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Messages - Yaw

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1
Black Panther / Re: Path of the Black Panther: A Retrospective
« on: June 24, 2014, 01:32:54 pm »
It is sooo good to see you back again, bruh. Where you been?

I took a break from comics for a minute to finish up my PHD.  But I have been back for awhile, but I usually just stick to lurking.

ohhhhh Playa Hata Degree Yaw now? I'm very impressed, my brutha. I plan on joining you soon...if you don't mind me asking; what's your PHD in?

developmental psychology

2
Black Panther / Re: Path of the Black Panther: A Retrospective
« on: June 19, 2014, 04:02:43 pm »
It is sooo good to see you back again, bruh. Where you been?

I took a break from comics for a minute to finish up my PHD.  But I have been back for awhile, but I usually just stick to lurking.

3
Black Panther / Re: Path of the Black Panther: A Retrospective
« on: June 19, 2014, 04:01:10 pm »
Does any of what you've typed here change the fact that Jonathan Maberry's bigotry (internalizec or otherwise) had a direct impact on the way Doomwar was conceptualized?

It doesn't change anything.  My point was to make a distinction in order to preempt the inevitable "Jon Maberry is a good man," "has Black friends," etc.  (And yes I see that those comments have already occurred.)

In general we need to move away from attacking individuals' intent. There is too much obfuscation and variation to PROVE someone's intent.  However there is no reason to even question someone's intent when we see an obvious pattern.  Patterns do not necessarily occur because of intent.  They occur because belief, behaviors and practices have a common foundation.  All I was saying is let's focus on the foundation and not disparage an individual's character because then the discussion will become a defense of the individual as opposed to the flaws in the work. 

4
Black Panther / Re: Path of the Black Panther: A Retrospective
« on: June 15, 2014, 04:45:25 pm »
"Writing Black Panther was a particularly rewarding experience for me,” he says. “I have some history with the King of Wakanda. I grew up in a very violent neighborhood during the racial conflicts of the 1960’s. My father was an aggressive racist and member of the local chapter of the KKK. All I got as a kid was propagandized anti-black hate talk, and for a while I thought that was the way the world was.


As far as I'm concerned, Maberry is a straight up bigot whether he acknowledges it or not.

Dude, used Reginald Hudlin's closing arc on the Black Panther book as a platform from which to desstroy all that Hudlin achieved on the book.

I knew who and what he was all about when he first came to HEF to promote Doomwar and most of the regulars were asking him questions about the story and he rudely snapped at one of them.

I'm like, "Th' fvck is up with him" ???

He even gave me a snarky reply when I asked about a plot point in a Black Panther issue where Namor was reading a book without a title.

What happened to his post?  Was it edited by someone?

BTW whether someone is a bigot or not is irrelevant.  White supremacy has a way of defining people's subconscious beliefs and opinions despite how they feel towards any one group and despite their own ethnicity/race.  That is why I said that despite moving away from his father's views it is not unlikely that he has engrained opinions about Black people. 

Can anyone imagine a major white hero being bested by Dr. Doom in the manner that Black Panther was and NOT having a clear win in the end?

Antman's clear defeat to Dr. Doom was a slap in the face to Black Panther and speaks to how Black Panther is treated by the company as a whole.   Remember Maberry had an editor.  An editor who allowed the travesty known as Doomwar to end as it did.

Yaw, with all due respect, what exactly do you mean with your "BTW whether someone is a bigot or not is irrelevant." comment?

I sometimes get the impression that some of you guys just like to be argumentative for the fun of it. :smh:


I meant  is "not RELEVANT." 

Bigot= a person who strongly and unfairly dislikes other people, ideas, etc. : a bigoted person; especially : a person who hates or refuses to accept the members of a particular group (such as a racial or religious group)

My point is that focusing on whether someone "likes or hates" another group of people is not relevant.  It simply doesn't matter because racism/white supremacy is institutionalized so people's norms and beliefs will be influenced into the notion that Black people are ultimately inferior and thereby should be depicted in ways not equal to their White counterparts.

I once had a professor who once said that a particular historical figure is racist which caused many students to argue that point.  When one student replied "But he loved Black people!", the professor responded, " People love their dogs but that doesn't mean they see them as equals."

So no I was not being argumentative for the fun of it, I just believe that discussions on racism and white supremacy are often diluted by the belief that these concepts are predicated on personal feelings of love and acceptance.  They aren't and never were.

5
Black Panther / Re: Path of the Black Panther: A Retrospective
« on: June 15, 2014, 06:28:16 am »
"Writing Black Panther was a particularly rewarding experience for me,” he says. “I have some history with the King of Wakanda. I grew up in a very violent neighborhood during the racial conflicts of the 1960’s. My father was an aggressive racist and member of the local chapter of the KKK. All I got as a kid was propagandized anti-black hate talk, and for a while I thought that was the way the world was.


As far as I'm concerned, Maberry is a straight up bigot whether he acknowledges it or not.

Dude, used Reginald Hudlin's closing arc on the Black Panther book as a platform from which to desstroy all that Hudlin achieved on the book.

I knew who and what he was all about when he first came to HEF to promote Doomwar and most of the regulars were asking him questions about the story and he rudely snapped at one of them.

I'm like, "Th' fvck is up with him" ???

He even gave me a snarky reply when I asked about a plot point in a Black Panther issue where Namor was reading a book without a title.

What happened to his post?  Was it edited by someone?

BTW whether someone is a bigot or not is irrelevant.  White supremacy has a way of defining people's subconscious beliefs and opinions despite how they feel towards any one group and despite their own ethnicity/race.  That is why I said that despite moving away from his father's views it is not unlikely that he has engrained opinions about Black people. 

Can anyone imagine a major white hero being bested by Dr. Doom in the manner that Black Panther was and NOT having a clear win in the end?

Antman's clear defeat to Dr. Doom was a slap in the face to Black Panther and speaks to how Black Panther is treated by the company as a whole.   Remember Maberry had an editor.  An editor who allowed the travesty known as Doomwar to end as it did.

6
Black Panther / Re: Path of the Black Panther: A Retrospective
« on: June 10, 2014, 07:20:52 pm »
http://marvel.com/news/comics/2014/6/10/22666/path_of_the_black_panther_a_retrospective_pt_4#ixzz34HNp8hTq

"Writing Black Panther was a particularly rewarding experience for me,” he says. “I have some history with the King of Wakanda. I grew up in a very violent neighborhood during the racial conflicts of the 1960’s. My father was an aggressive racist and member of the local chapter of the KKK. All I got as a kid was propagandized anti-black hate talk, and for a while I thought that was the way the world was. Then I started reading comics. In the pages of FANTASTIC FOUR, I was introduced to T’Challa, the noble king of a small but powerful African nation. T’Challa was the exact opposite of a black man as my father and the others in our neighborhood described them.

Then I read FANTASTIC FOUR #119 in 1972. It was the first time Apartheid was presented in a comic and it showed the Thing and the Torch going to a totalitarian white African nation to help free their unfairly imprisoned friend, T’Challa. I took that comic to a librarian and asked if anything like that ever happened in the real world. The answer changed my life. That comic, and the character of the Black Panther, changed who I was as a person. It broke apart the shackles of racism that had been put on me by my father. It opened my eyes and my mind."
- Jonathan Maberry

Marvel has released the final part of their Black Panther articles and I felt the need to write this after reading the comments by Maberry.  I'm not calling him racist.  However I feel as though it is instructive to see how he admits he was raised in this sort of environment.  Kudos to him for his honesty.  The reality of racism and specifically white supremacy is that although people may overcome certain certain ill-conceived prejudices, there are certain subtleties about how we view people that may be residual.  In describing what he sought to accomplish with Black Panther further, Maberry stated:
"The story I wrote explored how it’s not the vibranium or the superior technology of Wakanda that defines who T’Challa is, but his own integrity, his personal honor, and his moral courage."

I couldn't help but see the parallels between this view and the mainstream celebration of the Civil Rights Movement (CRM).  IF the CRM accomplished anything it established the consensus that "racism is bad" and through certain policy changes and integration, all races are equal.  Martin Luther King is only celebrated for saying that people of all races should one day be able to live, work and play together.  What is NEVER celebrated in the mainstream about MLK is that he fought for economic justice and reparations for Black people as well.

This brings me to Maberry's goal.  It has been a common theme in American fictional history to focus on the integrity, honor and courage of disenfranchised Blacks as a means of improving their lot in life. This was an important part of the movie "The Butler" where the main character "kept his head up" while he endured hardship only to finally get that raise at the end of his life.  The focus of gaining and maintaining land and resources (i.e. wealth) is often an missing virtue.  We don't celebrate MLK in schools when he said that Black people need to go to Washington to "Get our check" owed to them in contrast to the government-sanctioned financial and economic support given to other racial and ethnic groups. 

Yes Black Panther is a man of integrity, honor and courage.  However integrity, honor and courage alone will not save a nation or a people.  After reading the end of Doomwar, I felt hollow.  The victory is beyond pyrrhic.  In the coining of the term, Pyrrhus' army beats the Romans who suffered greater casualties.  However the smaller army and resources of Pyrrhus made the victory devastating to his people.  How was Dr. Doom hurt in anyway?  He went from having no vibranium, to tons of vibranium, to tons of useless vibranium.  The damage to Wakanda was incalculable (deaths of the population, royal family and loss of a large amount of the number one resource that makes the country unique and able to defend itself).

Yes vibranium and superior technology are essential to defining T'Challa otherwise he is Captain America or any number of other superheroes in the MU.  Integrity, honor and courage do not create power, defenses and wealth for a people. Resources and the intelligence on how to use them do.

7
Black Panther / Re: IGN deems Panther/Storm Marriage bad
« on: April 17, 2014, 08:21:39 pm »
The trolling of Black Panther is really, really bad, in the  X-Books. Seriously Kymera is the ultimate slap in the face.  First we now have Storm being a jumpoff AND an unwed single mother.  Then the child is meant to seem like she is a child of Storm/BP but they won't tell us?  I think it is obvious that she is not his child or at least if they reveal it at some point she will be the child of someone else (Bishop maybe?)  But at this point I say epic fail.  They are trolling BP and the marriage by Kymera's very existence and design.


8
Latest Flicks / Re: The Dark Knight Rises
« on: August 20, 2013, 04:50:43 pm »
Flex forgot to mention that Bane was fueled by Venom in the film as evidenced when the hose is damaged in the final fight.

I will let this glaring omission pass without penalty.

Actually he wasn't fueled by "venomm" in the comic book sense.  He was on painkillers due to being in chronic pain ever since he took a beatdown for helping Talia Al Ghul escape that prison.

9
Is this a new trend...Kill off the brothers and throw the sistas to the white guys... or am I just being paranoid now that Barak is the nominee....?

both
and I'm right with you  ;)

10
Other Comics / Re: X-Men: Divided We Stand
« on: April 20, 2008, 04:21:42 pm »

As for Prodigy, maybe in the second issue of this 2-parter we'll get a story about him and what's going on between him and Surge after the X-Men are now no more. Maybe those two will get a happy ending after all... or not.

Surge will have a story in the next issue but I haven't heard any confirmation if Prodigy will be apart of that or not.  I'm sure he will though.

11
Other Comics / Re: X-Men: Divided We Stand
« on: April 18, 2008, 09:27:20 pm »
BTW is this a growing trend where Black characters are being revealed to have at least one white parent later on down the road.  First blade has a white daddy and now Nezhno has a white daddy. Who is next?

12
Other Comics / Re: X-Men: Divided We Stand
« on: April 18, 2008, 08:30:44 pm »
I really enjoyed the Nezhno story. It was a nice piece of Wakandan lore and tragic story all-in-one.  Nezhno is half White Russian (mutant) and half Wakandan.  That is a wierd combination.  I mean I wonder how is mother got with the Russian guy.  he is also said to be of the royal court.  I wonder if that is Storm's influence or if his mother is royalty somehow.  Either way it was a enjoyable story.  I liked the part about raw vibranium used to treat illnesses such as tremors and seizures.  I wonder if Kyle and Yost had this planned all along.  At least now we know why a Wakandan has a Russian name.  in fact I seem to remember discussing this a LONG time ago and Jen made the argument that Black people have European names all of the time.  Well I think given the nature of Wakandan lore in the comic books Kyle and Yost made a good decision in respects to how they would  explain why a Wakandan has a Russian name.  This is one instance where a Black person having a European name makes absolutely no sense whatsoever and is evidence of lazy writing.

13
Black Panther / Re: Reverend Achebe was not a compelling villain
« on: April 14, 2008, 11:11:36 am »
Let's not even talk about Moses Magnum. ::)  He could seriously be brought back as a serious baddie.  If done right he could become Black Panther's Kingpin in that he started as a baddie in another book but became so significant in another book that he is thought of as part of that franchise.  The thing that is good about Moses Magnum is that he is a global threat as opposed to simply a "Wakandan threat."  The way I'm seeing it, Moses Magnum and Black Panther should have an African Cold War of sorts where they are fighting each other to such a scale that other countries are affected.  I mean an Ethiopian superhuman weapons dealer?  Weapons dealing is a problem affecting the entire continent to a significant degree.

14
Other Comics / Re: Who do you think is the Ultimate Black Panther?
« on: April 13, 2008, 01:06:58 pm »
issue #3 will come out this christmas... if there aren't any delays.
;)

Issue #3 is already out.  We are waiting on issue #4 and #5 now.

15
Black Panther / Reverend Achebe was not a compelling villain
« on: April 13, 2008, 01:03:35 pm »
I know I'm treading on shaky ground here but please hear me out.  I was thinking the other day about villains that I would like to see Black Panther face again and when thinking about Achebe I realized that I really don't understand his purpose.  I mean yes he is a lunatic but, um... what else?  What is his purpose?  I think the first arcs of Priest's run was fantastic and that Achebe was suitable for the role of an antagonist at the time.  however what else is there?  HE was never really used again significantly (yes he was in the Avengers arc but it was somewhat trivial).  I mean he was first introduced as a psychotic leader of a group of warring ethnic refugees who attempted a coup d'tetat on Wakanda.  However as the arc continued he became more comical and less threatening IMO (I think Texeira's art in the beginning played a role in making him look more threatening). 

At any rate if he was brought back what would be his purpose?  How could he be made more threatening again?  Killing pet leopards won't help much neither does torturing characters that have become villains themselves (Nakia/Malice) off-panel.  I think the parody Priest and crew made of Black Panther where he was "Batman" and Achebe was "the Joker" was a bit too true at this point.  Achebe's characterization should have been explored and extended a bit more.  By the end of the run I think he was really nothing more than a joke.

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