Poll

BP710 Story Ideas     Deadlines for selection: November 22, 2017

Death Be Not Proud-The final days of T'Chaka the Black Panther
1 (16.7%)
Lost in Space-The search for the Vibranium asteroid field
2 (33.3%)
Doomwar-The Black Payback: T'Challa v Doom as it should've been
0 (0%)
Black on Black violence-The on panel fight between the Black Panther and Black Dwarf
0 (0%)
Where is the Love-The romance of T'Challa and Ororo
0 (0%)
Sweat of the Panther-Steampunk Wakanda
1 (16.7%)
Beware Of Geek's Reply #4210 on: October 22, 2017, 07:39:29 am
1 (16.7%)
Battle's Supreme nomination  Reply #4208 on: October 22, 2017, 04:59:32 am
1 (16.7%)
Kickin' it with Kip Lewis Reply #4238 on: October 25, 2017, 08:21:20 pm
0 (0%)
Other
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 3

Voting closed: November 22, 2017, 07:45:54 pm

Author Topic: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS  (Read 1097122 times)

Offline Ture

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4665 on: November 15, 2019, 12:13:26 pm »
THE VIBRANIUM TRUMPET



The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***    The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***

Op-ed

That informant needs to go through a background check. He cant be trusted. Lol. Tchalla is on the moon.

Our informant is most reliable having interned at both the Daily Bugle and the Daily Planet. Not to mention an intense but brief stint at TMZ.

The reason T'challa is on the moon is to access a portal (established by mutant leader Cyclops) so to discretely enter Krakoa. The propaganda published by the Black Panther's agents of Wakanda Information Ministry about a rescue mission to the moon helps to ensure plausible deniability.

Integrity is everything here at the Vibranium Trumpet. Should new information come forth to discredit any published article we will issue an immediate response.

We thank you, our dedicated readers for taking the time to comment. #SOUND THE ALARM
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 06:13:01 pm by Ture »
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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4666 on: November 15, 2019, 03:01:11 pm »

THE VIBRANIUM TRUMPET



The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***    The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***

BREAKING NEWS...BREAKING NEWS...

Marvel's X-Men Are Making Black Panther a Future ENEMY
BY THOMAS BACON – ON NOV 15, 2019

Marvel's X-Men relaunch is setting up a major conflict between the mutant race of Krakoa, and the superhero Black Panther. No room for misunderstanding, either: the X-Men are attempting to instigate a regime change in the nation of Wakanda.

Jonathan Hickman's X-Men relaunch has seen the entire mutant race gather on the living island of Krakoa, with Charles Xavier abandoning his old dream of peaceful coexistence in favor of a more isolationist vision. Xavier proposed that the key to lasting peace between man and mutant lay in drugs provided exclusively by Krakoa. One extends the life of a human by five years, another is an adaptive antibiotic, and the third helps with the treatment of mental illness. The majority of the world's governments have, at least on paper, approved the establishment of the mutant nation in return for access to these new drugs. There are, however, a handful of exceptions - and the kingdom of Wakanda is one of them.

As revealed in House of X #5, the Wakandans issued a strongly-worded response insisting they "DO NOT NEED MUTANT DRUGS." Now other nations in the Wakandan Economic Protectorate - Azania, Canaan, and Kenya - have followed their lead. But X-Force #1 reveals the X-Men's response. Officially, the mutants accept this decision and are undertaking "firm but friendly diplomacy" in order to persuade non-treaty nations to open their borders to Krakoan drugs.

But behind the scenes, the Black King of the Hellfire Trading Company, Sebastian Shaw, is attempting to create black-market channels. And the issue offers the mutants' own "Unofficial response to Non-Treaty Nations... Mutant operative cells will work to undermine the current administration." The obvious next step being to influence a regime change to a more mutant-friendly successor. In the case of Wakanda, that policy clearly implies that the X-Men are secretly attempting to overthrow the Black Panther.



It will be fascinating to see how this affects Storm, the former Queen of Wakanda, who has resumed her historic relationship with Black Panther. The establishment of Krakoa appears to have encouraged a shift in Storm's perspective, and she's become more of a mutant triumphalist than ever before; in X-Men #1 she used blanket terms to describe the entire human race, in a way she would never have done previously. All this is highly likely to put Storm's romance with Black Panther under great strain - even worse if Black Panther uncovers the X-Men's secret attempts to institute regime change, and confronts her about it. It's surely only a matter of time before Storm is forced to choose between the X-Men and Wakanda.



This strategy is even more unwise given Black Panther's current position of global prominence. He's been appointed leader of the latest incarnation of the Avengers, and he has the superhero team working life a finely-tuned machine. What's more, Black Panther has recruited countless superhumans and adventurers as so-called "Agents of Wakanda," creating a metahuman espionage unit that incorporates some of the brightest minds and most skilled warriors on the globe. The X-Men will have to tread with care, because they don't want Black Panther as an enemy.


https://screenrant.com/xmen-comics-wakanda-black-panther-enemies/

With the VIBRANIUM TRUMPET you don't have to read between the lines just read the red ones.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 04:49:36 pm by Ture »
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Offline CvilleWakandan

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4667 on: November 15, 2019, 05:37:08 pm »
Thanks for the article.

There was an authors note to the artist in Xforce #1 that one of the members of the mutant hate group could be dressed as a Wakandan. It didn't' say to do it specifically, just letting the artist decided.

But I noticed the person sitting next to Domino did have an African dress style.
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 "I think my Panther run traumatized a lot of folks with its explicit blackness.  But you can't win unless you commit to something."

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4668 on: November 15, 2019, 06:12:12 pm »
More than welcome CvilleWakandan.

Interesting concerning the author's note. I prefer that a Wakandan not be a part of a mutant hate group. I imagine Wakandans being very sophisticated in their suspicions and having an evolved insular sensibility that has nothing to do with hatred or racism.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 06:50:36 pm by Ture »
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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4669 on: November 15, 2019, 06:42:04 pm »
THE VIBRANIUM TRUMPET



The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***    The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***

Have the X Men forgotten whom they are dealing with? This is the Black Panther. The Most Dangerous Man Alive. The Black Panther has fought and defeated Cyclops, Beast and Wolverine. The Black Panther has the tech to neutralize Magneto's powers and even redirect Storm's power back at her. The Black Panther can and has out strategized Apocalypse.

The Black Panther can mask his thoughts from Cable; and painfully prevent Emma's telepathy from entering his mind. On top of all that, the Black Panther has developed an X Gene suppressant; built a genetic null field generator; and a telekinetic and psionic dampening device. The Black Panther could take on the X Men and their mutant allies with out even involving Wakanda.

Know who you're messing with.








































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Offline Ezyo

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4670 on: November 16, 2019, 07:41:23 pm »
If im being Honest? Whike i know T'Challa himself would give the x men hell, I honestly think Wakanda itself needs a solid win as well as T'Challa. So I would like to see T'Challa and Wakanda show their might again. No more of this " the Golden city was nearly brought to it's knees" by a dozen hulked out goons, or losing to Faustus in an unexplained, plot device. We need another SWaD situation,  showing why Thanos took 3 tries to take Wakanda with arguably the most powerful army in the universe.

We need to see not onlyl the Black panther unleashed, but Wakanda as well.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2019, 09:14:54 am by Ezyo »

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4671 on: November 16, 2019, 11:20:03 pm »
The Black Panther is that polymorphic character whom from his inception was depicted as being not only powerful but strategic and calculating. The problem with such a character and by extension his nation is providing significant and appropriate challenges. Add to this fact the brilliant retrocon imposed by Hudlin of Wakanda having never been conquered and one has quite the conundrum. Wakandan is not a nation of ordinary people.

This is why T'Chaka's death is problematic; invasions attempts are flawed from the start; and coup d'etat do not make much sense. Very few nations on earth should be a match for Wakanda. Thus the threat would be more viable coming from mystical realms and galactic empires. Super villains should be polymaths and class 100 strength; exotic humans and  cosmic beings. Anything else simply comes of as a fallacy.
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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4672 on: November 17, 2019, 09:23:26 am »
I agree that T'Chakas death wasn't that great, but Hudlins version at least was the best of then all. He died being out of his Homeland which would make him the most vulnerable and he was trying to protect his family, and klaw was now a trained assassin and not just some thug essentially. (Evan's version is helps a little but still T'Chaka should of died in a manner that shows killing a Wakandan head of state and black panther is no easy task.

As for coming up with threats Worthy of BP abd Wakanda? I don't think it's problematic at all. Priest and Hudlin had no issues with it, even going back further to gillis as well. It's writers if late lack imagination, they care more about their agenda abd their story moving that they go the lazy route instead of thinking "what could challenge the most technologically advanced, warrior nation on earth who's king is one of the smartest men earth and the most dangerous man alive?" It's a tough task for those who limit themselves, but for people who want to take T'Challa to the next level? This stuff is easily doable.

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4673 on: November 26, 2019, 08:16:18 am »

courtesy of CBR's Chesterfield

Simply outstanding. This is the path BP comic interiors should be on.
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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4674 on: November 27, 2019, 03:30:13 am »
The Hooded Justice reveal was stunning, but Watchmen is needlessly complicating its Veidt and Rorschach threads
By Sam Barsanti



Note: This post discusses plot points from the Watchmen season one episodes “This Extraordinary Being” and “Little Fear Of Lightning.”

The most recent episode of HBO’s Watchmen features what is easily the most obvious change from Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ original comic so far: Aided by the memory-recovering drug Nostalgia, Regina King’s Angela Abar discovers that her grandfather, Will Reeves—the wheelchair-using man who claims that he somehow killed her boss—is none other than Hooded Justice, an original member of super-team The Minutemen. In the Watchmen comic series, Hooded Justice is the only member of that team who doesn’t get a definitive backstory, making him the only character from that era who even could get explored in a new way on the TV show without dramatically infringing on the events of the comic. It was an alteration to the comics’ canon, but it was done in service of the story that showrunner Damon Lindelof is trying to tell with Watchmen—specifically involving the whitewashing of Black heroes, with Will’s white face paint under the Hooded Justice mask tying in with his childhood love for Bass Reeves, the real-life Black deputy U.S. marshal who inspired The Lone Ranger.

This is the sort of “remixing” that Lindelof was talking about last May when he pleaded with Watchmen fans to give his project a chance, explaining that he had no intention of creating a canonical “sequel” to Moore and Gibbons’ comic. Instead, he wanted to use its world and themes as a springboard to tell new kinds of stories. Changes to the original text are obviously going to be a part of that and it doesn’t inherently make them bad—but there is a fine line between a change for the sake of change and a change that actually brings a new layer to the story.

Lindelof’s method of “remixing” the comics to tell a new story without contradicting what came before is both well-meaning and well-executed in “This Extraordinary Being.” But the preceding episode, “Little Fear Of Lightning,” features a remix that just contradicts things, needlessly blurring what is happening in the show and how it’s been impacted by what happened in the book. Last week, the cop-killing Seventh Kavalry militia kidnapped Tim Blake Nelson’s Wade Tillman/Looking Glass; their apparent leader, Senator Joe Keene (James Wolk), tried to break him down by showing him a video that would shatter his worldview. We learned Wade was in New Jersey in 1985 when a giant alien squid was dropped on New York and killed millions of people (as seen at the end of the comic series). In the video, Jeremy Irons’ Adrian Veidt explains to future president Robert Redford that he created the squid and killed all of those people in an attempt to scare the United States and Soviet Union into giving up their seemingly inevitable march toward nuclear war.

On the surface, this is a pretty straightforward way to introduce the truth about the squid (which comic readers already know), especially since hearing it from Veidt himself means that Wade won’t have any reason to doubt it, but it’s also a bizarrely complicated shift from the comics. That version of Veidt is never shown recording a video (and the reference to Redford’s political career is mostly a one-off joke about the divergence from our reality); the truth about his involvement in the squid attack is revealed in a different way. Just before confronting Veidt, violently paranoid vigilante Rorschach drops off his journal—containing all of his evidence against the supposed Smartest Man In The World—at his favorite tabloid newspaper. Though Rorschach dies before he can personally reveal the truth, the near-omnipotent Dr. Manhattan’s last words to Veidt (“Nothing ever ends”) and the final pages of the comic strongly imply that the peace Veidt created is more tenuous than his overconfident monologuing would imply.

We know that Rorschach’s journal was found in the canon of the show, as a page from it appears in an FBI briefing, which means that proof that Veidt staged the squid attack exists in this world already. This Veidt video, however, renders Rorschach’s journal—and therefore the actual end of the comics series—irrelevant. Rather than the seeds of his downfall coming from a questionable source like Rorschach, who knew the truth but still wouldn’t necessarily be trusted (tying in with Rorschach’s conspiracy obsessions and the Seventh Kavalry’s distrust of authority), Veidt planted the seeds himself by creating an extremely incriminating and replicable video confession.

This doesn’t sound at all like something the Veidt from the comic would do, seeing as how he makes a point to only explain his “master stroke” to Rorschach and Nite Owl once he knows there’s no possible way for them to affect the outcome. Just before that, he uses a bomb to kill everyone who helped him create the squid (even though they didn’t know about its true purpose) and poisons a group of scientists who seemingly knew exactly what he was doing and believed in his mission, presumably just so there weren’t any loose ends he’d have to worry about. And yet, despite the fact that it’s a clear shift from his behavior in the comic, the TV version of Veidt made a video that introduced a gigantic loose end and created a paper trail that directly connects him to the squid. Now, thanks to the Seventh Kavalry, it’s even being used to undermine the phony peace that he worked so hard to create—which the self-obsessed super-genius of the comic should’ve and would’ve been able to predict.

Speaking of the Seventh Kavalry, which very clearly idolizes Rorschach, this change makes the group’s motivations unnecessarily blurry. In the comic, for as much as he’s a fan favorite, Rorschach has a racist streak that underlines his extremely bitter opinion of humanity, and it makes perfect sense that his anti-social, viciously angry journal would become a holy text for a racist militia—so much so that the show could’ve gotten away with never directly explaining it. However, in giving the Kavalry this Veidt video (which is definitive proof that President Redford and his liberal cronies know the squid was a hoax), the show has turned Rorschach’s journal into a footnote, making it oddly unclear why the Kavalry worships him as much as it does—beyond his racist tendencies, of course.

It’s all confusing, and it subverts the established facts of Watchmen for seemingly no reason other than efficiency. Compare that to the Hooded Justice reveal, which took an opening in the canon and filled it in a way that introduced a new concept that wasn’t really present in the source material. The show’s “remixes” have largely been successful, offering a wider view of Watchmen’s world by focusing on a part of the country and some major social issues that were barely addressed in the book. But with one seemingly straightforward twist that does nothing but create new problems, it has revealed just how easy it is for this sort of continuation to go astray.
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Offline Ture

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4675 on: November 27, 2019, 03:30:28 am »
In 1986, Superheroes Needed Watchmen. Now Superhero Movies Need the New Adaptation.
The genre’s problem isn’t too many movies. It’s not enough risks.
By SAM ADAMS




For the past three weeks, fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe have been raging against Martin Scorsese’s contention that the movies are “not cinema.” The MCU is, by just about every conceivable measure, the most successful film franchise in history: The Avengers movies hold four of the top 10 slots on the list of all-time box office champions, and earlier this year Endgame surpassed Avatar to become the highest-grossing movie ever.

But that previously undreamt-of cultural dominance isn’t enough. As Scorsese has been followed by Francis Ford Coppola, who called the Marvel movies “despicable,” and Ken Loach, who said they had “nothing to do with the art of cinema,” the backlash (or back-backlash) intensified as well. Marvel directors Joss Whedon and James Gunn responded with hurt feelings (although Whedon admitted he kind of saw Scorsese’s point), and fans went on the offensive: Scorsese and Coppola were old, out of touch, and generally washed-up—and besides, they were just jealous. “For those keeping track at home,”ComicBook.com crowed, “Marvel movies have earned more than double Scorsese and Coppola’s box office hauls combined.”

With due respect to the director of The King of Comedy and The Age of Innocence, the question of whether or not Marvel movies are “cinema” doesn’t seem as important as how they’ve shifted the definition of what movies are. As Vulture’s Bilge Ebiri puts it, they’ve “terraformed their own audience,” training viewers over 11 years and 23 movies to respond to certain kinds of stimuli, to superficially distinct but fundamentally unvarying tales of good vanquishing evil, of the world being saved again and again and again.

They’re movies that speak to a global audience—one of the most memorable things I saw this year was a video of moviegoers in South Africa absolutely losing their minds at the climax of Endgame—and have helped usher in a new era of diversity in blockbuster filmmaking. I may have found Captain Marvel a featureless slog, but my 9-year-old daughter bounded out of the theater and proclaimed it the best movie she’d ever seen.

The trouble isn’t that there are too many comic book movies—really, it’s that there aren’t enough. There have never been more than three MCU movies in a given year, and even if you throw in all the others—the DC Extended Universe, the X-Men saga, even the Deadpools—you’d rarely top a dozen. But that tiny fraction, a little more than 1 percent of theatrical releases, dominates the cultural conversation for months at a time, and their sprawling release patterns crowd other movies out of the theaters:

At its peak, Endgame was playing on more than one out of every 10 screens in the U.S. Defenders of comic book movies’ dominance frequently point to the history of the Western, a genre that dominated the U.S. box office for the first half of the 20th century. But at their peak, there were dozens of Westerns released in a year, and they came in all shapes and sizes: comedies, musicals, dramas, action movies. Comic books are one of the great American art forms, with a rich and varied history stretching back nearly a century. But comic book movies are a far narrower and more constrained microgenre, with little of the invention and elasticity of the medium that spawned them. The MCU’s movies have been praised for their recent efforts at diversity, but look past the race and gender of their protagonists and the differences between them are negligible. There are funny ones (with serious bits) and serious ones (with funny bits), but the underlying formula hardly alters.


That’s why we need Watchmen.

In 1986, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ miniseries transformed the popular understanding of what comic books could be. At the time, its most notable aspect was its exploration of how costumed heroes might exist in the real world—a conceptual leap that unleashed several decades of “realistic” spins on the superhero myth. But reading Watchmen now, what’s most striking is its formal adventurousness, the way Moore and Gibbons dance between past and present, foreground and background, plot and commentary. Every issue takes a different approach, often dictated by the psyche of its central character, serving as a self-contained work rather than just doling out its allotted portion of the overarching story. It’s an expansion of what comics could be, not just what they could be about.

Watchmen, the HBO sequel created by Damon Lindelof, trades the comic’s focus on the then-pressing threat of global nuclear war for America’s ongoing history of white supremacy and racial violence. Moore and Gibbons, both English, were dealing with distant archetypes; for the TV series’s American writers room, these issues strike closer to home. But the TV series shares the comic’s mutability, the sense that every time you sit down to watch or read, you don’t know what you’re in for next. (That’s true even from the first minute; no one would have expected a sequel to Watchmen to open with a depiction of a 1921 race riot.) Not every risk the show takes pays off, but at least it takes them, which is a claim you can barely make for any movie in the MCU.

Superhero movies throw the occasional curveball, but even then it’s only surprising because of the genre’s extraordinarily narrow range. The only interesting thing about Joker’s story of an alienated loner rebelling against an uncaring society is that it’s called Joker. It’s not doing anything that the Scorsese movies it steals from didn’t already do.

Black Panther mainstreamed Afrofuturistic aesthetics for a global audience, but it’s also a movie set in Africa that makes a hero of a white CIA officer. In theory, the massive success of the MCU ought to allow Marvel to take more gambles, but the company’s breaks from orthodoxy are largely cosmetic, hiring directors from underrepresented groups but never allowing them to imprint a movie with more than a whiff of their own personalities. As fans have turned into stans and critics have been recast as haters, merely quibbling with the MCU’s success inevitably prompts a flood of bad-faith counterarguments. In response to Coppola’s “despicable” remark, Disney CEO Bob Iger invoked the name of Black Panther’s Ryan Coogler twice, as if the fact that Marvel hired a black director for its 18th movie should exempt the world’s largest entertainment conglomerate from criticism.

At its heart, the original Watchmen isn’t about superheroes so much as it’s about power. The story boils down to a conflict between Adrian Veidt, a billionaire genius who has honed his mind and body to the peak of human perfection, and Dr. Manhattan, whose near omnipotence has turned him into something other than the human he once was. And while that conflict has a winner and a loser, its ultimate moral is that regardless of their intentions, having that much power inevitably makes the holder monstrous. As Marvel and its corporate parent move closer to unparalleled domination of global culture, that’s an idea that even their most devoted fans should pause to consider.


https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/watchmen-hbo-series-marvel-movies-superheroes-scorsese.html
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Offline Battle

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4676 on: November 27, 2019, 04:47:58 am »
Coppola's remarks does seem to display a hint of jealousy; there seems to be more to the story of why Stan Lee rejecting Mario Puzo's MARVEL submission(s), the would be author of 'The Godfather' & its movie adaption in the 1970s and the success of MARVEL comicbook characters/stories transitioning into movie theaters, completely dominating the box office for the last decade in 2019.

If Coppola believes the success of today's MARVEL cinematic universe is "despicable", one wonders what he thought of the first entry into the superhero movie genre, 'Superman' which was a masterpiece.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2019, 07:42:32 am by Battle »

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4677 on: November 27, 2019, 06:13:23 pm »

MY SISTAH...
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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4678 on: November 27, 2019, 06:17:36 pm »
Marvel Studios Commissioned This Filipino Artist to Make Black Panther Fan Art
And boy did he deliver.
By ANGELICA GUTIERREZ



Practically everyone has been singing The Black Panther’s praises since it hit movie theaters. After all, the film is an unabashed celebration of African culture, and T’Challa is the kind of leader we all need.

Being the marketing-savvy studio that it is, Marvel Studios has asked its fans to express their love for the movie by posting fan art using the hashtag #BlackPantherFanArt. They’ve gotten the ball rolling by commissioning artists to pay tribute to Wakanda’s benevolent king.



Among them is paper-cutting artist John Ed De Vera, who also designed Esquire’s July 2016 cover. This is his first collaboration with Marvel, and he based his work on cover and promotion artist Alexander Lozano's illustrations. “I still couldn’t believe it happened,” he says. “I used the design from Civil War as my reference, and it was a challenge figuring out how to illustrate his suit on paper. I wove some parts and used different types of black paper stock just to get the effect!”

When asked about what he liked most about the film, De Vera says, “From a designer’s stand point—Wakanda! I like how they envisioned and designed a technologically advanced African country with a culture ‘untouched’ by colonizers. Loved their costumes!”

When working on a paper-cutting project, De Vera begins by drawing his subject. Once he’s satisfied with the form, he plans the layers and paper colors as he finalizes the details of the drawing. “I then transfer the drawing to the actual paper stock I’m going to cut. I fold some of the layers to add a little dimensionality to the artwork when photographed,” he explains.



De Vera has been into paper cutting since his college days. “I used to borrow cutters from my dad every time I needed to cut something for my plates. He would always get mad because I would never return them,” he says. One of his first paper sculptures was a finals plate for a major AD subject, an omnibus ad for an airline.

After graduating, his first job was at Gift Gate, as a junior artist for Swatch. “We did window displays and the first ever window display we created was a paper sculpture. We were cutting signages and standees back then which I think ‘sharpened’ this particular skill. It was only about a few years back that I went back to cutting paper whenever there are opportunities for such art,” he says.

Today, he has an ongoing project with sabaw.ph called #madethepapers, where he does portraits of personalities who recently made news.

If you ever need a stress reliever, scrolling through the impressively intricate paper art on De Vera’s feed will make you forget all about your worries. To see more of his art, check out his Instagram account.

https://www.esquiremag.ph/culture/books-and-art/marvel-studios-commissioned-this-filipino-artist-to-make-black-panther-fan-art-a00225-20180220

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Offline Ezyo

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Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
« Reply #4679 on: November 29, 2019, 08:32:54 am »
In 1986, Superheroes Needed Watchmen. Now Superhero Movies Need the New Adaptation.
The genre’s problem isn’t too many movies. It’s not enough risks.
By SAM ADAMS




For the past three weeks, fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe have been raging against Martin Scorsese’s contention that the movies are “not cinema.” The MCU is, by just about every conceivable measure, the most successful film franchise in history: The Avengers movies hold four of the top 10 slots on the list of all-time box office champions, and earlier this year Endgame surpassed Avatar to become the highest-grossing movie ever.

But that previously undreamt-of cultural dominance isn’t enough. As Scorsese has been followed by Francis Ford Coppola, who called the Marvel movies “despicable,” and Ken Loach, who said they had “nothing to do with the art of cinema,” the backlash (or back-backlash) intensified as well. Marvel directors Joss Whedon and James Gunn responded with hurt feelings (although Whedon admitted he kind of saw Scorsese’s point), and fans went on the offensive: Scorsese and Coppola were old, out of touch, and generally washed-up—and besides, they were just jealous. “For those keeping track at home,”ComicBook.com crowed, “Marvel movies have earned more than double Scorsese and Coppola’s box office hauls combined.”

With due respect to the director of The King of Comedy and The Age of Innocence, the question of whether or not Marvel movies are “cinema” doesn’t seem as important as how they’ve shifted the definition of what movies are. As Vulture’s Bilge Ebiri puts it, they’ve “terraformed their own audience,” training viewers over 11 years and 23 movies to respond to certain kinds of stimuli, to superficially distinct but fundamentally unvarying tales of good vanquishing evil, of the world being saved again and again and again.

They’re movies that speak to a global audience—one of the most memorable things I saw this year was a video of moviegoers in South Africa absolutely losing their minds at the climax of Endgame—and have helped usher in a new era of diversity in blockbuster filmmaking. I may have found Captain Marvel a featureless slog, but my 9-year-old daughter bounded out of the theater and proclaimed it the best movie she’d ever seen.

The trouble isn’t that there are too many comic book movies—really, it’s that there aren’t enough. There have never been more than three MCU movies in a given year, and even if you throw in all the others—the DC Extended Universe, the X-Men saga, even the Deadpools—you’d rarely top a dozen. But that tiny fraction, a little more than 1 percent of theatrical releases, dominates the cultural conversation for months at a time, and their sprawling release patterns crowd other movies out of the theaters:

At its peak, Endgame was playing on more than one out of every 10 screens in the U.S. Defenders of comic book movies’ dominance frequently point to the history of the Western, a genre that dominated the U.S. box office for the first half of the 20th century. But at their peak, there were dozens of Westerns released in a year, and they came in all shapes and sizes: comedies, musicals, dramas, action movies. Comic books are one of the great American art forms, with a rich and varied history stretching back nearly a century. But comic book movies are a far narrower and more constrained microgenre, with little of the invention and elasticity of the medium that spawned them. The MCU’s movies have been praised for their recent efforts at diversity, but look past the race and gender of their protagonists and the differences between them are negligible. There are funny ones (with serious bits) and serious ones (with funny bits), but the underlying formula hardly alters.


That’s why we need Watchmen.

In 1986, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ miniseries transformed the popular understanding of what comic books could be. At the time, its most notable aspect was its exploration of how costumed heroes might exist in the real world—a conceptual leap that unleashed several decades of “realistic” spins on the superhero myth. But reading Watchmen now, what’s most striking is its formal adventurousness, the way Moore and Gibbons dance between past and present, foreground and background, plot and commentary. Every issue takes a different approach, often dictated by the psyche of its central character, serving as a self-contained work rather than just doling out its allotted portion of the overarching story. It’s an expansion of what comics could be, not just what they could be about.

Watchmen, the HBO sequel created by Damon Lindelof, trades the comic’s focus on the then-pressing threat of global nuclear war for America’s ongoing history of white supremacy and racial violence. Moore and Gibbons, both English, were dealing with distant archetypes; for the TV series’s American writers room, these issues strike closer to home. But the TV series shares the comic’s mutability, the sense that every time you sit down to watch or read, you don’t know what you’re in for next. (That’s true even from the first minute; no one would have expected a sequel to Watchmen to open with a depiction of a 1921 race riot.) Not every risk the show takes pays off, but at least it takes them, which is a claim you can barely make for any movie in the MCU.

Superhero movies throw the occasional curveball, but even then it’s only surprising because of the genre’s extraordinarily narrow range. The only interesting thing about Joker’s story of an alienated loner rebelling against an uncaring society is that it’s called Joker. It’s not doing anything that the Scorsese movies it steals from didn’t already do.

Black Panther mainstreamed Afrofuturistic aesthetics for a global audience, but it’s also a movie set in Africa that makes a hero of a white CIA officer. In theory, the massive success of the MCU ought to allow Marvel to take more gambles, but the company’s breaks from orthodoxy are largely cosmetic, hiring directors from underrepresented groups but never allowing them to imprint a movie with more than a whiff of their own personalities. As fans have turned into stans and critics have been recast as haters, merely quibbling with the MCU’s success inevitably prompts a flood of bad-faith counterarguments. In response to Coppola’s “despicable” remark, Disney CEO Bob Iger invoked the name of Black Panther’s Ryan Coogler twice, as if the fact that Marvel hired a black director for its 18th movie should exempt the world’s largest entertainment conglomerate from criticism.

At its heart, the original Watchmen isn’t about superheroes so much as it’s about power. The story boils down to a conflict between Adrian Veidt, a billionaire genius who has honed his mind and body to the peak of human perfection, and Dr. Manhattan, whose near omnipotence has turned him into something other than the human he once was. And while that conflict has a winner and a loser, its ultimate moral is that regardless of their intentions, having that much power inevitably makes the holder monstrous. As Marvel and its corporate parent move closer to unparalleled domination of global culture, that’s an idea that even their most devoted fans should pause to consider.


https://slate.com/culture/2019/10/watchmen-hbo-series-marvel-movies-superheroes-scorsese.html


The underlined portion is so far from the truth. In fact Coogler made a point to NOT do this because this is always a typical trope when it comes to movies with poc. Theres a white savior who comes into a culture they are apart of then become this key savior. In reality, he helps but a hero? Not really no. He didn't actually do anything in the movie except get shot, and run a plane into another and that was with extensive help from Shuri. Hardly a hero