises her children with love and the support of their grandmother (Alfre Woodard) and doesn't resort to all that cussin n'sh*t? There's even a child molester, ffs! Is it because it's NOT the dad, who loves his daughters and pays (some) child support?
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on December 17, 2009, 01:30:38 am
I think the support of Tyler Perry and Oprah probably had something to do with it. Plus, Mariah Carey to a lesser extent Paula Patton, with even Lenny Kravitz and Sherri Shephard thrown in there. Precious had bigger stars.

American Violet was not promoted well. I only saw an article about it in the Washington Post, didn't go see it. Didn't really know what it was about. And then bam, I see it at Target and its 18 dollars, which I think is a little expensive for my taste, though I might pick it up. I also have to wonder, after reading the box, is that the American Violet movie might've had a more proactive, tougher protagonist. Precious, though she did fight back, didn't really accomplish much, not like I'm assuming the AV protag did from the box cover. I might be wrong but the AV protag fought against the system and won. At the end of Precious, she hadn't even passed one damned test. She was near it. It was like the idea of black resignation, perhaps more powerful in Precious, made it both attractive to white and black audiences. I think black resignation has been a powerful theme throughout black media, for a long time. Despite all the buzz though, Precious isn't making tons of money. Though the TP and Oprah thing, plus the false advertising about Precious being uplifting, got some people to the theater. I don't think its a film that has a lot of rewatch value and I don't think its uplifting or heartwarming enough, like I'm assuming the Blind Side is, particularly from its strong box office receipts. Though I have no desire to see that film. I've seen one large, uneducated, black pin cushion this season and I have no desire to see another.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Vic Vega on December 17, 2009, 01:54:46 am
I think the support of Tyler Perry and Oprah probably had something to do with it. Plus, Mariah Carey to a lesser extent Paula Patton, with even Lenny Kravitz and Sherri Shephard thrown in there. Precious had bigger stars.

This.

If its one thing those two can is get thier chosen product advertised. And most of the early press I saw for Precious was more about Mariah Carey then anybody else actually.

"Hey look everybody! Mariah's is a movie! and she's actually pretty good!! She even de-glammed!!! She's so brave!!!!"

It was only after the initial screening that anybody even mentioned Mo and Gabby. 

Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on January 07, 2010, 09:45:02 pm
http://www.counterpunch.org/reed12042009.html
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Hypestyle on March 27, 2010, 02:24:36 pm
I just got to see it finally.. the film finally hit the second-run theater chain near me..  I had avoided reading much to avoid spoilers..

I liked it.. but wow.. it's really difficult to watch at times.. all the casual brutality heaped upon Precious.. the enabling grandmother.. the younger girl in the tenement who likely has her own misery to deal with..

..I haven't read the book, so I don't know what's "missing".. but the ending felt kind of abrupt; I would have liked a sort of epilogue..

Yo... was that Nicki Minaj playing the girl with the glasses?  ???  If not, it's uncanny..
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BlackRodimus on March 28, 2010, 02:33:34 pm
May I just point out again that Nicole Beharie was NOT nominated? You watch clips like this and tell me if that's right.

[url]http://tinypic.com/m/6qlgeq/4[/url]
[url]http://tinypic.com/m/6qli0n/4[/url]

And may I point out that Negroes didn't exactly flock to this movie, either. So when I get to Hollywood and get rich on my Coony McShuffles the Tap Dancing Nigger films, I don't want to hear anything from anybody.


Damn I want to steal that so bad! I laughed for like a few minutes. Its funny cause its true. I saw this movie and I was like, why doesn't Mo'Nique have a mustache she can twirl to complete her cartoon villainy? All those good roles she did, she (like Denzel) wins for being the worst example of a black person they could portray. And everytime Precious got hit she's have a fantasy about being white or at some awards show or something. I just couldn't get with this movie.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on March 28, 2010, 02:50:43 pm
I'm sorry but what good roles has Mo'Nique been in? The only movies I can think she's been in was Phat Girls and Roscoe Jenkins. I do get your point, though to be fair, I thought Mo'Nique's acting was fine especially compared to what I had seen of it before. And I had a good feeling she would get the Oscar because the Academy seems to loves black pathology. Now I'm hearing that Lee Daniels is going to do a movie about Selma, I shudder to think how he'll ride the black pathology train in that too like Precious and Monster's Ball.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BlackRodimus on March 29, 2010, 02:26:30 pm
I'm sorry but what good roles has Mo'Nique been in? The only movies I can think she's been in was Phat Girls and Roscoe Jenkins. I do get your point, though to be fair, I thought Mo'Nique's acting was fine especially compared to what I had seen of it before. And I had a good feeling she would get the Oscar because the Academy seems to loves black pathology. Now I'm hearing that Lee Daniels is going to do a movie about Selma, I shudder to think how he'll ride the black pathology train in that too like Precious and Monster's Ball.

Sorry for the late reply, finishing up my screenplay for "Coony McShuffles and the Mystery of the Magic Grits."

But yeah you do  have a point, its just a vicious catch 22 I guess. I wonder if she would have been a good Amanda Waller for the GL movie? They're going with Angela Bassett.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on March 29, 2010, 02:30:41 pm
Actually Mo'Nique might have the chops to do that, though I prefer Angela, a far superior actress who should've long had an Oscar, or two. And though it doesn't match her comic description, I hope they don't put Ms. Bassett in a fat suit.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Redjack on April 17, 2010, 07:22:55 am
Okay, but black people are bitching about The Blind Side, too. So WTF do black people WANT, exactly, and why should anybody in Hollywood listen to us?

I dunno. I'd like to see movies where we're just living lives rather than lives of degradation and occasional uplift.

DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS
HANCOCK
BOOMERANG
TAKING OF PELHAM 123

It makes me ill how the sort of "uplifting" movies that the Academy (and America) seems to really love are those showing us in the most foul or needy aspect.

I don't write that sh*t and I'm damned sure not going to support it with cash.

f*ck MONSTER'S BALL, f*ck PRECIOUS, f*ck THE BLIND SIDE.

We have billions of better stories than those to tell and yet, over and over, it's the same crap that garners "mass appeal."

To paraphrase Detective Murtaugh, "I'm getting too old for this sh*t."

Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on April 17, 2010, 02:11:59 pm
Right on target Red Jack,

Precious was over hyped garbage. I finally got around to watching American Violet, which Jenn had recommended somewhere on this thread or the one on the Blind Side, and it was a very good movie, one that was truly uplifting. The main character wasn't perfect, she had flaws, but she also had courage and a love for her family and community. That's the example that could serve as a true inspiration.

I almost shudder to think what Lee Daniels is going to do with his upcoming movie about Selma.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: BmoreAkuma on April 18, 2010, 09:07:09 am
Actually Mo'Nique might have the chops to do that, though I prefer Angela, a far superior actress who should've long had an Oscar, or two. And though it doesn't match her comic description, I hope they don't put Ms. Bassett in a fat suit.
well foxy brown was Amanda Waller

Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Emperorjones on April 18, 2010, 02:21:16 pm
Actually Mo'Nique might have the chops to do that, though I prefer Angela, a far superior actress who should've long had an Oscar, or two. And though it doesn't match her comic description, I hope they don't put Ms. Bassett in a fat suit.
well foxy brown was Amanda Waller



Though I think Pam Grier is still attractive, she's not quite got that Foxy Brown foxy body anymore. Though she's nowhere near obese.
Title: Re: PRECIOUS
Post by: Princesa on June 09, 2010, 06:46:51 pm
I finally saw this movie...honestly I saw it as a comedy. I laughed beginning to end. I was not touched or moved at all. Don't get me wrong. It was very well made and well acted, Daniels made an outstanding film--but I couldn't take it serious...it was too much. And while she was good that wasn't what I consider THAT much a stretch for Mo'nique.Was  Sidibi good or was she playing what the world sees her as?  I thought Mariah was good and I loved Paula Patton's character and the girls, Lenny Kravitz was good--but watching the commentary it struck me that if everything placed was on purpose then the colorism was too...