Hudlin Entertainment Forum

Show Bizness => Latest Flicks => Topic started by: Reginald Hudlin on April 17, 2012, 04:27:30 am

Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on April 17, 2012, 04:27:30 am
HOLLYWOOD REPORTER:

Quentin Tarantino Reveals 'Django Unchained' Synopsis
5:52 PM PDT 4/13/2012 by Todd Gilchrist

Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson star in the director's "Southern" about a slave who teams up with a bounty hunter to find his wife while tracking down a murderous pair of brothers.

Sony Pictures and the Weinstein Company released a synopsis Friday for Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained. The follow-up to Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, the film tells the story of a slave in the antebellum South who agrees to help a bounty hunter track down a violent pair of fugitives in exchange for help in finding his long-lost wife.

According to the press release, the plot is as follows:

Set in the South two years before the Civil War, Django Unchained stars Academy Award®-winner Jamie Foxx as Django, a slave whose brutal history with his former owners lands him face-to-face with German-born bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Academy Award®-winner Christoph Waltz). Schultz is on the trail of the murderous Brittle brothers, and only Django can lead him to his bounty. The unorthodox Schultz acquires Django with a promise to free him upon the capture of the Brittles - dead or alive.
Success leads Schultz to free Django, though the two men choose not to go their separate ways.  Instead, Schultz seeks out the South's most wanted criminals with Django by his side.  Honing vital hunting skills, Django remains focused on one goal: finding and rescuing Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), the wife he lost to the slave trade long ago.   
 
Django andSchultz's search ultimately leads them to Calvin Candie (Academy Award®-nominee Leonardo DiCaprio), the proprietor of "Candyland," an infamous plantation where slaves are groomed by trainer Ace Woody (Kurt Russell) to battle each other for sport.  Exploring the compound under false pretenses, Django and Schultz arouse the suspicion of Stephen (Academy Award®-nominee Samuel L. Jackson), Candie's trusted house slave.  Their moves are marked, and a treacherous organization closes in on them.  If Django and Schultz are to escape with Broomhilda, they must choose between independence and solidarity, between sacrifice and survival...

Written and directed by Tarantino, Django Unchained will be released in the U.S. on December 25, 2012, and internationally by Sony Pictures. The film is produced by Stacey Sher, Reginald Hudlin and Pilar Savone.  The executive producers are Harvey and Bob Weinstein, Michael Shamberg, Shannon McIntosh and James Skotchdopole.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on April 17, 2012, 07:46:33 am
coolness.. looking forward to the trailer and the film..
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on April 17, 2012, 08:38:37 am
Artist Christopher Marc created a great looking fan art poster:
(http://www.djangounchained.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/django-unchained-poster-spaghetti-western-719x1024.jpg)

Here's the Official poster(I believe):
(http://www.djangounchained.org/wp-content/gallery/official-posters/official-django-unchained-teaser-poster.png)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on April 27, 2012, 08:35:17 pm
some photos and an article in the latest Entertainment Weekly (Avengers cover), also in the issue an interview with Kerry Washington (mostly about Scandal) that briefly mentions it..
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: James72 on May 08, 2012, 07:03:01 pm
It's on the radar!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on June 06, 2012, 08:40:24 am
The first set of prints for "DJANGO UNCHAINED" put together is rumored to be shown as a trailer before "Promethius" this Friday (June 8th) according to Indiewire.

Would You Like To Know More?
http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/e4f3a3f0-add4-11e1-bcc4-123138165f92


EDIT:

Wait a sec... I just saw this clip from Entertainment Tonight:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cl8cEYhRmY0
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BlackRodimus on June 06, 2012, 04:56:34 pm
Any chance this will pave the way to a live-action Catcher Freeman movie?  ;D Granddad's version, of course.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on June 06, 2012, 07:19:25 pm
Reggie, when should I, uh, I mean WE, Heffas prepare for our private screening of DJANGO UNCHAINED? 8)

I understand if you want to make the private screening NYC exclusive as that works for me as well!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Mastrmynd on June 07, 2012, 07:36:23 am
Reggie, when should I, uh, I mean WE, Heffas prepare for our private screening of DJANGO UNCHAINED? 8)

I understand if you want to make the private screening NYC exclusive as that works for me as well!

We all know that ATLanta is a better choice for a premiere private screening.
:)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on June 07, 2012, 10:02:21 am
Reggie, when should I, uh, I mean WE, Heffas prepare for our private screening of DJANGO UNCHAINED? 8)

I understand if you want to make the private screening NYC exclusive as that works for me as well!

We all know that ATLanta is a better choice for a premiere private screening.
:)

Tyler Perry has exclusive rights to ATL premieres. You should know that.

DJANGO NYC!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on June 07, 2012, 10:09:52 am
DJANGO NYC makes for a great t-shirt.

I will ask for a meager 5% of shirt sales as a gesture of good will. 8)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on June 07, 2012, 01:32:12 pm
I'd love it if there were a special screening held in Det... never mind.. the shootout between knuckleheads who showed up wouldn't be worth it..  :-\

..there must be a wide opening for this film.. thousands of screens.. demand that your local theaters show this film..

..the international promotion should be aggressively pursued as well.. canada, south america, asia, europe, africa/middle-east..

..I hope some cool merchandise eventually comes out.. action figures, coffee mugs, t-shirts, beach towels, bedding sets..
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on June 07, 2012, 05:12:25 pm
I had a great workout today!

No carbs for the next few months and I should be prepared for the sequel to DJANGO UNCHAINED

SON OF DJANGO!!!!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on June 08, 2012, 05:12:23 pm
Y'know, the more I view the official trailer of ''Django'',  the more it looks like a road trip/buddy type of movie.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jackson35 on June 12, 2012, 01:17:47 am
seeing jamie fox in that green jacket reminded me of Micheal Landon as little joe in bonanza. as a matter of fact the few clips i've seen remind me of an episode that is similar to this movie. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: isaiah_bradley on June 13, 2012, 01:45:35 am
Y'know, the more I view the official trailer of ''Django'',  the more it looks like a road trip/buddy type of movie.

High 5!
Title: New Reggie interview on Django movie
Post by: Hypestyle on June 28, 2012, 06:04:09 pm
New interview with Mr. Reggie, regarding Django movie, page 11:
http://nabjconvention.org/2012/PDF/NABJ_0623.pdf
 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on October 14, 2012, 10:20:09 pm
AHEM!

I was wondering when exactly the PRIVATE screening of DJANGO UNCHAINED in NYC will be? Time is growing short and I would like to know when I should make arrangements for the premiere.

 8)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on October 20, 2012, 04:33:53 pm
in the new Entertainment Weekly, Kerry Washington is featured in an article about the wardrobe she wears for Scandal and Django.  http://www.ew.com/ew/inside/issue/0,,ewTax:1230,00.html (http://www.ew.com/ew/inside/issue/0,,ewTax:1230,00.html)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Marvelous on October 28, 2012, 10:42:43 am
Just finalized the orders for the issues #1 and 2, released Dec. 5 and Jan. 2.  Has "Scalped" artist R.M. Guera, looking forward to checking out the movie and the comic!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: supreme illuminati on November 03, 2012, 01:00:23 pm
Just finalized the orders for the issues #1 and 2, released Dec. 5 and Jan. 2.  Has "Scalped" artist R.M. Guera, looking forward to checking out the movie and the comic!


Saw the trailer. Hooked like a fiend. You already know that I'll be choppin necks in the front row.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on December 02, 2012, 08:28:42 am
Django is already getting heat from the "conscious" of the ATL.
Seems QT isn't qualified to do justice to a film about slavery, so how dare he try.
Also, feminist are pissed-off that Kerry Washington is being objectified in the film.

Interesting push-back I'm hearing and reading from proclaimed intellectuals.

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 02, 2012, 08:34:36 am
Django is already getting heat from the "conscious" of the ATL.
Seems QT isn't qualified to do justice to a film about slavery, so how dare he try.
Also, feminist are pissed-off that Kerry Washington is being objectified in the film.

Interesting push-back I'm hearing and reading from proclaimed intellectuals.




Thank you! ;)

Never cared for his 'johnny knoxville'  style of story-telling in movies  although I did appreciate DEATHPROOF.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Vic Vega on December 02, 2012, 11:51:46 am
Django is already getting heat from the "conscious" of the ATL.
Seems QT isn't qualified to do justice to a film about slavery, so how dare he try.
Also, feminist are pissed-off that Kerry Washington is being objectified in the film.

Interesting push-back I'm hearing and reading from proclaimed intellectuals.

The concept I'm getting from the trailer is an updated version of Blaxspoitation flicks like Take a Hard Ride or Boss Nigger, but with people who can actually act this time.

So I'm taking it as the pulp entertainment is seems to be designed to be an not the study of Slavery in the South that the usual suspects seem to want.

And speaking as a Het male, any movie that Kerry Washington is in that doesn't objectify her is doing it wrong.

Especially if she is gonna be in a neo-Blaxplotation joint.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Curtis Metcalf on December 02, 2012, 01:49:14 pm
Django is already getting heat from the "conscious" of the ATL.
Seems QT isn't qualified to do justice to a film about slavery, so how dare he try.
Also, feminist are pissed-off that Kerry Washington is being objectified in the film.

Interesting push-back I'm hearing and reading from proclaimed intellectuals.

The concept I'm getting from the trailer is an updated version of Blaxspoitation flicks like Take a Hard Ride or Boss Nigger, but with people who can actually act this time.

So I'm taking it as the pulp entertainment is seems to be designed to be an not the study of Slavery in the South that the usual suspects seem to want.

And speaking as a Het male, any movie that Kerry Washington is in that doesn't objectify her is doing it wrong.

Especially if she is gonna be in a neo-Blaxplotation joint.
I agree with Vic. The Legend of Nigger Charley, Buck and the Preacher come to mind to add to the list of Blaxsploitation Westerns. I expect DU will be much better than those though.

Did make me wonder what qualifications would be acceptable and what "doing justice" means in this context. If I'm entertained and not offended, I'm good. If it manages to be feel good or even uplifting to boot, well, now we're talking.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 02, 2012, 02:02:15 pm
And speaking as a Het male, any movie that Kerry Washington is in that doesn't objectify her is doing it wrong.

Especially if she is gonna be in a neo-Blaxplotation joint.



Good point! ;D

I have 'Night Catches Us'  sitting on the DIRECTV harddrive.  Has anyone seen this movie?  I saw a clip here and there but really hadn't sat up to watch the whole story.   How did Ms. Washington come off in this?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Lion on December 02, 2012, 02:16:25 pm
I've got a grudge against QT because the ending to Kill Bill 2 infuriated me. That said...

Unless QT is somehow revealed to be the mastermind behind the KKK, I could give two sh*ts whether he's "qualified" to do justice to a film about slavery. I like the film's concept. I like it's not a politically-correct rendering of everything. I like the cast involved. I like that I expect to go to the movie and have a good time rather than to do so out of obligation to support a movie with a Black historical focus simply out of the fear there will be no more of those movies made. *cough*redtails*cough* I like that I'm actually excited to see the movie.

And if the movie is a piece of sh*t, I reserve the right to say so. I really hope it isn't, because I'm going to have to pay $11 to see it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 02, 2012, 02:22:25 pm
Here's some commentary from SHADOW AND ACT:

One S & A Reader's Take After Seeing 'Django Unchained'
Reviews.
by Sergio
December 2, 2012 10:51 AM

As I mentioned last week, media and award consideration screenings for Django Unchained start later this week; but there have already been a few advance screenings of the film for specially-invited audiences, one of whom is an LA-based filmmaker whose work weve profiled on this site, and who is also a regular reader of S & A.

He saw the film last night at a screening, with Quentin Tarantino present, and what he says I think is pretty interesting, making me even more excited (as if I wasn't already) to see the film; here you go:

"I know how anticipated this film is for a lot of Shadow and Act readers...and so I had to share this with you. Just came from a screening of Django. I went in wanting to hate that movie. Based on the script I read back in the summer of 2011 I was not optimistic. This film deals with slavery one of the ugliest atrocities America ever committed. To show too little would make it come off safe like the Help. To show too much would make it come off as being excessive. Like the use of the N-word in most of Tarantino's films."

"From the first frame, it is obvious that the film is a homage to spaghetti westerns like The Good The bad and the ugly. Images of African American men in chains is hard to take. It triggered in me, thoughts on just how bad it was for us during that time. The powerlessness, the victimization, the demeaning, all lead you to hating this movie. But you can't look away. Instead you take this ride with Django.  He transforms from a slave to a free man to a gun slinger and Jamie pulls it off effortlessly."

"The acting all around was stellar. This all star team of actors definitely showed up. Leonardo did his thing as Candy. I wouldn't call him a villain, slavery was probably the villain, characters like candy were just men doing business. I guess that's why it is so impacting. Realizing that it isn't a personal affront. A black person was no different than a cow or goat."

"I digress... The character that stands head and shoulders above everyone else is Stevens, played by Sam Jackson. Talk about crabs in a bucket. His character reminded me that some blacks kept blacks down harder than anybody."

"As westerns go, this film is more action based which makes sense. At 160 minutes its long but it moves unlike the sleep inducing film Lincoln and Order. There are some lighter moments, most I wasn't laughing at but the audience seemed to get in to. I couldn't let my guard down enough to enjoy those moments,too busy thinking about what my ancestors dealt with that allowed me to sit here, educated, and able to write this."

"At its foundation, the film is about a man doing what ever it takes to get his woman. Like I said, I wanted to hate this film but I can't. It is a solid piece that does not let whites off the hook. I saw it in an audience of 95% white and they seemed to have realized just how f*cked up slavery was. During the q and a after, Tarantino admitted how f*cked up.slavery was and how it still affects this country."

"it's a polarizing film that isn't for everybody. Based on the discussions thus far, the film will trigger even more discussion. Tarantino said that there are thousands of great stories to tell from that era and hopes this will lead to more. I don't know if I want to see too many films dealing with slavery but with Django, black folks will have someone to root for, that is a straight up bad ass."

So does his review change the minds for anyone who had any doubts, or are they still there?

.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 02, 2012, 03:18:31 pm
I find it interesting that Samuel Jackson's character almost looks like republican michael steele. ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 02, 2012, 04:22:18 pm
While I am always interested in the examionation of race in pop-culture, there is something of GREAT importance that is being overlooked here. Namely,

When will my tickets to the advanced screening of DJANGO in NYC arrive?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 02, 2012, 05:10:21 pm
While I am always interested in the examionation of race in pop-culture, there is something of GREAT importance that is being overlooked here. Namely,

When will my tickets to the advanced screening of DJANGO in NYC arrive?





HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!!! ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on December 03, 2012, 05:19:05 am
I suppose, out of all Quentin's films so far, this one has the "most" excuse to liberally feature n-bombs sprinkled throughout the dialogue.  I remember years ago, renting Reservoir Dogs (I had little idea of what it was about, only this was his first film) but I could only get maybe 35-40 minutes in before turning it off, almost every main character was some form of a bigot ("you guys are fighting like.....") I started to want them all to just get killed and end the movie like that.  I suppose I'll rent it again someday to find out what happens..

Considering the subject matter, I wonder how many theater outlets/chains in the South will decline to showcase the film, or perhaps switch tickets?  Southern HEF peeps, let us know..
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 03, 2012, 05:40:04 am
Considering the subject matter, I wonder how many theater outlets/chains in the South will decline to showcase the film, or perhaps switch tickets?  Southern HEF peeps, let us know..




I most certainly will do that, Hype! :)

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on December 03, 2012, 07:38:32 am
Considering the subject matter, I wonder how many theater outlets/chains in the South will decline to showcase the film, or perhaps switch tickets?  Southern HEF peeps, let us know..




I most certainly will do that, Hype! :)

Does Maryland count or just the Confederate States that voted for Romney? ;)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Lion on December 03, 2012, 08:32:26 am
Well... the Mason-Dixon Line is north of you, so...
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on December 03, 2012, 08:52:42 am
Well... the Mason-Dixon Line is north of you, so...

And Washington DC
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kimoyo on December 03, 2012, 02:20:27 pm
Considering the subject matter, I wonder how many theater outlets/chains in the South will decline to showcase the film, or perhaps switch tickets?  Southern HEF peeps, let us know..

I saw "Skyfall" with my son at a theater in a predominantly caucasian neighborhood.  It was the second weekend and the venue was packed.  The previews were received with interest by some and ignored by others but as usual with a crowd that size there was a healthy buzz throughout until the last preview -- Django Unchained!  After that preview...CRICKETS!  You could hear a pin drop in the theater.  I mean dead silence!  I haven't heard a crowded movie theater go that quiet since the scene in "Forrest Gump" where after Forrest gave Bubba's family their share of the profits from his shrimpin' business (Bubba inspired the idea) the suddenly wealthy black family hired a caucasian butler.

Gotta go see Django!

Peace,

Mont
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 12, 2012, 06:31:45 am
Ask Jamie Foxx about "Django Unchained"  at CNN.com/interview


Ask Leonardo DiCaprio a question at  CNN.com/interview


Have a question for Samuel L. Jackson?  Ask at  CNN.com/interview
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 13, 2012, 06:35:37 am
Have a "Django Unchained"  question?

Go to CNN.com/Interview.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 13, 2012, 08:54:58 am
HUFFINGTON POST:


Trey EllisNovelist, Screenwriter, and Associate Professor at Columbia University

Django Surprised Me
Posted: 12/11/2012 9:12 am

Like every other black filmmaker and/or self-appointed guardian of black cultural treasures, I was as worried as I was delighted when I heard Quentin Tarantino's next film would be a slave-narrative-cum-spaghetti-western. He's easily one of the most exciting filmmakers in the history of cinema, and much of that excitement comes from how he challenges the audience. However some black fans, including me, have sometimes struggled with his well-publicized, pre-hipster love affair with the n-word.

For example Tarantino's Jackie Brown is a masterpiece. For resuscitating the career of Pam Grier alone, the director should have been awarded whatever the black equivalent is of the Légion d'Honneur. The 38 utterances of the n-word didn't enrage me as it did Spike Lee (who counted them), and then said in an interview for Variety, "Quentin is infatuated with that word. What does he want to be made -- an honorary black man?"

Well, now for making the funniest, most-energizing, complicated, brilliant and uplifting action-adventure about a slave turned gunslinging folk hero, Tarantino has more than earned his black card. Jamie Foxx's Django and Sam Jackson's Stephen are two of the most nuanced, real, raw and entertaining black characters ever filmed. Foxx has the courage to begin his character as a vulnerable, beaten and heartbroken slave who gradually grows into an unforgettable and instantly iconic American folk hero. Jackson's Stephen (a play on Stepin Fetchit) is easily one of the most audacious and ultimately brilliantly surprising performances of his career.

The ocean of black pain that is slavery has cried out for dramatizations as loudly as the mad slaughters of WWII, and yet, curiously, it has been seriously underfilmed. Just as Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds reclaims that war for Jewish heroism, Django positions an indelible black hero as the avenging angel of the great shame that is slavery. As a black man I have to thank him for that. And as a black filmmaker I'm both impressed and jealous.

Any old-school, righteous black folks still holding a grudge against Tarantino ought to let it go already. Denzel famously confronted the director on the set of Crimson Tide over his use of racial epithets, and now, almost twenty years later, Denzel's daughter crewed on Tarantino's new film.

Django is a new and important black hero. Finally a prism through which to view slavery that empowers rather than shames or defeats. Plus it makes you laugh at things you never thought possible. My son's eleven and he's about to see his first R-rated film.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Catch22 on December 13, 2012, 03:17:11 pm
This is the first Tarantino film I'm actually thinking about buying a ticket to see in the theater and the first one I think will be good since the Reservoir Dogs. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 14, 2012, 01:22:16 am
SHADOW AND ACT:

More Than A Few Words (Maybe Too Many...) About 'Django Unchained'

REVIEWS BY SERGIO
DECEMBER 12, 2012 12:05 AM

 
Oh boy here we go…

Well, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Is there a film that has caused more heated discussion this year, before it's even come out, than Django Unchained? (Next year I’m sure there will be a new film that will raise peoples' hackles).

Most of the furor over the film was from the result of an early draft of the script that was leaked online - a draft that I admittedly never read. Reason being, scripts change a lot during development and production, and the end result on the screen is often radically different than what finally ends up on the big screen.

But let’s state the obvious here... Django is a film that’s supposed to be controversial, and I find that there’s nothing wrong with that. In fact, I’ve always believed that controversy is good for the soul. People need to get upset from time to time. Too many films, and most TV shows for that matter, are conceived to be passive entertainment designed to lull you into sleep.

I would rather have a film get people upset enough to leave the theater in a rage, than to have people dragging themselves out after seeing a film, nodding to themselves, saying: “Oh, I guess that was O.K., I guess.” I think that films should, sometimes, engage and outrage.

So, of course, if it’s a film that deals with slavery, it’s still a touchy subject even in this 21st Century. Especially when it comes to black folks. We’re still too conflicted over dealing with this “peculiar institution” as it was called. There are those who wish to ignore it altogether, to pretend it’s something in the past to be ashamed of and forgotten. However there are others who feel that we still don’t talk enough about it, and the still lingering psychological effects it has on black people.

However, when it comes to the cinematic treatment of slavery on the screen, that’s when the fur really begins to fly. It’s no secret that slavery has been woefully and inaccurately portrayed in cinema history. Too often it’s portrayed either as a romantic fairy tale, full of happy content slaves, serving their white masters without complaint, or some female house slave who falls in love with her white master with dreams of a happy life together. The horror and brutality of slavery has rarely been seen in films, and it’s no surprise that people are reluctant to see it.

Granted there have been black directors who have dealt with slavery before in films, such as Haile Gerima (Sankofa), Charles Burnett (Nightjohn) and soon Steve McQueen when his 12 Years a Slave comes out next year. Though I find it interesting that of those three I named, only one is African American - the other two being British and Ethiopian. Which comes back to a piece I wrote for S & A a year and half ago about why a serious film about slavery is so hard to be made - the reason being, as I said, “simply that we, even in this day and age, still have way too much psychological and emotional pain and baggage still associated with slavery.”

Which brings us to Django Unchained and what it is not.

It is not the definitive, ultimate film about slavery, and it was never intended to be that. It is, after all, a Hollywood studio movie made for the main purpose of entertainment. What it is, is a fantasy of sorts. A sort of wish fulfillment of what one wishes might have been, of black avengers righting wrongs. A black hero who goes through hell and high water to save his damsel in distress.  There have been a million movies like that with white characters, so what’s wrong with having a black one doing that for a change?  When was the last time you saw a black man on the screen going through the gates of hell and back again with one single purpose in mind, to save the women he loves? I'm think like, never.

Some have called Django a “black revenge” film and there’s nothing wrong with that, though some have complained about it. I don’t recall anyone complaining about Jewish revenge films like Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds, Spielberg’s Munich or Edward Zwick’s Defiance. Didn’t hear a peep.  No one had a problem. But seeing a black man getting payback against slave owners, and suddenly people, lots of them black, start getting hot under the collar.

Something else is that, though the film is very funny at times, none of the humor comes from scenes involving slavery or the degradation of black people. In fact, it’s just the opposite. There are painful and quite disturbing scenes of the brutal treatment of black people being whipped, branded with hot irons, and torn apart by rabid dogs. It’s violent, brutal and extremely ugly. Not for the squeamish or more sensitive types. The point is that that, this is what happened and even worse atrocities than that. Would you rather see a film that tries in some way to reveal the horrors of slavery, or Halle Berry in Queen?

But after all that, what’s the deal on Django in the final run?

The result is, as far as I’m concerned, simply fantastic! In fact, I consider Django one of Quentin Tarantino’s strongest films, far better than Basterds, which tended to meander into other subplots, interrupting the basic dramatic flow of the main story. Django is all of one piece, with a forward moving narrative.

And for a film running 165 minutes, it moves. It never feels draggy or long winded. And like all of Tarantino’s films, it features all his own trademarks. There’s the mixture of film genres. Django is a wild mixture of Blaxploitation films such as Slaughter’s Big Rip -Off, the spaghetti westerns of Sergio Leone and Sergio Corbucci, Goodbye Uncle Tom, Blazing Saddles, Mandingo, and the late 60’s TV western show The Outcasts, which I wrote about HERE , with an eclectic soundtrack featuring everything from Ennio Morricone’s music for Two Mules for Sister Sara, Verdi’s Requiem to Rick Ross.

No doubt, people will criticize the extreme violence in the film where bullets seemingly tear out chunks of people bodies when they get hit. But that's historically accurate. Large caliber bullets during the 19th century traveled more slowly and were made of heavier material and as a result would rip out people’s flesh. If you didn’t die from the shot, you would bleed to death screaming in agonizing pain, as a lot of people do in Django.

And of course there’s Tarantino’s patented technique of long dialogue scenes that slowly rise in tension to a sudden climax, before reverting, and then building again in suspense to a more explosive and violent final climax.

And there are his quirky choices in casting including, Walton Goggins, the original Django himself, Franco Nero in an amusing cameo bit, Lee Horsley (from that ABC detective show Matt Houston back in mid- 80’s - where did he find him?), Don Johnson who is great as evil plantation owner, Bruce Dern,  to, of all people, Don Stroud, who played villain Ed McMahon’s enforcer and hit man in Slaughter’s Big Rip –Off.

As for the performances  all of them are terrific, but Leonardo DiCaprio must be the standout. As Calvin Candie, a plantation owner who breeds Mandingo fighters, he’s both charming and frightening at the same time. There always a glint of madness in his eyes. It is truly mesmerizing performance and one extended dinner table scene which starts off calmly, but turns into a truly frightening display of terror alone maybe his best work to date in a film is years.

Christoph Waltz is also charming and very charismatic as Dr. King Schultz the bounty hunter, who Django partners with. There’s a practiced theatricality in his style and mannerisms - half actor, half killer. What is interesting though is that unlike what people have been thinking about his character is without seeing it; Schultz is no white savor. He’s a businessman and killer who sees Django as a means to an end to get what he wants. Something that Django quickly understands. If someone else could have provided that for him, Schultz could have gone with him. As a result, Django uses Schultz as an opportunity to get what he wants - his wife back and bloody revenge.

Jamie Foxx’s performance as Django is much more subtle and complex. Some will complain that he doesn’t seem to say much in the film, but that’s missing the point that’s right in front of them. Django is, like Schultz  an opportunist, but unlike him, for a righteous cause. Once freed of his shackles, he quickly leans the tricks of trade of being a bounty hunter, and becomes his own man. Something that he always was, even before the chains came off. Something  he does to one of the traders who was transporting him at the beginning of the film reveals that. After learning the ropes of the bounty hunting trade and being a natural deadly shot, he takes his situation into his own hands; and what is the most pivotal scene halfway through the film, tells Shultz that, from then on things will be done his way and they are. This is not the white savior/black pupil situation that some feared their relationship would be in the film.

Samuel L. Jackson is a horse of a different color, playing what is essentially the King of Uncle Toms. It’s actually a rather brave role for Jackson to play. A character who is meant to be despised and loathed, kowtowing to his white master DiCaprio, and doing everything he can to subvert and undermine Django. He’s so despicable that I suspect even white people in the audience will have nothing but contempt for him. In many ways he’s a parody of the devoted slave stereotype seen in countless antibellum plantation movies of the 1930’s and 40’s, usually played by an actor like Clarence Muse, but taken to an even more extreme level.

Kerry Washington, one would argue, compared to the other actors, is underdeveloped in term is characterization. Yes she is brutalized and whipped, though not raped in the film. But one must argue that, that’s what happened back then. The ugly reality is that black women were considered chattel. But nevertheless, Washington’s character is yet strong and resilient. If she is not as fully fleshed out as the other major characters, is perhaps the film’s only shortcoming.

No doubt people will be upset with my take on the film (I can hear the angry comments already), but that’s what Django does. It demands an emotional response whether you like it or not. Tambay will soon give his opinion on the film which I suspect will be far different than mine. That’s great as far as I’m concerned. I wish there were more films that could create this sort of furious debate and conflicted feelings.

But I absolutely love and was blown away by Django Unchained, and I can’t wait to see it again, and again after that.

In a way I’ve been waiting to see a film like this about a black hero for the last 30 years.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 14, 2012, 02:24:09 am
HOLLYWOOD REPORTER:

'Flight,' 'Django Unchained' Among NAACP Image Awards Nominees
11:58 AM PST 12/12/2012 by Rebecca Ford
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Despite a controversy of its use of the n-word, Quentin Tarantino's film collects four nominations.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) announced nominations for the annual Image Awards on Tuesday.


Robert Zemeckis’ Flight, Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained will compete for best motion picture against Beasts of the Southern Wild, Red Tails and Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds. Despite a controversy over its use of the n-word, Tarantion's film collected four nominations, one for best picture and others for Jamie Foxx, Samuel L. Jackson and Kerry Washington.

The Weinstein Company leads with four nominations, and Lionsgate and Paramount Pictures follow with four in the motion picture category.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 16, 2012, 09:39:10 am
ColeSmithey.com – december 12, 2012: by Cole Smithey 

 

You know from Tarantino’s audacious choice of intro music — the haunting theme song from Sergio Corbucci’s iconic 1966 Spaghetti Western “Django,” that the maestro-of-all-things-tasty has many surprises in store for his delighted audience. Campy, funny, shocking, and seeping with sardonic social commentary, “Django Unchained” is Quentin Tarantino’s finest film. 

 

The madness of slavery, i.e. racism, hangs thick in the air of the American South circa 1858. Tarantino says of his film’s representation of the pre-Civil War South: “It can’t be more nightmarish than it was in real life. It can’t be more surrealistic than it was in real life. It can’t me more outrageous than it was in real life.” Indeed, groans of audience empathy arrive at intervals with the agony we witness on-screen. Tarantino’s allegory regarding the use of torture couldn’t be more obvious.

 

In typical revenge-plot fashion, Tarantino establishes the nimble bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (brilliantly played by Christoph Waltz) as the kind of man who can get himself out of any situation. The retired dentist “purchases” freedom from slavery for Django (Jamie Foxx) to assist Schultz in identifying a trio of brothers named Brittle whose heads carry a hefty reward. Django proves more than qualified for hunting down and killing slave-owners. Working together as a team, Dr. Schultz and Django craft a complex plan to free Django’s enslaved wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) from the evil clutches of Leonardo DiCaprio’s plantation owner Calvin Candie. “Candyland” is name of Mr. Candie’s plantation where he cultivates “Mandingo” slave warriors who fight to the death. DiCaprio’s centerpiece monologue — wherein the actor accidentally cut his hand and chooses to use the blood draining from his hand — is the stuff of cult movie legend. It’s not too early to call “Django Unchained” an instant classic.   

 

Tarantino’s plot acrobatics have never seemed silkier — or bloodier for that matter. Blood doesn’t just splatter — intestines explode from bodies. As with all of Tarantino’s films, “Django Unchained” is filled with spellbinding dialogue and outstanding plot twists. Movie lovers rejoice; Q.T. is back in the house. 

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 16, 2012, 09:49:29 am
I'm just curious how the pacing will be executed in "Django Unchained"  because without the quirking editing style of Sally Menke, I'm not certain what (or where)  tarantino can go with this material.

Plus, I still think my suggestion of Van McCoy  would work more effectively for Django's theme music! ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 16, 2012, 10:00:26 pm
VARIETY:



The "D" is silent, though the name of "Django Unchained's" eponymous gunslinger sounds like a retaliatory whip across the face of white slaveholders, offering an immensely satisfying taste of antebellum empowerment packaged as spaghetti-Western homage. Christened after a coffin-toting Sergio Corbucci character who metes out bloody justice below the Mason-Dixon line, Django joins a too-short list of slaves-turned-heroes in American cinema, as this zeitgeist-shaping romp cleverly upgrades the mysterious Man in Black archetype to a formidable Black Man. Once again, Quentin Tarantino rides to the Weinsteins' rescue, delivering a bloody hilarious (and hilariously bloody) Christmas counter-programmer, which Sony will unleash abroad.
After "Inglourious Basterds" and "Kill Bill," it would be reasonable to assume that "Django Unchained" is yet another of Tarantino's elaborate revenge fantasies, when in fact, the film represents the writer-director's first real love story (not counting his "Badlands"-inspired screenplays for "True Romance" and "Natural Born Killers"). At its core is a slave marriage between Django (Jamie Foxx) and Hildi (Kerry Washington), torn asunder after the couple attempt to escape a spiteful plantation owner (Bruce Dern, blink and you miss him).

Brutally whipped and then resold to separate bidders on the Greenville, Miss., auction block, Django and his bride -- whose outrageous full name, Broomhilda von Shaft, blends epic German legend with the greatest of blaxploitation heroes -- possess a love too great to be shackled by slavery. But getting even with Dern's character doesn't feature on Django's agenda. After settling the score with his former overseers early in the film, he cares only about reuniting with his wife.

"Django Unchained" could also qualify as a buddy movie -- an odd twist, considering that Corbucci's original Django was a loner (as played by Franco Nero, who cameos in this film). Liberally reinventing a character bastardized in more than 30 unofficial sequels, Tarantino pairs this new black Django with a bounty hunter named Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz). Posing as a dentist, Waltz's charming figure first emerges in the dead of night driving an absurd-looking carriage with a giant tooth bobbing on top -- the first indication of how funny the film is going to be.

As in "Basterds," Waltz's genteel manner masks a startling capacity for ruthlessness. This time, however, he's undeniably one of the good guys. Though he tracks and kills men for a living, the doctor is fundamentally fair, shooting only when provoked or justified. Happening upon Django's chain gang, Shultz offers to buy the slave from his redneck escorts. When they decline, he leaves the traders for dead and liberates their "property," enlisting Django in his bounty-hunting business.

Tarantino's on sensitive turf here, and he knows it, using these early scenes not only to establish the cruelty shown toward slaves in the South, but also to deliver the same sort of revisionist comeuppance Jewish soldiers took upon Hitler in his last picture. Ironically, as a well-read and clearly more enlightened German, Schultz is disapproving of Americans' claims to racial superiority, which positions him as the story's moral conscience. When the time comes, he will accompany Django to Candyland, the plantation where Hildi now resides under the thumb of the unctuous Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio).

But the film seems to be in no hurry to get there, focusing on Django's most unusual education -- killing white men -- for the first 90 minutes of the director's longest feature yet. Tarantino freely quotes from his favorite stylistic sources, whether oaters or otherwise, featuring lightning-quick zooms, an insert of unpicked cotton drenched in blood and a shot of Django riding into town framed through a hangman's noose. Early on, Foxx appears to be following Waltz's lead, but once the snow melts on the bounty-hunting subplot (an extended homage to Corbucci's "The Great Silence"), all traces of subservience disappear and Foxx steps forth, guiding this triumphant folk hero through a stunning transformation.

True to its spaghetti-Western roots, the pic reveals most of its stoic hero's unspoken motivations through garishly colored flashbacks, though Tarantino and editor Fred Raskin (stepping in for the late Sally Menke) seem to realize that limited glimpses of such white-on-black sadism go a long way. Filmmakers who choose to portray this shameful chapter of America's past bear a certain responsibility not to sanitize it. But here, even as it lays the groundwork for "Django's" vengeance, dwelling on such brutality can verge on exploitation. To wit, the film problematically features no fewer than 109 instances of the "N word," most of them deployed either for laughs or alliteration.

While good taste doesn't necessarily apply, comedy seems to be the key that distinguishes "Django Unchained" from a risible film like "Mandingo." Both take a certain horror-pleasure in watching bare-chested black men wrestle to the death -- the sick sport at which Candie prides himself an expert -- but what better way to inoculate the power of a Klan rally than by turning it into a Mel Brooks routine, reducing bigots to buffoons as they argue about their ill-fitting white hoods?

Using rap and other cheeky music cues to similar effect, the script repeatedly finds ways to use the characters' racism against them, most ingeniously in its somewhat protracted second half. According to Schultz, if he and Django were to show up at Candyland and offer to buy Hildi directly, they'd be laughed off the plantation, so they hatch a plan to pose as men looking to buy a mandingo fighter. Though there's a flaw to their logic, since the direct-request approach worked fine with Don Johnson's "Big Daddy" earlier, it allows the film to explore the complex caste system among slaves.

There are two things Tarantino, as a director, has virtually perfected -- staging Mexican standoffs and spinning dialogue for delayed gratification -- and expert examples of both await at Candyland. Seductively revealing a dark side auds have never seen before, DiCaprio plays Candie as a self-entitled brat, spewing the character's white-supremacy theories through tobacco-stained teeth. Like a Southern despot, he surrounds himself with menacing cohorts, none more dangerous than old Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson), who runs the affairs of Candie's household and represents a form of toxic black-on-black rivalry still smoldering in American culture today.

Gorgeously lit and lensed by Robert Richardson against authentic American landscapes (as opposed to the Italian soil Corbucci used), the film pays breathtaking respect not just to Tarantino's many cinematic influences, but to the country itself, envisioning a way out of the slavery mess it depicts. In sheer formal terms, "Django Unchained" is rich enough to reward multiple viewings, while thematics will make this thorny "southern" -- as the director aptly dubs it -- perhaps his most closely studied work. Of particular interest will be Tarantino's two cameos, one delivered with an Australian accent, and the other alongside Jonah Hill in the "baghead" scene.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on December 17, 2012, 05:28:41 am
Vibe Magazine interview w. DiCaprio, Foxx, Washington- http://www.vibe.com/article/vibe-cover-story-django-unchained (http://www.vibe.com/article/vibe-cover-story-django-unchained)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 21, 2012, 05:48:31 pm
I've come here to report an OUTRAGEOUS INJUSTICE!!!

No, wait, I've come here to report a MORAL DISGRACE!!!

An outsider at Millarworlder is now bragging how HE got to see an advanced screening of DJANGO! A non HEF member has seen DJANGO before ME, a founding member of the forum. This is a travesty and won't go unremembered.

I'm considering leading a boycott of the film because of this BUT I may still allow a pass.. for now!

I want my fellow supporters to practice the following chant just in case I decide to protest

DJANGO..

NO GO

DJANGO

NO GO
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 21, 2012, 07:09:30 pm
That ain't right! ;D


That ain't even right!(http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g22/hollyeclark1/f4363e34.gif)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 21, 2012, 07:18:30 pm
That ain't right! ;D


That ain't even right!([url]http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g22/hollyeclark1/f4363e34.gif[/url])


It can all be avoided IF I get my advanced screening.

If not..

DJANGO..

NO GO

DJANGO

NO GO
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 22, 2012, 09:11:51 am
Joy Reid was the guest host on MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry this morning and "Django Unchained"  was the topic.   Great segment! :)

Her pre-recorded interview with Kerry Washington & Jamie Foxx gave me a little more confidence in the film. 

The show also presented more shots from the movie, which is weakening my firm resolve to "...never see another tarantino movie again"  moot because it looks looks soooo good!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 22, 2012, 09:21:56 am
Joy Reid was the guest host on MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry this morning and "Django Unchained"  was the topic.   Great segment! :)

Her pre-recorded interview with Kerry Washington & Jamie Foxx gave me a little more confidence in the film. 

The show also presented more shots from the movie, which is weakening my firm resolve to "...never see another tarantino movie again"  moot because it looks looks soooo good!

I just watched the segment and I found the criticisms of the female guest to be rather bizarre. She was outraged about elements of the film and then later added "But I haven't seen it yet".

I think her attitude is indicative of a lot of the criticism I am seeing so far in the media.

What was much better viewing was Tarantino on Charlie Rose. It gave greater insight into his mentality on filmmaking and ultimately what he wanted to accomplish with the movie.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 22, 2012, 09:29:28 am
I just watched the segment and I found the criticisms of the female guest to be rather bizarre. She was outraged about elements of the film and then later added "But I haven't seen it yet".




That's because Commentator Toure, who had already seen it, was practically revealing the whole &#%-ing movie! >:( ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 22, 2012, 02:23:34 pm
I just watched the segment and I found the criticisms of the female guest to be rather bizarre. She was outraged about elements of the film and then later added "But I haven't seen it yet".




That's because Commentator Toure, who had already seen it, was practically revealing the whole &#%-ing movie! >:( ;D

It serves Reggie right! If I had seen the movie as I was SUPPOSED to in an advanced screening, I would've kept the story under wraps.

Spoil Toure, Spoil! 8)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Princesa on December 22, 2012, 04:00:01 pm
I must say i love Anthea Butler and Joy as well as the MHP show.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 22, 2012, 08:10:57 pm
I must say i love Anthea Butler and Joy as well as the MHP show.

I DON'T love Anthea Butler!

You may have had one too many non-virgin conquitos!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 23, 2012, 04:56:42 pm
LOS ANGELES TIMES:

Movie review: 'Django Unchained' is Tarantino unleashed
The filmmaker's audacious talents are given full rein in a wildly entertaining pre-Civil War epic whose comic flourishes only add to the gritty slavery drama's blistering power.
 
 
 
December 23, 2012, 2:55 p.m.
Here is the particular brilliance of Quentin Tarantino: He can rip a horrific page out of history — for his latest, "Django Unchained," slavery in the antebellum South — put it through his favorite grindhouse mill, kick in biting comedy whose sheer audacity and searing irony demands laughter, and yet ... and yet ... never for a moment diminish or let us forget the brutal reality.

What the writer-director did so caustically to Nazis in 2009's "Inglourious Basterds" — scalping (literally) and roasting (comically) — was apparently just a warm-up.

In "Django," Tarantino is a man unchained, creating his most articulate, intriguing, provoking, appalling, hilarious, exhilarating, scathing and downright entertaining film yet. Even given the grand tradition of artists using their work for sharp social rebukes — Mel Brooks' genius swipe at Nazism in "The Producers," for one —Tarantino's mash-ups between the unconscionable inhumanity of others and his outrageous riffs on the matter defy comparison.

The four horseman of his apocalypse — Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson — come with guns and metaphors blazing. Their archetypes serve to mark out the battleground Tarantino bloodies with a vengeance that surpasses everything else in his archive, including "Kill Bill" volumes 1 and 2.

Django (Foxx), the slave/freeman; Dr. King Schultz (Waltz), the liberator; Calvin Candie (DiCaprio), the abusive plantation owner; and Stephen (Jackson), the sycophant house slave, provide the film's chaos and catharsis with every rise and fall of their clashes. The indictment comes with each stroke of the lash — and there are countless of them — none harder to watch than the whipping of Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), Django's wife.

With Tarantino there's always a very specific artistic influence informing the theatrics on screen, and in "Django" the style is a priceless cut at spaghetti westerns. The primary homage is to the two Sergios (Corbucci, who introduced "Django" into the movie lexicon in 1966, and Leone, who created a fistful of classics). Whether it was nothing more than a creative choice or a latent desire to extend the Italian dominance of the genre across generations and borders, Tarantino has never seemed more comfortable in the saddle.

The film begins with a line of slaves shackled together on a forced march across a desert that is scorching hot by day, frigid by night. Title cards, which are dropped in periodically, their size a clue to significance, starts the timeline at two years before the Civil War. The arrival of Dr. Schultz, ostensibly a dentist, a giant tooth bobbing atop his coach, changes the course of everyone's life. He is actually a bounty hunter looking to acquire a slave named Django to identify the three murdering-thieving Brittle brothers, who mask their illegal activity as overseers for hire and have a substantial price on their heads.

Schultz puts forth his proposition with such elegant erudition that it rarely fails to nettle nearly anyone he encounters. This first group, a matted bunch of slavers who spit tobacco and growl at Schultz to "talk English," are typical. The cultural clash becomes one of the film's smartest running gags, and Waltz's delivery, as slick as it is sly, is possibly better than his Nazi colonel in Tarantino's "Basterds," which won him an Oscar.

DiCaprio's villain, who turns up later, is equally exceptional in radically different ways. It is one of the film's conundrums for Foxx, technically the leading man. He does a fine job of melding his newly freed slave into a masterful gunslinger, with all the swagger and retribution that suggests. But there are so many finely crafted performances around him, it's hard for him to rise above the rest.

The side proposition Schultz makes with Django is his freedom once he identifies the Brittles. Over the many campfires that follow, life stories are traded, a friendship is formed and a partnership in the bounty-hunting game is hammered out: "I get paid to shoot white men?"

As satisfying as that is — for us as well — what Django wants most is to buy the freedom of his beloved Broomhilda, their marriage illegal in those times.

Though the bounty-hunting business is filled with scoundrels, slavery is the central villain here. Schultz and Django encounter the many faces of that evil in the course of their travels. A few lend themselves to slapstick, like the birth of the KKK. Others — such as the rarefied world of the bordello beauties and the softer life of the house slaves — get a more ironic treatment. But mostly the director chooses to expose the cruelty. The various types of torture used to punish runaways — attack dogs, hot boxes and, of course, the whipping posts — are unsparingly depicted.

Though badness abounds, evil incarnate thrives in particularly insidious ways in Candyland, a huge Mississippi planation run by its pampered potentate, Calvin. Never has DiCaprio been more sinister than he is here — sarcasm dripping in every honeyed word, insolence flickering in his eyes, hate in his heart. The to-the-death sport of Mandingo fighting is his current obsession and the stage for some of the most difficult scenes to stomach. When Schultz discovers Broomhilda has been sold to Candyland, a major ruse around the sport is concocted in their bid to buy her freedom, and the various complications drive the back half of the film.

Since this is quintessential Tarantino, there is never much time between blood-spilling. Somehow, he and cinematographer Robert Richardson have created a palette that connects the visual sensibility of the Old South and the Old West seamlessly — the blood is just as red and bountiful in both places.

One of Tarantino's greats strengths, and weaknesses, as a filmmaker is the way he falls in love with his actors and his ideas. It makes him reluctant to let go of certain bits and means that others go on too long — often it's the highly choreographed action scenes that he can't bear to end.

This pushes "Django" close to the three-hour mark, and there are a couple of spots when you are sure you've just witnessed a bang-up ending only to find Tarantino setting things up for another round. Editor Fred Raskin, who has worked on a number of the director's projects, must have the patience of Job. I can just imagine the pained expression Tarantino gets when he's forced to make cuts — it's there in his cameo, which might have been a place to start.

--------------------------

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 23, 2012, 05:16:41 pm
WIRED:

Review: Django Unchained Is a Love Story That Ranks Among Tarantino’s Best
By Angela Watercutter12.22.126:30 AM

With all of the hullabaloo surrounding the hyper-real depiction of slavery in Quentin Tarantino’s latest film Django Unchained, most people have probably not heard about what’s actually most shocking about the director’s latest — fantastic — movie: It’s a love story.

In the two decades that Tarantino has been making films, he’s had Mexican stand-offs, slick-talking gangsters, revenge plots and ultra-violence in spades. But with the possible exception of True Romance, love stories have never really been Tarantino’s thing. With Django Unchained, though, he has all the stand-offs and revenge you’ve come to expect, but still manages to turn the story into a romantic tear-jerker. Who knew he had it in him?

But let’s back up. The R-rated Django Unchained, which opens Tuesday, is still a tried-and-true Tarantino flick. Set in the South in the 1850s, the director’s version of a Spaghetti Western opens with Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz, who is clearly looking to one-up his Oscar-winning performance in Inglourious Basterds) bloodily “negotiating” the purchase of a slave named Django (fellow Oscar winner Jamie Foxx) from a pair of bumbling traders because the young man can help him find a trio of brothers with bounties on their heads.


(Spoiler alert: Minor plot points to follow.)

After purchasing Django, the German-born Schultz takes him to a nearby town and explains that if Django helps him find the Brittle brothers he will grant him his freedom and share the bounty. But after Schultz learns that Django will use his freedom to rescue his wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) from a plantation (later discovered to be that of Calvin Candie, a diabolical Leonardo DiCaprio), Schultz asks that they team up to spend the winter collecting bounties with the intent of going to retrieve Broomhilda together in the spring.

That’s the set-up, and what follows is nothing less than one of Tarantino’s best efforts. The brutal indignities of slavery and racism in the Antebellum South aren’t exactly easy things to turn into entertainment, but Tarantino’s gift is finding unlikely protagonists – and here he’s found two. Unchained may be about a man’s quest to reunite with his wife, but the relationship between Schultz and Django is the movie’s true love story. (You thought it was going to be the one about saving the girl? It’s that too, but only in the last act. You’ll see.)

Schultz finds slavery absolutely abhorrent and takes the role of liberator earnestly. (The moment when he tells Django he won’t let him go onto Candie’s plantation – Candyland – alone because he feels responsible for the man’s safety might be the most touching exchange the director has ever put on screen.) Waltz and Foxx are in step from the outset, and their banter is classic Tarantino, from the moment the German teaches his apprentice about the “flesh for cash” business of bounty hunting to the moment they execute their gambit at Candyland.

If you liked Waltz’s sinister Nazi act in Basterds you’ll love his turn as a good German here, with a winking tone that levels idiotic plantation owners and outsmarts everyone he encounters. And Foxx’s ease with his character’s arc from slightly gun-shy and contemplative accomplice to gun-slinging badass is fantastic.

The duo is so dynamic that its only competition is the singularly blood-chilling performance of DiCaprio. He’s played tough guys before — The Departed comes to mind – but not so much bad guys. Tarantino has opened up a wicked floodgate in the actor, transforming him into one of the most ruthless characters of his career. As the head of the Candyland plantation, Calvin Candie is already running an inhumane operation, but as one of the top players in the “Mandingo fighting” game (essentially death matches between slaves) he’s undoubtedly the most despicable character DiCaprio has ever embodied.

To say what happens when these two forces — along with with a brilliant Samuel L. Jackson as Candie’s house slave and Kerry Washington as Django’s long-lost wife — collide would be too much. But suffice to say, what’s in the trailer is barely a taste. As with Basterds, Tarantino is on a revenge streak to cinematically right the wrongs of now the last two centuries. By couching his denunciation of slavery in both a buddy picture and a man’s quest to save his princess, he has made his movie more than just another tale of bloody comeuppance. He’s given it heart.

WIRED Second-to-none performances; whip-smart dialogue; fantastic bromance between Waltz and Foxx; wonderful twist on gun-slinging Westerns; classic Tarantino dialogue and soundtrack.

TIRED It’s not Pulp Fiction?

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: True Father 7 on December 23, 2012, 06:39:31 pm
Katt Williams said he was offered the title role first......................for some reason I don't believe him
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pyT389ndnqQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pyT389ndnqQ)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 23, 2012, 08:43:50 pm
No.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on December 24, 2012, 07:18:59 am
Katt Williams said he was offered the title role first......................for some reason I don't believe him
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pyT389ndnqQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pyT389ndnqQ)

wow, katt's melting down something fierce.. this has gone way beyond eccentric, it's just.. sad..
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 24, 2012, 04:35:43 pm
NEW YORK TIMES:

.December 24, 2012
Movie Review
The Black, the White and the Angry
By A. O. SCOTT
“It’s better than ‘Lincoln,’ ” my teenage daughter said, as the end credits rolled at a screening of Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.” She was teasing me — it’s a sad fact of my life that some of the people I’m fondest of do not seem to share my fondness for Steven Spielberg’s latest movie — but also suggesting an interesting point of comparison.

“Lincoln” and “Django Unchained,” the one a sober historical drama and the other a wild and bloody live-action cartoon, are essentially about different solutions to the same problem. You could almost imagine the two films, or at least their heroes, figuring in the kind of good-natured, racial-stereotype humor that used to be a staple of stand-up comedy (and was memorably parodied on “The Simpsons”): “white guys abolish slavery like this” (pass constitutional amendment); “but black guys, they abolish slavery like this” (blow up plantation).

A more substantive contrast might be drawn between the approaches of two filmmakers — both steeped in the history of popular cinema and both brilliant craftsmen whose skill inspires admiration, as well as a measure of suspicion — to a subject full of pain and fraught with peril. Mr. Spielberg, in his ambitious, history-minded projects, hews to the proud (though sometimes mocked) tradition of the Hollywood A picture, in which big themes are addressed with appropriately sweeping visual and emotional gestures. Mr. Tarantino finds inspiration in what are still frequently seen as less reputable genres and styles: Asian martial arts movies, spaghetti westerns, blaxploitation.

Not that you need, at this point, to choose. Among Mr. Tarantino’s achievements has been his successful argument that the maligned and neglected B movies of the past should be viewed with fresh eyes and unironic respect. His own tributes to the outlaw, outsider film tradition — flamboyant in their scholarly care and in their bold originality — have suggested new ways of taking movies seriously. “Django Unchained” is unabashedly and self-consciously pulpy, with camera moves and musical cues that evoke both the cornfed westerns of the 1950s and their pastafied progeny of the next decade. (The title comes from a series of Italian action movies whose first star, Franco Nero, shows up here in a cameo.) It is digressive, jokey, giddily brutal and ferociously profane. But it is also a troubling and important movie about slavery and racism.

As such, “Django Unchained” is obviously a companion to “Inglourious Basterds,” in which Mr. Tarantino had the audacity to turn the Nazi war against the Jews into the backdrop for a farcical, ultraviolent caper. He did not simply depart from the facts of history, inventing, in the title characters, a squad of mostly Jewish-American killers led by a United States Army lieutenant from Tennessee; he rewrote the past in the vivid, visceral language of film fantasy.

The point of “Inglourious Basterds” was not to engage in counterfactual speculation about a successful plot to kill Hitler, but rather to carry out a vicarious, belated and altogether impossible form of revenge, using the freedom of cinematic make-believe to even the score.

Like “Inglourious Basterds,” “Django Unchained” is crazily entertaining, brazenly irresponsible and also ethically serious in a way that is entirely consistent with its playfulness. Christoph Waltz, who played the charming, sadistic SS officer Hans Landa in “Basterds,” here plays Dr. King Schultz, a charming, sadistic German bounty hunter (masquerading as an itinerant dentist) whose distaste for slavery makes him the hero’s ally and mentor.

That hero, first glimpsed in shackles and rags on a cold Texas night in 1858, is Django (Jamie Foxx), who becomes Schultz’s sidekick and business partner. Schultz is an amoral gun for hire, tracking down fugitives and habitually choosing the first option offered in the formulation “Wanted: Dead or Alive.”

Over time the traditional roles of white gunslinger and nonwhite sidekick are reversed, as the duo’s mission shifts from Schultz’s work to the rescue of Django’s wife, Broomhilda (Kerry Washington). After the couple tried to run away from their former plantation together, they were whipped and branded (the horrific punishment is shown in flashback), and Broomhilda was sold.

Django and Schultz’s search for her leads them to Candyland, a Mississippi estate whose debonair master, Calvin Candie, is played with almost indecent flair by Leonardo DiCaprio. Candie is assisted in his savagery by Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson), a house slave who may be the most shocking invention in “Django Unchained.” He is an Uncle Tom whose servility has mutated into monstrosity and who represents the symbolic self Django must destroy to assert and maintain his freedom.

The plot is, by Mr. Tarantino’s standards, fairly linear, without the baroque chronology of “Pulp Fiction” or the parallel story lines of “Inglourious Basterds.” But the movie does take its time, and it wanders over a wide expanse of geographic and thematic territory.

In addition to Mr. Tarantino’s trademark dialogue-heavy, suspense-filled set pieces, there are moments of pure silliness, like a gathering of hooded night riders (led by Don Johnson), and a late escapade (featuring Mr. Tarantino speaking in an Australian accent) that perhaps owes more to Bugs Bunny than to any other cultural archetype.

Of course, the realm of the archetypal is where popular culture lives, and Mr. Tarantino does not hesitate to train his revisionist energies on some deep and ancient national legends. Like many westerns, “Django Unchained” latches onto a simple, stark picture of good and evil, and takes homicidal vengeance as the highest — if not the only — form of justice.

But in placing his story of righteous payback in the Old South rather than the Wild West, and in making its agent a black former slave, Mr. Tarantino exposes and defies an ancient taboo. With the brief and fascinating exception of the blaxploitation movies and a few other works of radical or renegade art, vengeance in the American imagination has been the virtually exclusive prerogative of white men. More than that, the sanctification and romanticization of revenge have been central to the ideology of white supremacy.

In “Regeneration Through Violence,” his classic study of the mythology of the frontier, from colonial times to the eve of the Civil War, the literary historian Richard Slotkin identifies two essential mythic figures: the captive, usually an innocent woman held against her will by ruthless and alien usurpers, and the hunter, who is obsessed with protecting her honor and, sometimes secondarily, securing her freedom. (“The Searchers,” with John Wayne as the hunter and Natalie Wood as the captive, is perhaps the most sophisticated modern version of this narrative.)

Broomhilda and Django certainly fit those roles, and yet the roles, historically, were not intended for them. Some abolitionist works like “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” could paint slavery as a form of captivity, but the canonical captives of antebellum American literature were white women kidnapped by Indians, who after the Civil War were often replaced by freed slaves as objects of superstitious terror. The idea that regenerative violence could be visited by black against white instead of the reverse — that a man like Django could fill out the contours of the hunter — has been almost literally unthinkable.

But think about that when the hand-wringing starts about “Django Unchained” and ask yourself why the violence in this movie will suddenly seem so much more problematic, so much more regrettable, than what passes without comment in “Jack Reacher” or “Taken 2.” Mr. Tarantino is a virtuoso of bloodshed, that is for sure, and also more enamored of a particularly toxic racial slur than any decent white man should be. But decency in the conventional sense is not his concern, though in another sense it very much is. When you wipe away the blood and the anarchic humor, what you see in “Django Unchained” is moral disgust with slavery, instinctive sympathy for the underdog and an affirmation (in the relationship between Django and Schultz) of what used to be called brotherhood.

So maybe it’s not so different from “Lincoln,” after all. And if “Django Unchained” is not better, it is arguably more radical, both as cinema and as (fanciful) history. A double feature might be just the thing, if you have five and a half hours to spare. By any means necessary!

“Django Unchained” is rated R (Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian). Grisly violence (both comical and horrible); vile language (ditto).

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 24, 2012, 04:36:47 pm
from CNN:

The comparison with "Lincoln" is irresistible -- the two films take place within five years of each other. One is grounded in assiduous historical research and offers a shrewd analysis of idealism and political pragmatism, while the other is pure fantasy. But it's the fantasy that truly rattles the chains of slavery, confronting not just the racist assumptions but also the economic power structure that underpinned it -- the paradoxes, hypocrisies and insidious evils that permitted the system to flourish for so long.

Unlike "Lincoln," "Django Unchained" affords room at the heart of its narrative for compelling and assertive African-American characters, both heroic (Foxx in the title role) and otherwise (Samuel L Jackson, memorably repellent as a house servant who has become his master's right-hand man and confidant).

'

At a time when so many of our movies aspire to be colorblind (but "urban" film remains largely ghettoized), "Django Unchained" dares to confront racism as a potent force and a moving target, discovering horror and also grotesque comedy in the niceties of Southern etiquette: the way a white landowner can maintain a black mistress, for instance, or tolerate the grumbling of a loyal servant, just so long as everyone knows he will have his dogs tear a runaway limb from limb. That may be the film's true subject, when you get right down to brass tacks: the vacuity of good manners, and the limits of tolerance.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 24, 2012, 04:40:14 pm
MSNBC:

Django Unchained is a heroic love story
Touré, @Toure
12:11 pm on 12/24/2012
(Rex Features via AP Images)
Django Unchained is a film about love. Three kinds of love, really.

There’s the romantic love that pulls together two of the main characters: Jamie Foxx’s Django who is willing to travel through hell and risk his life to save his wife, Kerry Washington’s Broomhilda. As he travels toward her, Hildi appears in his daydreams looking luminous and gorgeous. We rarely see Black love portrayed in a Hollywood film in this way — a Black knight in shining armor battling dragons to rescue his radiant queen.

There’s also the bromantic love between Django and his liberator/mentor Dr. King Schultz, played by Christoph Waltz, who leads Django on a physical journey from Texas to Mississippi, and a psychic journey from slave to master of bounty hunting. Schultz abhors slavery, but he comes to care deeply for Django and to love him in a brotherly way.

But the sort of love that is most powerful in the film is the self-love of Django. Foxx applies a sheen of nobility to the character from the second he is freed and begins moving through the air with his shoulders back and his head high, his dignity shining. In a repeated motif, Django rides into towns atop a horse, his body language singing of pride and strength, a sight that causes people to rear back in shock, unused to seeing a Black person cloaked in dignity. In this way Django moves through the film like a single beam of light piercing through the dark.

In a critical moment Leonardo DiCaprio’s slavemaster Calvin Candie points out that there are more Blacks than whites on his plantation and wonders, “Why don’t they kill us?” He explains via phrenology — Black brains are lesser — which is now obviously and hysterically false.

But he is actually close to the truth. The answer isn’t in the brain, it’s in the mind. The colonized mind trapped in a white supremacist world; a world that believes in and is structured around the myth of Black intellectual inferiority.

Even when Candie is outsmarted by one of his slaves who must explain to Candie that he’s being played for a fool, his certainty in white intellectual superiority goes unchallenged. Early on, Django excises white supremacy from his mind and eventually destroys white supremacy in his tiny corner of the world. Yes, white supremacy relates to a national (if not global) matrix that no one man could conquer. There’s no telling what could happen to Django after the screen fades to black. But his self-love propels him through the universe of this film, making him heroic before he even begins killing slavemasters.

Django is heroic not just for rescuing his wife but also for spreading justice by putting slavemasters in the grave. It’s honestly baffling to me that smart people could find Django’s slavemaster killings as anything other than heroic. The moral calculus between slave and master is clear and unambiguous. The slave, cinematic or real, who doesn’t want to kill his master may be psychotic and still in the grip of white supremacy.

Killing a slavemaster does not reduce the slave to the slavemaster’s moral level. Nothing short of becoming a slavemaster could do that. Murder is the only fitting punishment and given the generations-long pain and chaos that slavery had and would cause, for a slavemaster to die only once is to get off easy.

For the descendants of slaves, who live in a world still tangibly doused in slavery’s residue, watching Django kill his oppressors could possibly feel cathartic. If murder can ever be morally justified by the presence of clear, undiluted, sustained evil — and I believe it can — then it is justified when a slave kills a master.

It’s also justified when a Jew kills a Nazi, which of course was at the heart of Tarantino’s previous revisionist revenge fantasy. A smart man in a green room at NBC posited that Kill Bill works in similar fashion as a revenge fantasy where a woman gets back at a patriarchal figure after near death in a scene akin to domestic violence or perhaps an honor killing. So then Django marks the third time Tarantino gives us people from outside the demographic power structure getting deadly revenge on white male oppressors.

There are those who have been anxiously hesitant about seeing Django, or have outright refused to see it, presumably because it was made by a non-Black filmmaker and one who has shown a love of Black culture that for some has been off-putting or raised suspicions about his “true intentions.”

These people may miss out on a delicious scene where Django whips a master in slow-motion or the hilarious scene where Tarantino destroys a Klan forerunner group by reducing them to madcap parody because they literally cannot see through their hoods. They may miss an assault on white supremacy and a beautiful Black love story. To dismiss Tarantino because his aesthetic embraces — in a bearhug — Black culture because he feels Black culture is part of his cultural legacy is, to me, a bit precious.

Many find the worlds of, say, Woody Allen and Wes Anderson, uninteresting because Black people and culture barely enter into them. Tarantino is one of the few major filmmakers whose worldview fully includes Black people and Black culture. I wonder if some of the anger at Tarantino is discomfort with any white person dealing with Black culture. Or anger at Hollywood for not producing more Black films or Black filmmakers, which is definitely a problem and surely not Tarantino’s fault.

From the moment it was announced that Tarantino intended to do a film about slavery, many worried that he would somehow trivialize slavery. Far from that, we’ve gotten an unsparing look at its horrors, from Mandingo fighting to hot boxes to facial branding to brutal whipping to all sorts of frightening headgear. Tarantino applies none of his typical campiness to slavery, never backing away from showing it as a despicable evil and enjoying its destruction.

We also have, in Django, that rare Hollywood thing: a film about Black history where a Black person has agency and is central to shaping his or her destiny rather than playing the foil for a white person who proves they have character by helping a downtrodden Black person. We could arrange a three-day film festival filled with those. Django wouldn’t qualify. Schultz is Django’s liberator and teacher but over time Django becomes the leader of their duo and his journey remains central.

Some bristle at Tarantino’s copious use of the n-word in this film, and in his oeuvre, which is perhaps the least valuable or interesting discussion point for a film of this import.

Slavery is the real obscenity, not this word. Tarantino has made the n-word a significant part of his canon partly because it’s a major part of American history. The view that he (or no one) should ever use it is simplistic and reductive, and attempts to correct a difficult part of history by stuffing it in the ground.

I’m uncomfortable with lazy, colloquial usage. But within the world of art the word cannot be simply erased. It’s part of the American linguistic songbook.

Tarantino has surely taken far more liberties with it than any other filmmaker, but his usage can be broken down into three buckets. Mostly he has used it to further the characterization of a morally bankrupt white person. From the thugs of Reservoir Dogs to the slavemasters of Django, when white people in his movies use the n-word he is generally signaling that they’re racist and thus despicable.

Tarantino has also put the n-word in Black people’s mouths to signify that they’re “supercool.” In this way, he is building on the supposedly badass recontextualization of the word that the hiphop generation has made infamous. The third way Tarantino has used the n-word is a single-serving group: Jimmy from Pulp Fiction, played by the director, who has a Black wife and at least one Black professional gangster friend. He uses the n-word but not to seem morally bankrupt or cool. He is far from either. Is it just for a shocking, subversive laugh? Seems so.

In Django he never does that. He gives us masters dying at the hands of a freed slave on a mission to liberate his wife. I wonder if our ancestors would find that disrespectful.

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 25, 2012, 06:10:24 pm
The theater around my way where "Django" is playing is packed! ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on December 25, 2012, 08:13:50 pm
Y'all, the matinees were sold out round my way, so I sat through Les Mizz clenching my tix to the first Django showing of the evening.  Two extra-long films!  I would see each of them again.  Django was OUTSTANDING.
It was EVERYTHING I anticipated (Buck and the Preacher meets Inglorious Basterds) and then about 30 minutes MORE! 

Just.....WOW!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 25, 2012, 08:42:09 pm
Y'all, the matinees were sold out round my way, so I sat through Les Mizz clenching my tix to the first Django showing of the evening.  Two extra-long films!  I would see each of them again.  Django was OUTSTANDING.
It was EVERYTHING I anticipated (Buck and the Preacher meets Inglorious Basterds) and then about 30 minutes MORE! 

Just.....WOW!
Great to hear, Magic!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Derrick on December 25, 2012, 09:53:23 pm
DJANGO UNCHAINED
2012
Written and Directed by Quentin Tarantino
Produced by Reginald Hudlin, Stacy Sher and Pilar Savone

At the end of the day after we’ve finally put to bed all the complaints about Quentin Tarantino’s use of the word ‘nigger’, the stylized ultra-violence and placing the story of DJANGO UNCHAINED in the pre-Civil War, slavery infested American South ultimately it comes down to one thing: is DJANGO UNCHAINED a movie worth your time and money seeing? I think it is. And I recommend it highly. But you have to keep in mind that I’m a confirmed Quentin Tarantino fan and so I tend to overlook a lot of the flaws in his movies. And they do have flaws, as do all movies as there’s no such thing as a perfect movie. It’s just that Tarantino gets so many things right in his movies I’m totally willing to cut him much slack on those flaws. And I just love his attitude about making movies. He just goes ahead and puts it all out there, manically throwing in so many influences from so many things that you can’t rightly point at a Tarantino movie and say that it’s strictly a crime story or a revenge drama or a war movie. And in the case of DJANGO UNCHAINED it’s a spaghetti western, a comedy, a romantic quest, a revenge saga and a surprisingly honest look at slavery as it existed in the period before the Civil War. That honesty comes with a whole lot of brutality and pain and Tarantino doesn't turn away from it.

DJANGO UNCHAINED has nothing to do with the classic 1966 spaghetti western “Django” save that the protagonists share the name. There is a subtle passing of the torch in a nice little scene between Jamie Foxx and the original Django, Franco Nero himself but it’s not at all necessary to have seen the earlier movie. This new Django is a black man, a slave with no future save to work and die. But he’s given a new life when he is freed by Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) a dentist turned bounty hunter. Schultz is hunting three men who have sizeable bounties on their heads. He’s never seen them before but Django has. Schultz makes a deal with Django who is frankly bewildered by this loquacious, articulate white man who treats him with respect and speaks to him as an equal. If Django helps him find the three men, he’ll give Django his freedom and part of the bounty money.

During the course of their hunt for the Brittle Brothers, Schultz teaches Django how to shoot and how to track men as he discovers that the ex-slave in his words is “born for this line of work” and shortly the two men are full partners in bounty hunting. Their friendship grows such a degree that Schultz agrees to help Django rescue his wife Brunhilde/Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) who was separated from her husband and sold to Calvin J. Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) master of the fourth largest plantation in Mississippi, Candyland. Candyland is famous for the Mandingo fighters Candie trains and it’s by pretending that they are interested in buying one of his fighters that gets Django and Schultz inside Candyland. But due to the suspicious nature of Candyland’s majordomo Steven (Samuel L. Jackson) the partners may not make it out alive, much less accomplish their mission.

I have to admit again that I’m a sucker for the reckless operatic nature of any Tarantino film and DJANGO UNCHAINED is no different. It looks and feels like a big movie should and it has the acting power to back it up. And in addition, Tarantino has put away his toolbox of his usual stylistic visual effects to just tell his story and trust the strength of that story and the performances to back it up. Christoph Waltz I fell in love with five minutes into the movie. At first I thought it was a little risky for Tarantino to put the beginning of this film on his shoulders the way he did in “Inglourious Basterds” but Waltz quickly establishes that this is a totally different character and does it very well with a quirky edge that is both very funny and very dangerous.

Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson appear to have some sort of private side bet to see who can out-ham the other in their scenes together and I mean that in the best possible way. They’re having fun with the material and their characters and it shows in their outstanding performances. I’ve never been much of a Jamie Foxx fan but I liked his performance a lot here. His transformation from raggedy slave to professional bounty hunter to avenging angel is thrilling to watch. And I thought it really refreshing to have as a protagonist an heroic black man who is motivated by the love he has for his wife and wants her back. It gives the movie an emotional core that puts it on a level above a simple revenge or hunt for gold plot.

If there’s anything in the movie I can point to and go, “say wha now?” it’s Kerry Washington’s performance in the movie. Not that it’s a bad one. Or even a good one as there simply isn’t enough there for me to say one way or another. Considering that it’s her character’s plight that gets the story going, Kerry Washington has surprisingly few lines and even fewer scenes. Oh, trust me when I say that she works with what she’s been given but it just struck me as odd that more wasn’t done with her character.

What else? There’s the parade of familiar and not so familiar faces in the movie. I didn’t recognize Lee Horsley, Tom Wopat, Robert Carradine, Tom Savini or James Remar. But I did recognize Dennis Christopher, Bruce Dern, Walton Goggins and James Russo. And I most certainly did recognize Don Johnson and Jonah Hill in an absolutely side-splitting scene  involving The Klan and a discussion about the proper way to cut eyeholes in a hood that is hilarious enough to be worthy of Mel Brooks.

Two more things and I’ll let you get back to what you were doing. The language is extremely raw and graphic and ‘nigger’ is used freely, often and by every member of the cast. If you are offended by the word then I strongly urge you to give the movie a pass. However, if you can accept the usage of the word considering the period of American history the movie is set in as one where the word was used commonly, fine. Mind you, I’m not condoning or condemning the use of the word. But I do consider it my duty as a reviewer of the movie to inform you that the word is used and used a LOT.

The violence. I’d heard a lot about the violence in DJANGO UNCHAINED and maybe I’ve become desensitized due to all the violent movies I’ve seen but I actually didn’t see anything in DJANGO UNCHAINED I hadn’t seen before. The gunfights are obviously inspired by Peckinpah’s “The Wild Bunch” and there are some grisly scenes of mayhem and torture that actually could have been worse if Tarantino had lingered on them. But he stays on the shot just long enough for you to get the idea and then he cuts away to let your imagination fill in the rest.

So should you see DJANGO UNCHAINED? Chances are that if you’re a Quentin Tarantino fan you’ll already made up your mind to see it and if you’re not then I doubt anything I’ve said here will change your mind. But for me, it’s another home run for him. Quentin Tarantino hasn’t yet made a movie I haven’t enjoyed and I immensely enjoyed DJANGO UNCHAINED.

Rated R
165 minutes

 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Lion on December 25, 2012, 10:44:35 pm
Just got back from it. I didn't think I was going to be able to see it until the weekend, but I couldn't wait and I'm glad I did.

All I gotta say is... yes.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 25, 2012, 11:39:56 pm
  I tried going to Django  after dinner in the Promenade (Santa Monica CA) for those that don't know..and it was freakin' sold out.Damn Gina! I will see it don't worry.  :D Crowd mostly Caucasian down there. Thought that of all places there would be a chance to get in. Unlike Baldwin Hills or Fox Hill.
However when I googled the number one box office hit the "Hobbit" shows #1 for the weekending December 23rd. What's up with that? I am not versed on the day of the week when movie box office statistics are tallied but these MF's skew $#!& in their favor all of the time. I am not saying this is the case but If I go to a movie early evening after dinner and the line is wrapped around the corner. No tickets left for that show. And the other show doesn't begin until 10 something and its damn near sold out. Some body some where needs to acknowledge this movie at number one . I am going to see in the morning what these news people say. Mr. Hudlin your timing was impeccable. Everyone wants to see a good movie who isn't worn out by the kids and the Christmas thing. Christmas day just as good a day as any.I think I will go Friday or Saturday to get the weekend statistics up.  ;)\

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on December 26, 2012, 04:16:11 am
  I tried going to Django  after dinner in the Promenade (Santa Monica CA) for those that don't know..and it was freakin' sold out.Damn Gina! I will see it don't worry.  :D Crowd mostly Caucasian down there. Thought that of all places there would be a chance to get in. Unlike Baldwin Hills or Fox Hill.
However when I googled the number one box office hit the "Hobbit" shows #1 for the weekending December 23rd. What's up with that? I am not versed on the day of the week when movie box office statistics are tallied but these MF's skew $#!& in their favor all of the time. I am not saying this is the case but If I go to a movie early evening after dinner and the line is wrapped around the corner. No tickets left for that show. And the other show doesn't begin until 10 something and its damn near sold out. Some body some where needs to acknowledge this movie at number one . I am going to see in the morning what these news people say. Mr. Hudlin your timing was impeccable. Everyone wants to see a good movie who isn't worn out by the kids and the Christmas thing. Christmas day just as good a day as any.I think I will go Friday or Saturday to get the weekend statistics up.  ;)\
I mean seriously? You're going to ask a question like that? For real? This is a prequel to LOTR of course it is going to be the number one movie of the week.

I havent seen the film yet but I am interested in Django
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on December 26, 2012, 04:41:21 am
I saw Django with my mom.  It's rare that we like the same movies.  Django, she loved as much as I did.  She was actually cheering with the rest of the audience!  In the car on the way home, she wondered aloud about the "coincidental" timing of Roots on BET just before the opening of Django.
She'd been angry at white folks all week.  Now I reckon she's just gonna laugh at them.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Mastrmynd on December 26, 2012, 08:09:29 am
I saw Django with my mom.  It's rare that we like the same movies.  Django, she loved as much as I did.  She was actually cheering with the rest of the audience!  In the car on the way home, she wondered aloud about the "coincidental" timing of Roots on BET just before the opening of Django.
She'd been angry at white folks all week.  Now I reckon she's just gonna laugh at them.

It's done all of the time Magic. TV (cable and network) will show programming similar (or previous sequels) to the "BIG MOVIE" that's coming out that week. I think it was very smart of BET to do that.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 26, 2012, 10:36:56 am
Dropped the teenaged girls off at the show last night and they came back with comments like,

"That movie was off da chain!!!"

"That movie was funny!"

"It was good!"
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: TripleX on December 26, 2012, 11:16:48 am
I just saw it and loved it. Part of me wants to put my critique up here, but I don't want to because Mr. Hudlin was a producer and I'm reluctant to say anything negative about it. So that leaves Millarworld...but I don't want to criticize the movie on a white site amongst mixed company either.

Bump it, I'll just say what I've got to say. That's NOT Black folks. Sure Django was a great fantasy but at it's core it rang hollow. I read the Newsweek article wherein QT and Mr. Hudlin discussed their reaction to a scene in "Roots" where a slave is given the opportunity to beat his master and declines. It was said that the idea of that was ludicrous, but I don't think it was.

Django Unchained was mostly what a white person thinks a Black person's response to slavery would be.  As a whole we're not that blood thirsty and violent, even in the face of the atrocities of slavery. We're seekers of justice, not vengeance. That's why throughout antiquity incidence of Black people rising up to slay our white oppressors are few and far between. It's not because our brains are created in such a way as to make us naturally subservient, we're just better people.

With that said I still loved it. My favorite part was when one of the caged slaves looked at Django like he was Tupac and smiled.  This was the same brother that hated Django's arrogance, status and freedom the day before, but when the opportunity came for him to throw him under the bus he instead told the truth, thereby giving Dejango his freedom back and as a result his own. It was a beautiful moment of solidarity that undid the fervent nastiness of Samuel L. Jackson's character. It was great, the Alexandre Dumas part was too.

The entire film was more than worthy of the excited cheers and applause that erupted at it's end. The predominately Black audience in the theater I attended was ecstatic. I'm glad it was a hit and I can't wait for the sequel. The woman slaver with her face covered by a scarf was noticeably absent during the bloodshed at the movie's climax. She was a Tarantino sequel villain if there ever was one
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 26, 2012, 12:27:13 pm
Django Unchained was mostly what a white person thinks a Black person's response to slavery would be.




There's a lot of truth to this...





EDIT:   Had to trim the quote down to one sentence.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 26, 2012, 12:57:02 pm
There were plenty of slave revolts.  Not only the famous ones by Nat Turner and Denmark Vesey and the successful one by Toussaint L'Ouverture, but the ones that were covered up by slave owners to make sure that more slaves didn't get inspired. 

Fighting back against oppression is the right thing to do. 

Yes, black folks have really internalized Christian forgiveness.  We can debate how healthy that is.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: TripleX on December 26, 2012, 01:16:02 pm
Fighting back against oppression is always the right thing to do, but it matters how you fight. You can't allow yourself to become like what you're fighting against and surrender the moral high ground.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 26, 2012, 01:26:38 pm
Fighting back against oppression is always the right thing to do, but it matters how you fight. You can't allow yourself to become like what you're fighting against and surrender the moral high ground.
Hurting innocent people is becoming what you're fighting against.  Putting down murderers, brutal thugs that will hunt you down and kill you if you let them live is just self defense and making the world a better place.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Lion on December 26, 2012, 01:46:46 pm
Slave resistance is definitely the story that doesn't get told. From the armed ones to the more "passive" ones like the house slaves who put ground up glass in their master's food. Not all slaves just sat around accepting their lot.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on December 26, 2012, 01:49:02 pm
I'd imagine that a lot of those slavers were ancient versions of the monsters we see on the network news today.


That slavery sh!t was  a   very dirty business and needed even dirtier people to run it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: TripleX on December 26, 2012, 01:57:36 pm
Fighting back against oppression is always the right thing to do, but it matters how you fight. You can't allow yourself to become like what you're fighting against and surrender the moral high ground.
Hurting innocent people is becoming what you're fighting against.  Putting down murderers, brutal thugs that will hunt you down and kill you if you let them live is just self defense and making the world a better place.

True, so why did DiCaprio's sister have to die in such a solitary and violent manner? She was hardly innocent, but she wasn't a tracker either.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 26, 2012, 02:04:47 pm
Funny you mention her.  Her death, consistently, gets the biggest laugh from ALL audiences. 

First of all, if anyone was left alive, they would aid the Regulators in tracking them down.  They all had to go. 

Second of all, she aided and abetted.  She was complicit in evil.  You're the first person I've heard defend her life.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: TripleX on December 26, 2012, 02:24:41 pm
It was hilarious, but it was overkill. It's not like I'm shedding any tears, I just thought it was unnecessary. It would be different if there was a character moment that established her as evil in her own right because of her complicity (or even due to the implied incestuous relationship with her brother) but if there was one, I missed it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 26, 2012, 03:09:48 pm
Okay with the super sized criticism XXX. It was a good movie from what I hear. I am wanting to see it more now then ever. Tomorrow hopefully. Yes, this and that coulda shoulda been done but what the Hell? We have a major "African American Story" in front of the rest of the movies. Does this tell us something about consumerism or what? People have money to see movies. They may be struggling elsewhere but for 2 and some change hours they can forget their troubles. Hell even fantasize about the $#!! they could do to the ones doing them wrong. Just sayin' :D Peace Mr. XXX Love Ms. Sherelle D ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: TripleX on December 26, 2012, 03:22:05 pm
If you think that's super-sized you don't know me very well. lol

That's a small quibble about a great movie.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Vic Vega on December 26, 2012, 03:26:08 pm
This is interesting.

I just got finished reading a comparison of Django and
the Fred Williamson Blaxploitaton Westerns like Boss N*gger.

I'm not going to get into the specifics of the comparison, but now I'm
wondering if an action dude had been cast as Django would the reactions here change..

Cause if somebody enslaves Fred Williamson in a movie, everybody is getting killed by him at the end.

Tarantino's last 3 movies ( if you count the 2 parts of Kill Bill as 2 separate films) have been revenge flicks.

I'm kinda shocked at the idea that some thought Django was gonna be anything else.

If I'm not mistaken the original Django was a revenge flick.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 26, 2012, 03:39:07 pm
XXX I am just pulling your leg. I know you weren't being super critical.  I just want to hear all positive stuff because I am really proud of our HEF founder.  ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Jihad the Roughneck on December 26, 2012, 04:33:23 pm
Went to see this last night and I was pleasantly surprised.  I often ask myself can a white director or writer create an African American character that rings true to me and gives me inspiration? I realized I was asking the wrong question entirely.  If you do your research and hire talented African Americans like Reggie, Jamie, and Sam, it can be done correctly and respectfully.  I don't think this film could have been made with Tarantino and the Weinsteins.  As a moviegoer, I have seldom seen a black  male hero killing whites.  It's a taboo, I only think Blade got the chance and that was vampires.  In this, the slavers were clearly villains like the Nazi's or terrorists and deserved retribution.  Taboo broken.  Django is not only the fastest gun in the south but he also uses his intellect and cunning to turn the tide in his favor.  He could read, and his wife could speak German.  Maybe now, since Tarantino had the balls, we can get some more films and more work for black Hollywood. Django had that black love thing I'm glad they didn't have him get with the the white lady in the big house and stay with his wife!  Magnificent and unprecedented. Phrenology, Mandingo fighting, Django is gun slinging brer rabbit.     
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: jefferson L.O.B. sergeant on December 26, 2012, 06:39:38 pm
It seems that the conversation that Spike Lee and Jamie Foxx had about DJANGO may have been too optimistic on Foxx's part. I've just seen Lee's criticism of the film and ostensibly Tarantino on MSNBC.

Lee is a Brooklynite.

I'm a Brooklynite.

Is there a link? 8)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on December 27, 2012, 02:31:15 pm
Spoilers....


I'm not a Tarantino fan and I was very leery of this project when I heard about it. Though the plot intrigued me and the idea of a black revenge flick got my interest. I decided to put my trepidations about Tarantino and his cavalier using, or rather his sense of entitlement regarding using the n-word (in previous films) aside, as well as he seems like the kind of white guy who knows black people. I put that to the side, watched the film, and I enjoyed it a great deal.

I was squeamish going in about how lurid it would be in how it handled the treatment done to Kerry Washington's character, but Tarantino was largely restrained there. Also the movie didn't seem to revel in the violence against the slaves, though it didn't shirk either or whitewash the brutality of slavery. So I was happy about that.

I also liked the relationship with Waltz and Foxx's characters. I was surprised when King Schultz died. And I liked how it all came together with Jamie getting revenge . Perhaps Jefferson is right that Django, Broomhilda, and even Stephen are a white person's idea of how blacks are, but this time I was okay with it. Because the black guy actually had courage and brains, he saved his wife, there was love there between them, and Django was a black hero who anyone could relate too without having to sacrifice being black or being proud to be black or forgetting where he came from. I thought everyone in the film did fine jobs acting wise. Leo was appropriately sinister as the decadent and decayed Monsieur Candie. Jackson did solid work as the odious Stephen. Even Walter Goggins added something to the redneck white trash role that he seems to own. Don Johnson looked like Colonel Sanders. And they even had Tom Wopat and Lee Horsely (Matt Houston) in it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 27, 2012, 07:15:33 pm
NOTORIOUS PHD:

Dec 27, 2012God Forgives, I Don't



Django Unchained, the latest offering from celebrated auteur Quentin Tarantino was sure to incite controversy.  Like all of Tarantino's films, Django is what one might call a built environment.  The world constructed in the film is one drawn from the filmmaker's expansive imagination and his encyclopedic knowledge of pop genres like Spaghetti Westerns and Blaxploitation.  Set below the Mason-Dixon line in the years immediately prior to the start of the Civil War, employing elements of both the western and the slave narrative, this unique construction is one Tarantino calls a "Southern."  At issue of course is the central role that the "peculiar institution" otherwise known as slavery plays in the film.


Slavery is that thing that America would rather forget.  For all those who love to talk about American Exceptionalism, slavery punches a gaping hole in this self-serving thesis.   The horrors of slavery and the reality that this nation was built upon the backs of those enslaved has created a situation riff with explosive possibilities.  Some cringe at the inconvenient mention of slavery, while others recoil at the deafening silence surrounding its articulation.  Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey have both made movies about slavery.  Neither Amistad (1997) nor Beloved (1998) were very successful though, in spite of the uber popularity of both of the figures behind these respective films.  In other words, if Spielberg and Oprah can't sell slavery chances are it can't be sold.


The problem with well-meaning representations like those seen in Amistad and Beloved is the earnest, self-righteous tone, a tone dripping with morally indignant sentimentality at every conceivable turn. While Roots may serve as the blueprint for representations of slavery in American popular culture, Tarantino rejects this model, instead drawing inspiration from another 70s cultural form, Blaxploitation, referencing a film like The Legend of Nigger Charley (1972)



and Mandingo (1975)





both of which predated Roots by a few years.  One could even argue that the popularity of Blaxploitation films in the theaters during the early 70s helped create a climate for the eventual airing of the more mainstream Roots mini-series on television in 1977. As groundbreaking a cultural moment as Roots was, it had more to do with black suffering than it did black empowerment.

In Mandingo, Ken Norton's character Meade, the film's resident Mandingo, dies in a pot of boiling water, while the plantation's Uncle Tom character, Agamemnon, surprisingly shots his beloved Master Hammond Maxwell in response.  Though the film allows for the cathartic killing of Master Hammond at the hands of one of his slaves, Meade dies, while Uncle Tom lives. In the years since Mandingo, America has seen the rise of a newly empowered class of real life characters whose resemblance to the old Uncle Tom archetype makes it difficult to discern whether one is looking at a fictional character or the real thing? The fabled Uncle Ruckus from the Boondooks series is fictional, though one need not look far to find real life versions of the same thing scattered amongst us.    Recognizing this, Django realizes that for the film to be relevant in contemporary society, Uncle Tom deserves a fate similar to that of his Master in order for good to truly triumph over evil.  Thus it is fitting that Django saves his last act of retribution for Samuel L. Jackson's vile "house nigger" character Stephen, who after being shot in both knees, dies a horrific death as the Master's mansion explodes with him in it, thanks to Django setting off a dynamite blast.   

Django's mind may be immersed in the Spaghetti Western's of Corbucci or the choreographed mayhem of a Sam Peckinpah, for example, but the film's heart remains in Blaxploitation.  Back in 1971 Melvin Van Peebles promised that there was a "bad ass nigger" who was "coming back to get some dues," at the end of his groundbreaking classic Sweetsweetback's Baadasssss Song.  Some forty-one years later, Jamie Foxx's Django has fulfilled this prophecy.  The brilliance of Blaxploitation as a genre was its ability to rewrite common narratives so that black characters triumph over white oppression and do so in high style.  There was a life affirming message of what Obama calls "old testament justice" combined with an extravagance of style that made these films so popular.  Coming in the immediate aftermath of the Civil Rights movement and informed by the politics of Black Power, the films recognized, in spite of budgetary limitations, that James Brown's notion of "payback" was real indeed in the minds of its audience members.  Django modernizes this mythology in an age when super heroes now dominate the box office and such is fitting as Foxx's Django becomes the super hero of the slave era.

Blaxploitation, of course, would eventually have a strong influence on hip hop.   As the genre experienced a re-birth in the late 80s, thanks to the rise of gangsta rap, films once dismissed as shlock began to experience a second life.  In the 90s, Tarantino forged an aesthetic that finally took Blaxploitation seriously as an influence.  The filmmaker's mash up of various styles, mixing both the sacred and the profane, without regard to time and place, has become the epitome of postmodern cinematic expression. Yet the aesthetic itself owes a lot to hip hop as Tarantino recently discussed in his appearance on The Charlie Rose Show.

The art of the remix, creative sampling of pop cultural ephemera, a love of retro as aesthetic, and the overall ability to give old forms new meaning, pitched to just the right in-crowd, defines a style of cinematic hipness that Tarantino has now perfected.  Make no mistake about it though, Django Unchained is hip hop cinema at its finest.  There is no place else in the world where Wagner, Ennio Morricone, Tupac, and Rick Ross can co-exist with Sergio Leone and Fred Williamson other than in hip hop and a Tarantino movie. 

In spite of Tarantino's achievement, many, aided by the ubiquitous echo chamber of social media, have quickly lodged their complaints.  This is not surprising.  Tarantino is a popular filmmaker who often prompts an equally critical response from his numerous detractors.  Though popular, Tarantino's films are quite studious as well.  His approach to cinema is often over the heads of those who want their film going experience to be a moral affirmation of their own tightly held beliefs.  Tarantino is abstract, but these erstwhile critics only want the literal.  His overt embrace of style strikes the detractors as not severely entrenched enough in victimization for their taste.

Some have complained about what they see as the film's excessive violence, failing however to recognize the utter violence that was slavery.  Further the repeated use of the word "nigger" in the film gives haters an easy excuse to discredit the effort.  For a film set in 1858, what else would you expect the characters to say, African American?!  Where do these self righteous saints think the contested word came from in the first place?  The repeated utterance of this word in the film is in keeping with the era that the film is set.  Django, again like both Blaxploitation and hip hop, deploys the word in a most effective manner, liberating the word from the bondage of disingenuous, self-righteous social censorship in the process. In spite of what others may say, the use of the word is both humorous and appropriate given the context.





Simply stated, Django Unchained is an instant classic.  In an era when movie experiences often resemble an amusement park ride, where comic books, sequels, and the expanses of digital technology often determine what gets made and what does not, Tarantino has consistently crafted a cinema where story and dialogue still reign supreme.  This is very old school, but old school in the best possible way.  On the other hand, Tarantino's ability to make traditional concepts like story and dialogue relevant in a contemporary context through modern practices like cut and paste, re-mix, and mash-up demonstrates that old school inevitably informs the creation of the new school.  To do all of this while rewriting the slave narrative as one where ethical vengeance trumps saintly victimization is something that Nat Turner would have most certainly been proud of. 

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Catch22 on December 27, 2012, 07:57:40 pm
I saw it with my Father-in-Law last night.  We both enjoyed the movie and I'm not a Tarantino fan in the slightest.  I'm sure it's been said here before, but I'm of the opinion that if a black director made this movie, he or she would be labeled a racist and there wouldn't have been as many white faces in my theatre.  Having said that, I'm glad the movie was made at all.  Django is as much an African-American revenge fantasy as Inglorious Basterds was a Jewish revenge fantasy.  Jamie Foxx killed it and Christoph Waltz is one of my new favorite actors.  Sam Jackson was so vile and ridiculous, he stole almost every scene he was in.  All in all, I liked it...but I guess I'm the target audience. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Seven on December 27, 2012, 08:48:24 pm
Loved it...classic. Sorry spike.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 27, 2012, 11:46:28 pm
Quote
Some have complained about what they see as the film's excessive violence, failing however to recognize the utter violence that was slavery.  Further the repeated use of the word "nigger" in the film gives haters an easy excuse to discredit the effort.  For a film set in 1858, what else would you expect the characters to say, African American?!  Where do these self righteous saints think the contested word came from in the first place?  The repeated utterance of this word in the film is in keeping with the era that the film is set.  Django, again like both Blaxploitation and hip hop, deploys the word in a most effective manner, liberating the word from the bondage of disingenuous, self-righteous social censorship in the process. In spite of what others may say, the use of the word is both humorous and appropriate given the context.

Okay I love this response. If I had sound effects to this quote it would go something like this. "Whooopac" :o
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on December 28, 2012, 02:08:39 am
RH,

Thanks for posting the Notorious PHD article. I thought it was an interesting take on Tarantino's style. However I didn't like that the writer used the argument that Tarantino's films are 'over the head' of his critics. Or the writer's defense of the n-word. For Django, I thought it's usage was appropriate. In contemporary hip hop, not so much. I don't think modern hip hop's usage liberates that word from its social censorship or history at all. It's power continues to derive from that history of dehumanization. And the words power to provoke is one of the reasons it continues to resonate with hip hop artists. And look at how the popularity of its usage among many blacks, not just young ones, has went hand and hand with the worse ways we treat each other. The n-word is not endearing, it's still the language of dehumanization.

As for Tarantino's style, I think he is up for criticism like anyone else and it's glib to just insult or question the intelligence of the people who are 'lodging' complaints. Further, I feel that some blacks in the media today are quick to attack other blacks as being 'self-righteous' when they are criticizing a beloved white or black artist who is dealing with a racial issue. I don't like that. I think we need to come up with a better way to discuss issues than to insult or dismiss.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Derrick on December 28, 2012, 06:32:33 am
This is interesting.

I just got finished reading a comparison of Django and
the Fred Williamson Blaxploitaton Westerns like Boss N*gger.

I'm not going to get into the specifics of the comparison, but now I'm
wondering if an action dude had been cast as Django would the reactions here change..

Cause if somebody enslaves Fred Williamson in a movie, everybody is getting killed by him at the end.

Tarantino's last 3 movies ( if you count the 2 parts of Kill Bill as 2 separate films) have been revenge flicks.

I'm kinda shocked at the idea that some thought Django was gonna be anything else.

If I'm not mistaken the original Django was a revenge flick.

Actually, just about all of Tarantino's movies have been about outsiders of the Rich White Men Power Structure getting revenge on that structure.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 28, 2012, 08:03:47 am
RH,

Thanks for posting the Notorious PHD article. I thought it was an interesting take on Tarantino's style. However I didn't like that the writer used the argument that Tarantino's films are 'over the head' of his critics. Or the writer's defense of the n-word. For Django, I thought it's usage was appropriate. In contemporary hip hop, not so much. I don't think modern hip hop's usage liberates that word from its social censorship or history at all. It's power continues to derive from that history of dehumanization. And the words power to provoke is one of the reasons it continues to resonate with hip hop artists. And look at how the popularity of its usage among many blacks, not just young ones, has went hand and hand with the worse ways we treat each other. The n-word is not endearing, it's still the language of dehumanization.

As for Tarantino's style, I think he is up for criticism like anyone else and it's glib to just insult or question the intelligence of the people who are 'lodging' complaints. Further, I feel that some blacks in the media today are quick to attack other blacks as being 'self-righteous' when they are criticizing a beloved white or black artist who is dealing with a racial issue. I don't like that. I think we need to come up with a better way to discuss issues than to insult or dismiss.

Alrighty then looks like we can agree to disagree ;)  I am on the side of staying positive. We have to learn how to do like the "gentlemen of the anti-bellum era" smile, say kind words, puff on a cigar, have a glass of brandy and call it a day. Speak our opinions behind closed doors. In public it's solidarity. ;)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on December 29, 2012, 07:54:58 am
^
I'm fine with agreeing to disagree. Everyone has their own opinions and that's cool.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Greg on December 29, 2012, 11:00:21 am
I very much enjoyed it. Very well made, well directed, well shot, and well performed. I was thinking, though, how different the film would have been with Sally Menke's editing, but alas. Samuel L Jackson was FANTASTIC as Stephen and I'm a bit surprised at the lack of acclaim he's receiving compared to DiCaprio and Waltz. My only real hang up with the film was that Kerry Washington was rather underdeveloped and I wish she had more of an active role than just get pushed around and wait to be saved. We know she was feisty and was a runaway and got into trouble, but we as a viewer never actually see it. We see her punishments throughout but non of her actual fighting. But her scenes when she's being imagined by Django were beautiful.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 29, 2012, 11:40:38 am
Any chance this will pave the way to a live-action Catcher Freeman movie?  ;D Granddad's version, of course.
Catch a freeman's character is hilarious.  ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Lion on December 29, 2012, 03:03:59 pm
I very much enjoyed it. Very well made, well directed, well shot, and well performed. I was thinking, though, how different the film would have been with Sally Menke's editing, but alas. Samuel L Jackson was FANTASTIC as Stephen and I'm a bit surprised at the lack of acclaim he's receiving compared to DiCaprio and Waltz. My only real hang up with the film was that Kerry Washington was rather underdeveloped and I wish she had more of an active role than just get pushed around and wait to be saved. We know she was feisty and was a runaway and got into trouble, but we as a viewer never actually see it. We see her punishments throughout but non of her actual fighting. But her scenes when she's being imagined by Django were beautiful.

Well... To be fair with Brumhilda, I don't know how much opportunity there would have been to even show it, especially given the time frame from her introduction to the sh*t hitting  the fan. We're talking a span of just a few hours. (Trying to keep everything relatively spoiler-free.) While in that sense, she indeed got the short end of the stick, the entire movie was really all about her.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: JLI Jesse on December 29, 2012, 05:42:36 pm
I just saw it this afternoon and was unsure going in since I only seem to enjoy Jamie and QT about 50% of the time.  Turns out I loved the majority of it, especially Christopher Waltz.  Jamie and Leo were both pretty great as well.  But it kinda lost me with the giant gun fight at the end...it just seemed like too much.  I would have been happy if they ended it before that since it seemed to drag on a bit after and got a little too "tarantino-y" for me.

The strangest and most pleasant surprise for me was a song by the late great Jim Croce. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on December 30, 2012, 06:28:04 am
I very much enjoyed it. Very well made, well directed, well shot, and well performed. I was thinking, though, how different the film would have been with Sally Menke's editing, but alas. Samuel L Jackson was FANTASTIC as Stephen and I'm a bit surprised at the lack of acclaim he's receiving compared to DiCaprio and Waltz. My only real hang up with the film was that Kerry Washington was rather underdeveloped and I wish she had more of an active role than just get pushed around and wait to be saved. We know she was feisty and was a runaway and got into trouble, but we as a viewer never actually see it. We see her punishments throughout but non of her actual fighting. But her scenes when she's being imagined by Django were beautiful.

Yeah, I would have liked to have seen more of Washington's character or at least more back story for why and she Django became involved, got married, and decided to leave. Granted it wasn't necessary, but still it would've been nice to get another flashback or more to flesh that out.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 30, 2012, 06:38:58 am
SALON:

DECEMBER 27, 2012 1:40PM
Django, Unplugged
 Rate: 0 Flag Email.Click "Submit Abuse" if you feel this post is inappropriate. Explain why below if you wish.  Cancel 
If, in Quentin Tarantino’s new cinematic indictment of slavery, Jamie Foxx’s quest to rescue and reunite with his wife (who has been sold off to another plantation as punishment for the two of them trying to escape) is an amplification of the Prince Charming myth, most black women will tell you they’d be just as happy with an acoustic version!

We don’t need our men to put themselves in harm’s way slaying evil overseers for us, we just want them to want to and to groove on the idea of riding off into the sunset with us. 

(Cue violins.)

How auspicious that this movie should come out when there’s a black man in The White House presenting us with just such an example. 

You can tell by the way Barack looks at Michelle that he “luvs her dirty draw’s”…even though you can also tell by the glint in Michelle’s eyes that she’s the kind of woman who “don’t take no stuff.”   But Barack doesn’t resent her for it, au contraire...he respects her for it.

I was thrilled to see this movie retire the “strong black woman” myth.  Because truthfully, most of us are tired of the struggle…not to mention the eye-rolling we get when we ask for help…which then disheartens us and toughens so many into: “Well, f*ck you, then…I’ll just do it my damn self”  -- which then perpetuates the “evil, black bitch myth.”

I’m just sayin’…

You wanna tame the shrew?  Be her hero. Be a Django...or a Barack. She may not be used to it, so she might need some convincing...and it may take some time.

But like Django and Barack, a hero perseveres.

Trust me...for every black man who’s willing to saddle up, there’s a black woman eager to get up on that pony and ride with him.

Watching Django and Brunhilde ride off into the sunset together isn't an image of black relationships we get to see that often onscreen.

I'm looking forward to the sequals.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 30, 2012, 10:26:08 am
Quote
I was thrilled to see this movie retire the “strong black woman” myth.  Because truthfully, most of us are tired of the struggle…not to mention the eye-rolling we get when we ask for help…which then disheartens us and toughens so many into: “Well, f*ck you, then…I’ll just do it my damn self”  -- which then perpetuates the “evil, black bitch myth.”

I’m just sayin’…

You wanna tame the shrew?  Be her hero. Be a Django...or a Barack. She may not be used to it, so she might need some convincing...and it may take some time.

But like Django and Barack, a hero perseveres.

Trust me...for every black man who’s willing to saddle up, there’s a black woman eager to get up on that pony and ride with him.

Watching Django and Brunhilde ride off into the sunset together isn't an image of black relationships we get to see that often onscreen.

I'm looking forward to the sequals.
This is such a good point. Our women (African American) need to really understand that they can make any man a hero. They do not have want and savior another's hero. If we had "make my man a hero course in college" the curse would be broken and we would have many more Barracks, Django's, Reginald Hudlins. We the elders of this generation need to change that stereo type. "Strong black women"If we want to be strong we need to breath life into our boys/men. We have the power. In that final scene of the movie. Django pranced his horse in pride and rode out in front. Hilde' smiled with pride and blushed. Then she picked up her rifle and said without saying "I got your back you are my man" :-*
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on December 30, 2012, 07:08:34 pm
...In the coming weeks, as the box office returns tally up for Django, I'm hopeful that other studios will take note and immediately start greenlighting more black-hero projects, Western-themed and otherwise.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 30, 2012, 07:35:25 pm
Agreed! Hype :o we see that the consumer wants and will pay for a good black movie. ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Catch22 on December 30, 2012, 08:44:00 pm
Agreed! Hype :o we see that the consumer wants and will pay for a good black movie. ;D


Yeah, as long as Tarantino is directing it.   :(
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 30, 2012, 09:49:35 pm
Django is no comparison to Roots. Roots was that era's movie for "blecks" and no I did not misspell it....Django is the movie for 2012 and it brings out some points I think some may have missed. The movie started out in Texas which was interesting. History tells us that Texas was late in realizing the civil war was over by six months thus the Texas Born and Raised people of color celebrate Juneteenth. There were so many subtle interesting things in that movie.  I am shaking my head at the back and forth of pettiness of who said what (lee vs terantino or vise versa). At this point the egg can be washed off of Spikes because he as smart as he proclaims to be should have watched it. And criticized it from a directors stand point. As opposed to generalizations. I think one of my favorite scenes was the end. When Django met Hilde at the gate and pranced his horse like "yeah" it's done. He began to ride off and she rode behind him gun drawn like yeah you my ninja and this here riffle got your back. We are in this together. Loved it.  ;D


*footnote: I did not like Roots back then and do not find the comparison is just.
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on December 31, 2012, 02:07:20 am
The Sam Jackson scene where he 'hugs' the Leonardo character will live forever more in infamy...such a valuable lesson.

But....Seeing Reggie's name in the opening credits was a personal thrill.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 31, 2012, 04:27:45 am
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES:

  Django America
Uploaded by Roger Ebert on December 29, 2012 3:58 PM | No Comments | No TrackBacks

• Omer M. Mozaffar in Chicago



Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" (2012) is a very good Tarantino movie. Save for "Pulp Fiction," I tend to appreciate and respect Tarantino movies more than I enjoy them. "Pulp Fiction," however, was so entertaining that I did not want it to end. Such were my feelings with "Django Unchained." As a mash of bloody pulp cinema with great aspirations, it is as entertaining as anything I have seen from Tarantino. For Tarantino diehards it is as Tarantino-esque as everything else from him.

This is the story of an 1858 partnership between a German dentist-turned-assassin Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz), seeking the help of the enslaved Django (Jamie Foxx) to track down a trio of bandits hiding somewhere with whips and pistols among the plantations. Their journey soon shifts to a scheme to find and free Django's wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington).


The acting in this movie is outstanding. Jamie Foxx invokes the silent stern stare of Eastwood's nameless gunslinger, mixed with the confidence of a 1970s cop (though, on a side note, it is the damsel in distress, Broomhilda, whose surname is "von Shaft"). And consider that we are speaking of Foxx, who despite early moments in his career getting criticized for his portrayals of African American characters, has since earned nearly every possible media award. We are watching a hero in multiple ways.







I knew this movie would win me over in the first few minutes, watching Foxx step out of his shackles, throwing off his blanket as a newly free man. He has the slow, deliberate gate of a determined hero, and the scars of whippings. It is as though Foxx has captured the raw muscle of that powerful first scene of Tarantino's "Inglorious Basterds" into one quick slow-motion gesture.



But, Schultz himself, dressed in thick beard, long hair, fitted suit, polished tongue, and clever strategy, captivates us with his choices, shifting roles from liberator for Django to mentor to partner to servant to redeemer. There is a developing narrative from film to film with his roles. In "Basterds," his Hans Landa was a bloodthirsty, merciless killer, a Nazi, eventually hooked. Here, still a killer, he has a German Enlightenment conscience and moral code that he redirects through rationalization. Meaning, he is a bounty hunter, though he is killing killers; who cares if they might have reformed themselves.



And such delicious villains. While Don Johnson (Big Daddy) is the smiling Plantation Owner enjoying the comforts of a Confederate lifestyle, DiCaprio's sharp-eyed Calvin Candie takes his power to its brutal, logical conclusion. Johnson has that organic Southern dignity that somehow justifies the inhumanity in his field. DiCaprio, on the other hand, commands his place of Privilege at the top of a eugenically modified food chain, with the support of his servant Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson, of especially powerful tone, but distracting makeup). Candie not only runs his "Candie-land" plantation; he invests in African-American men as combatants for an after dinner, parlor room version of a "mandingo" dog-fighting league. I do not know how many different types of disgust - visceral, moral, etc. - I felt, while also wondering how different those fights were from the many boxing matches I have watched.









And, as a Tarantino film, it loads us with all types of excessively bloody violence. Maybe it is parenting or piety, but I no longer have the iron stomach to digest violence. It may be that if I screened "Pulp Fiction" again, I would not be able to complete it. But, in that film and in this film, Tarantino's play with violence seems appropriately fitting in our recurring, yet incomplete and inconsistent and at times dishonest national conversations about guns in America.



We find every type of violence in this film. Sometimes it forces us to cringe; I had to squint to obscure some moments, or look away during others. Sometimes the violence forces us to laugh because it gets so excessive that it becomes cartoonish. Sometimes, however, as a tale of vengeance it invites us to celebrate.



There is a moment when a horse gets shot in the face, and the audience gasps, and I started laughing at the absurdity. That the horse got shot was troubling, but we were all so accustomed to movie murder that the other shots hitting the humans should offend us, but of course did not generate such a response.



Not all the violence involves guns, for we have killer dogs, wrestling bloodsports, rapes, and, most of all, this is a film about slavery. The deeper problem in our culture is not the guns, but the culture of violence. Tarantino is both a contributor to our bloodlust, as well as a commentator on it. We might say the same thing, or more, about the violence in "Basterds."



But, watching this film, starting right from that moment with the blanket, this film taught me something seemingly obvious about our culture. While we say, in praise or repudiation, that ours is at heart a capitalist society, that is not accurate.



Deeper than the philosophy of business is that ethos of altruistic self-determination. Meaning, the people we respect in our culture are not so much winners or the wealthy, for we would then celebrate the Plantation Owners. We recognize their innate desire to be masters of their domains. But, we celebrate people (usually men) who seem to live the lives they choose to live, on their own terms, while in that process, they benefit others (sometimes at the cost of their own lives).



So, either you are selfish or selfless, and either you are a master, or you are a servant. It follows, then, that many of this film's comic moments involve men who have handed over their own self-determination. Ready to launch a raid, our plantation owners and dwellers struggle with their masks, blaming wives for poor craftsmanship. Much later, Samuel L. Jackson is Malcolm X's House Negro, at times earning cackles from the audience. Watching this film, I began to think about how many South Asian celebrities suddenly came to mind, who are so wealthy yet seem to choose to be chained.



Thus, that culture of mastery also gives us a hint about the roots of our problems of violence. This film loads itself with altruistic violence, if there can be such a thing. But in this film, we watch the clash between those who exercise their masculine mastery over others, against those who exercise their masculine mastery to serve others. Through this film's lens, then, a source of violence in our culture is an innate need to dominate or to refuse domination.



And that appreciation for self-determination also speaks to Tarantino and auteurism. Part of the appeal of Tarantino is that he seems to make his movies his way. His films mimic the movies we often ignore, featuring actors we've discarded, yet we call his films masterpieces. And, how rare is it that we see a movie, aside from documentaries, about American slavery? How bold is it that Tarantino chooses to speak to it!







It is not easy to assess Tarantino movies, except against each other. He is one of those auteurs using his own techniques to make movies that primarily attract his own following. How many American filmmakers are there on this very short list? Perhaps John Waters, Kevin Smith and Spike Lee, though none of these directors is very active today (at least as feature filmmakers). It is far easier to objectively assess something from Scorsese, Spielberg, or the Coens than it is to assess these auteurs.



But, there are those universals. This film is vastly entertaining. It had me continually asking what would happen next. You can rarely predict what will happen in this film, and you most certainly will want to know. And, that Tarantino dialogue remains so vibrant. In Spielberg's "Lincoln," our characters seemed to jump into soliloquies in every setting. It also happens here, though we do not notice it.



You may have noticed, also, that thus far I've avoided the more common questions explored in essays about this film, those related to slavery and race. "Django Unchained" is so captivating that it will generate a profit, and I hope that it will inspire more films about slavery, race, and their legacies. Otherwise, the conversation will end as soon as we shift to the next big movie. I know racism and bigotry all too well, but as a South Asian, this is a conversation I am part of only secondarily. Similarly, a major reason I have mostly avoided the conversation is that my colleague and dear friend Steven Boone has already written something better than I could have.



But, a lesser reason is that the conversation is selective. As is their wont, many bleeding liberals will jump in celebration of this film's social commentary, perhaps not noticing that while this movie has the prominent House Negro character, "Inglorious Basterds" does not have such a vivid, parallel character (nor would we want to see one). Of course, that is not nearly as absurd as the Tea Party Nation posting arguing that the Holocaust was worse than American Slavery, because the goal of the Holocaust was to kill, while the goal of Slavery was to keep slaves healthy and working. I hope that I do not need to express all the levels of bizarre offensiveness of these points.



Or, consider, that if we take the film's narrative to its fulfillment, then Django would now be the Wanted murderer, followed by another set of bounty hunters, and would, potentially, not be free. Of course, that would be the natural plot for a sequel. Or, we might notice the expected Liberal silence over the complete lack of any major sympathetic White American characters; the closest would be the German immigrant. Still, almost all the African American and White characters are a backdrop anyways. Or, moving the conversation on bigotry beyond "Django," we might notice the silence about the bigotry in Ben Affleck's "Argo." But, these are not complaints about the film as much as they are complaints about holes in the conversations.



More than that, however, these would be matters of bigotry, not racism. Thankfully, the film does thoroughly understand something that "Lincoln" did not explore, that the difference between racism and bigotry is that racism involves power and mastery, that the violence of slavery and racism is not only the physical subjugation, and not only the psychological dehumanization, but also the privilege exercised in the process.



So, despite how much I am praising this film's entertainment, and its complex exploration of slavery, race and privilege, I must say that I frowned, clenched my teeth, or held my breath every single time I heard the n-word, and every time I heard any of the enslaved use the word "Sir."



Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on December 31, 2012, 07:22:49 am
Quote
So, despite how much I am praising this film's entertainment, and its complex exploration of slavery, race and privilege, I must say that I frowned, clenched my teeth, or held my breath every single time I heard the n-word, and every time I heard any of the enslaved use the word "Sir."
I do the same when I listen (forcefully) to the latest Little Wayne recordings. I think he skips sir, may  have replaced it with ho or the b-word. And I am making light of the N word being used here. How ever I am a realist and the word is used every single day today. In board rooms,  on buses, restaurants. And I cringe every time I hear it too.  As a matter of fact I was called one just recently. So I understand. It is not one of our cultures niceties.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on December 31, 2012, 09:23:53 am
Let me get this straight. A movie that deals with slavery and for some reason "nigger" is being used "too much"? Seriously? I havent looked at the film yet but I am for real?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on December 31, 2012, 03:19:54 pm
huffington post:


Rodney Barnes.Award-winning writer and producer
Lincoln, Meet Django: Slavery's Latest Films Are Controversial, But Not Why You Think
Posted: 12/31/2012 1:05 pm

This December the Civil War Era got the Hollywood treatment as two tinseltown heavyweights (Stephen Spielberg and Quentin Tarantino) presented their drastically different takes on a period of American history very few like to visit.

Well, at least not in a critical way.

As U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said in 2009, Americans are "cowards" when it comes to race. This includes in films about slavery and the Civil War it spawned.

From fantasies meant to justify fears and glorify terrorists like Birth of A Nation, to sob-inducing, torturous "We lost the battle, but won... in spirit or something... in the end" flicks like Glory and Amistad, Americans -- and by Americans, I mean a lot of white people -- tend to like their racial dramas in two ways. One is the classic mold of "White hero saves damned, downtrodden dark people from other white people who are racist jerks," a la Cry Freedom or Mississippi Burning. The other is the almost always Oscar-worthy "Black people turn other cheek while foot is placed in ass over and over, but never raise a fist in retaliation because they're good, magical Negroes meant to cure us of our erectile dysfunction and high golf handicap."

The latter is still incredibly popular.

Surprisingly though, and possibly a sign of progress, Spielberg's Lincoln and Tarantino's Django Unchained are neither of those things, while still being somewhat related to those types of films.

Although, not always in the way you'd expect.

Spielberg's work regarding one of our most mythologized and celebrated presidents is technically fantastic, passionately acted and executed. It's so perfect it is almost a parody of a Hollywood Oscar-bait -- the method-obsessed Daniel Day-Lewis as Lincoln, a screenplay by award-winning Angels in America scribe Tony Kushner, brought to you by the man who made both Schindler's List and Saving Private Ryan.

It's the definition of a prestige picture.

There's just one problem...

Due to a glaring oversight, at moments, it falls into the "white savior" category of films.

Not because it's inaccurate, to say. It's more of a sin of omission. Former slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, debated, befriended and challenged Abraham Lincoln to make the choices he made. At times Lincoln was reticent to "free" the slaves, wasn't sure about "equality" in the traditional sense of the word and Douglass was there in varying capacities to and for Lincoln, as such to ignore his existence in my opinion is reprehensible.

But Douglass was a no-show in Lincoln, despite his looming importance in Lincoln's presidency. This leaves the impression to those less informed about the Civil War period that it was Lincoln and Lincoln alone who "freed the slaves." This ignores that blacks and whites worked together to right a wrong, an example to us all of what can be accomplished when two cultures work together.

And this wouldn't be a "big deal" if it weren't for that fact this is the reductionist vision most Americans have of Lincoln already thanks to the most basic of compulsory public school educations.

At least the film got the aspect of "white people dragged kicking and screaming to the right side of history" right.

Getting history "right" was less of a concern for the purposely cartoonish Django Unchained -- Quentin Tarantino's controversial, slavery-era Spaghetti Western.

In a recent interview with VIBE Magazine, director Spike Lee said he wouldn't watch Django because it "would be disrespectful to his (our) ancestors." And even I, before seeing the film, wanted to agree with Lee. As I prepared to cut through Django with all the militant muster I could generate, a strange thing happened in the theater...

I loved the movie...

I really, really loved the movie.

Django is a ripe display of the pulpiest of fictions and uses 1858's slavery-riddled American South as the backdrop for a violent and oft unsettlingly hilarious revenge flick.

There is no movie about slavery quite like it.

It's a film that perverts a perversion by turning it into a cruel farce of those who thought there was nobility in owning (and treating) a man as if he were a horse.

While it recalls 1970s exploitation flicks Mandingo and Addio Zio Tom, it only references their most comically absurd and unsettling parts. And rather than become slavery-based torture porn, in Django every white person who is a slaver gets their comeuppance -- "Antebellum Die Hard" style -- with Jamie Foxx as Slave John McClane.

For example, there's a scene in the miniseries Roots where Chicken George has a chance to whip a white man, but takes the high road.

In Django, Jamie Foxx -- former slave turned John Shaft -- beats his ass.

The cinematic equivalent of a Rick Ross album title -- God Forgives, "Django" doesn't.

The film is a well-acted, directed and a cinematic and aural feast, yet Tarantino's Django remains hotly debated among black intellectuals. And when it comes to why this is such a lightning rod, I have a theory.

Black people have a complicated and frustrating with popular cinema as stereotypes -- the hallmark of lazy storytelling -- are easy to market and produce. But we, as African Americans, are also guilty of drafting our own inflexible standards and mythology, choking out individualism and creative freedom in the name of "progress."

Film is an art form. It is a form of expression. And it is a business. And I want my films about my culture to be honest. Not positive or negative, just honest. There are those who feel all slavery-era films should be of the same tone where a gospel choir plays in the background as the noble slave is whipped and defiantly refuses to cry... a story where the prospect of revenge would never enter his mind because he is chiseled and formed from the spirit of Mother Africa.

Well, that's boring.

And doesn't really reflect the much more complicated story of black slaves -- from Harriet Tubman to Nat Turner to the anonymous slave just trying to make it another day in hell.

All these stories deserve telling. And they deserve to be told in many different ways. And there's nothing wrong with one of those stories being about the slave who got angry, as there were most assuredly slaves who got angry.

That's Django.

And in some ways it's more honest than the raft of African American films that shine a light so brightly on our heroes it canonizes them to the degree that they are no longer real.

If Lee has any real challenge with the film it should be about how, due to virtue of Tarantino's whiteness (plus his marquee reputation), it was easier for him to get the film he wanted made while Lee has had to fight for everything from Do the Right Thing to Red Hook Summer.

Prestige in the form of Malcolm X and the commercial success of Inside Man, hasn't made it any easier for the auteur and that's well worth getting upset over.

But Django is not
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on January 01, 2013, 01:36:21 am
Quote
And even I, before seeing the film, wanted to agree with Lee. As I prepared to cut through Django with all the militant muster I could generate, a strange thing happened in the theater...

I loved the movie...

I really, really loved the movie.

I love this response. Excellent  :D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on January 01, 2013, 05:51:27 am
So much venom and vitriol being spewed about the net over this polarizing film.
Question to the producer:  Did y'all anticipate such controversy?

My favorite line so far, from one of ATL's self-proclaimed conscious/intellectuals,  "Now, if Madea were hanged in Django, maybe I'd go see it".
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on January 01, 2013, 05:56:31 am
This bears repeating:


You wanna tame the shrew?  Be her hero!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on January 01, 2013, 06:04:33 am
and



For every Black man who’s willing to saddle up, there’s a Black woman eager to get up on that pony and ride with him.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on January 01, 2013, 06:48:48 am
Thembisa S. Mshaka:

The Cold Part About Django Unchained *Spoilers*
 

I saw Quentin Tarantino’s new one last night. More like experienced it. I purposely blocked out any reviews so I could watch it with as little chatter in the background as possible. Tarantino makes controversial films. He draws equal praise and ire–just depends on who you ask. Hate him or love him, he’s a bold visionary. I am not one for gore or bloodbaths but when it comes to much of Tarantino’s work, I just can’t look away. See: Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill, Reservoir Dogs, and Inglorious Basterds.

 

So when I learned Tarantino was bringing his pen and eye to a film with a freed slave on a mission of vengeance to rescue his wife from a plantation, I was immediately checking for it. I had no idea what to expect, and was willing to put my squeamishness aside yet again. Then more details unfolded. Jamie Foxx was cast as Django. Check. Supported by Kerry Washington, Leonardo DiCaprio and Christoph Waltz. Triple check. Then I saw that “The D Is Silent” trailer using James Brown’s “The Big Payback”. Check. It wasn’t until the cast appeared on BET’s 106 & Park the week of release that I learned longtime Tarantino collaborator Samuel L. Jackson was in the film–as a villainous house slave. Check (now that I had to see). I also found out that Reginald Hudlin (The Boondocks, Black Panther) a producer whose choices and voice I deeply respect was on board. Chiggy check.  It should also be noted that two women producers, Stacey Sher and Pilar Savone join Hudlin on this epic mission. There is also one woman executive producer, Shannon McIntosh. Always a big deal for this blogger when women run the show. CHECK!

Django Unchained is a spaghetti western-inspired love story that takes place during American slavery. It is not about slavery, but slavery is depicted in all its twisted depravity, its horrifying brutality, and its utter insanity–all gnarled like the tree shaped scars on lashed backs throughout the film. Being the period piece that it is, Tarantino gets to let the n-word fly. Being the Tarantino piece that it is, so does the blood. Only this time, the slavers, overseers and profiteers all die at Django’s hand–a hand guided not by brute strength but with intelligence; driven by undying love.

But here’s the cold part about Django Unchained:

No Black director has yet to helm a major motion picture where slaves rebel–and live to tell about it with their soulmate as they ride off into the moonlight. Would this film have gotten the greenlight, the budget, or the marketing support it enjoys with a black director? Hellz no. Even with Tarantino writing and Hudlin producing, I still doubt it. Django Unchained brings into sharp relief just how unenlightened Hollywood continues to be. Now, this is neither Tarantino’s fault nor his problem. His job is to bring his vision to life, which he did to stunning effect here. I’m grateful he did. It opens a new generation of eyes to slavery in a fresh, albeit painful context. And in the absence of a national conversation about the 4-century long slave trade, the Middle Passage (what many call the African holocaust), the genocidal treatment of people of African descent under slavery for profit, and the heroic, at times equally violent efforts of those people to liberate themselves, this film is a damn good conversation piece. Had that conversation been undertaken, slavery in cinema may not be so loaded a subject that we can’t even watch a film in its totality without sweating the obvious. Yes, the n-word is splattered throughout. Yes, it’s hard to hear repeatedly from the mouths of white people. But it was typical of the period.

The flap over this being a “nigger”-filled Tarantino movie that mocks the peculiar institution is getting in the way of substantive critique and discussion. Yes, the film has comedic moments. But real talk, they are necessary–and kept me from crying as human flesh, Black flesh, was whipped, branded, hammered, hog-tied, torn apart by dogs. There is nothing funny about what the enslaved endured–but in my view, they are not the butt of a joke in Django Unchained. In fact, the lynch mob that was ostensibly the ramp-up to the Ku Klux Klan and the bumbling overseers were the ones portrayed as the ignorant criminals they truly were, despite the laws of the day being on their side. Waltz’s character Dr. King Schultz even uncovers Calvin Candie as the ultimate poser using The Three Musketeers. The punchlines aren’t there to coddle white moviegoers. Much of the laughter I heard from them was of the nervous variety. I’m sure they are used to feeling comfortable at the movies since their hero images pervade overwhelmingly. Oh well. Shoe’s on the other foot here. So go ahead, cheer along with the people of color when Django exacts his revenge.

Another cold part about this movie is The Hot Box (just wait). Tarantino literally strips Broomhilda, the character deftly played by Kerry Washington of everything but her dignity and virtue. That’s more than most of American media can say when it comes to portrayals of Black women, from directors both Black and white. She is even acknowledged for being smart because she’s bilingual, a rare quality in slaves, given their mother tongues are cut upon arrival.  I appreciated that for all the harrowing images of Broomhilda being tortured and humiliated, we also saw her radiant, in love, laughing, unspoiled–through her husband’s eyes. Schultz even has a chance to bed her, which would have been customary at this point in history–and doesn’t. Tarantino is putting many an image of Black relationships to shame with this film. The cold part about that? It takes having slavery as the context to get two award-winning, bankable Black lead actors starring as husband and wife in a big budget action film. In 2012. But I digress.

Other cold things about this film:

The complete and total bad-ass that is Jamie Foxx in this role. He lights up the screen with the keen brilliance of the trickster from start to finish. And yet, he gives us glimpses of compassion and vulnerability that are rarely available to Black male characters, who must usually be all funny, all womanizing player, all menace–or some nauseating mix of the three.

The unexpected and wondeful music choices, from the updated Django theme song to original music written by Foxx and performed by Rick Ross and an original song from John Legend. Tarantino is a music head with a great ear and this new approach of using original music along with existing material does not disappoint.

The sweeping panoramas, from the mountains of Yellowstone National Park to the arching trees on the plantation set in Mississippi but shot near New Orleans. Really great to watch Tarantino’s eye work with such scale; with the exception of Basterds and Kill Bill I & II, the film I’ve seen of his are usually focused on close, urbane quarters.

Leonard DiCaprio as Calvin Candie. It could not have been easy to drop into this character, even for one as seasoned as Leo. His big monologue (you’ll know it when you get there) is so raw, so full of molten rage, the hairs on your neck will stand up. So much for the Southern Gentleman. And that’s his own real blood on his hands from an unplanned lasceration during the take Tarantino kept in. WOW.

Thank you Mr. Tarantino for having the courage to make this film and take the heat. Thank you, Mr. Hudlin for lending your perspective and producing chops to this film. And thank you, Django–for giving the Hollywood slave his long overdue and much-needed revolutionary makeover.

 

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on January 02, 2013, 06:28:49 am
Hmm... I wonder are some action figures on the way?  That would be cool..  ake sure to include a couple special weapons for each.  Django can have a whip, a pistol and rifle.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Marvelous on January 02, 2013, 12:20:54 pm
Samuel L. Jackson dares interviewer to say the n-word -- VIDEO
http://popwatch.ew.com/2013/01/02/samuel-l-jackson-django-nword/ (http://popwatch.ew.com/2013/01/02/samuel-l-jackson-django-nword/)

No one knows how to make white men squirm quite like Samuel L. Jackson.

A post on Reddit last night has unearthed a prime example. Two weeks ago, the Django Unchained cast sat down with Jake Hamilton, host of Houston’s Emmy-winning film show Jake’s Takes, at a press junket. Things went smoothly enough until Hamilton approached Jackson with a question about the movie’s controversial use of the “n-word.” Jackson insisted that Hamilton, who is white, say the word out loud; after Hamilton repeatedly refused, they moved on. It was uncomfortable.

“The most awkward moment was just seeing everyone in the room freeze, and waiting to see what my reaction was going to be,” Hamilton says today.

The internet reaction has been mixed. Many commenters claim that Hamilton should have simply said the word, while others applaud the reporter for not caving to Jackson’s demand. Hamilton says that his decision was in the best interest of the show and the network.

“Whatever the video’s doing today, making the rounds, it’s not as bad as it would be if I had actually said it,” he says. “The last thing that my affiliate needs is one of their reporters going around saying the n-word and broadcasting it everywhere.”

While it’d be easy to harbor some resentment for the provocation, Hamilton says that ultimately there’s no hard feelings between him and Jackson. “He doesn’t suffer any fools, and he’s the kind of guy I feel like I have to step up my game as a reporter,” he says. “I look forward to interviewing him again.”

Watch the video below — Jackson’s segment starts at 13:55:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=j3b2dH6n3Qg# (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=j3b2dH6n3Qg#)!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 02, 2013, 02:52:23 pm
Samuel L. Jackson dares interviewer to say the n-word -- VIDEO
[url]http://popwatch.ew.com/2013/01/02/samuel-l-jackson-django-nword/[/url] ([url]http://popwatch.ew.com/2013/01/02/samuel-l-jackson-django-nword/[/url])

No one knows how to make white men squirm quite like Samuel L. Jackson.

A post on Reddit last night has unearthed a prime example. Two weeks ago, the Django Unchained cast sat down with Jake Hamilton, host of Houston’s Emmy-winning film show Jake’s Takes, at a press junket. Things went smoothly enough until Hamilton approached Jackson with a question about the movie’s controversial use of the “n-word.” Jackson insisted that Hamilton, who is white, say the word out loud; after Hamilton repeatedly refused, they moved on. It was uncomfortable.

“The most awkward moment was just seeing everyone in the room freeze, and waiting to see what my reaction was going to be,” Hamilton says today.

The internet reaction has been mixed. Many commenters claim that Hamilton should have simply said the word, while others applaud the reporter for not caving to Jackson’s demand. Hamilton says that his decision was in the best interest of the show and the network.

“Whatever the video’s doing today, making the rounds, it’s not as bad as it would be if I had actually said it,” he says. “The last thing that my affiliate needs is one of their reporters going around saying the n-word and broadcasting it everywhere.”

While it’d be easy to harbor some resentment for the provocation, Hamilton says that ultimately there’s no hard feelings between him and Jackson. “He doesn’t suffer any fools, and he’s the kind of guy I feel like I have to step up my game as a reporter,” he says. “I look forward to interviewing him again.”

Watch the video below — Jackson’s segment starts at 13:55:
[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=j3b2dH6n3Qg#[/url] ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=j3b2dH6n3Qg#[/url])!
Then dont have the balls to ask that type of question if you dont have the balls actually say it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 02, 2013, 04:04:56 pm
^
I think that's easier said than done. If the reporter didn't want to say it then he was right to refuse Jackson. If he had caved in, now he's on TV for all time, saying that word. It might hurt his career on down the road, first for saying the word and then for caving into an interviewee.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: JLI Jesse on January 02, 2013, 05:40:41 pm
^
I think that's easier said than done. If the reporter didn't want to say it then he was right to refuse Jackson. If he had caved in, now he's on TV for all time, saying that word. It might hurt his career on down the road, first for saying the word and then for caving into an interviewee.

If he says the word then all we will read in headlines is that a TV host made a racist statement, without any background on why.  Sadly, that's how the internet seems to work.  He was smart to stick to his guns.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 02, 2013, 05:59:39 pm
^
I think that's easier said than done. If the reporter didn't want to say it then he was right to refuse Jackson. If he had caved in, now he's on TV for all time, saying that word. It might hurt his career on down the road, first for saying the word and then for caving into an interviewee.
Then maybe just maybe one shouldn't be asking questions of controversy like this. Everyone knows that this word comes at a price. I am still trying to figure out is why that saying "nigger" throughout a film about slavery is a problem? Yes it is a word of hurt and suffering. You can tell Jackson was frustrated having to answer that question. He probably had to deal with that question more than once.

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Marvelous on January 02, 2013, 09:26:32 pm
Yea, J-Man I can totally see it, that's the media. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 03, 2013, 03:28:26 pm
^
I think that's easier said than done. If the reporter didn't want to say it then he was right to refuse Jackson. If he had caved in, now he's on TV for all time, saying that word. It might hurt his career on down the road, first for saying the word and then for caving into an interviewee.
Then maybe just maybe one shouldn't be asking questions of controversy like this. Everyone knows that this word comes at a price. I am still trying to figure out is why that saying "nigger" throughout a film about slavery is a problem? Yes it is a word of hurt and suffering. You can tell Jackson was frustrated having to answer that question. He probably had to deal with that question more than once.

From what I have read, most of the criticism regarding the n-word is not it's usage, but it's the excessive usage. Heck, Tarantino had to get just one more in there even after the credits rolled. Geez, there were other historically appropriate racial epithets besides the n-word and a couple others were actually used in the film, but Tarantino had to go n-word overboard. The subject matter, the overuse of the n-word, and past controversies regarding Tarantino and its usage were bound to make for a combustible mix. And the historical accuracy defense  for it's overuse is shaky when you consider that the idea of a freed black bounty hunter roaming the antebellum South is already historically inaccurate, as far as I know. We know that Mandingo fighting has not been historically proven and I recently learned that even dynamite was invented in the 1860s, after the film. So if Tarantino can play around with history on those matters, he didn't have used the n-word so much.

Jackson had to know going in that a film like this was going to controversial and that he would like get questions of this nature. The controversy is helping sell tickets and keeping people talking so he can relieve his frustration by buying a new house or something.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 03, 2013, 05:43:32 pm
The "excessive usage" That's bullsh*t. Jeez I hate to go there but this "PC" thing that many have a tendency to whine about fits the bill here.
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 03, 2013, 07:17:12 pm
The Sam Jackson scene where he 'hugs' the Leonardo character will live forever more in infamy...such a valuable lesson.

But....Seeing Reggie's name in the opening credits was a personal thrill.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/us/a-soaring-homicide-rate-a-divide-in-chicago.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0&ref=us (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/us/a-soaring-homicide-rate-a-divide-in-chicago.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0&ref=us)

They were talking about the Black on Black crime in the Ghettoes of Chicago...wondering just what is the root cause.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/us/a-soaring-homicide-rate-a-divide-in-chicago.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0&ref=us (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/us/a-soaring-homicide-rate-a-divide-in-chicago.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0&ref=us)

The Sam Jackson scene where he 'hugs' the Leonardo character will live forever more in infamy...such a valuable lesson.

Daddy I want good hair

Nigger please.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on January 04, 2013, 12:02:20 am
I have one thing to say "Django has made an impact both positive and negative, the thing is Ya'll still talking about it" and that is the point.  :o
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Magic Wand on January 04, 2013, 06:47:33 am
The "excessive usage" That's bullsh*t. Jeez I hate to go there but this "PC" thing that many have a tendency to whine about fits the bill here.

BOOM!




Who the hell are these niggaz sitting up in the cinema COUNTING n-words?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: JLI Jesse on January 04, 2013, 07:14:50 am
The "excessive usage" That's bullsh*t. Jeez I hate to go there but this "PC" thing that many have a tendency to whine about fits the bill here.

BOOM!




Who the hell are these niggaz sitting up in the cinema COUNTING n-words?


The only scene that struck me as using the word excessivly (if I am even remembering it correctly) was the initial scene between Christopher Waltz and Don Johnson.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 04, 2013, 08:08:22 am
I've been meaning to see this movie and I may have to make a call to boo to see if she is interested.  Cuz mang I mean one movie we should be pissed out is the "Nina" film where they are darkening the skin of Zoe and giving her a bigger nose.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on January 04, 2013, 08:37:01 am
 :o word count. The N-word ha ha ha
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on January 04, 2013, 08:55:04 am
African Americans Turn Out in Force for Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained'

4:41 PM PST 1/2/2013 by Pamela McClintock

Debate over multiple uses of the N-word in "Django" doesn't appear to be dampening interest in the film.

Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained -- starring Jamie Foxx as a slave in the pre-Civil War South -- is doing strong business among African-American moviegoers.

But much as Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds sanctified violence against Nazis, Django targets another bad guy nobody can sympathize with -- a slave owner. When Foxx's character is freed by a bounty hunter, played by Christoph Waltz, the duo go after Leonardo DiCaprio's character, the ruthless master of a plantation.

Opening on Christmas Day, 42 percent of Django's initial audience was black, according to exit polling data. TWC estimates that the percentage now is holding steady at about 30 percent, while a look at the top-performing theaters for Django further confirms that it has crossed over, playing to both white and black moviegoers.

"Django is playing well to African-Americans and to audiences across the board. You can't have these kind of numbers otherwise. It's getting everybody," TWC president of distribution Erik Lomis said.

Django has grossed $77.8 million so far in North America and has a strong shot at becoming Tarantino's most successful film at the domestic box office, eclipsing the $120 million earned by Inglourious Basterds in 2009. Sony is TWC's partner on Django and will handle the movie internationally.

Of Django's top 10-grossing theaters, three cater heavily to African-Americans: The Cinemark Egyptian 24 in Baltimore, the AMC Hoffman Center in Alexandria, Va., and the AMC Southlake 24 in Atlanta. And another three draw a mixed audience, including the AMC Empire 25 in New York City and the Regal Atlantic Stadium 16 in Atlanta.

Other top 10 theaters for Django include AMC Regal Union Square in New York City and the ArcLight in Sherman Oaks. While these locations nearly always make the list of top-grossing theaters for any given film, the Egyptian and Hoffman Center don't as a rule pop up unless a movie crosses over, such as The Blind Side.

For example, none of the top 10 theaters for Django's fellow holiday releases The Hobbit: An Unepexpected Journey or Les Miserables are in heavily black communities.

There's no racial breakdown for the recent Denzel Washington drama Flight, though the Egyptian was the only black theater making the top 10 list.

Conversely, Foxx's Ray, released in 2004, played to a predominately black audience.

When testing Django, TWC held two simultaneous screenings in New York. One audience was made up of African-Americans, while the other was a mixed audience (about 15 percent was African-American). The film received top, identical scores from the two audiences.

Just before Christmas, Spike Lee publicly chastised Tarantino for being "disrespectful" of black poeple and called for a boycott of Django.

Tarantino has maintained that he won't be influenced by what he calls social criticism. "I believe in what I'm doing wholeheartedly and passionately. It's my job to ignore that," he said in a December interview with THR.
.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 04, 2013, 10:06:20 am
Of Django's top 10-grossing theaters, three cater heavily to African-Americans: The Cinemark Egyptian 24 in Baltimore,
Used to be the only theater the wife and I would go to a few years back, until the "ghetto" and "white trash" element started showing up. For some strange reason, I like to hear the movie I'm watching. Really nice layout, though.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 04, 2013, 05:16:17 pm
The "excessive usage" That's bullsh*t. Jeez I hate to go there but this "PC" thing that many have a tendency to whine about fits the bill here.

I recommend you check out the film first before you go after the all too convenient "PC police".  I think that political correctness has become a dreaded boogeyman these days to excuse inappropriate or disrespectful comments and words.

I saw the film twice and I did think Tarantino could've used more restraint in the words usage, though I still enjoyed the movie. You don't have to use a word a million times to get the point across. If nothing else, change up the vocabulary a little.

As for the Nina Simone movie, some criticism of that has already begun and it will likely intensify the closer that film comes to being released.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 05, 2013, 12:37:38 am

I recommend you check out the film first before you go after the all too convenient "PC police".  I think that political correctness has become a dreaded boogeyman these days to excuse inappropriate or disrespectful comments and words.

I saw the film twice and I did think Tarantino could've used more restraint in the words usage, though I still enjoyed the movie. You don't have to use a word a million times to get the point across. If nothing else, change up the vocabulary a little.

As for the Nina Simone movie, some criticism of that has already begun and it will likely intensify the closer that film comes to being released.
I'll see the movie but I wont have those expectations of "usage" of a certain word. I'll look at the movie out of enjoyment. Honestly I would have prefer the movie to go hard like that since it is dealing with a very serious and ugly past. I'm sorry but it wasnt pretty.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on January 05, 2013, 03:14:30 am
Hmm... I wonder are some action figures on the way?  That would be cool..  ake sure to include a couple special weapons for each.  Django can have a whip, a pistol and rifle.


...heard you loud & clear, bredren... man, fantastic...

(http://collider.com/wp-content/uploads/django-unchained-toys-action-figure-dolls-600x432.jpg)


(http://collider.com/wp-content/uploads/django-unchained-toys-action-figure-dolls-jamie-foxx-365x600.jpg)cool
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on January 05, 2013, 04:49:59 am
DC, huh.... interesting... jim lee.... stfu....

i didn't see the n-word in the comic... wow, that would be fun to see in print....


(http://comicbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/django-unchained-1-cover.jpg)

(http://comicbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/django-unchained-page-1.jpg)

(http://)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 05, 2013, 04:55:44 am

I recommend you check out the film first before you go after the all too convenient "PC police".  I think that political correctness has become a dreaded boogeyman these days to excuse inappropriate or disrespectful comments and words.

I saw the film twice and I did think Tarantino could've used more restraint in the words usage, though I still enjoyed the movie. You don't have to use a word a million times to get the point across. If nothing else, change up the vocabulary a little.

As for the Nina Simone movie, some criticism of that has already begun and it will likely intensify the closer that film comes to being released.
I'll see the movie but I wont have those expectations of "usage" of a certain word. I'll look at the movie out of enjoyment. Honestly I would have prefer the movie to go hard like that since it is dealing with a very serious and ugly past. I'm sorry but it wasnt pretty.

No one film,or really any number of films can capture the horror of slavery. That being said, Tarantino doesn't shy away from showing some of that brutality. I'm sure you are aware that some people are just as critical of that violence. One black reviewer I read, Kelli Goff, was more concerned about that violence than the usage of the n-word. So, I do think the film goes hard, or would've even without using the n-word so exhaustively.

But like I said before, I liked the movie, I just thought that Tarantino didn't have to use the n-word so much, though its usage didn't offend me that much since I went to see it twice and bought the soundtrack, which is also laced with the n-word, from what I have listened to thus far. All that being said, I can empathize with people who have concerns about the usage of that word in the film. I can see how it isn't easy to take or listen to, coupled with the at times graphic violence in the film and the touchy subject matter.

Apex,

Thanks for posting the toys and comics pics. I know the toys are going to be too expensive but I wouldn't mind having that Django. Since the movie turned out better than I expected, I'll probably buy the comic, but just wait until it comes out as a trade.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on January 05, 2013, 12:14:03 pm
LOVE LOVE LOVE the action figures. Wow guys you are AWESOME! Emperorjones I am glad you saw the movie (twice). Nice.  :D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 05, 2013, 04:58:53 pm
DC, huh.... interesting... jim lee.... stfu....

i didn't see the n-word in the comic... wow, that would be fun to see in print....

Maybe you have a different version than mine, because "nigger" IS in thecomic (Digital and Print copies).
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on January 05, 2013, 09:33:54 pm
even more so....

must add to collection...

hey, hats-off to John Legend's - "Who Did That To You?" from the soundtrack...  powerful song.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 06, 2013, 03:30:02 pm

   A note about authenticity -

    Django & Schultz are both packing too much firepower. There's a scene where both characters are wielding the iconic, Winchester Repeating Rifle. The shoulder fired weapon is known as one of the "guns that won the West". The earliest versions of the Winchester are from 1865 or 1866 {a few years after the film takes place}. I think the models from the film are the famous 1873 model. The Winchesters are used in the scenes/sequences of Django & Schultz putting down a group of criminals on horseback {from the "Winter" segment of the film.

   A minor detail. Most filmgoers would never notice.

 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 06, 2013, 04:40:07 pm

   A note about authenticity -

    Django & Schultz are both packing too much firepower. There's a scene where both characters are wielding the iconic, Winchester Repeating Rifle. The shoulder fired weapon is known as one of the "guns that won the West". The earliest versions of the Winchester are from 1865 or 1866 {a few years after the film takes place}. I think the models from the film are the famous 1873 model. The Winchesters are used in the scenes/sequences of Django & Schultz putting down a group of criminals on horseback {from the "Winter" segment of the film.

   A minor detail. Most filmgoers would never notice.

 






'Django Unchained' takes place before the Civil War actually began.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 06, 2013, 04:56:14 pm

   A note about authenticity -

    Django & Schultz are both packing too much firepower. There's a scene where both characters are wielding the iconic, Winchester Repeating Rifle. The shoulder fired weapon is known as one of the "guns that won the West". The earliest versions of the Winchester are from 1865 or 1866 {a few years after the film takes place}. I think the models from the film are the famous 1873 model. The Winchesters are used in the scenes/sequences of Django & Schultz putting down a group of criminals on horseback {from the "Winter" segment of the film.

   A minor detail. Most filmgoers would never notice.

 






'Django Unchained' takes place before the Civil War actually began.

   Yes.

  That's my point. In this one section of the film Django & Schultz are using firearms that were NOT in use at the time. The other rifles and pistols seem fine.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 06, 2013, 05:01:35 pm

Yes.

  That's my point. In this one section of the film Django & Schultz are using firearms that were NOT in use at the time. The other rifles and pistols seem fine.




I haven't seen the movie yet (in due time) but I have to ask:


Was there any reference at all to the American Civil War to clue the audience in what period in the timeline this movie takes place?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 06, 2013, 05:06:32 pm


  Yes.

    There is an onscreen note stating the season & year...."two years before the Civil War".


Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 06, 2013, 05:45:58 pm

   A note about authenticity -

    Django & Schultz are both packing too much firepower. There's a scene where both characters are wielding the iconic, Winchester Repeating Rifle. The shoulder fired weapon is known as one of the "guns that won the West". The earliest versions of the Winchester are from 1865 or 1866 {a few years after the film takes place}. I think the models from the film are the famous 1873 model. The Winchesters are used in the scenes/sequences of Django & Schultz putting down a group of criminals on horseback {from the "Winter" segment of the film.

   A minor detail. Most filmgoers would never notice.

 

I certainly didn't. Thanks for pointing that out.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Pantherfan on January 07, 2013, 03:49:39 am
I seen the film this weekend. It reminded of Fred "The Hammer" Williamson's flicks back in the seventies. Who here has seen Boss Nigga? I wouldn't mind seeing a sequel of Django Unchained either set during the Civil War or after it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on January 07, 2013, 07:06:24 am
MOTHER JONES:

In Defense of Django
—By Adam Serwer
| Mon Jan. 7, 2013 3:01 AM PST5.
Jamie Foxx as Django in the new Quentin Tarantino flick.
WARNING: This post contains multiple spoilers.


Every time Jamie Foxx’s character Django rides into town in Quentin Tarantino's new Spaghetti Western Django Unchained, set against the backdrop of American chattel slavery, someone asks some variation of the question, "What is that nigger doing on a horse?"

This is much a threat as an inquiry. Almost every character who asks it is involved in trying to tear Django off the horse, because a black man on a horse is a threat to a strict racial hierarchy that even those who cannot afford a horse hold dear. It's a question that Tarantino might even assume his own audience members are asking, since the iconic American gunslinger is nearly always white. It's also a question that might well have been asked by the protagonists of America's classic Westerns, from Rooster Cogburn to Ethan Edwards to Josey Wales—all former Confederate soldiers who committed treason in defense of slavery.
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The lionization of the Lost Cause and the Confederacy runs like an inedible streak of gristle through the revenge Western genre, where those who fought to protect the rights of whites to own blacks as property are humanized while those who fought to preserve the Union are recalled as monsters. Blacks, if they appear, serve merely to bolster the lie that the Civil War wasn't about slavery. The trope of the wronged former Confederate is alive and well, whether excised from its historical context (Firefly) or hilariously rationalized for new audiences (Hell on Wheels).

Django kills white people like he's trying to make up for a century of on-screen genocide in Western films.Django is an inversion of the genre, where the loner seeking revenge is a former slave instead of a former Confederate; where the alien savages who stole his life from him are white, as is the sidekick with the nonexistent past: Tarantino hasn't simply flipped the notion of a Western hero, he's even given him an inverted Magical Negro sidekick in the character of King Shultz, a German abolitionist bounty hunter who appears out of the ether to free Django, and dies to facilitate his revenge—much as the death of Ned Logan (Morgan Freeman) sets off Clint Eastwood’s character in Unforgiven. Except in Django, deserves has everything to do with it. Django kills white people like he's trying to make up for a century of on-screen genocide in Western films where black, Latino, and Native American antagonists are treated like disposable pocket litter. The only white man in Tarantino's Mississippi who survives meeting Django is played by Franco Nero, his Italian namesake.

If the box office take is any indication, Tarantino has not only accomplished all of this genre-busting, but has managed to do it while making white people enjoy watching what is essentially a two-hour-plus lecture on racism in American film, an extended f*ck you to DW Griffith and John Ford, John Wayne and Clint Eastwood.

The film has provoked the usual controversy over language, violence, and historical accuracy—this is Tarantino, after all, and vivid cinematic depictions of American slavery are so rare in film that Django takes on outsize importance. It is also one of the few films to convey how arbitrary, cruel and brutal slavery was—Kerry Washington, who plays Django's wife Brumhilda, told Vibe that she had initially thought the gothic metal masks seen on slaves throughout the film were Tarantino's invention. (They were not.) Tarantino himself is aware that he hasn't even come close to portraying the horrors of slavery, telling an audience, "As bad as some of the sh*t is in this film, a lot worse sh*t was going on. This is the nice version."

 The acclaimed director Spike Lee slammed the film as disrespectful to slavery without having seen it. Writer Ishmael Reed called it an "abomination" and suggested white people avoid producing fiction about slavery. Part of the reason for the controversy is that the film is peppered with the word "nigger" throughout. It's hard to take seriously most critics who complain that their ears are too delicate to stand the repetition of such words—I assume that what guys like the esteemed film critic Matt Drudge most object to is white people being portrayed as overtly racist in a world where the line between racism and not racism has been reduced to whether or not one uses certain naughty words.

More worthy of consideration is Jelani Cobb in the New Yorker accusing the director of "racial ventriloquism, a kind of camouflage that allows Tarantino to use the word without recrimination." But Tarantino's previous offerings make far riper targets: The racial ventriloquism charge is more fittingly applied to a white person who "gets away" with using the loathsome word by channeling it through a black character. In Django it is racist whites who spout the word most frequently, thus obliterating any racial alibi.

The film's greatest weakness, particularly given its topic of resistance, is its lack of interest in gender.Django, like many Tarantino films, also has been criticized as cartoonishly violent, but it is only so when Django is killing slave owners and overseers. The violence against slaves is always appropriately terrifying. This, if nothing else, puts Django in the running for Tarantino's best film, the first one in which he discovers violence as horror rather than just spectacle. When Shultz turns his head away from a slave being torn apart by dogs, Django explains to Calvin Candie—the plantation owner played by Leo DiCaprio—that Shultz just isn't used to Americans.

Django works best as film criticism; it certainly doesn't work as history. A key plot point, wherein Django and Shultz pretend to be a slave traders seeking a champion "Mandingo fighter" from Candie, is ahistorical—slave fights to the death were relatively rare because slaves were expensive. (Tarantino appears to have drawn the idea from the 1970s blaxploitation flick Mandingo.) As Cobb points out in his critique, were this our only exposure to slavery, we might assume that violent resistance among slaves was rare, never mind the history of blacks fighting alongside the Union (Django is set two years before the Civil War) and the many rebellions and escape attempts that occurred before the war.

Cobb asks, "Is this how Americans actually perceive slavery?" and answers sadly that, yes, the idea that most blacks quietly acquiesced to slavery is pervasive and may even be enhanced by Django, despite Brumhilda's attempts to escape on her own or the scene at the beginning of the film in which a group of slaves kill a trapped slaver. I generally agree with Cobb on this question, though he fails to identify a similar problem with Tarantino's 2009 ethnic revenge flick, Inglourious Basterds. Both films might leave the impression that that Jews and blacks could have ended their persecution if only they had been gangsta guerilla superheroes.

Django's greatest weakness, particularly given the topic of resistance, are its women characters. The director of Kill Bill should have been able to make Brumhilda more than a damsel in distress, particularly since Shoshanna, the main female protagonist in Basterds, not only engineers Hitler's death but defies both the Nazis and her own Jewish heritage by falling in love with a non-Jew.

Issues of gender were central to slavery—modern gynecology began with nonconsensual medical experiments on enslaved woman—but Tarantino's lingering hang-ups about masculinity remain a severe blind spot. We learn that the shuffling of Samuel Jackson's Stephen is an act, but I kept waiting to learn whether the same was true of Candie's slave concubine Sheba—the film never considers her perspective important enough to make it clear.

Casting Samuel Jackson as a superficially subservient house negro was an act of great cinematic irony.The flipside of Cobb's argument, of course, is that given our general ignorance about slave resistance, Django's audiences may be learning of it for the first time and be inspired to learn more. For Django to communicate the misperception that slaves did not resist would require some initial knowledge that they resisted more than the movie suggests—Cobb himself notes that few people seem aware of any slave resistance at all.

Perhaps most disturbing to Cobb is that the primary antagonist in the end is not Candie, but his self-serving house slave Stephen, Jackson's character. Cobb complains that "a white director holds an obsequious black slave up for ridicule," and in doing so is "disrespectful to the history of slavery." The image of white folks in movie theaters guffawing at souls being ground to dust under the foundations of American civilization leaves a bitter taste. Even if Stephen is monstrous, what right have they to judge him, let alone laugh?

Part of the joke, it seems, is that casting Jackson as a superficially subservient house negro was an act of great cinematic irony. As Jackson put it in a recent interview, "Fifteen years ago I could have played Django, now I can't. Now you (Tarantino) want me to play the most hated Negro in cinematic history." Stephen is not simply some live-action Uncle Ruckus; he is as openly defiant of Candie as his mask will allow. When he summons Candie into a parlor to reveal Django and Shultz' plot to free Brumhilda, he sips from a snifter of brandy and his Uncle Ben accent is gone. Later, we learn that even his limp is fake. Unlike the happy slaves of prior films, Stephen doesn't appear to have any personal love for Candie, but the owner facilitates some limited freedom for Stephen because without him, Candie cannot hold his racial caste system together. As Jackson describes it, Stephen is the plantation's "Dick Cheney," wearing the mask that grins and lies only because it affords him some measure of agency within a system meant to deny it. He's the twisted mirror image of Django, because while Stephen is smart and capable enough to subvert the system, he has instead chosen to benefit from it. This provides narrative symmetry for Tarantino, but it also raises a question that the director seems ill-prepared to handle. Stephen's internalizing of his master's crank scientific racism is easy enough to understand, but as Cobb points out, it isn't not funny.

Flawed as Django may be, it remains a deeply satisfying rebuke to racism in Western cinema.Flawed as Django may be, it remains a deeply satisfying rebuke to racism in Western cinema. Cobb writes that "a response to slavery—even a cowardly, dishonorable one like what we witness with Stephen—highlights the depravity of the institution." I couldn't agree more, and that's why I think Django is far superior to Basterds. Nazis are the original disposable foreign antagonists, whereas Django's enemies are a part of American history and of a type occasionally viewed as Western heroes. Basterds gives Jews a taste of revenge fantasy by "killin Nazeez," but it's uninterested in the system of global anti-Semitism that led to the Holocaust. With Django, the institution is the villain. We are constantly reminded, visually and narratively, that it that it is slavery that twists hearts, shatters lives, and erases families.

Even Schultz, the abolitionist sidekick, tells Django that he's relieved that Django, being a slave, cannot refuse to help him. Tarantino is saying that no white person, no matter how good, can extract themselves from a system so pervasive. No one—no one—walks away from Django with the perception that slavery was anything but monstrous. Perhaps lovers of Westerns may even walk out understanding what some of their most memorable "heroes" were actually fighting for.

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on January 07, 2013, 07:45:31 am
Quote
Even Schultz, the abolitionist sidekick, tells Django that he's relieved that Django, being a slave, cannot refuse to help him. Tarantino is saying that no white person, no matter how good, can extract themselves from a system so pervasive. No one—no one—walks away from Django with the perception that slavery was anything but monstrous. Perhaps lovers of Westerns may even walk out understanding what some of their most memorable "heroes" were actually fighting for.
The movie was worth seeing and what ever one walks away with, it stirred something inside. That said "Swing down sweet chariot stop and let "it" ride". I tend to quote George Clinton songs. He was a master at saying $#!!. :D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on January 07, 2013, 09:03:25 am
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Oh man, I'm (more or less) glad this movie didn't come out back when I was in high school.. I don't know if I'd be here today.. I know mad fights would have been started..   "Whatcha call me?"  Bapp!!   For whatever reason, when the plantation house blew up I saw my old high-school building in its place, lol..  ;D  (Yes, sometimes I'm that far gone..)

..Oscar nominations are in a few weeks, right?  They'd better recognize!

Side note 1:  Jamie for a (Supreme Power) Nighthawk movie!
Side note 2: Kudos for the Tupac/James Brown posthumous collaboration; if 'pac were alive I know he'd have wanted in on this movie..
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 07, 2013, 06:45:18 pm
even more so....

must add to collection...

hey, hats-off to John Legend's - "Who Did That To You?" from the soundtrack...  powerful song.

What's really kool about the comic, is that it's the first draft of the movie. Basically, "Django Uncut".
For example, the dialogue in panels 2-4 is not in the movie:
(https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/540296_4451387040070_189066939_n.jpg)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 08, 2013, 09:55:11 am
Damn... :)

The artwork on "Django"  is so nicely layed out.

Where'd you get your issue of "Django", Kristopher, from a comic shop or directly from the Hudlin Entertainment online store?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 08, 2013, 10:02:59 am
Damn... :)

The artwork on "Django"  is so nicely layed out.

Where'd you get your issue of "Django", Kristopher, from a comic shop or directly from the Hudlin Entertainment online store?

I bought the digital copy from Comixology. I picked up a hardcopy from a local store.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 08, 2013, 10:08:28 am
I bought the digital copy from Comixology. I picked up a hardcopy from a local store.






Hey, thanks! :)


Good!
I want to see if I could get a copy from Barnes & Noble or Books-A-million around my way.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 08, 2013, 02:06:29 pm

  "Even Schultz, the abolitionist sidekick, tells Django that he's relieved that Django, being a slave, cannot refuse to help him. Tarantino is saying that no white person, no matter how good, can extract themselves from a system so pervasive. No one—no one—walks away from Django with the perception that slavery was anything but monstrous. Perhaps lovers of Westerns may even walk out understanding what some of their most memorable "heroes" were actually fighting for."
   

  ......Adam Serwer. From the Mother Jones article review.


  Hmmm?  "Abolitionist sidekick"?.

   That wasn't my take on this character. I felt that Schultz was motivated by more of a personal angle; not the most pressing social justice issue of that age. Did I just misread the character?

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Rockscissorspaper on January 08, 2013, 05:54:36 pm
   Hmmm?  "Abolitionist sidekick"?.

   That wasn't my take on this character. I felt that Schultz was motivated by more of a personal angle; not the most pressing social justice issue of that age. Did I just misread the character?

Nah. Maybe if he'd lived, he would have become an actual abolitionist. He was just a bounty hunter who didn't like slavery.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Vic Vega on January 09, 2013, 08:06:55 am

  "Even Schultz, the abolitionist sidekick, tells Django that he's relieved that Django, being a slave, cannot refuse to help him. Tarantino is saying that no white person, no matter how good, can extract themselves from a system so pervasive. No one—no one—walks away from Django with the perception that slavery was anything but monstrous. Perhaps lovers of Westerns may even walk out understanding what some of their most memorable "heroes" were actually fighting for."
   

  ......Adam Serwer. From the Mother Jones article review.


  Hmmm?  "Abolitionist sidekick"?.

   That wasn't my take on this character. I felt that Schultz was motivated by more of a personal angle; not the most pressing social justice issue of that age. Did I just misread the character?

Not at all.

Schultz hated slavery and thought it was evil, but it was a personal objection for him NOT a dogma.

He wasn't John Brown, killing slavers wherever he saw them. He helped Django because it advanced his interests to do so. He freed Django later because he was a decent man.

Had the slavers at the beginning of the movies just sold him Django he wouldn't have killed them and he would have left the other "poor devils" to thier fate. Since they got in his way he killed his attacker and let the slaves who he sympathised with kill the other one for him and escape.

If Schultz had been a gunslinging abolitionst, he and Django would have just stormed Candieland by night and taken Broomhilda in a hail of gun(and considering how scary good they both Schultz and Django were with guns they could have won that way).

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 09, 2013, 08:37:11 am

  Re: "Django Unchained" - the comic book

   Couple of things....

     1} Should there be a thread in another section about the book? Yes, the book and the film are related. But, they are different pieces of work. Is discussing the film and comic in the same thread making things a little too cluttered?

    2} The DC and Vertigo FB pages announced that Issue #1 is going back for a 2nd printing. Don't fret if you missed out.

  and 3} I just checked with my FLCS. Issue #2 has been pushed BACK. I'm told that won't be out until 2/13/13.

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 09, 2013, 08:40:01 am

  "Even Schultz, the abolitionist sidekick, tells Django that he's relieved that Django, being a slave, cannot refuse to help him. Tarantino is saying that no white person, no matter how good, can extract themselves from a system so pervasive. No one—no one—walks away from Django with the perception that slavery was anything but monstrous. Perhaps lovers of Westerns may even walk out understanding what some of their most memorable "heroes" were actually fighting for."
   

  ......Adam Serwer. From the Mother Jones article review.


  Hmmm?  "Abolitionist sidekick"?.

   That wasn't my take on this character. I felt that Schultz was motivated by more of a personal angle; not the most pressing social justice issue of that age. Did I just misread the character?

Not at all.

Schultz hated slavery and thought it was evil, but it was a personal objection for him NOT a dogma.

He wasn't John Brown, killing slavers wherever he saw them. He helped Django because it advanced his interests to do so. He freed Django later because he was a decent man.

Had the slavers at the beginning of the movies just sold him Django he wouldn't have killed them and he would have left the other "poor devils" to thier fate. Since they got in his way he killed his attacker and let the slaves who he sympathised with kill the other one for him and escape.

If Schultz had been a gunslinging abolitionst, he and Django would have just stormed Candieland by night and taken Broomhilda in a hail of gun(and considering how scary good they both Schultz and Django were with guns they could have won that way).

I agree...until the last part. They were good, but not THAT good. Way too many guns on Candieland, Schultz was even a little trepidant at Django's boldness when they were riding with Candie and his men to the Big House. No way they were sneaking in and out there, they didn't even know where Broomhilda was.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Vic Vega on January 09, 2013, 09:09:32 am

  "Even Schultz, the abolitionist sidekick, tells Django that he's relieved that Django, being a slave, cannot refuse to help him. Tarantino is saying that no white person, no matter how good, can extract themselves from a system so pervasive. No one—no one—walks away from Django with the perception that slavery was anything but monstrous. Perhaps lovers of Westerns may even walk out understanding what some of their most memorable "heroes" were actually fighting for."
   

  ......Adam Serwer. From the Mother Jones article review.


  Hmmm?  "Abolitionist sidekick"?.

   That wasn't my take on this character. I felt that Schultz was motivated by more of a personal angle; not the most pressing social justice issue of that age. Did I just misread the character?

Not at all.

Schultz hated slavery and thought it was evil, but it was a personal objection for him NOT a dogma.

He wasn't John Brown, killing slavers wherever he saw them. He helped Django because it advanced his interests to do so. He freed Django later because he was a decent man.

Had the slavers at the beginning of the movies just sold him Django he wouldn't have killed them and he would have left the other "poor devils" to thier fate. Since they got in his way he killed his attacker and let the slaves who he sympathised with kill the other one for him and escape.

If Schultz had been a gunslinging abolitionst, he and Django would have just stormed Candieland by night and taken Broomhilda in a hail of gun(and considering how scary good they both Schultz and Django were with guns they could have won that way).

I agree...until the last part. They were good, but not THAT good. Way too many guns on Candieland, Schultz was even a little trepidant at Django's boldness when they were riding with Candie and his men to the Big House. No way they were sneaking in and out there, they didn't even know where Broomhilda was.

Good point.

They would have had to FIND Broomhilda before they could rescue her and Candieland is HUGE.

I was only looking at the fact that Django killed about 10 of those guys by himself in the drawing room standoff (I figured Schultz was nearly as good with a gun) and both Django and Schultz were for all intents and purposes expert snipers.

They would have wreaked bloody havoc on Candieland, but would have died without even finding Broomhilda (if she didn't get killed in the crossfire).

They really had no choice but to use the subterfuge that they ended up using.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 09, 2013, 09:37:27 am
They really had no choice but to use the subterfuge that they ended up using.

I keep thing about that. They knew who bought her, it was a matter of public record. Why not just make the same ridiculous offer on a 300 dollar slave? "I understand, you have a slave that speaks my native language, which is quite unusual in this part of the country. I'm prepared to make you an offer you can't refuse for her." I mean, I really liked the movie, and will see it a few more times, but still... ???
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Hypestyle on January 09, 2013, 12:18:15 pm
Roger Ebert's belated review at his blog:  http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2013/01/django_unchained.html (http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2013/01/django_unchained.html)
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 09, 2013, 01:23:46 pm

Quote from: Reginald Hudlin

I don't look for Marvel or DC to give me the true satisfaction of what black comics can be any more than I look to Hollywood studios to deliver what black cinema can be.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

"When measured on the yardstick of silky hair, Blacks will always fall short"...Muhammad Smith, 2005.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Vic Vega on January 09, 2013, 02:17:02 pm
They really had no choice but to use the subterfuge that they ended up using.

I keep thing about that. They knew who bought her, it was a matter of public record. Why not just make the same ridiculous offer on a 300 dollar slave? "I understand, you have a slave that speaks my native language, which is quite unusual in this part of the country. I'm prepared to make you an offer you can't refuse for her." I mean, I really liked the movie, and will see it a few more times, but still... ???

Schultz and Django certainly had the bank to do that.

I can only assume that Schultz was going to stiff Candie and had no intention of coughing up $12000 in any event.

Schultz would have paid Candie up front for Broomhilda( as that was a nominal sum to him) said he was going to get his lawyer for the Mandingo figther transaction, taken Broomhilda and never returned.

I guess Schultz didn't want to enrich Candie's evil (or he was a cheapskate who didn't want to part with 12 grand-take your pick).

Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 09, 2013, 02:54:58 pm
"Schultz"

Ya'know when I saw the movie "Lincoln" I couldn't bring myself to believe that the character played by Tommy Lee Jones was real. I figured it was just a tool used for fictional and dramatic effect. But at the end of the movie when the Black woman appeared to be his wife, I (and my admittedly racist self) was almost certain it was dramatic fiction.

Regardless when I got home I just had to google it....

"Thaddeus Stevens"....wow.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Lion on January 09, 2013, 02:55:59 pm
Schultz intended to stiff Candie, hence the whole Mandingo scheme.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on January 09, 2013, 06:28:08 pm
Schultz intended to stiff Candie, hence the whole Mandingo scheme.

Well okay, that makes sense.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 10, 2013, 08:14:00 am


 The Oscar Nominations are out.

 "Django Unchained" is nominated in five* categories:

    Best Picture
    Supporting Actor - Christoph Waltz
    Original Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Sound Editing

   * I'm trying to find out if the film is up for the costume design category.

 Quentin Tarantino {directing} and Leonardo DiCaprio both snubbed by the nominating committee.   >:(
 
   

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on January 10, 2013, 10:19:33 am
even more so....

must add to collection...

hey, hats-off to John Legend's - "Who Did That To You?" from the soundtrack...  powerful song.

What's really kool about the comic, is that it's the first draft of the movie. Basically, "Django Uncut".
For example, the dialogue in panels 2-4 is not in the movie:
(https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/540296_4451387040070_189066939_n.jpg)

splendid!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on January 10, 2013, 10:27:05 am
Quote
Best Picture
    Supporting Actor - Christoph Waltz
    Original Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Sound Editing

   * I'm trying to find out if the film is up for the costume design category.

 Quentin Tarantino {directing} and Leonardo DiCaprio both snubbed by the nominating committee.   
 
What? Where is Jamie Foxx's name? Samuel Jackson? Congrats Mr. Hudlin. You picked a great movie and you told us so way back when.....Love it! ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Metro on January 10, 2013, 12:53:17 pm
"Schultz"
"Thaddeus Stevens"....wow.

Be sure to check out his plan for Reconstruction, too.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on January 12, 2013, 10:13:07 am
////spoiler alert/////

i was waiting....

The commercial advertising-- "Why don't they just rise up and kill the whites?"...something like that.

Well, that $old it for me.
How Tarantino answers the question & how that scene would unfold, sparked my curiosity to see the film.

"At first you had my curiosity. Now you have my attention."

...That was the million dollar question?  I thought, wait, these guys are f*ckin with us (us meaning the general public)... how would you answer?

Candie uses science & medicine to support his subservient claim...."3 dimples"...wtf... Tarantino was smart to give an 1850s answer.
At that point, I felt as though the film didn't give me the answer I was looking for. Candie answers his own question. So I didn’t count his response to be rational. Theatrical but not rational. 

I kept thinking, how could they not answer the friggin question?

Marketing Django as a concept within a concept... A black hero killing white villains and why is he the only one? Advertising Django with a question?


/////highlights/////

Dr. Schultz, feeling responsible for Django. The “Cleopatra House" & house-slave named "Sheba" (two of the worlds most powerful african women). Plus, Beethoven & Dumas…c’mon, all time classics.
Candie, a slave owner, paying homage to black culture and black contributions, simultaneously, exploiting the very people whose ingenuity, invitations & achievements he holds in the highest regard. 

This is Tarantinos most intelligent film. why? the damn question. Django re-defines the term spaghetti western.” I mean, ‘mama mia‘, the pasta is thick.

I'm glad people responded to the violence & n-word controversy/criticism like adults.  violence= it's a western. n-word= an unclassified term still in transition.
Black people still attach the "n-word" to slave-history instead of African history... Tarantino could have used a slew of words to describe slaves. I recall hearing the word “pica ninny” which is far more comically-tragic (to me) than ”nigger.”

Do we know the context & how the n-word has been bastardized?

The etymology of  the n-word (in it’s various forms & definitions) goes beyond slavery. African dialect has similar sounds & spellings… for example: Negus, Niger, Wah Ben Naga & Senegal are all african words with similar pronunciation to the n-word. Hailesse Sailiei was known as “The Great Negus Nagast” meaning King of kings.”

The n-word derives from the Portuguese meaning "black." However, the african terms for the n-word usually applied to sacred, spiritual and religious beliefs. Ironically, the term “nigger” may have been recognizable to the early-slaves (from their native languages). Hearing a foreign variation of the word may have caused slaves to respond or embrace the term. 

but... did the movie give us an answer? maybe!

i would suggest Dr. Schultz answers the million dollar question... when referring to Candie as an.... 
I think that about summed it up for me. 


Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: LGarcia on January 12, 2013, 02:10:25 pm
I am a 55 yr old Caucasian raised in a Jewish home .. married 20 yrs to Tommy a 60 yr old guy who has combined blood - Mexican paternal Greek maternal .. as of age 8 Tommy was raised by African American preacher Father Divine in Pennsylvania .. between the 2 of us we cover alot of stuff ..

We finally were able to see DJANGO and we both thoroughly enjoyed & appreciated it ..  sure there is lots to be discussed, and thats what good movies are all about after all ..

Congratulations and big bravo to those who worked together to make this film ..

Sincerely, Lori Garcia
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 12, 2013, 07:56:57 pm
I am a 55 yr old Caucasian raised in a Jewish home .. married 20 yrs to Tommy a 60 yr old guy who has combined blood - Mexican paternal Greek maternal .. as of age 8 Tommy was raised by African American preacher Father Divine in Pennsylvania .. between the 2 of us we cover alot of stuff ..

We finally were able to see DJANGO and we both thoroughly enjoyed & appreciated it ..  sure there is lots to be discussed, and thats what good movies are all about after all ..

Congratulations and big bravo to those who worked together to make this film ..

Sincerely, Lori Garcia

For one who is admittedly racist...perhaps with a small "r", the exponential explosion in diversity from the White House on down is overwhelming in a good way. Yet to hear mention of the Father Divine Hotel in my residential Philly gives me reason to pause. The Father Divine Hotel is so very symbolic of the word "Gentrification", with a capital "G". The all but racial assault on urban Public schools (excuse the nusience but that is a capital "P"), the all but racial application of drug laws, the all but certain history of Anne Frank.

Django could be so symbolic of all we dare not say.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 13, 2013, 06:38:31 am
^
Interesting that you would bring up White House diversity.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/10/does-obama-have-a-diversity-problem_n_2447586.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/10/does-obama-have-a-diversity-problem_n_2447586.html)

http://www.politico.com/story/2013/01/charlie-rangel-hits-obama-on-diversity-86005.html (http://www.politico.com/story/2013/01/charlie-rangel-hits-obama-on-diversity-86005.html)

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 13, 2013, 06:39:08 am
I am a 55 yr old Caucasian raised in a Jewish home .. married 20 yrs to Tommy a 60 yr old guy who has combined blood - Mexican paternal Greek maternal .. as of age 8 Tommy was raised by African American preacher Father Divine in Pennsylvania .. between the 2 of us we cover alot of stuff ..

We finally were able to see DJANGO and we both thoroughly enjoyed & appreciated it ..  sure there is lots to be discussed, and thats what good movies are all about after all ..

Congratulations and big bravo to those who worked together to make this film ..

Sincerely, Lori Garcia

Welcome to the board.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on January 13, 2013, 08:18:35 am
Yes, welcome Lori!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: LGarcia on January 13, 2013, 08:20:49 am
Thank you Emperorjones (& as I was getting ready to post) Thank you Reggie ..

I am a reader/lurker than a poster.  I enjoy reading others comments about subjects that interest me.

Tanksleyd - bringing up FDivine's name is very natural to me - he is a little discussed character of history - my interpretations from 20yrs of research of FD ead me to have an overall positive vs negative opinion.  His death Sept 11, 1965 resulted in a dramatic altering of his plan/s for the future of his movement - His was forward thinking and sought to unite people of all races, religions and social statuses.

I applaud those who had the ability/determination/fortitude to bring DJANGO to fruition.  I don't imagine it was an easy road.

I think it necessary people of all ages be made aware - painfully so if required - and my reason to support poetic license  - of what history is.  Movies are an important, sometimes only and often ideal avenue for that education.

I hope President Obama's long term effects include kindness emulation ... I believe that kindness is contagious and encourage those I encounter to pass it on.

If I were a voting member of SAG I would cast my vote for DJANGO!
Peace, LGarcia


Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 13, 2013, 08:24:11 am
^
Interesting that you would bring up White House diversity.

[url]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/10/does-obama-have-a-diversity-problem_n_2447586.html[/url] ([url]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/10/does-obama-have-a-diversity-problem_n_2447586.html[/url])

[url]http://www.politico.com/story/2013/01/charlie-rangel-hits-obama-on-diversity-86005.html[/url] ([url]http://www.politico.com/story/2013/01/charlie-rangel-hits-obama-on-diversity-86005.html[/url])






Looking for a contradiction?
From discussions I've read and overheard, President Obama does not have a diversity problem.
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 13, 2013, 09:04:32 am
^^^^^

More women in Congress and the Supreme Court
Blacks in total theorectical control of national law enforcement.
ala...Benghazi is a scandal??????

Such accusations are proof that at any time we can return to the ugly reality of Anne Frank.

Django could be so symbolic of all we dare not say.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Rural America loved (LOVED) socialist Roosevelt democrats until July 2, 1964.

"They will never admit it"...Alistair Cooke, 1972
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 13, 2013, 09:38:14 am
>>>Tanksleyd



Can you be more specific about how (and what) Anne Frank has to do with 'Django'?   

,,,or even the complaints about President Obama's Cabinet choices...?
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 13, 2013, 10:00:16 am
^^^^^^^^

As we search out and hunt down Trayvon Martin we ignore the growing reality of Adam Lanza.

As we search out reasons to belittle the ultimate representative of Black America (Obama) we create even more reasons to hunt out Trayvon Martin.

Cabinet choices?????? President Obama has literally lead a redefinition of diversity which is clear in all levels of society. Still he is under attack for being worthless....much as Clinton, known as the first Black president, was during his administration.

Since the final compromise of 1787, our bloodiest war, and the fact that the geographical core of opposition to Roosevelt's Socialist vision is from the old south, Race has been a driving force in American politics. And as proven by the Jews of 1930's Europe, who were known to be rich AND smart, at any time a forceful minority can come and kill our children be they named Trayvon Martin or Anne Frank. A minority that can be as crazy as Adam Lanza, The Brown Shirts or The Tea Party.

Django, and perhaps Quarentino himself, shows how violent...our bloodiest war can truly be.

Perhaps there is more to discuss.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 13, 2013, 12:07:25 pm
Perhaps there is more to discuss.




Thanks for the reply!

Definetly. :)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 13, 2013, 06:43:26 pm


  Quentin Tarantino wins the Golden Globe for Original Screenplay.

    I believe he will take home the Oscar as well.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Michael Jewett on January 13, 2013, 07:30:59 pm

  Christoph Waltz wins the Golden Globe for Supporting Actor.

  He may win the Oscar as well.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 14, 2013, 02:16:27 pm
^^^^^^^^

As we search out and hunt down Trayvon Martin we ignore the growing reality of Adam Lanza.

As we search out reasons to belittle the ultimate representative of Black America (Obama) we create even more reasons to hunt out Trayvon Martin.

Cabinet choices?????? President Obama has literally lead a redefinition of diversity which is clear in all levels of society. Still he is under attack for being worthless....much as Clinton, known as the first Black president, was during his administration.

Since the final compromise of 1787, our bloodiest war, and the fact that the geographical core of opposition to Roosevelt's Socialist vision is from the old south, Race has been a driving force in American politics. And as proven by the Jews of 1930's Europe, who were known to be rich AND smart, at any time a forceful minority can come and kill our children be they named Trayvon Martin or Anne Frank. A minority that can be as crazy as Adam Lanza, The Brown Shirts or The Tea Party.

Django, and perhaps Quarentino himself, shows how violent...our bloodiest war can truly be.

Perhaps there is more to discuss.

I'm sorry I don't see Obama as the ultimate representative of black America. I think we have got to stop giving Obama a pass on a lot of things. On one hand we say that he is the ultimate representative, the heir of MLK and the fulfillment of The Dream. Then many of these same people will slap down any criticism on Obama's record on black unemployment, education rates, mass incarceration, his aversion to racial issues, by saying he's the president of 'all America' and he's not a 'black' president. Or that he's just a politician. Which is it going to be? Is he MLK Junior Jr. or is he just another politician?

I could personally care less about this cabinet issue because what's the difference between having a black person towing the same line as a white one would in his administration. Sure it adds some color, but it doesn't change policy in any fundamental way. Like, Condi being Secretary of State. Sure, it was great for the history books, but beyond that, what did it really mean or do? How much influence did she really have?

However I do think critics shouldn't be dismissed because Cabinet appointments have long been a way to reward the coalitions that put you in office and to symbolize racial, gender progress.  It is telling that many of the major decision-making roles in the Obama White House are run  by white men, when the multiracial, multi-gender coalition that put him in office is not being reflected in the power positions. So, his Cabinet is starting to look like the cabinet of Bush II and Clinton, a reversion, not a step forward.

To me, Obama is a largely conventional politician who is acting in conventional ways. It's just his skin color and his charisma, and his great ability to describe, if not always bring forth, the better angels of our nature, that have so many black folks and progressives hearts fluttering.

I don't think Obama's elevation has led to a redefinition in any fundamental way. He is one 'exceptional Negro' who has become president, and one of the prices of doing so is to be quiet about racial issues, to go along to get along. Sure, in a surface way it is a big diversity point, but when it comes to the black masses, how much of their lives have fundamentally changed under Obama and for the better? I just refuse to believe the hype until I see the results from the supposed Great Dreamer II.

Further I don't think it's hard to find reasons to disagree with the President or to criticism him. Similar to the other Presidents, you look at what he said he's going to do and what he's done and see the discrepancies and then try to figure out why that's so. Was it outside opposition, a lack of will or vision, change in priorities, deception, or what have you, that is the cause?
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 14, 2013, 05:47:58 pm
^^^^^^

George Washington didn't chop down no Cherry Tree. Nor did John Wayne cut them off at the pass.
For me President Obama is the, a,  epitome of Black America. Much as was once true of Dorie Armstrong and Joe Louis. Besides in all these 500 years who has spoken more eloquently than Rodney King...."Can't we all just get along...".

There is a certain truth that he passed a national health plan where others have failed and with his two picks on the Supreme Court his legacy is already promised.

In fact I am excited by President Obama's current pick for Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, who does not believe in the traditional beliefs that have U.S. in a traditional rut.

Yes, I do think that President Barack Hussein Obama is all that and a bag of potato chips too.

Besides, the alternative is Django...which do you prefer?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Emperorjones on January 14, 2013, 06:30:49 pm
^
That's a false choice, a term Obama likes to use from time to time. Hey, Obama is your thing and that's cool. I feel differently. I think he is a nice guy, a good family man, and a good politician. He has a good legislative record despite dealing with a hostile Congress. Now I mean good in terms of getting legislation passed, not that all that he has passed has been good in terms of content. Some has, some hasn't, IMO.

However does all his political maneuvering have put black Americans in a stronger place than they were in 2008, I don't think so. I think that we are still in a precarious position. Now one can say, and rightly so, that that isn't all the fault or within the responsibility of Obama or any president. But with what is within his purview, I have so far not been too impressed. Thus far I think he is overrated by many blacks because he represents the ultimate insider, the greatest key to white validation and acceptance and many of us live vicariously through him, or that is what we are encouraged to do or believe, IMO, like the Obama Effect the media gushed about early in his presidency.

I'm holding out to see what the healthcare plan will ultimately do, I'm not cool with the idea of mandates right off the bat. And I wonder if the healthcare 'gains' will be undercut by entitlement reform. If Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid benefits are cut how are we going to pay for that mandated healthcare?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 15, 2013, 12:33:36 am

I'm holding out to see what the healthcare plan will ultimately do, I'm not cool with the idea of mandates right off the bat. And I wonder if the healthcare 'gains' will be undercut by entitlement reform. If Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid benefits are cut how are we going to pay for that mandated healthcare?
Cut funding in the military, war on drugs, war on terror, department of homeland security, military industrial complex, overpopulation of prisons. Pipe dream unfortunately.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 15, 2013, 06:28:21 am

I'm holding out to see what the healthcare plan will ultimately do, I'm not cool with the idea of mandates right off the bat. And I wonder if the healthcare 'gains' will be undercut by entitlement reform. If Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid benefits are cut how are we going to pay for that mandated healthcare?
Cut funding in the military, war on drugs, war on terror, department of homeland security, military industrial complex, overpopulation of prisons. Pipe dream unfortunately.





There it is.
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on January 15, 2013, 07:15:29 am
^
That's a false choice, a term Obama likes to use from time to time. Hey, Obama is your thing and that's cool. I feel differently. I think he is a nice guy, a good family man, and a good politician. He has a good legislative record despite dealing with a hostile Congress. Now I mean good in terms of getting legislation passed, not that all that he has passed has been good in terms of content. Some has, some hasn't, IMO.

However does all his political maneuvering have put black Americans in a stronger place than they were in 2008, I don't think so. I think that we are still in a precarious position. Now one can say, and rightly so, that that isn't all the fault or within the responsibility of Obama or any president. But with what is within his purview, I have so far not been too impressed. Thus far I think he is overrated by many blacks because he represents the ultimate insider, the greatest key to white validation and acceptance and many of us live vicariously through him, or that is what we are encouraged to do or believe, IMO, like the Obama Effect the media gushed about early in his presidency.

I'm holding out to see what the healthcare plan will ultimately do, I'm not cool with the idea of mandates right off the bat. And I wonder if the healthcare 'gains' will be undercut by entitlement reform. If Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid benefits are cut how are we going to pay for that mandated healthcare?



^^^^^^

George Washington didn't chop down no Cherry Tree. Nor did John Wayne cut them off at the pass.
For me President Obama is the, a,  epitome of Black America. Much as was once true of Dorie Armstrong and Joe Louis. Besides in all these 500 years who has spoken more eloquently than Rodney King...."Can't we all just get along...".

...

Besides, the alternative is Django...which do you prefer?


Actually the greatest strides in "Civil Rights" came vis-a-vis mass media...Photography in 1864 and Television in 1964.
Of course it was mass violence that was displayed with this mass media.
The Republicans of today seem perfectly willing to destroy the US economy, among other things, to secure their rights.
Republicans openly talk of secession as Obama speaks of a more perfect union.
Django, unfortunately, could easily be a sign of things to come.


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

http://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Muhammad-Smith-Million-March/dp/1420867040 (http://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Muhammad-Smith-Million-March/dp/1420867040)

The only bad (curse) word in this book (Muhammad Smith) is N***** .
No MF, no B, no AH....Just N***** .
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on January 15, 2013, 07:24:02 am
Actually the greatest strides in "Civil Rights" came vis-a-vis mass media...Photography in 1864 and Television in 1964.
The Republicans of today seem perfectly willing to destroy the US economy, among other things, to secure their CON.
Republicans openly talk of secession as Obama speaks of a more perfect union.
Django, unfortunately, could easily be a sign of things to come.





Fixed.(http://www.clicksmilies.com/s1106/spezial/Fool/val.gif)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: mayday on January 21, 2013, 08:41:28 am
THIS was my Avengers.

N-word didn't bother me. Much like all the current rappers T-Dog was just "keeping it real"

I did stand up & cheer...It was awesome
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Redjack on January 21, 2013, 11:14:44 am
i think the action figures were a horrible mistake but the movie itself is gold.


nice work all around.


the "controversy" is ridiculous. similar to people who want the word "nigger" removed from Huckleberry Finn.



Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: BmoreAkuma on January 21, 2013, 05:18:03 pm
I've just looked at the move and ROFL I mean seriously people were whining about the use of the "n" word. I'm sorry my point from last time:

The "excessive usage" That's bullsh*t. Jeez I hate to go there but this "PC" thing that many have a tendency to whine about fits the bill here.

Still stands
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Blanks on January 28, 2013, 01:26:33 pm
I finally saw it this weekend. T'was cool. I will admit, I think the flick kinda went overboard with the N-word, but given the subject matter... it was expected.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Wise Son on February 02, 2013, 01:19:20 pm
Popping back on the HEF to say I saw Django, I loved it, and I think everyone involved should feel proud of this movie. I remember hearing that some of the black people involved weren't entirely happy with the first draft of the script, but the input that reportedly came from Foxx, Washington, and of course Mr Hudlin seem to have turned the problems into a film that works on a whole load of levels of racial politics.

Great movie. Congratulations to everyone.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 02, 2013, 04:51:23 pm
SLJ said that Stephen would go down in history as the most hated Negro in cinema. I think the man has a point. At the end of the film, I was screaming in my head, "Kill him, Django! KILL HIM!!!!"
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Wise Son on February 03, 2013, 02:48:35 am
SLJ said that Stephen would go down in history as the most hated Negro in cinema. I think the man has a point. At the end of the film, I was screaming in my head, "Kill him, Django! KILL HIM!!!!"
True, but what I like is that he was clearly the smartest guy in Kandieland. Don't we even seeing him signing Kandie's signature on stuff when he first appears, implying that he's actually kind of running the place? Let's face it, neither Kandie, his sister or his lawyer were that smart.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 03, 2013, 05:59:30 am
Some people are upset that Django doesn't get to kill Candie, but the bottom line is that the end of the film is about the two smartest guys facing off with each other.  Stephen is the only guy in the whole movie to see through Schultz's blizzard of words and figure what's really going on.  But Django is smart enough to escape his legend-destroying deathtrap and return for revenge.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 03, 2013, 04:51:44 pm
I was more pissed off that Schultz let his temper get the best of him and shot Candie, putting Django and Hilde in a ton of danger. Speaking of the good German, every time my students come in from recess, I think in my head, "Ev-ree-bod-dee calllllllm dowwwwwwwn..."
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 04, 2013, 07:18:49 am
I was more pissed off that Schultz let his temper get the best of him and shot Candie, putting Django and Hilde in a ton of danger. Speaking of the good German, every time my students come in from recess, I think in my head, "Ev-ree-bod-dee calllllllm dowwwwwwwn..."
That's one of my favorite quotables from the film as well. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 04, 2013, 07:19:56 am
HOLLYWOOD REPORTER:

Foreign Box Office: 'Django Unchained' Still Atop Anemic Overseas Circuit, No. 1 For Third Straight Weekend



Unchained maintained its No. 1 rank in at least 10 territories, and for the third straight weekend the biggest single market remained Germany ($6.35 million drawn from 865 locations, down only about 20% from the prior round; market cume, $29.8 million). 

 

The action western costarring Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz (a Vienna native) and Leonardo Di Caprio, adorned with five Oscar nominations, remained No. 1 in France (cume $22.8 million), Australia, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Austria, Sweden, Belgium and New Zealand. 

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 04, 2013, 05:04:59 pm
Warning:  Spoilers Below:

I saw “Django Unchained” on Sunday, I really enjoyed it.  First, I’m a sap for righteous revenge movies. Second, nothing could be more righteous.  But there was a lot more to the movie than that.

Of all the characters, I found Samuel L. Jackson’s “Stephen” to be the most interesting.  Because, despite his (mandatory) public Uncle Tomfoolery, it was clear that he was the brains behind the entire plantation.  That brief scene in the library revealed that to be the case.  Even his public displays of servility to Candie were tinged with sarcasm … as with his “you is a rock in my shoe” comment.  While we are meant to dislike Stephen (and we do, for the obvious reasons), there is a certain poignancy to his character.  Today, he would be a corporate CEO, a senior military officer, or a major politician.

I found it interesting that the white protagonist in the film, Dr. Schultz, was German.  The same actor who played (so wonderfully) the Nazi in “Inglorious Basterds.”  I had to wonder if Tarantino intentionally made the character German, to balance out his portrayal of Germans in the other film?  Or maybe he just enjoys working with Christopf Waltz, just as he obviously does with Samuel L. Jackson. Anyway, I bet Europeans find Schultz's nationality particularly appealing.
 
As to Schultz, and his shooting of Calvin Candie, well … the storyline did explain it, with his ruminating over the former fighting slave torn apart by dogs, his anger over Broomhilda’s plight, as well his irritation over Candie’s (really Stephen’s) seeing through his scheme to save Broomhilda at nominal cost.  Still, with all of that, Schultz was no softie (as a bounty hunter, he had no problem killing men, including having Django shoot a man in front of the man’s son).  He was also very savvy.  For him to fly off the handle like that was a little hard for me to understand, given his instinct for survival. Why not just shake that bastard's hand, and live another day? But it was explained.

Finally, as to the ending:  I had to wonder, what happens after the credits?  How would it really play out?  Being the eternal pessimist, I see everything unraveling into a tragic climax. While we are meant to believe that Django and Broomhilda, armed with their documents of emancipation, will ride north into the sunset, I don’t think so.  Sure, the 1850s didn’t have the lightning fast communication that we have today, but still … word would have quickly spread.  Particularly with the massive explosion of the house, the fire, the telltale “alarm” of smoke that could be seen for miles.  Even though Django shot all the white witnesses (including, hilariously, Lara Lee Candie-Fitzwilly) … he let the slaves go free (with the exception of the evil sellout Stephen). Of course he had to … in this movie, how could he not?  So what would have happened?  Word would quickly spread that there had been a major slave revolt in Candieland, the fourth largest plantation in Mississippi.  Candie had earlier alluded to this ever-present fear among the white plantation owners, and this fear was historically present at the time.  A major manhunt would ensue, to capture any runaway slaves, and to interrogate any who stayed behind.  Through coercion if not “voluntary” compliance, other slaves would inform the authorities that Django did it all.  (Historically, slave revolts were at times unwound by slaves informing on one another, before things even got off the ground).  It is less clear if word would get out that all this happened after Django’s and Schultz’s plot to “swindle” Candie went south, but other slaves may have overheard something about that as well, and they clearly knew he was with Schultz.  That’s a small detail, however. “SLAVE REVOLT” would be enough to galvanize the authorities. The papers of emancipation signed by Schultz would serve as an indictment of Django and Broomhilda, were they to actually show them to anyone in the South.  So unless Django and Broomhilda were to make it to a “free” state very very quickly, they would likely be apprehended.  And even if caught in the north, Django and his coconspirator Broomhilda could well be turned over to the authorities in Mississippi, on charges of murder in the first degree (unless “saved” by the onset of the Civil War).  Likely outcome:  Both hung by the neck until dead, and probably first tortured. If not first killed by a bounty hunter.

… I know … just a little ray of sunshine.  That’s me.  ;)

Oh, and as to the “controversy” over the use of the “n” word. That’s just silly. For heaven’s sake, how were the white bigots supposed to be portrayed?  And as for Stephen’s use of the term, well, he wasn’t using it as a collegial term of endearment. The word is what it is. A disparging racial slur.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 04, 2013, 06:26:29 pm
Good, smart commentary, Michael. 

I can see your pessimistic take on their future, but remember, we've seen Django escape from impossible situations several times in the film.  When seen his ability to out think and out shoot most opponents.  We know Broomhilda is a worthy partner with great capacities herself.  I presume they will beat the odds, however long...which is a worthy subject for a film of its own. 

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 04, 2013, 06:40:48 pm
Good, smart commentary, Michael. 

I can see your pessimistic take on their future, but remember, we've seen Django escape from impossible situations several times in the film.  When seen his ability to out think and out shoot most opponents.  We know Broomhilda is a worthy partner with great capacities herself.  I presume they will beat the odds, however long...which is a worthy subject for a film of its own.

Is that a hint?!!  I hope so!   ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 04, 2013, 08:16:57 pm
I LOOOOOVED at the very end, where we see Hilde pull out a shotgun of her own! Apparently, this viewer didn't (http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/13884-invisibility-in-django-unchained-broomhilda-in-chains). Reminds me of a viewer who complained that Hilde wasn't "heroic" enough. I guess running for your life (twice!) isn't heroic enough - you're supposed to be able to grab a gun and fire at will, even if you've never held one before in your life.

My take? Django and Hilde make it up north, maybe all the way up to Canada, and start a family. Years later, Django surprises his wife by joining the Union Army, feeling strongly for the freedom of all men (not just men with German sponsors). Hilde holds down the fort at home, teaching the local women how to shoot and other forms of self-defense, as well as raising their son, King S. Freeman. Since it is strongly suggested that Hilde is literate - or she certainly would've been once Django taught her to read (as Schultz taught him), I think she would become a schoolteacher as well. Yes, I've thought about this waaaay too hard.

So what would have happened?  Word would quickly spread that there had been a major slave revolt in Candieland, the fourth largest plantation in Mississippi.


Doubtful. First off, the now free slaves wouldn't have exactly run around telling everybody that Candieland was no more. Second, I believe Candieland was what...75 miles all around or something like that? There was nobody nearby, and nobody was going to be nearby for quite a while. Third, nobody was going to let that kind of thing become common knowledge, black or white. My Texas "history" textbook goes out of its way to minimize slavery in this state, even going as far as to say that there were no slave rebellions or uprisings in north Texas. However, a trip to the Old Red Courthouse museum prominently features a display about a slave uprising is what is modern day Dallas County. But since that suggests that slaves 1) had a reason to revolt and 2) had the mental capacity to do so, the textbooks keep mum about it. The same would've happened back then, I'm sure.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 04, 2013, 09:10:36 pm
Glad you caught her pulling the rifle at the end...key shot...Hildy has the last word. 

The scenario you outlined is plausable, one we have dicussed among others. 

And while shooting down in Louisiana, I talked to a lot local historians, who emphasized how slave revolts and smaller acts of rebellion were constantly hushed up so other slaves wouldn't feel inspired. 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: stanleyballard on February 04, 2013, 10:03:27 pm
Saw the movie....powerful performances from Samuel Jackson & Leonardo DiCaprio too.  Haunting subject matter and some realistic scenes.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 04, 2013, 10:12:31 pm
Very interesting point about the coverup possibility. Of course those doing the covering up would have found out what happened, but even then what you are suggesting is that the authorities would have to tread carefully. Maybe. I wouldn't mind seeing a sequel to find out. Django's Rebellion.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Kristopher on February 05, 2013, 06:48:19 am
Good, smart commentary, Michael. 

I can see your pessimistic take on their future, but remember, we've seen Django escape from impossible situations several times in the film.  When seen his ability to out think and out shoot most opponents.  We know Broomhilda is a worthy partner with great capacities herself.  I presume they will beat the odds, however long...which is a worthy subject for a film of its own.


Is that a hint?!!  I hope so!   ;D


Michael, I think they just MIGHT survive:
http://www.eonline.com/news/330255/quentin-tarantino-talks-django-unchained-character-named-shaft-no-accident (http://www.eonline.com/news/330255/quentin-tarantino-talks-django-unchained-character-named-shaft-no-accident)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 05, 2013, 08:42:22 am
Quote from: Kristopher

Michael, I think they just MIGHT survive:
[url]http://www.eonline.com/news/330255/quentin-tarantino-talks-django-unchained-character-named-shaft-no-accident[/url] ([url]http://www.eonline.com/news/330255/quentin-tarantino-talks-django-unchained-character-named-shaft-no-accident[/url])


Hahaha. This is beyond great!  Broomhilda von SHAFT!  So Hilde survives to be the great great grandmother of Shaft. But is Django killed? Or is the name "Shaft" preserved on official birth records because her marriage (jumping over the broom?) to Django is not legally recognized? 

Man, this has so many cool layers!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Curtis Metcalf on February 05, 2013, 08:58:11 am
I LOOOOOVED at the very end, where we see Hilde pull out a shotgun of her own! Apparently, this viewer didn't ([url]http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/13884-invisibility-in-django-unchained-broomhilda-in-chains[/url]). Reminds me of a viewer who complained that Hilde wasn't "heroic" enough. I guess running for your life (twice!) isn't heroic enough - you're supposed to be able to grab a gun and fire at will, even if you've never held one before in your life.

Second this. While I understand the commentator's complaint, Broomhilde Unchained is another movie. I think it's another case of the audience being so starved for this kind of art/story that when we finally get one, folks want it to be everything at once.

I'm invested in Django and Broomhilde's survival and life together as in Maxine Shaw's scenario or another. I'm sure they have stories to tell and I hope to see them someday.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 05, 2013, 09:18:46 am
I agree. Though in my head I like to keep the suspense going. And yes, Hilde was perfect in this movie. Setting the stage hopefully for more in the future.  ;D
Title: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Tanksleyd on February 06, 2013, 07:52:52 am
I like movies too....

But reality is better:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2013/02/05/strom-thurmonds-black-daughter-a-flesh-and-blood-symbol-of-americas-complicated-racial-history/?hpid=z4 (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2013/02/05/strom-thurmonds-black-daughter-a-flesh-and-blood-symbol-of-americas-complicated-racial-history/?hpid=z4)

Perhaps deserving of it's own thread but things were getting deep up in here...."16 years old"
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 06, 2013, 01:57:26 pm
Hahaha. This is beyond great!  Broomhilda von SHAFT!  So Hilde survives to be the great great grandmother of Shaft. But is Django killed? Or is the name "Shaft" preserved on official birth records because her marriage (jumping over the broom?) to Django is not legally recognized? 

It's possible that a distant relative picked up the name on a whim. If I was to get my name legally changed, I would use my mother's maiden name (which is more distinct), rather than my father's name (which is very generic), even though my parents were married. I've looked at records where there was no last name up until the early 20th century, even. So a (likely male) relative - maybe fleeing from trouble himself - may have seen the name "von Shaft" and shortened it to Shaft.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 06, 2013, 02:28:40 pm
Given that the film touches on the issue of slave rebellions, here are a couple of interesting sources that further describe the historical background. Of course you gotta be careful with the sources, as some historians may have a desire to manipulate the data through a loose or narrow definition of "insurrection." Also whether they choose to count or not count planned rebellions that never got off the ground because of informants.

As you know, the major revolts that took place, cited by all historions, were quite dramatic. Some involved the intervention of U.S. troops.

Most of the more-frequent small-scale acts of rebellion were engaged in by male bondsman, and tended to be spontaneous. This makes sense because a severely subjugated population is less likely to rebel if their women and children are held hostage by the oppressor. Also, the larger the scope of a planned rebellion, and the longer it is planned, the more likely it will be nipped in the bud by informants before it even gets off the ground. That probably explains why the number of large rebellions that actually rose to the level of being implemented is small. Nonetheless, it is clear that the white plantation owners had a pervasive fear of a major slave revolt. This is not surprising, given the population demographics and the brutality and injustice inherent in slavery. As you have pointed out, they would have had an incentive, at the time, to downplay incidents that did occur, if at all possible, so as not to inspire rebellions elsewhere. Something we might see in a sequel to "Django Unchained."

"Django Unchained" touched on or hinted at several of these themes. I am just inching to see them more fully developed in a sequel.

Slave Rebellion Timeline - PBS

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/natturner/slave_rebellions.html (http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/natturner/slave_rebellions.html)

Slave Rebellions - Britannica

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/548231/slave-rebellions (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/548231/slave-rebellions)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 06, 2013, 02:36:38 pm
Apropos of...well, nothing.

Off the Chain: Kerry Washington and Jamie Foxx Sing "All Gold Everything" - Hiphollywood.com (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rd3wV_RGNLs#ws)

I don't think these two have a drop of chemistry - Django could've been saving his little sister - but they are just adorable together.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 06, 2013, 05:21:34 pm
I like movies too....

But reality is better:


Nahhh. Reality SUCKS!  :o

Oh, as an aside, it may have been the randy Randall Jefferson, brother of Thomas Jefferson, who was the perpetrator, though, either way, the author's point remains valid.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on February 07, 2013, 10:52:01 am
When he shot Candie... I said, "Bravo, Dr. Schultz, Bravo!” He enjoyed it... savoring in the moment. 

The word ‘bravo’ in Italian means= brave, desperado, bravado &/or hired-gunmen. Doesn’t ‘bravo’ describe Dr. Schultz & Django? Not really, Dr. Schultz is the bounty hunter. He took-out an entire lynch mob. He’s the real gunfighter in the film. Django carries on his spirit & teachings. Hilda can learn from Django… & the saga continues....?

Dr. Schultz, German? Jewish or Yiddish? lol

Dr. King...? lol 
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: The Griot on February 08, 2013, 04:48:13 am
We gave a Black Science Fiction film festival yesterday (Feb. 7) at Georgia Tech which was very successful (we've been invited back for next year). Afterwards we had a panel with the film creators. Steve Barnes was in attendance. One of our questions was 'With the success of Django Unchained, what do you think this will mean for future black films?' The discussion was lively, with  Steve sharing insights on the movie, but the consensus was overwhelming; everyone loved the movie.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 08, 2013, 05:42:17 am
Congrats on your event and Steven Barnes is The Man.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: The Griot on February 08, 2013, 05:52:47 am
Thanks, and yes he is. Y'all should get together and do Lion's Blood. Just sayin'  ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 08, 2013, 08:52:44 am
When he shot Candie... I said, "Bravo, Dr. Schultz, Bravo!” He enjoyed it... savoring in the moment. 

Dr. Schultz, German? Jewish or Yiddish? lol

Dr. King...? lol

Dr. King Schultz was German. Certainly no suggestion he was Jewish from the way he spoke. However, here is an interesting tidbit:

Actor Christoph Waltz's first wife is Jewish. One of his sons is an Orthodox Jew studying in a yeshiva in Israel. I've read that the son is a rabbi.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: APEXABYSS on February 08, 2013, 08:36:55 pm
 Cool, Chris is that dude! Yep, The Torah, Tanakh & Talmud can have that affect on people.  i can dig it!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Metro on February 12, 2013, 08:19:16 am

Should there be more historical fiction in film?  Lincoln will certainly inspire more biopics about other presidents (didn't FDR have a film this year, too?).  A Washington film could be epic, but a Jefferson movie about his legacy would be as powerful as Lincoln was.

As for Django, I can't see how other filmmakers will follow up on Reg/Q's creativity.  The combination of blaxploitation/western is cool, but I'd like to see more like it developed through HBO or PBS.

Maybe the Wayans will do a compilation historical film spoof that attracts a PG-13 audience while raising important questions and new interpretations subtly between the slapstick jokes ... retrospective on films like Color Adjustment, Down in the Delta, Harlem Nights with elements of Hangover/Bridesmaids?   Could be a blockbuster...
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 12, 2013, 11:57:38 am

Should there be more historical fiction in film?  Lincoln will certainly inspire more biopics about other presidents (didn't FDR have a film this year, too?).  A Washington film could be epic, but a Jefferson movie about his legacy would be as powerful as Lincoln was.



I agree, however, there are many, many  Hollywood movies out there that tell stories about our American Presidents.  Nick Nolte played President Jefferson in "Jefferson In Paris" for example, Thadie Newton played Sally Hemings.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Metro on February 13, 2013, 07:12:05 am

I agree, however, there are many, many  Hollywood movies out there that tell stories about our American Presidents.  Nick Nolte played President Jefferson in "Jefferson In Paris" for example, Thadie Newton played Sally Hemings.

"Jefferson in Paris" was terrible on multiple levels.  Jefferson deserves more attention for his actual historical contributions (and limitations) rather than the nuances of his personal life.

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 13, 2013, 10:12:53 am

I agree, however, there are many, many  Hollywood movies out there that tell stories about our American Presidents.  Nick Nolte played President Jefferson in "Jefferson In Paris" for example, Thadie Newton played Sally Hemings.

"Jefferson in Paris" was terrible on multiple levels.  Jefferson deserves more attention for his actual historical contributions (and limitations) rather than the nuances of his personal life.



Speaking of historical contributions, is it true that Jefferson's most common philanthropy he was noted for "...life, liberty & the pursuit of property. " was changed after the 1860s?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Metro on February 13, 2013, 11:42:06 am
Speaking of historical contributions, is it true that Jefferson's most common philanthropy he was noted for "...life, liberty & the pursuit of property. " was changed after the 1860s?

Not sure what you mean by "philanthropy?"

He is often credited with adapting John Locke's ideas into the political formulation of "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" in the Declaration of Independence.  The evolution of "pursuit of happiness" into the Constitutional guarantee of the protection of private property is a longer story and involves hundreds of people (notably John Adams).

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 13, 2013, 11:50:58 am
Speaking of historical contributions, is it true that Jefferson's most common philanthropy he was noted for "...life, liberty & the pursuit of property. " was changed after the 1860s?


Not sure what you mean by "philanthropy?"

He is often credited with adapting John Locke's ideas into the political formulation of "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" in the Declaration of Independence.






Disregard what I asked about the word "philanthropy"...(http://www.rubicondev.com/forum/images/smilies/46.gif)



Quote
The evolution of "pursuit of happiness" into the Constitutional guarantee of the protection of private property is a longer story and involves hundreds of people (notably John Adams).



Tell the story here at HEF from your point-of-view. 

I'd love to read it.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Metro on February 13, 2013, 12:31:54 pm
You're most kind and gracious, Battle.

Here's a link to an interesting reading of primary sources that connect the popularity of the phrase "pursuit of happiness" to a fictional Abyssinia.

http://hnn.us/articles/46460.html (http://hnn.us/articles/46460.html)


In addition, a very distinguished historian (Stanley Katz) discussed Jefferson's fixation on the protection of private property in an article titled "Thomas Jefferson and the Right to Property in Revolutionary America" (1976).

I'll try to excerpt it later and discuss the implications for understanding the Constitution today.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 13, 2013, 01:01:03 pm
I'll try to excerpt it later and discuss the implications for understanding the Constitution today.




Thank you.

EDIT:  Ah! :D  Here we go!
(http://s2.tinypic.com/1zdww08_th.jpg)
From the article:

“The pursuit of happiness” is the most famous phrase in the Declaration of Independence. Conventional history and popular wisdom attribute the phrase to the genius of Thomas Jefferson when in an imaginative leap, he replaced the third term of John Locke’s trinity, “life, liberty, and property.”  It was a felicitous, even thrilling, substitution. Yet the true history and philosophical meaning of the famous phrase are apparently unknown.

In an article entitled “The Pursuit of Happiness,” posted at the Huffington Post July 4, 2007, Daniel Brook summed up what most of us learned in school: “The eighteenth-century British political philosopher John Locke wrote that governments are instituted to secure people's rights to ‘life, liberty, and property.’ And in 1776, Thomas Jefferson begged to differ. When he penned the Declaration of Independence, ratified on the Fourth of July, he edited out Locke's right to ‘property’ and substituted his own more broad-minded, distinctly American concept: the right to ‘the pursuit of happiness.’ "

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: The Griot on February 14, 2013, 01:42:26 am
If we're talking about historical fiction, how about Frederick Douglass? A man born in slavery and who became one of the greatest abolitionists and orators in America? And nobody has done a good movie about Harriet Tubman yet. Talking about exciting if done the right way. Tons of stuff hiding in plain sight.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 14, 2013, 03:05:05 am
If we're talking about historical fiction, how about Frederick Douglass? A man born in slavery and who became one of the greatest abolitionists and orators in America? And nobody has done a good movie about Harriet Tubman yet. Talking about exciting if done the right way. Tons of stuff hiding in plain sight.





I know, right? :-\

I remember just a few weeks ago, that there was some criticism about the historical accuracy in the biographical motion picture, "Lincoln",  that Conneticut politicians didn't agree to abolish the 13th amendment at all but none of those critics bothered to mention in the movie the absense of Fredrick Douglass,  a former slave that recruited Blacks for the Union army and who was also President Lincoln's main confidant. 

How do you tell this story without him?  Where is the outrage there?(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g439/exatera/smileys/confused/smiley-confused013.gif)

Oh, TheGriot, I agree...   we've got a lotta stories in Hollywood to tell that are hiding in plain sight.   The best is yet to come! ;)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 14, 2013, 07:24:17 pm
(http://i50.tinypic.com/2nlft76.jpg)

Happy V-Day!!!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 24, 2013, 05:57:33 pm
(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w184/Battle-D/HEFoscars_03_zpsad5e2abd.gif)
Best Actor In A Supporting Role
Christopher Waltz
"Django Unchained"
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: JLI Jesse on February 24, 2013, 06:16:15 pm
([url]http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w184/Battle-D/HEFoscars_03_zpsad5e2abd.gif[/url])
Best Actor In A Supporting Role
Christopher Waltz
"Django Unchained"


With a shout out to Reggie
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 24, 2013, 07:38:39 pm
Awe-some!  He so deserved it!  At the dinner table Friday night we were saying Waltz deserved to win but probably wouldn't. I am so pleased.

Reg, congratulations again for bringing us such a great movie!

 ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 24, 2013, 08:31:45 pm
(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w184/Battle-D/HEFoscars_03_zpsad5e2abd.gif)
Original Screenplay
Quentin Tarantino
"Django Unchained"
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on February 24, 2013, 08:43:29 pm
Whooo Hooo Quentin......Great Job! ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 24, 2013, 08:54:09 pm
This is just better and better!  What wonderful news to get during our Purim festive meal, via the HEF!  I'm so happy, Reg, that your film is getting such well-deserved recognition.  ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on February 24, 2013, 09:01:10 pm
Yeah Django you held them high!  ;D
I loved the movie and so did many others......Great Job!
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Maxine Shaw on February 24, 2013, 09:01:25 pm
*picks up a garbage can and hurls it, Mookie style*
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Battle on February 26, 2013, 06:27:37 am
(http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w184/Battle-D/HEFoscars_04_zps8e3ddfa2.jpg)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on February 28, 2013, 04:18:59 am
Christoph Waltz and Quentin Tarantino make Oscars history with 'Django Unchained' wins
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained, Christoph Waltz, Oscars 2012 - Best Supp. Actor, Oscars 2012 - Best Original Screenplay
 By Daniel Boneschansker
Feb 27 2013 19:09 pm  0 0

Both of the Oscars wins for "Django Unchained" --  Christoph Waltz (Best Supporting Actor) and Quentin Tarantino (Best Original Screenplay) -- are history making.

Waltz, who claimed this same award three years ago for "Inglorious Basterds," his first collaboration with Tarantino, is the seventh actor to win more than once in this category, following:

•Walter Brennan: "Come and Get It" (1936), "Kentucky" (1938), "The Westerner" (1940);
 
•Anthony Quinn: "Viva Zapata!" (1952), "Lust for Life" (1956);
 
•Peter Ustinov: "Spartacus" (1960), "Topkapi" (1964);
 
•Jason Robards: "All the President's Men" (1976), "Julia" (1977);
 
•Melvyn Douglas: "Hud" (1963), "Being There" (1979); and
 
•Michael Caine: "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986), "The Cider House Rules" (1999).

Waltz is only the second performer to win the Oscar without a corresponding SAG nomination. Marcia Gay Harden pulled off this feat with her Best Supporting Actress win for "Pollock" in 2000. Waltz's SAG snub is attributabe to a botched campaign early on in the season -- Waltz was submitted in lead and SAG voters did not get DVD screeners.

Waltz also joins an exclusive list of winners who batted a thousand, winning both their bids:

•Luise Rainer: Best Actress, "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936); Best Actress, "The Good Earth" (1937);
 
•Vivien Leigh: Best Actress, "Gone with the Wind" (1939); Best Actress, "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1951);
 
•Helen Hayes: Best Actress, "The Sin of Madelon Claudet" (1931); Best Supporting Actress, "Airport" (1970);
 
•Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor, "The Usual Suspects" (1995); Best Actor, "American Beauty" (1999); and
 
•Hilary Swank: Best Actress, "Boys Don't Cry" (1999); Best Actress, "Million Dollar Baby" (2004).


Sally Field had been on this list for her two Best Actress wins -- "Norma Rae" (1979) and "Places in the Heart" (1984) -- but lost her third nomination this year -- Best Supporting Actress for "Lincoln" -- to Anne Hathaway ("Les Misérables").

Rainer was the only German-speaking performer with multiple acting Oscars. Waltz is now the first male actor to pull off this accomplishment, and is also the only double-winner from Austria.

Tarantino, who prevailed in this same race in 1994 for "Pulp Fiction," becomes only the fifth person to win multiple Oscars in the Best Original Screenplay category, following:

•Charles Brackett: "Sunset Boulevard" (1950), "Titanic" (1953);
 
•Billy Wilder: "Sunset Boulevard" (1950), "The Apartment" (1960);
 
•Paddy Chayefsky: "The Hospital" (1971), "Network" (1976);
 
•Woody Allen: "Annie Hall" (1977), "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986), "Midnight in Paris" (2011).

With Tarantino having directed both of Waltz's Oscar-winning performances, many have wondered how often director-actor pairings have reaped multiple wins.  So far, only three other collaborations have done so:

•Walter Brennan and William Wyler: Best Supporting Actor, "Come and Get It" (1936) [co-directed with Howard Hawks]; Best Supporting Actor, "The Westerner" (1942);
 
•Dianne Wiest and Woody Allen: Best Supporting Actress, "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986); Best Supporting Actress, "Bullets Over Broadway" (1994); and
 
•Jack Nicholson and James L. Brooks: Best Supporting Actor, "Terms of Endearment" (1983); Best Actor, "As Good as It Gets" (1997).
 
As to why their collaboration with each other has been so successful, Waltz says, "Quentin writes poetry, and I like poetry."

Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: JLI Jesse on February 28, 2013, 07:07:12 am
I really like Christoph Waltz and was happy he won.  However, I do somewhat agree with the criticism that he didn't below in that category.  He was basically co-lead with Jamie Foxx.  Is that just a strategy to give him a better chance to win?  I think shows like Friends and Modern Family have used in the past.  I know that, duh, it is named Django Unchained, but I think a case could have been made for Waltz in the best actor category.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on February 28, 2013, 08:49:52 am
I really like Christoph Waltz and was happy he won.  However, I do somewhat agree with the criticism that he didn't below in that category.  He was basically co-lead with Jamie Foxx.  Is that just a strategy to give him a better chance to win?  I think shows like Friends and Modern Family have used in the past.  I know that, duh, it is named Django Unchained, but I think a case could have been made for Waltz in the best actor category.

I had the same thought. Without Waltz it would not have been the same movie. Maybe the answer is that with true co-leads, as here, it is truly ambiguous which category the actor should be nominated for. A co-lead may be at a disadvantage competing againt unambiguous lead actors in the Best Actor category. So perhaps the Best Supporting Actor nomination was fairer. I dunno though. Just speculating.

Oh and Reg, the article you posted with all the historical detail was interesting.   

This is great.  ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: sherelled on February 28, 2013, 09:38:14 am
Agreed the Oscar is a political football. Who catches it and on what yard line depends on the QB. All of Django's cast was good. Some out shined others. The producers and directors were awesome. Hats off once again. ;D
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Vic Vega on February 28, 2013, 01:41:37 pm
I really like Christoph Waltz and was happy he won.  However, I do somewhat agree with the criticism that he didn't below in that category.  He was basically co-lead with Jamie Foxx.  Is that just a strategy to give him a better chance to win?  I think shows like Friends and Modern Family have used in the past.  I know that, duh, it is named Django Unchained, but I think a case could have been made for Waltz in the best actor category.

The thing about that is you want your nominees in a postion where they can win. Waltz wasn't going to beat out Daniel J Lewis for Best Actor even if he had gotten nominated. He was a mortal lock going into these awards (Anne Hathaway best supporting actress) was the other.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: FLEX HECTIC on March 04, 2013, 06:09:23 pm
Out of curiosity Mr. Hudlin if you had won who would you have thanked and how long or short would your acknowledgement have been before they started rolling the credits on you?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on March 04, 2013, 06:16:24 pm
Hey Flex!  A blast from the past.  Hope all is well.  :)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: FLEX HECTIC on March 04, 2013, 06:20:58 pm
Hey Michael, I don't know what happened I was eating Honey Nut Cheerios when a blinding flash of light teleported me here and I decided to post just to kill time. ;)


(Don't believe me I'm TROLLING as part of some extravagant over the top diabolical plan to overthrow absolutely nothing relevant to anybody)


But yeah all is well... For now! 8)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: michaelintp on March 04, 2013, 10:20:54 pm
Hahaha! 
 ;)
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: supreme illuminati on September 04, 2013, 10:25:26 am
*picks up a garbage can and hurls it, Mookie style*

You see why I love me some her?
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: Reginald Hudlin on September 05, 2013, 05:02:07 pm
Out of curiosity Mr. Hudlin if you had won who would you have thanked and how long or short would your acknowledgement have been before they started rolling the credits on you?
Just seeing this.  I think. 

Well, my wife and mother were there, so they would get a shout out of course.  With my kids.  And Quentin and my fellow producers.  And as much as the cast and crew as I could fit in, with a special shout to the the late great J. Michael Riva, who we lost while shooting the film.
Title: Re: DJANGO UNCHAINED
Post by: FLEX HECTIC on September 05, 2013, 05:37:57 pm
So basically you would not have said this...


Hudlin: "I would like to thank that TROLL Flex Hectic on my forum who brings a whole bunch stuff nobody understands or comprehends but himself... Even though he is OUT THERE sometimes he drives me to be the best that I can be! Thank you Flex Hectic for everything... Big Ups East Boogie Representing!!!"

(Credits start rolling to cue you to cut it short...)
Title: Academic Analysis of Django Comics Adaptation
Post by: Hypestyle on June 23, 2019, 06:06:30 am
https://themiddlespaces.com/2019/01/22/broomhilda-django-unchained/

Kept in a Jar: Broomhilda and the Representation of Enslaved Women in Reginald Hudlin’s Django Unchained
Matthew Teutsch / 22 January 2019
Editor’s Note: I have been reading Matthew Teutsch’s thoughts on comics as part of the tradition of American literature (particularly as it related to African-American and Southern literature) on his blog Interminable Ramblings for quite some time, and thus was excited when he offered to write a guest post on the comic book adaptation of the controversial and alternately praised and condemned Quentin Tarantino film Django Unchained. Here, Teutsch asks us to consider what happens when the notable absence of Broomhilda’s perspective from a story focused on saving her from bondage is addressed, but her voice remains mostly silent.

Reginald Hudlin’s comic adaptation of Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained for DC’s Vertigo Comics imprint (with art by Denys Cowan, R.M. Guera, Jason LaTour, and John Floyd) contains some scenes that did not make it into the final cut of the 2012 film. Tarantino’s film focuses on Django’s attempts to rescue his beloved wife Broomhilda from her enslavement at Candyland, a plantation owned by a particularly sadistic Southerner, Calvin Candie. In 2013, Vertigo published the seven-issue adaptation of the film, adding sequences from Tarantino’s original script to the narrative. One of these sequences depicts how Broomhilda von Shaft came to be Candie’s property. The sequence (from issues #3 and #4 – penciled by Cowyn and Guera, respectively) provides an important narrative plot point in the story and a space for some very important discussions about the lives of enslaved women and the system that kept them enslaved.
Arriving in Greenville, Mississippi, to search for Broomhilda, Django, and his white bounty hunter compatriot King Schultz, enter the records office. As King Schultz speaks with the clerk, Django begins to “look into his past” as he thinks about “when he was on the auction block,” and he recalls the first time he saw the man who bought him, “the same man who sold him because of his love for Broomhilda.” These memories lead him to ponder, “Who owns Broomhilda now?” A 27-page flashback detailing what has happened to Broomhilda since her forced separation from Django follows.
A white plantation owner Mike Harmony buys Broomhilda for his son, Scotty, a 24-year-old who cannot seem to find love with white women. Harmony acquires Broomhilda solely as a sexual object for Scotty.

The only scene of sexual interaction between Broomhilda and Scotty comes in montage of panels showing her life with the Harmony family, the joy it brings Scotty, and the relative privileges of her position as a kept plaything for the family scion. The two of them are depicted as silhouettes with Broomhilda straddling Scotty. Her positioning astride her master in this panel does not diminish the forced sexual relations between the two. The removal of facial expressions from both Broomhilda and Scotty link them. While Scotty seems gentle and genuinely interested in Broomhilda and she eats at the same table as the family and plays games on the lawn with them, she is still very much Scotty’s property, even if she must perform the role of the enthusiastic lover.
About three months later Scotty and Broomhilda head into town for what Scotty views as a romantic getaway. In these panels, Scotty smiles broadly as he walks through the streets of Greenville with Broomhilda on his arm. However, Broomhilda’s countenance shows sadness, especially when she sees enslaved people being led through the streets under clearly dire circumstances. The two end up at Candie’s Cleopatra Club (where in the film Schultz and Django first meet the slave owner). Scotty starts playing cards with Candie, and eventually they reach the point where Candie wants to play for higher stakes, so he suggests that they bet their “property,” wagering Broomhilda against Candie’s slave Sheba. Scotty loses the hand. Scotty protests, Candie kills him and then barges into Broomhilda’s hotel room, chases her outside, and rapes her. This is the last image of the flashback and the narrative moves to a slave auction in the present where King Schultz tells Django that he has learned that Broomhilda is at Candyland.
From the outset of the flashback sequence, we see the ways that enslaved women endured sexual violence. Broomhilda stands on the auction block as the auctioneer exposes her breasts stating, “Fellas, you ain’t felt gentle till you felt nigger gal gentle.” Scotty looks on lustfully. The next panel shifts the focus from sexual exploitation to physical violence as the auctioneer displays Broomhilda’s scarred back and the “r” branded on her cheek. These images cause Scotty to “react with repulsion.” These six panels display, in full detail, the pervasive culture of sexual violence that enslaved women endured. As Alice Walker writes regarding this culture,
For centuries the black woman has served as the primary pornographic “outlet” for white men in Europe and America. We need only think of the black women used as breeders, raped for the pleasure and profit of their owners. We need only think of the license the “master” of the slave woman enjoyed.

On the auction block, Broomhilda becomes a “pornographic ‘outlet’” for the onlookers, though in order for her to remain appealing to Scotty he does not consider too closely the physical reminders of her enslaved condition. Standing on the auction block, Broomhilda looks out at the men who begin to bid on her. After each man bids, we see closeups of Broomhilda’s face as she peers at them in disgust and fear, aware of their desire. When Harmony bids, and wins, Broomhilda’s face displays more sadness than fear. These shifting emotions highlight that even though none of the men that Broomhilda outwardly feared purchased her, even the “best” result nevertheless continues to relegate her as a nonperson. In essence, she learns to develop levels of gradation regarding “acceptable” violence and humiliation, and Harmony’s appearance causes her to feel some miniscule sense of fortune because the other men, who openly display sexual desire for her, did not purchase her. In Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), Harriet Jacobs highlights the same fears of sexual violence that enslaved women constantly encountered. Describing her childhood, Jacobs writes that fifteen marked “a sad epoch in the life of a slave girl,” when the master takes notice and “whispers foul words in her ear.” Continuing, she describes seeing two young girls playing together: “One was a fair white child; the other was her slave, and also her sister.” Jacobs looks into the future to see that the white girl will blossom into womanhood; however, the enslaved girl would endure sexual predation as “she drank the cup of sin, and shame, and misery.” Broomhilda’s expression reveals those very thoughts of “shame, and misery” regarding her inevitable circumstances and being fated to categorize preferences amid a myriad of awful possibilities.
After the auction, Scotty and Broomhilda ride to the plantation in a wagon. Scotty offers her jelly beans and even invites her to sit beside him in the front of the wagon. Yet, once they arrive at the house, the provisional nature of her treatment is made clear. Scotty’s mother tells Broomhilda, “Boy’s twenty-four. He still ain’t a man yet. That’s why you’re here.” Scotty’s parents see Broomhilda as something for their son to practice his manhood on. Scotty, however, views her as a friend and a romantic companion. They chase butterflies together during the day and catch fireflies at night. As they chase butterflies, they are completely blackened against a bright background. In the next panel, we see them catching fireflies at night. Here, we see both Scotty’s and Broomhilda’s faces, each with a smile. After catching fireflies, Broomhilda holds a jar with the lightning bugs she has captured as Scotty sleeps peacefully next to her. Here, Broomhilda’s face shows a mixture of sadness and anger. She sees herself, as similarly trapped, living an existence as just a pretty object for Scotty to enjoy while she physically and psychologically suffocates from that captivity.
While Scotty (perhaps unwittingly) challenges the unspoken societal rules regulating relationships between masters and enslaved women who are their property through how he expresses his feelings about Broomhilda, she knows these rules and refuses to completely reciprocate his feelings too enthusiastically. Ultimately, she is still property, and as property, she can be bought and sold on a whim. Scotty’s realization of this fact occurs during his card game with Candie. Up until this moment, Scotty appears naïve to the fact that he owns Broomhilda. His facial expressions and interactions with her make it appear that he sees their relationship as romantic, not as owner and enslaved.

When Candie bets Sheba, he demands that Scotty bet Broomhilda. Scotty refuses, and his facial expressions change from jovial laughter to fearful dejection. One panel shows Scotty with his hand on his forehead and downcast eyes telling Candie, “I can’t bet Broomhilda.” Candie persists informing Scotty, “In Chickasaw County, [Broomhilda is] money. Pony her up or fold.” Scotty doesn’t want to fold because he is all in and thinks that he has a winning hand. Reluctantly, Scotty signs a bill of sale, then the men show their cards. Candie wins with a flush, and Scotty then realizes that Candie cheated. He had sent Sheba over to kiss Scotty, thus spying on his opponent’s hand. Scotty calls Candie out and pleads to get Broomhilda back. Candie denies the request, telling Scotty, “You lost that girl, fat boy.” Candie then shoots Scotty, who falls on the table, blood splattering on the bill of sale. Candie walks, with the bloody bill sale, across the street to the hotel, asks what room Scott Harmony was staying in, and violently breaks down the door while Broomhilda sleeps.
Two panels show the bloody bill of sale, and each of these panels recall the opening of the sequence. In one panel, we see Scotty’s body draped over the table with blood splattered on the deed. Here, naïve Scotty from the beginning of the sequence who does not quite grasp how the “rules” work, lies dead and his blood stains the paper representing his relationship to Broomhilda. Rather than a marriage license, a bill of sale bonds him to the woman he “loves.” The next panel shows Candie’s feet walking through the door of the hotel as he holds the bill of sale between his fingers. Blood drips from it. Again, the bill represents a white slave owner’s relationship to Broomhilda, and the symbolic nature of the blood brings to minds the ownership of her body and that sexual violence again awaits her, asking readers to consider what the real difference, if any, might be between their ownership.

In this sequence, Broomhilda essentially becomes the bill of sale. While Scotty may feel like he loves her, he actually owns her. Candie wants her because he knows that she can add to his stock. When Candie first enters the cardroom to gamble with Scotty, he lustfully leers at Broomhilda, his eyes following as she leaves the table to return to the hotel room. Both men ignore Broomhilda’s desires by denying her humanity and agency. In fact, throughout the entire sequence, Broomhilda rarely speaks, uttering probably no more than five or six lines throughout. (Most are only one word or two.) Writing about Broomhilda in the film, Eisa Nefetari Ulen argues, “What Broomhilda lacks, even when she appears in real time, is agency over her destiny—a destiny where she will be free. This lack of agency, this powerlessness, is an insult to real slave women like [Harriet] Jacobs, who crafted complicated strategies to liberate themselves.” Even in flashing back to her backstory, this comic maintains a perspective that denies her any agency.
Broomhilda’s lack of agency and voice is problematic, especially considered within the context of Harriet Jacobs’ escape and narratives from women such as Sojourner Truth. Broomhilda becomes more akin to Aunt Hester in Frederick Douglass’ A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845). In Douglass’ narrative, the suffering of enslaved women takes place on the sidelines or under a voyeuristic gaze as is the case with Aunt Hester’s whipping. This positioning, like Broomhilda’s, places Hester and other enslaved women as nothing more than serving as a lesson leading to Douglass’ realization of his position as an enslaved individual and his desire to escape or Django’s vengeance. This is something we need to consider along with the stark depiction of the violence enacted upon enslaved women in Django Unchained because by solely focusing on Django, Broomhilda’s voice becomes subsumed beneath a male-centered tale of revenge. While Broomhilda does not speak much in this sequence or the narrative as a whole, seeing some of her story gives voice, albeit only through facial expressions and body language, to the suffering that enslaved women endured. This manner of representation, however, falls short because ultimately Broomhilda continues to exist as a narrative tool for Django’s journey towards enacting his agency and humanity through his revenge.
Hudlin’s adaptation of Django Unchained, however, adds an important narrative point that the film lacks, the constant suffering and sexual predation that Broomhilda endured as an enslaved woman that is otherwise erased save as motivation for the protagonist. Broomhilda’s path to Candyland is important in highlighting the sexual violence of slavery, a violence that the film does not explore in detail. The film does show physical violence against Broomhilda, and there are sexual discussions about her; however, the punishment and physical violence she endures occurs because she gets caught running away from Candyland not as a consistent strategy of discipline and control. If the scenes that appear in the adaptation were in the film, there would still be a problem with Broomhilda’s lack of agency and voice, but they would allow for a larger focus on Broomhilda instead of just focusing on Django’s quest to reunite with her. While still not centering Broomhilda’s voice, the sequence showing how she becomes Candie’s property highlights that slaves, specifically women, encountered sexual violence at every turn. Even with this sequence, this can still come across as an exploitative and dehumanizing representation of enslaved women.
Writing about the ways that Frederick Douglass used photography to counter stereotypes during the nineteenth century, Renee Graham points out that along with Douglass’ “self-possessed and unafraid” representation the majority of images “reinforced ideas of subservience such as the cowed and broken slave, his back a mass of scars from the lick of an overseer’s whip.” Unfortunately, Broomhilda is portrayed in the same manner. We see her suffering, the scars on her back, and her naked body on display for those who seek to purchase her. This representation differs from the ways that John Ira Jennings presents Dana Franklin’s experiences in antebellum Maryland in the graphic novel adaptation of Octavia Butler’s Kindred. There, Dana expresses resistance, not exploitation. In Django Unchained, however, Broomhilda exists as nothing more than a victim and enslaved woman. Dana along with Alice, Sarah, and others in Kindred show that Black women resisted the system of control over their bodies to varying degrees.
We see Broomhilda, but we do not hear her. What does this do for readers? How can the horrors and violence that enslaved women endured be represented visually—specifically in sequential art—in such a way that does not render them voiceless and that does not exploit or dehumanize them through sexualized and violent images? These are questions that arise when reading something like Django Unchained. It may be credible to show the violence, both physical and psychological, enacted upon enslaved individuals, but when does that representation work challenge this history and when does it reinforce wide-held beliefs?
Matthew Teutsch is currently a Fulbright Professor of American Literature at the University of Bergen. He is an instructor of English at Auburn University. He maintains Interminable Rambling, a blog about literature, composition, culture, and pedagogy, and is a regular contributor to Black Perspectives and Teaching United States History. His research focuses on African American and Southern literature, and he has published on the works of Ernest J. Gaines, Charles Chesnutt, Robert Beck, Jean Toomer, and others. His writing has appeared in various venues including LEAR, MELUS, Mississippi Quarterly, and Studies in the Literary Imagination. Currently, he is working on an edited collection of Georgia author Frank Yerby and on a monograph that examines the continued impact of Christopher Priest’s Black Panther run (1998-2003). Follow him on Twitter @SilasLapham.