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Messages - DRobinson

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46
Congrats Mastrrmynd.

To precisely calculate the delivery date, I will need a few more pieces of data:

1.   Is this your wife’s first baby?
2.   Is she carrying low or high?
3.   Boy or Girl?
4.   Have either of you ever been on a Jerry Springer paternity segment?
5.   Give conception details or provide link to film.
6.   Was alcohol, an insincere promise, or a hand gun used in the process of conception?
7.   Again, congrats to you and Mrs. Mynd, enjoy Minimynd, and focus on number 5 above.


DR :)

47
Sports Talk / Willie Mays
« on: May 18, 2010, 11:33:12 am »
Willie Mays, The Baseball Giant
By MICHAEL MINK, FOR INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY
Posted 05/17/2010 05:10 PM ET
 


Mays, in the mid-1950s when the Giants were still in New York, clubbed 660 homers, grabbed 12 Gold Gloves and won two MVP trophies. AP View Enlarged Image
Willie Mays knew tough times.

And how to get through them.

Born near Birmingham, Ala., in 1931, he grew up amid segregation. His father taught him to avoid bitterness and instead focus on maximizing his athletic gifts.

Mays got the message — and swung through baseball's stages.

By 1950 — three years after Jackie Robinson broke Major League Baseball's color barrier — Mays signed with the New York Giants and joined their minor league team in Trenton, N.J. There he was subjected to race-baiting by fans and some opposing players as the Interstate League's first black player.

Mays' father, a former semipro baseball player, told Willie to keep ignoring the darts. Both knew his immense talent could take him to the major leagues while helping pave the way for other black players.

The next year he was in the big leagues. Yet early on he hardly looked like a Giant, going one for 26.

Could Mays endure? His father had prepared him for such situations, and his manager, Leo Durocher, believed in him. Neither mentor would let the center fielder quit.

Mays' Keys
•Called by some the top player in baseball history, he entered the Hall of Fame in 1979 and was chosen to MLB's All-Century Team in 1999.
•"In baseball, you have to be very disciplined as far as knowing what to do, how to do it. And you have to prepare."
Never Give Up

Mays bounced back with a vengeance, helping the Giants to the 1951 National League pennant and winning the NL's Rookie of the Year. Over the next two decades he performed on such a high level, fans lauded him as they did Babe Ruth.

"My father gave me that one thing, positive thinking, that allowed me to look past whatever was happening," Mays, 79, told James Hirsch in "Willie Mays: The Life, the Legend." "Sure there was some pain. But if you can overcome your pain and do your job, the pain disappears the next day. That's where the positive thinking comes in."

Hirsch told IBD that Mays shares that thinking with fans, advising them that "whatever you want to do, there's going to come a point where you're going to feel like you're not good enough. But don't give up. Don't give up when things are going badly."

With that attitude, Mays made sure things hardly went south. He won two NL Most Valuable Player trophies, in 1954 and 1965. His lifetime .302 batting average included 3,283 career hits, 11th most in MLB history. He hammered 660 home runs, fourth on the all-time list. His 1,903 runs batted in rank 10th.

In the field, Mays was so outstanding he received 12 Gold Gloves.

In 1979, six years after his final season, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.
"Whatever I did, I tried to be the best in each category, in hitting, running and throwing," Mays told IBD in a 2000 interview.

Durocher, a Hall of Fame manager who played with Ruth, consistently called Mays baseball's greatest player ever. Hirsch wrote that Mays "was an American icon ... a distinctive figure of ambition, sacrifice and triumph. He succeeded by hewing to the country's most cherished values — hard work, clean living and perseverance."

Mays grew up seeing that baseball was his ticket to a better life. His heroes were ballplayers, especially Joe DiMaggio, Stan Musial and Ted Williams. He learned about their success by reading about them and watching newsreel footage. Soon enough, he would pattern his batting stance after DiMaggio's.

During his 22 seasons in the majors, Mays played to win games, not pile up statistics. "Winning the pennant was more important than anything I could accomplish individually," he said.

"You never heard Willie talk about his stats when playing," said former Giants broadcaster Lon Simmons.

Mays led the Giants to three pennants, helped the New York Mets to one in 1973, his last season — and made the World Series poster catch that sparked their sweep of the Cleveland Indians in 1954.

Mays hit .286 and scored four runs in that upset of the Indians. But it was his defense that set the tone.

The grand moment came in the first game. In a 2-2 tie, Cleveland had men on first and second with no outs in the eighth inning.

Up stepped Vic Wertz, who drove one deep to center. Running full speed with his back to the plate, Mays made a stunning over-the-shoulder catch. He then wheeled and fired a rope to second base, keeping the runner at first from advancing. "I knew exactly what I was going to do if I caught the ball," he said. "You have to think all plays out before they ever happen."

After he made another great catch in the 10th inning, the Giants won it in the bottom of the inning, 5-2.

Mays' eighth-inning heroics live on as The Catch, which Indians skipper Al Lopez called "the best play anybody ever made in baseball."

Such clutch play made Mays the first black captain of a team in the majors. "Baseball was my life when I played," he said. "I didn't know any other way than to play hard."
Mays would charge after balls in center field as though he "actually registers belligerence toward" them, the Sporting News wrote in 1958, the year the Giants moved to San Francisco. The article also said "Mays attacks a ballgame — any game, one that doesn't count as well as one that figures importantly in the standings — as if history for the ages depended on that score."

Capping It Off

Bill Rigney, who managed Mays on the Giants from 1956 to '60, said: "Every time Willie walked into the clubhouse you knew you had a chance to win. He brought electricity to the clubhouse. He was a winner all his life. Consequently, everybody followed after him."

Mays was so detailed, he'd check each stadium's turf. Depending on its speed, he knew how deep to play. Then he would go all-out, with his cap often flying off — his trademark. "You got to learn for yourself (and) do it your way," he said. "If you love the game, you can do it."

48
Hard Choices / Re: What would you do........?
« on: May 14, 2010, 01:21:52 pm »
"Define Cheating" ...sounds a little Clinton-esque... :)




Define 'Clinton-esque':)

Funny :)

49
Hard Choices / Re: What would you do........?
« on: May 14, 2010, 09:18:41 am »
.....if you have friends who are married to each other and you catch one of them cheating?



Define 'cheating'.

"Define Cheating" ...sounds a little Clinton-esque... :)

50
Sports Talk / Re: The NBA Playoffs Thread
« on: May 14, 2010, 06:51:20 am »
*gets up early in the morning just to mail DRob his HEFfa check of all my HEFfa money.

u were right. i was wrong.
happy now?
lol

You are a stand up guy for crawling out of bed early to give me props.

It's cold out here by the mail box - I'm going inside now.

51
Sports Talk / Re: The NBA Playoffs Thread
« on: May 13, 2010, 03:32:07 pm »
i want my HEF dollars tomorrow Drob.
you are on notice.
what are the odds in Vegas, anyway?
i'm about to get HEFfa paid!!!
 8)

BTW - Boston favored by 1-1/2 pts

52
Sports Talk / Re: The NBA Playoffs Thread
« on: May 13, 2010, 03:28:26 pm »
i want my HEF dollars tomorrow Drob.
you are on notice.
what are the odds in Vegas, anyway?
i'm about to get HEFfa paid!!!
 8)

still just hearing crickets Mastrmynd. You're on your own out there

Enjoy the game, then PM me in the morning, for the address where you can send my winning$ I'm gonna grab a folding aluminum lawn chair and a cold beer, walk out to my mailbox and wait for your (now my) money!

53
Sports Talk / Re: The NBA Playoffs Thread
« on: May 13, 2010, 01:57:16 pm »
i'm puttin' my HEF dollars on Lebron & Co. tonight.
7 game series y'all.
who's with me?

.... crickets... I hear crickets, Mastrmynd

54
Hard Choices / Re: What would you do........?
« on: May 13, 2010, 01:55:09 pm »
.....if you have friends who are married to each other and you catch one of them cheating?

I was recently in this situation. My wife’s girlfriend was having a full on relationship with some dude from her past that had resurfaced. The girlfriend’s husband is a great guy who deserved to know what his wife was doing.

If the husband would have been a close friend, no question – I gotta tell him.

But this guy isn’t that close to me, so I pussed out and said nothing.

The problem is, no good can come to the person who informs the one who is being cheated on.

If they split up, you’re the a-hole because you split them up.
If they stay together, you’re the a-hole because you told.

All bad choices. But like I said above, if the friend is close, you tell.

BTW, the couple in this case is now split up. The husband found some topless & lingerie pictures that his wife had taken of herself and sent to the affair guy via email! They have been split up about 9 months and the wife is onto new guy number 5 (give or take a guy).

55
Hard Choices / Re: ... Your Last Meal, what ya havin??
« on: May 13, 2010, 10:15:18 am »
Texas is executing their second man this week. Here’s what he ordered for his last meal.

BLT
French Fries
Bacon Cheese Burger
Chocolate Cake
Milk
Mountain Dew

What a depressing last meal. Not sure if time in prison takes away one’s appreciation of good food, or if the prison menu is lacking for choices. Sad on all levels.

56
General Discussion / Re: Your Best Date Ever?
« on: May 12, 2010, 12:07:10 pm »
My “Best Date”, measured as the most satisfying, would have to be a date I never had. Let me explain.

There was a smart, incredibly beautiful, successful woman who worked out at the same tiny, private gym as I did. We were friendly for months and finally I found the huevos to ask her out. She said yes and we set a date a couple weeks out (she was bicoastal and leaving town for two weeks).

A few hours before our date, she called and cancelled, saying she had some business obligation, but it sounded weak to me – like I was getting blown off for a better offer. At least that’s how I read it.

About two weeks later, she called me mid week:
Her: small talk… how ya doin?... blah, blah… Do you have plans this coming Saturday evening?

Me: No, I got nothing planned.

Her: Do you want to get together and make-up the date I had to cancel a couple weeks ago?

Me: No thanks.

Her: stunned silence

I don’t remember for sure but I probably sat home alone that Saturday night with a good book, satisfied that I was the dude that said NO to this girl who probably had five guys a day making a play for her.

The truth is she probably never gave it another thought. But the truth I choose to believe is that she has thought back a hundred times and regretted canceling the first date with me.


DRobinson!
That is SO WHACK!!!!


Yeah, I know. Probably not my finest moment… but pretty damn satisfying!

57
Directing / The Scary Discipline Of Alfred Hitchcock
« on: May 12, 2010, 11:58:53 am »
The Scary Discipline Of Alfred Hitchcock
By ALAN R. ELLIOTT, INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY
Posted 05/11/2010 04:44 PM ET
 


Hitchcock was born in London and was already directing movie hits when he reached Hollywood in 1939. AP View Enlarged Image
The '20s hadn't started to roar when a young ad illustrator at a London telegraph firm learned that Famous Players-Lasky had opened a studio.

The production outfit was preparing to film "The Sorrows of Satan."

The illustrator, Alfred Hitchcock, quickly read the novel, by Marie Corelli. He then imagined the film and drew designs for the stylized title cards used as dialogue and description in silent films.

He submitted them to the studio with his portfolio.

The movie was canceled before it started. But Hitchcock didn't let that discourage him. He kept at it: imagining and drawing cards for other gestating films until the studio finally hired him full time in 1920 to design the cards for its productions.

Within two decades, Hitchcock would become Britain's greatest film director. He would then move to Los Angeles to become the top director of suspense films in America.

His work pioneered production and story-depiction techniques that locked in the look and feel of the suspense and horror genre.

Hitchcock also linked film to the developing field of psychology.

Hitchcock's Keys
•Became Britain's top film director with a dozen silent films and talkies, including "The 39 Steps" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much." Directed an additional 31 movies in America to become one of the industry's most influential filmmakers.
•"We (the directors) make the film succeed. The name of the director should be associated in the public's mind with a quality product. Actors come and go, but the name of the director should stay clearly in the mind of the audience."
Murderers and victims became objects of study, shifting "the focus away from the classic Universal (Studios) monsters of the 1930s and 1940s and onto the monsters in human form that cast dramatic shadows over the horror movies of the 1950s and 1960s," Karina Wilson, who runs HorrorFilmHistory.com, told IBD.

Hitchcock (1899-1980) was born in London's East End.

He was seven years younger than his sister, nine years younger than his brother. He was pudgy and soft and often excluded from neighborhood games. This forced the shy boy to live in what would become one of the most influential imaginations in the world.

Hitchcock's father was a grocer, a serious businessman and disciplinarian. His mother managed the home and doted on her youngest boy. Together, his parents were the portrait-perfect Victorian couple.

Hitchcock said he came away from that childhood with a keen sense of good and evil.

Tough Learning

His Catholic education continued that process. It included a stint at London's Salesian College, where the authorities used laxatives as punishment. He then moved to Saint Ignatius College, where the Jesuit priests ordered pupils to choose "the moment when they would receive their strokes with a hard rubber cane," according to Paul Duncan's "Alfred Hitchcock: The Complete Films."

The schools taught Hitchcock "control, organization, discipline and that I did not like to get a tanning," the director told Charlotte Chandler in her biography "It's Only a Movie."
Hitchcock took a job right out of school in 1915 at Henley Telegraph & Cable. Bored with the work, he took night classes and began drawing. His talent and energy eventually landed him in Henley's ad office.

Now thoroughly engaged, he worked creatively. And he took time to attend plays, watch the era's silent movies and read intensively. He especially liked Edgar Allan Poe.

Hitchcock followed crime tabloids closely, attending some murder trials at the Old Bailey, England's Central Criminal Court. And he scoured film trade journals, which would lead him to Famous Players-Lasky.

The U.S. company exported some of its top American talent to the London studio. Eve Unsell, Margaret Turnbull and Ouida Bergere all taught Hitchcock the ins and outs of story and screenplay mechanics as well as adapting novels for film. He soaked up the lessons.

He also made himself indispensable around the studio, learning every aspect of the trade while performing his title card design tasks.

Yet when he was about to direct a short comedy, the studio had slipped into financial trouble. Players-Lasky quit producing films and began renting its space and hiring its talent out to other studios.

In 1923, he had been hired out as an assistant director on "Always Tell Your Wife." A break came when Seymour Hicks, the film's producer/actor/writer fired director Hugh Croise and had Hitchcock direct the remaining scenes.

On his next film as assistant director, the producers needed help, so Hitchcock offered to write the script and handle the art direction. The film was a smash, so the trio worked on four more films.

Next Scene

Hitchcock wooed one of the studio's editors, Alma Reville. They became an item and soon moved to Germany's Ufa studios where Hitchcock dived into the technical aspects of that country's expressionistic filmmakers.

While sailing back on the English Channel, he proposed. A seasick Reville reportedly answered with a burp. He took the reply as a yes, and they were married in 1926.

In 1925, Hitchcock had been hired to direct "The Pleasure Garden" at locations around Europe. Then came turbulence. Authorities confiscated the production crew's film as he and his team traveled from Germany to Italy. Later, he was robbed of the funds he needed to finance the production. He had to borrow cash to pay the crew's hotel bills.

 


One of Hitchcock’s most shocking scenes had Janet Leigh in the shower that turned deadly in 1960’s “Psycho.” AP View Enlarged Image
More bad news arose. The studio delayed the release of Hitchcock's first two films, uncertain how the strange stories would affect audiences. Not until his third movie, 1927's "The Lodger," did the young director receive public exposure.

The story, from Marie Lowndes' 1913 novel, was based on the Jack the Ripper murders of the 1880s. Hitchcock's film was a smash.

Innovating From The Start

In "The Lodger," he used an overhead shot in one suspenseful scene in which only the lodger's hand on the banister is visible as he descends — a technique the director called a substitute for sound.

In another scene, the lodger paces upstairs. Hitchcock installed a plate-glass floor and filmed the frightened family below, looking up.

In "The Lodger," Hitchcock made the first of his trademark cameo appearances. A couple of extras hadn't shown up, he related, so he filled in.

By 1939, Hitchcock had directed a dozen silent films and 16 talkies as a British director. Those included such groundbreaking works as "The 39 Steps," "Blackmail" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much."

Ready for a change, he, Alma and their daughter jumped to America in 1939. There he began his string of box office smashes for producer David O. Selznick, beginning with "Rebecca." Over the next 35 years, he would direct an additional 31 films and seven years of his TV series, "Alfred Hitchcock Presents."

What made his work so magnetic?

"There is a look to Hitchcock films and the way they are put together that are really a unique signature," said Steve Mamber, a professor in UCLA's Film, Television & Digital Media Department.

Hitchcock never went to see his own films, wrote Chandler. He had already imagined them thoroughly and was disappointed at what never made it onto the screen.

Hitchcock pioneered storyboarding, mapping out each shot with drawings. He had special lenses made to handle focus variations in his running shots.

Many directors rely on multiple shots from many angles, then make design decisions during post-production editing. Hitchcock was in the school of "conceptualizing first and filming second," Mamber wrote in the Stanford Humanities Review.

Hitchcock also pioneered the technique of placing the camera in the character's position. In "Rear Window" (1954), most of what you see is what a wheelchair-bound L.B. Jeffries (Jimmy Stewart) sees. "Hitchcock was able to enforce a very close identification with the main characters by restricting what you could see to what was visible from their point of view," Mamber said.

The Zinger

A goal was to provoke an audience's anxiety, to zero in on a personal sense of horror.

Hitchcock was especially adept at prolonging the suspense to make viewers squirm. In 1963's "The Birds," Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette) and her class of children take the audience along, whispering, terrified as they try to sneak past a cloud of crows and sea gulls.

In "Psycho" (1960), Hitchcock put the audience in the shower with Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) as she's knifed — making it the prototype for Hollywood's slasher film genre. After all that, Hitchcock compared the film to a ride in an amusement park: suspense, thrills and chills.

"In a way that's true," Mamber said, "but in another way it is one of the most terrifying films ever made."

58
General Discussion / Re: Your Best Date Ever?
« on: May 12, 2010, 11:47:52 am »
My “Best Date”, measured as the most satisfying, would have to be a date I never had. Let me explain.

There was a smart, incredibly beautiful, successful woman who worked out at the same tiny, private gym as I did. We were friendly for months and finally I found the huevos to ask her out. She said yes and we set a date a couple weeks out (she was bicoastal and leaving town for two weeks).

A few hours before our date, she called and cancelled, saying she had some business obligation, but it sounded weak to me – like I was getting blown off for a better offer. At least that’s how I read it.

About two weeks later, she called me mid week:
Her: small talk… how ya doin?... blah, blah… Do you have plans this coming Saturday evening?

Me: No, I got nothing planned.

Her: Do you want to get together and make-up the date I had to cancel a couple weeks ago?

Me: No thanks.

Her: stunned silence

I don’t remember for sure but I probably sat home alone that Saturday night with a good book, satisfied that I was the dude that said NO to this girl who probably had five guys a day making a play for her.

The truth is she probably never gave it another thought. But the truth I choose to believe is that she has thought back a hundred times and regretted canceling the first date with me.

59
Hudlin's Huddle / The Welfare State's Death Spiral
« on: May 12, 2010, 09:21:24 am »
Below, Samuelson lays out a pretty clear argument.

I read this and worry about the future of the United States unsustainable increases of entitlement programs. Good intentions don’t automatically equal good results. I don’t question the motives of those who push for an ever expanding net of welfare programs (health care, TARP, bailing out Greece via the FED & IMF), whether the welfare is targeted at individuals, corporations, or countries, but I’m scared to death about the unintended consequences.


May 10, 2010
The Welfare State's Death Spiral
By Robert Samuelson

WASHINGTON -- What we're seeing in Greece is the death spiral of the welfare state. This isn't Greece's problem alone, and that's why its crisis has rattled global stock markets and threatens economic recovery. Virtually every advanced nation, including the United States, faces the same prospect. Aging populations have been promised huge health and retirement benefits, which countries haven't fully covered with taxes. The reckoning has arrived in Greece, but it awaits most wealthy societies.

Americans dislike the term "welfare state" and substitute the bland word "entitlements." The vocabulary doesn't alter the reality. Countries cannot overspend and overborrow forever. By delaying hard decisions about spending and taxes, governments maneuver themselves into a cul de sac. To be sure, Greece's plight is usually described as a European crisis -- especially for the euro, the common money used by 16 countries -- and this is true. But only up to a point.

Euro coins and notes were introduced in 2002. The currency clearly hasn't lived up to its promises. It was supposed to lubricate faster economic growth by eliminating the cost and confusion of constantly converting between national currencies. More important, it would promote political unity. With a common currency, people would feel "European." Their identities as Germans, Italians and Spaniards would gradually blend into a continental identity.

None of this has happened. Economic growth in the "euro area" (the countries using the currency) averaged 2.1 percent from 1992 to 2001 and 1.7 percent from 2002 to 2008. Multiple currencies were never a big obstacle to growth; high taxes, pervasive regulations and generous subsidies were. As for political unity, the euro is now dividing Europeans. The Greeks are rioting. The countries making $145 billion of loans to Greece -- particularly the Germans -- resent the costs of the rescue. A single currency could no more subsume national identities than drinking Coke could make people American. If other euro countries (Portugal, Spain, Italy) suffer Greece's fate -- lose market confidence and can't borrow at plausible rates -- there would be a wider crisis.

But the central cause is not the euro, even if it has meant Greece can't depreciate its own currency to ease the economic pain. Budget deficits and debt are the real problems; and these stem from all the welfare benefits (unemployment insurance, old-age assistance, health insurance) provided by modern governments.

Countries everywhere already have high budget deficits, aggravated by the recession. Greece is exceptional only by degree. In 2009, its budget deficit was 13.6 percent of its gross domestic product (a measure of its economy); its debt, the accumulation of past deficits, was 115 percent of GDP. Spain's deficit was 11.2 percent of GDP, its debt 56.2 percent; Portugal's figures were 9.4 percent and 76.8 percent. Comparable figures for the United States -- calculated slightly differently -- were 9.9 percent and 53 percent.

There are no hard rules as to what's excessive, but financial markets -- the banks and investors that buy government bonds -- are obviously worried. Aging populations make the outlook worse. In Greece, the 65-and-over population is projected to go from 18 percent of the total in 2005 to 25 percent in 2030. For Spain, the increase is from 17 percent to 25 percent.

The welfare state's death spiral is this: Almost anything governments might do with their budgets threatens to make matters worse by slowing the economy or triggering a recession. By allowing deficits to balloon, they risk a financial crisis as investors one day -- no one knows when -- doubt governments' ability to service their debts and, as with Greece, refuse to lend except at exorbitant rates. Cutting welfare benefits or raising taxes all would, at least temporarily, weaken the economy. Perversely, that would make paying the remaining benefits harder.

Greece illustrates the bind. To gain loans from other European countries and the International Monetary Fund, it embraced budget austerity. Average pension benefits will be cut 11 percent; wages for government workers will be cut 14 percent; the basic rate for the value added tax will rise from 21 percent to 23 percent. These measures will plunge Greece into a deep recession. In 2009, unemployment was about 9 percent; some economists expect it to peak near 19 percent.

If only a few countries faced these problems, the solution would be easy. Unlucky countries would trim budgets and resume growth by exporting to healthier nations. But developed countries represent about half the world economy; most have overcommitted welfare states. They might defuse the dangers by gradually trimming future benefits in a way that reassured financial markets. In practice, they haven't done that; indeed, President Obama's health program expands benefits. What happens if all these countries are thrust into Greece's situation? One answer -- another worldwide economic collapse -- explains why dawdling is so risky.

Copyright 2010, Washington Post Writers Group


60
Hard Choices / Re: ... Your Last Meal, what ya havin??
« on: May 11, 2010, 01:00:53 pm »
…. Imagine you’ve been on death row for 10 years, thought about it virtually everyday since you got here, now it’s time to order… what do you order for your last meal?

someone was watching the Cleveland show. lol

At the risk of sounding stupid, what's the Cleveland show?

my bad.
it was just a well timed comment by you, then.
:)

cartoon that comes on Fox at 830p on Sundays. (from the creators of family guy)

Ahhh, Got it!

I didn’t know about the Cleveland Show because:
My wife is anti-TV.
On the other hand, I’m pro-TV - but also pro-Wife …

This, as it turns out, makes me anti-TV.

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