Author Topic: Village Voice Article:System Failure: The Collapse of Public Education  (Read 2676 times)

Offline Vic Vega

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In consideration of all our discussions on the topic.

by Anya Kamenetz

"I hated math. Math was like, the worst thing on the planet. I would be late. I would go to the bathroom and just sit there." Jahleah Santiago, 18, widens her eyes, outlined in cat's-eye makeup. Santiago grew up in Flushing, Queens, of Puerto Rican and Native American descent. She graduated from the Academy of Environmental Science in Manhattan and sent in just one college application, which brought her to this windowless fourth-floor classroom at LaGuardia Community College in Long Island City. Both of her parents dropped out of high school; she is the third person in her family ever to go to college. And given her attitude toward math in high school—and the grades to show for it—the odds are stacked against her finishing.

http://www.villagevoice.com/2013-04-03/news/system-failure-the-collapse-of-public-education/


Offline Metro

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It's funny to me that there's so much discussion of the failure of public education, but there's rarely any discussion about the overall percentages of national graduation rates and the conditions in successful public schools that enable graduates to succeed in college and beyond.

Dean Walter Greason
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Offline Maxine Shaw

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That's because college is a scam that matters little in the long run, and jobs nowadays are all about who you know, not what you know. Not to mention that the bachelor's degree has become so common nowadays that it's practically a high school diploma. Hell, a Master's degree is starting to become the norm now.
She wanted attention and that's what she got. - more words of wisdom from HEF's favorite rape apologist TripleX

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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That's because college is a scam that matters little in the long run, and jobs nowadays are all about who you know, not what you know. Not to mention that the bachelor's degree has become so common nowadays that it's practically a high school diploma. Hell, a Master's degree is starting to become the norm now.
Hmmm, how could college not matter if it's common as a high school diploma?  Sounds like it's a requirement. 

Not to mention, if it's about who you know, where do you meet those important people?  Well, I met a lot of important people in college, but what I knew and how I did it still matters the most in my career. 

Offline Vic Vega

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It's funny to me that there's so much discussion of the failure of public education, but there's rarely any discussion about the overall percentages of national graduation rates and the conditions in successful public schools that enable graduates to succeed in college and beyond.

Because the educational system in this country is thought of in the same way a factory is thought of: in numbers produced. How many student graduate, how many students went on to college.

If there is no funding or support system for a student to get a 2 or 4 year degree, that isn't their problem. If there  aren't any jobs for them upon graduating, that isn't their problem either.

Even if your high school prepared you for College work( often NOT the case), unless you have rich parents or a scholarship you won't  be able to stick it out on what you get in financial aid and have money in your pocket at the same time.

So folks drop out because they are tired of being penniless or can't hack college classes and hours at Costco or whatever at the same time.

Folks tend to talk about high school as if it is just a factory for producing kids in caps and gowns, and screw what happens to them afterwards.

Half the damn problem here is that college isn't for everybody and people act like it is.

There is no sin in blue collar work, especially if you are going to be well paid for it, yet when I talk about trade schools for things like carpentry, plumbing and electrician jobs I get blank stares. There are construction sites all over this city and I can count the number of workers of color I see on one hand unless its non union.

Why are we as a people ignoring these jobs?

You have guys who came here from Eastern Europe yesterday, making like 60 dollars an hour on these sites. Yet folks are trying to shove kids into Law School by the crowdfull.  But every Summer, we get a new barch of intern who have passed the Bar and still can't find work. And that goes double for the kids of color.

The way the entire conversation is framed is highly suspect to me.

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