Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Emperorjones

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 220
7
Hudlin TV / Re: Star Trek: Discovery
« on: November 14, 2018, 05:03:58 pm »
I bought Star Trek Discovery Season 1 on DVD and finished it the other day. Even though I had read/watched a lot of spoilers already and knew about the major stuff that happened during the season, I still enjoyed watching it for myself. I liked the show more than I thought I would. I thought it was the second best first season of any Trek series, with TOS being at the top. DISCO has the best production values of any televised Trek, and is better than many of the movies too. And being 15-episodes, it was tighter, with a faster pace (sometimes to its detriment). Below are my thoughts:

Likes:
-Production values. I thought they were movie quality and fit the aesthetic of the J.J. Abrams's era Trek films.
-Ship/costume design: This show had very good costuming and cool ship and weapons designs. Once again, I thought they were often movie quality.
-Sonequa Martin-Green. While I didn't always get where they were going with her character, I thought Martin-Green was committed to the role and is not a bad lead for the series.
-Crew: Overall the crew wasn't that bad. They were not as bland as the ENT crew and I liked that the characters were allowed to have some interpersonal conflicts, more than the VOY crew. In addition to Burnham, Tyler, Lorca, Stamets, and Saru stood out for me. I also liked Michelle Yeoh's Philippa Georgiou. DISCO put me in the mind of DS9, but also had the feel of the recent Battlestar Galactica; with BSG actress Rekha Sharma being on the show didn't hurt either in making that comparison. I also liked the Klingons L'Rell, T'Kuvma, and Kol.
-Klingons: I was very iffy about the changes made to them, but I did like how they did feel more alien, somewhat. At least they made the attempt. The costumes and ships were an interesting design.
-Starfleet uniforms: I liked them already but they grew on me more as I got into the season.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
-Music: Never thought I would hear Al Green or Wyclef on a Star Trek show. I'm glad they are using more contemporary music than the classic stuff from previous Treks.

Dislikes:
-Battle scenes: Despite how much thought and care went into designing the space ships, I thought the battle scenes were often hard to follow and could've been better.
-Aesthetics: While great looking, they didn't fit the time period. Starfleet ships and technology was too advanced for a show set 10 years before TOS. It works for a modern audience, but I wish they had taken greater pains to emulate the TOS style. The fan film "Prelude to Axanar" which got shut down by CBS did it very well, and I wish CBS had hired those folks to design the ships instead of just shutting them down.
-
Spoiler (click to reveal)
Klingons: Even though I thought the design was interesting, I wish they had adhered closer to canon. There's little they did in DISCO that could not have been done with more traditional looking Klingons. I think the redesign was a little too radical. It was hard to reconcile such a divergent look without explanation, which the show did not provide. If the DISCO Klingons had been another species, and leave their ships and costumes as is, then I wouldn't have any complaints about them. But since they made them Klingons and there's decades of live-action material out there about the Klingons, they should've made sure to work better within what had already been established. I also thought the Klingon makeup was too restrictive and made it harder for the actors to say their lines. I also felt the show made a mistake by having the Klingon characters speak in Klingon far too much, and used subtitles to translate for the audience. When the Klingon actors were allowed to talk English I thought they sounded better.
-Sarek: Was just not feeling James Frain as Sarek. I never bought him in the role. There was something too serpentine about his performance. They should've saved him to play a Romulan or maybe a sly Klingon.
-Crew: The focus wasn't equally shared and I wish some of the junior officers had gotten more spotlight, also that they provided species' names for some of the alien crewmen besides Saru. Cadet Tilly, apparently a fan favorite, was just okay for me. Dr. Culber didn't do much for me either.
-"Michael" Burnham: Didn't like giving a black woman a masculine name. It goes back to me the tendency to depict black women as more masculine and black men as more effeminate in Hollywood. About the Burnham character I've read some criticism that she was othered and came to represent-in a negative way-the self-sacrificing black woman. I'm not sure about that, but it's something I need to keep an eye on. I did like that Burnham wasn't a Mary Sue. I thought they were going to go that route, with all the talk about how special Burnham is.  But the show shows her screwing up, perhaps too much at times, and she earns her victories, in ways that Star Wars's Rey doesn't, or hasn't yet.
-Black men: Very few black men on DISCO. Culber is the most prominent black male character and he is killed off, though the show's producers have promised he'll be back. There's two background players on Discovery-one a communications officer and another-with noticeable and notable dreadlocks-works the transporter. Together they probably had a few lines between them. The highest ranking black Starfleet officer was a Vulcan admiral who the Discovery's captain, Lorca, disrespected a bit too much for me. Also there was another black captain, Maddox, who Lorca disrespected even more, and I wasn't a big fan of that, though the show did explain Lorca's behavior there somewhat. Nigerian/English actor Chris Obi played T'Kuvma, the Klingon messiah who was killed off in the second episode, with his successor being a Klingon with albinism, so they had a very dark-skinned, coal black Klingon replaced by a literally white Klingon. As an aside, almost no black actors are chosen to be Klingon leaders in Trek period. They fill the ranks as the soldiers, and seem to have become the go-to actor for Klingons starting in TNG, and arguably there were black actors in several Jem'Hadar roles as well, but many of the leader roles have been saved for white/nonblack actors, and DISCO starts out with T'Kuvma, but moves on to Voq, L'Rell, and Kol, all played by nonblack actors. Off the top of my head, the only black actress that I can think of that played a Klingon was Gabrielle Union on DS9. As for black women on DISCO, there is a prominently featured bridge officer,  Joann Owosekun, who got some spotlight, but I would like to see more. There was also a Doctor Pollard that got a couple lines, and I would like to see her more as well. She sounded more credible as a physician than Culber to me.
-Harry Mudd: I didn't dislike Rainn Wilson as Mudd, but I'm not so sure about the darker take on the character. Plus he was the guest star for the time loop episode, the one I disliked the least. Even though that was the episode that had the Wyclef and Al Green songs.

Below are many of the black actors/characters from Season 1 (Beware spoilers):

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Michael_Burnham

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Terral

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Joann_Owosekun

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Hugh_Culber

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Pollard

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/R.A._Bryce

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/T%27Kuvma

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Maddox


10
I don't know what was going on with that big wig but Oprah did a good job. The speech about our ancestors was a soundbyte many of us needed to hear. The Blue Wave may not even be a trickle. The polls are all over the place and Republicans don't tell the truth in them anyway. In 2016 CNN projected Hillary as the winner up until she lost, so their reporting means nothing to me. I've been arguing with too many fake hotep brothas on the Internet who feel it's their life's work to convince other Black folks their votes don't matter.  All they do is spread doubt, misinformation and apathy in the name of Black Power. Google Team_Rob on youtube or ig to see what I'm talking about. It's a problem.

This Oprah sermon, while stirringly given, is what black people hear every election year, in some form or another. It's basically the last-perhaps only-card left the Democrats have to play to rally black support and that's to guilt, bully, and scare black voters into sticking with the Democrats. And I think black people 'fake hotep' or not have every right to question the efficacy of voting. We've had 50 years of full, or mostly full, voting rights to see if voting is so great, and that record is dubious. It works to some extent in some areas or for some issues, and not for others. It has definitely helped create a black political class, but their loyalty is more to the Democratic party and their own careers than to community, so I can see why some are down on voting. The Democrats and vote shamers like Oprah want us to just keep voting and voting without getting, or even expecting much in return, since the GOP is cast as being so monstrous that we have no choice but to remain captive to the Democrats and their last priority even though the party would be finished without black votes. There aren't enough white women, LGBT, Asian, or Latino reliably Democratic voters to supplant us as the key bloc of votes for the Democrats yet, and the white working class-who the Democrats have chased for thirty to forty years, aren't coming back in sufficient numbers either.

I see voting as a tool. It's not the end all/be all, especially if black voters are not picking these candidates and can't even get them to commit to any specific help. We accept when they talk about 'minorities', 'people of color', or a 'rising tide' stuff and we've seen decades of how those 'univeralist' policies still keep us at the bottom. So I can see why some are not rah rah about taking time out of their day or to get off work to go vote for someone who doesn't give a damn about them and is not going to represent their interests.

As I was saying, voting is a tool. Which means it can be misused or needs to be used for the right problem. But the idea that voting solves everything, or that voting is all the political engagement we need is wrong and history bears that out, but it is something promoted by the Democrats who only care that we continue voting for them, whereas the Republicans want to depress or suppress our vote. Democrats are much more hyped about voter suppression than doing something about police brutality, poor education, prison reform, for example. Why? Because they care about black votes far more than black lives. I can see why some do feel voting doesn't matter because all too often it hasn't. Though it is a tool, it is a way to express dissent, but also a want to express where people should think the country should go or what's important. That being said, when you have donor-selected candidates presented to us, instead of us building and supporting our own candidates, it invites distrust and apathy and that's where were are now. Though the Democrats still use symbolism and the politics of personality and celebrity to keep many on board, there are others who aren't jumping when they call, or need a lot more convincing, and that's a good thing. The supposed uptick in 'progressive' and candidates of color is a response to people not feeling Hillary, among other things. Sometimes withholding your vote, or not voting, or voting elsewhere, also gets a response as opposed to just voting over and over and over again. If they don't have to work for your vote, they aren't going to.

I plan on voting, in part because I just want to vote against someone instead of voting for anyone. But that's my choice. I'm not going to bully or shame someone who doesn't vote, because I get it.

That's the kind of stuff you worry about AFTER trump is incapacitated or out of office. Right now it's just self-centered and in the way.
If I have to guilt, bully or scare you it doesn't matter to me as long as you vote blue.

We've been voting blue, more than any other segment of the country for decades now and what has it gotten us? The Democrats can't, or won't, even defend the  only things they still talk about to retain our loyalty, and that's the Great Society programs and Civil Rights laws of the 1960s. Can you name me a new major Civil Rights law-aimed at black people-since that time? The last major Civil Rights breakthroughs was for the disabled under George H.W. Bush and for the LGBT community under Obama, but even under the most recent Blue President  (because he made clear he wasn't the president of Black America), the Voting Rights Act was gutted (and to my knowledge Obama did not put forward any legislation to address that), ACORN was shuttered, Obama's black-only lectures, Obama's refutation of MLK's philosophy when he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize he didn't earn, etc., etc., many things that left blacks on the outside looking in once again, even with a black family in the White House. "Brother" Bill Clinton gave us mass incarceration and welfare reform. We don't owe the Democrats anything. As Malcolm X once said, "We put them first and they put us last." That was true in his time and it remains true today.

The idea that we don't think, but just vote, how does that sound? If the vote is so 'sacred' as Rep. John Lewis says, when you can understand him, then shouldn't we be very careful and considerate in our use of it? And to 'worry about stuff later' and not to ask questions before I go into a voting booth is not the way to go. You might as well stay home if you are selecting people you have no clue about and you are making assumptions on based on party affiliation. Granted, there is a big chance with voting period because you can never be sure how people are going to go when they get in office, but it certainly doesn't help when we have people demanding people vote without questioning, without thinking, and certainly without demanding accountability from the people who are in office already, much less the ones who are aiming to get in now and be the new people to play us.

And it is concerning that you feel okay with doing whatever you have to do to get people to pull a lever for a party that takes them for granted and will continue to do so. But that's not outside the norm when it comes to black Democrats unfortunately. "Vote like your life depended on it," John Lewis has said, or something to that effect. What he meant to say IMO is that his paycheck and other black Democratic politicians paychecks and careers depend on it.

If this is self-centered to you, that's good. We should be self-centered when it comes to voting. Everyone else is and that's why voting works better for some-not all-but for a lot more groups than it does for us.

11
Black Panther / Re: Panther vs Deadpool mini series
« on: November 03, 2018, 03:55:47 pm »
I felt the opposite. Really didn't like the artwork. The tonal dissonance between BP's world and Deadpool's world didn't work for me. It made little sense, even for Deadpool to just tell T'Challa what he really needed the vibranium for. Granted, T'Challa would not believe him, and you could still have the fight between them. I did like learning about the Wakandan Halloween-like holiday though.

12
I don't know what was going on with that big wig but Oprah did a good job. The speech about our ancestors was a soundbyte many of us needed to hear. The Blue Wave may not even be a trickle. The polls are all over the place and Republicans don't tell the truth in them anyway. In 2016 CNN projected Hillary as the winner up until she lost, so their reporting means nothing to me. I've been arguing with too many fake hotep brothas on the Internet who feel it's their life's work to convince other Black folks their votes don't matter.  All they do is spread doubt, misinformation and apathy in the name of Black Power. Google Team_Rob on youtube or ig to see what I'm talking about. It's a problem.

This Oprah sermon, while stirringly given, is what black people hear every election year, in some form or another. It's basically the last-perhaps only-card left the Democrats have to play to rally black support and that's to guilt, bully, and scare black voters into sticking with the Democrats. And I think black people 'fake hotep' or not have every right to question the efficacy of voting. We've had 50 years of full, or mostly full, voting rights to see if voting is so great, and that record is dubious. It works to some extent in some areas or for some issues, and not for others. It has definitely helped create a black political class, but their loyalty is more to the Democratic party and their own careers than to community, so I can see why some are down on voting. The Democrats and vote shamers like Oprah want us to just keep voting and voting without getting, or even expecting much in return, since the GOP is cast as being so monstrous that we have no choice but to remain captive to the Democrats and their last priority even though the party would be finished without black votes. There aren't enough white women, LGBT, Asian, or Latino reliably Democratic voters to supplant us as the key bloc of votes for the Democrats yet, and the white working class-who the Democrats have chased for thirty to forty years, aren't coming back in sufficient numbers either.

I see voting as a tool. It's not the end all/be all, especially if black voters are not picking these candidates and can't even get them to commit to any specific help. We accept when they talk about 'minorities', 'people of color', or a 'rising tide' stuff and we've seen decades of how those 'univeralist' policies still keep us at the bottom. So I can see why some are not rah rah about taking time out of their day or to get off work to go vote for someone who doesn't give a damn about them and is not going to represent their interests.

As I was saying, voting is a tool. Which means it can be misused or needs to be used for the right problem. But the idea that voting solves everything, or that voting is all the political engagement we need is wrong and history bears that out, but it is something promoted by the Democrats who only care that we continue voting for them, whereas the Republicans want to depress or suppress our vote. Democrats are much more hyped about voter suppression than doing something about police brutality, poor education, prison reform, for example. Why? Because they care about black votes far more than black lives. I can see why some do feel voting doesn't matter because all too often it hasn't. Though it is a tool, it is a way to express dissent, but also a want to express where people should think the country should go or what's important. That being said, when you have donor-selected candidates presented to us, instead of us building and supporting our own candidates, it invites distrust and apathy and that's where were are now. Though the Democrats still use symbolism and the politics of personality and celebrity to keep many on board, there are others who aren't jumping when they call, or need a lot more convincing, and that's a good thing. The supposed uptick in 'progressive' and candidates of color is a response to people not feeling Hillary, among other things. Sometimes withholding your vote, or not voting, or voting elsewhere, also gets a response as opposed to just voting over and over and over again. If they don't have to work for your vote, they aren't going to.

I plan on voting, in part because I just want to vote against someone instead of voting for anyone. But that's my choice. I'm not going to bully or shame someone who doesn't vote, because I get it.

13
Hudlin TV / Re: House of Cards
« on: November 03, 2018, 12:45:41 pm »
Finished Season 6 today. This is supposed to be the final season. I thought overall this was a decent season, in the middle of the pack for me. The most prominent black actors were Boris Kodjoe and Ron Canada but neither had the kind of presence or importance to the show as Mahershala Ali's Remy Danton or the late Reg E. Cathey or his character Freddie. The first episode is dedicated to Cathey, and another person. There were several black female characters, one in the Cabinet and one a personal lawyer, but I wasn't familiar with those actresses, and then there were several black faces (male but mostly female) sprinkled throughout as background characters.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) absence was noticeable, and left such a big hole that the season was mostly about him, the questions surrounding his fate, his legacy, his ghosts, his demons to some extent, with some dialogue seeming to be throwing dirt more so at Spacey than his Underwood character. In Season 6 his wife Claire is now the president and is dealing with the ghosts from Frank's past, including dogged reporters, a grieving, vengeful Doug, Frank's right-hand man, and the Shepherd siblings, played by Diane Lane and Greg Kinnear. The set-up for Season 6 wasn't bad however I do think the supporting cast could've been more dynamic. Some of the returning characters weren't my favorites to be honest so the characters for the most part were bland or blah to me. Claire was great though, especially once she started showing her darker side. That being said, Claire never really enjoys the skulduggery like Frank did, so it was missing the thrill, it was more cold and methodical befitting Claire's personality I suppose.

Kodjoe plays an ambitious young Congressman and with his bald head and lighter complexion he made me think of Cory Booker immediately. However I don't think the show made much use of him. That being said, Kodjoe has never been the strongest actor to me anyway, and I wish they had gotten someone else and then expanded that role. They made even less use of Ron Canada, which is unfortunate. Though Canada's character was more important to the story than Kodjoe's IMO.

I thought the season started off slow, got better in the middle, and then the rushed in the end, so the series finale was unsatisfying. Really, the show stayed way past its expiration date. It should've did two seasons, three at the most. Season 6 wasn't a horrible conclusion, but one that didn't deliver enough IMO.

How I rank the seasons:
Season 1
Season 2
Season 5
Season 6
Season 4
Season 3


14
Hudlin TV / Re: Black Monday (Showtime)
« on: October 29, 2018, 05:47:12 pm »
^
I didn't know you were working on this show. Congrats, and good luck.

15
Hudlin TV / Black Monday (Showtime)
« on: October 29, 2018, 04:14:18 am »
! No longer available

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 220