Poll

BP710 Story Ideas     Deadlines for selection: November 22, 2017

Death Be Not Proud-The final days of T'Chaka the Black Panther
1 (16.7%)
Lost in Space-The search for the Vibranium asteroid field
2 (33.3%)
Doomwar-The Black Payback: T'Challa v Doom as it should've been
0 (0%)
Black on Black violence-The on panel fight between the Black Panther and Black Dwarf
0 (0%)
Where is the Love-The romance of T'Challa and Ororo
0 (0%)
Sweat of the Panther-Steampunk Wakanda
1 (16.7%)
Beware Of Geek's Reply #4210 on: October 22, 2017, 07:39:29 am
1 (16.7%)
Battle's Supreme nomination  Reply #4208 on: October 22, 2017, 04:59:32 am
1 (16.7%)
Kickin' it with Kip Lewis Reply #4238 on: October 25, 2017, 08:21:20 pm
0 (0%)
Other
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 3

Voting closed: November 22, 2017, 07:45:54 pm

Author Topic: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!  (Read 657055 times)

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - New Black Panther, New Black Power, Ourstory!
« Reply #4260 on: December 02, 2017, 12:44:24 pm »
BP:710 IS TAKING FLIGHT!



THE STORY HAS BEEN SELECTED...
THE WRITERS HAVE BEEN CHOSEN...
THE ARTIST IS CONFIRMED...
THE PLOT AND SYNOPSIS ARE BEING DEVELOPED...


Stay tuned for upcoming announcements.
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - New Black Panther, New Black Power, Ourstory!
« Reply #4261 on: December 05, 2017, 11:56:57 am »
BLACK PANTHER's Rage Re-Tempered for Heart & Homage By DON McGREGOR In 2018
By Chris Arrant, Editor

Don McGregor made a name for himself - and cemented it for T'Challa - over the years as the one-time Marvel editor wrote various Black Panther stories. From Jungle Action to Marvel Comics Presents to Black Panther: Panther's Prey, McGregor and various artistic collaborators fleshed out the world of Wakanda and the indentity of T'Challa.

And now, he's doing it again.




Newsarama announced back in November that McGregor was working on a new story for February 2018's Black Panther Annual #1. Working with Captain America artist Daniel Acuna, McGregor's new piece homages stories of his past - and his artists - with "Panther's Heart."

Newsarama talked to McGregor about this new story, as well as his history with the Panther as well as some untold stories from behind-the-scenes of Marvel Comics.

Newsarama: Don, Marvel has briefly told me your story involves New York City and the heart-shaped herb. Can you tell us about it?

Don McGregor: Let me just start from the beginning. Marvel first approached me about a month ago to do a story for this anthology. My initial impulse, however, was not to do it. I love the character, and I spent years of my life working on T’Challa – trying to hear his voice in my head – and seeing all those characters and the world of Wakanda. I lived it on a daily basis, so the idea of coming back to do one 10- or 12-page story… how do you contend with 600+ pages of stories done over the years? I labored over those pages, researched to make the stories the best I possibly could.

Like I said, my first impulse was that I wasn’t inclined to do it, but I mentioned it on my Facebook page and several hundred people stated “No, no you should do it!” so I began seriously thinking about it.

I knew that if I came back, the people who were familiar with my stuff would expect me to do something topical. I toyed around with some ideas as there’s so much going on in the world today – so much divisiveness and extremism – but it’s really difficult to come up with something that you can handle in the superhero genre in just 10 pages. It would have to have some kind of emotional intensity to it as well, so I thought back to a sequence I came up with a few years ago to use. I had wanted to do this opening sequence for years, but hadn’t determined how to pull it off. But I figured out a way to do it, and do something that focuses emotionally on T’Challa and the people around him – some of them being characters readers liked back when I was writing Black Panther regularly.

This turned into what I’m calling “Panther’s Heart,” with Wakanda’s heart-shaped herb being one of the meanings for the title of the story. But for the story itself, I go into more detail about the heart-shaped herbs and how they’re used.

And while I was deciding what kind of story to tell, a second, very strong reason came to write “Panther’s Heart,” that I could dedicate it to Rich Buckler and Billy Graham, the two talented artists who worked on “Panther’s Rage” with me, way back at the beginning.  Without them bringing the words to visual life, without their belief in the stories I wanted to tell, those books would not exist.  A writer can bleed onto the page in comics, but without an artist who is willing to go the extra distance to take the time and energy to fulfill those words, you are dead in the water.  We have lost both Rich and Billy, Rich just recently, and I miss them both dearly, and this is a chance for me to thank and honor them both for working side by side with me to bring T'Challa to the books readers can still hold in their hands to this day!

Nrama: Like you said, this is a relatively small story… but could you see yourself writing more Black Panther for Marvel, one more time?



McGregor: Like Sean Connery said, “Never say never again.”

Anything is possible – I never thought I’d be doing this. I would love to return to Sabre. I’ve written a 200-page script for Sabre: The Early Future Years, and Trevor Von Eeden has done an incredible job on it so far. I’d love to see that come to fruition. People who love Sabre would get to see the origins of all the major characters, and get answers to questions I’ve never been able to give until now. I’ve also done a pair of characters called Alexander and Penelope Risk, which was one of the few times I did something that had a ‘high concept.’ It’s basically Sherlock Holmes meets the Thin Man. It takes place in New York City during World War 2. It was first created with Tom Sutton, then later Mike Mayhew had drawn some samples. At one point it was set-up to be published through Marvel’s Epic line, but then they decided not to do creator-owned books anymore so the rights reverted back to me.

Those two projects are big projects – but they’re as good as anything I ever wrote. If people like what I do here with Black Panther Annual #1 or what I’ve done previously, they should ask for those.

Nrama: You had two major runs with the Black Panther, and you mentioned this new story is based on a sequence that had bubbled up but never used. Have you always had ideas in your back pocket for Black Panther?

McGregor: I did Black Panther over two time periods. The first one was in the 1970s – it was a very electric time, a very exciting time, and a lot of readers were every good to me with their response to Jungle Action. It was exciting, but traumatic as well; when I first started on staff at Marvel, Jungle Action was a reprint book with stories from the 1950s about jungle gods and goddesses with blonde hair saving the natives. It was such a racist portrayal. At an editorial meeting the Marvel line expanded, and there wasn’t enough people to handle all the books. There was an unwritten rule at the time that staff would be given something to write, and because I had made some comments about Black Panther and the state of Jungle Action – and that I had no political ambitions to become Editor-In-Chief – they offered it to me. When we first started, Jungle Action switched from all reprints to being 1/3 reprints and 2/3 new material. They offered me that and Amazing Adventures with Killraven.

They initially had high hopes for Killraven due to War of the Worlds, but it had gone through a quick succession of artists and writers and had floundered. They thought both Amazing Adventures and Jungle Action were going to die because they weren’t big sellers.

But I was lucky to work with Rich Buckler on the Black Panther serial and Craig Russell on the Kill Raven. They believed in what we were doing, and there was positive energy. In the first couple months of Black Panther’s Jungle Action it was all Wakanda, and I don’t think anyone expected it would be an all-Wakandan cast of characters.

“Where’s the white people?”

But that was the only thing that made sense to me. I was continually having to fight for these characters.

Then in my second stint in the 1980s, it began when then-Marvel editor Michael Higgins asked me to come back to Black Panther. I feigned him off at the time.

Archie Goodwin had previously convinced me to come back to Killraven under the agreement the only Marvel person I’d have to deal with was him. Archie was terrific – one of the best people in the world. He kept his word to me on every single thing – I love him, and I miss him dearly. Archie actually finagled me into doing Killraven again at a comic book function by coming up to me and saying “Don, would you be interested in doing Killraven? Craig Russell’s interested.” I jumped at the chance, then he went to Craig and did the same thing: “Craig, would you be interested in doing Killraven? Don’s interested.”

And it turned out terrific. If every book came out looking that good, no one would ever complain. IDW just published an Artist’s Edition of it all, and it looks terrific.

So anyway, I had agreed to do Killraven an then Michael Higgins said “Well, you’re going to do Black Panther too!” I had intended to do “Panther’s Quest” back in the 1970s during my original run. I re-read T’Challa’s earlier stories and realized that his mother was never talked about – his father, T’Chaka, yes, but never his mom. I don’t really know the reasons why, but my second Jungle Action story was going to be T’Challa going into South Africa to find his mom amidst a racist regime like Apartheid: a son trying to find his mother. I thought it would have emotional resonance there.

Anyway, that was my intended second story back in the 1970s and I even mentioned it briefly in some interviews done at the time. But after I finished “Panther’s Rage”, I was in the middle of a divorce and a child custody case. I didn’t have the emotional confidence to do a story like “Panther’s Quest,” so instead I did the Ku Klux Klan story. That was around America’s bicentennial, and I thought myself pretty well-versed on American history. The story caused a real stir, which would only have intensified if it happened today due to social media. It really made a number of people upset.

So now in the 1980s, Higgins was asking me to come back but I said no. But when we were discussing Killraven, Michael took me out to dinner. This is back when Marvel had expense accounts for this sort of thing, and I thought he was going to try to get me drunk and agree to do Black Panther. I wasn’t a big drinker, so I didn’t think he could get me.



“Oh yeah, we’re doing Black Panther…” he would say.

“That’s not what I want to do, Michael,” I replied.

“No, we’re doing it.”

I finally said okay when he got Gene Colan onboard. Again, I was so fortunate in the artists I was able to work with. I felt like Gene climbed inside my head and knew exactly what the characters should look like and what emotions we were playing with. I was very privileged to work with a lot of talented people, especially Gene. So anyway, two pages into writing “Panther’s Quest” and I get a midnight phone call from Michael Higgins: “I’m not on the book anymore. I’m not at Marvel anymore.”

I thought he was yanking my chain because of the hard time I gave him about coming back to Black Panther, but unfortunately it was true. I called up the Editor-In-Chief at the time, Tom DeFalco. He explained the situation and that he thought it didn’t matter what editor I worked with.

“Oh, it does matter,” I told him. “It’s whether I’ll write the story or not.” They then assigned Terry Kavanaugh to take over editing. I was apprehensive about someone new coming in, but after meeting him I realized he was someone I could trust – and he was enthusiastic about the project. “Panther’s Quest” ended up running through 25 issues of Marvel Comics Presents in 1989. I always thought the story would get collected, and now it finally is in January 2018.

I can only say of the experience that I was really fortunate; I worked with talented people who were enthusiastic about the project, and Terry especially was an advocate. When we were at the 12th chapter, Marvel asked “How many more chapters will it be?” I didn’t know as I was still doing researc

Storyline ran 25 chapters in MCP, always thought that story get collected, actually doing in January 2018. I can only say, got really fortunate. Working with people enthusiastic about it, and Terry was advocate for. At 12, asked “how many chapters?” Didnt’ know, still researching, visiting the Schomberg Center for Research on Black Culture, and making sure I had everything. Terry said, “I’ll tell them 25. That’s a good number.” We ended up – [Laughs] – actually needing some double-sized chapters to make it fit in 25 installments.

After that we went immediately to do Black Panther: Panther’s Prey as a standalone miniseries. Gene Colan couldn’t draw it, so we were looking around. I happened to be at Marvel one day Xeroxing something, and a staffer at the time named Chris Ivy asked If I’d seen Dwayne Turner’s work. I explained how I had only seen eight pages or so, but Ivy then informed me that Black Panther was Dwayne’s favorite character. I knew he was the person, as I’d rather work with a young person on their favorite character than just someone treating it as just another gig.

Working on Panther’s Prey, Dwayne and I probably talked on the phone every other day – and we remain friends even now. We met up again at Comic-Con International: San Diego earlier this year – we hadn’t seen each other in 10 years, but once we started talking it didn’t feel like a day had passed.

So once again, I’m really fortunate to have artists who believed in what I wanted to do.

Nrama: Black Panther Annual #1 will come out the same month as Marvel Studios’ Black Panther movie. What are your thoughts on it so far?

McGregor: Marvel has been really great about this. I just finished writing the introduction to the Panther’s Quest collection, and Marvel worked it out so Chadwick Boseman and I could meet at SDCC.

I loved him in Captain America: Civil War. Back when I was writing Black Panther, I always envisioned him as someone with poetic, lyrical, kinetic energy – like an Olympic-trained athlete. And Chadwick is doing that, showing real beauty and grace.
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4262 on: December 05, 2017, 02:15:46 pm »
T'CHALLA 101: A RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER SKETCHBOOK
Published Dec 5, 2017 By Tj Dietsch



Paul Renaud sharpens his pencils for the brand new series!

For a nation that prides itself on isolation, Wakanda sure seems to be drawing a lot of attention lately. Between the Ta-Nehisi Coates-penned BLACK PANTHER series and spinoffs like BLACK PANTHER AND THE CREW and BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA, this advanced African nation continues to shine.

And on January 3, the spotlight gets brighter as writers Evan Narcisse and Coates join artist Paul Renaud to kick off a six issue limited series with RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER #1! Witness T’Challa’s early days, before he assumed the throne, as the man that will be king earns his stripes.

We spoke with Renaud about balancing the old and the new, journeying into Wakandan history, and working with Narcisse and Coates.

Marvel.com: To prep for drawing T’Challa’s earlier days, did you look to any previous runs on the character? Or did you prefer to completely develop your own take?

Paul Renaud: Well I worked hard to create a sense of continuity between what we’ve seen before in the previous runs of Black Panther, but also his appearances in FANTASTIC FOUR and AVENGERS, leading to Ta-Nehisi’s more recent run.

Marvel.com: How has it been developing these unseen elements of the character’s past?

Paul Renaud: It’s very exciting for me to be the bridge between the traditional aspect of how this character had been portrayed in the ’70s and re-injecting this into the character’s past, as his grandfather’s and father’s lives. That’s what I love the most about the Marvel Universe. There’s an obvious search for modernity—staying current—while at the same time trying to honor the past and building new opportunities and visions from it.



Marvel.com: Along similar lines, the early portion of the story will feature T’Chaka alongside T’Challa’s mother. How did you figure out their family dynamic?

Paul Renaud: It’s all about starting from the man we know, T’Challa, and going backward into the past to find out who his parents were and what they looked like. We wanted to show that T’Challa was born from the love of a king for the most unusual queen—a strong, independent, modern woman; a scientist that makes a strong impact over Wakanda and her husband. T’Challa has always been a bit torn between tradition and modernity. This book presents the chance to give a face to that inner conflict of his.

Marvel.com: Wakanda has a similar blend of tradition and cutting-edge modernity—what’s it like balancing those two elements on a nation-wide scale?

Paul Renaud: The first issue deals especially with change and how King T’Chaka will be a modern king thanks to his wife’s influence. We tried to base our approach on the traditional way of showing Wakanda in the earliest Black Panther stories, working our way up to buildings and a more modern architecture. I think it’s important to keep a strong identity to Wakanda. This imaginary country acts almost as a character on its own. Wakanda is a more sophisticated, wiser nation than the rest of the world. They’ve managed to reconcile modernity and nature like nothing we’ve seen anywhere else.

Marvel.com: How has it been working with Evan, Ta-Nehisi, and the rest of the RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER crew so far? Paul Renaud: Evan, Ta-Nehisi, and I met in New York during Comic Con to talk about the book, and we all really clicked. We discussed the project and the Marvel Universe in depth. We had a wonderful time. Stephane Paitreau, our colorist, came aboard later in the process. I also met him at NYCC where he showed me his work. I thought his warm, generous colors would just be perfect for a book like BLACK PANTHER. And they are indeed. It’s all about good timing!

RISE OF THE BLACK PLANTER #1, by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Evan Narcisse, and Paul Renaud, illuminates history on January 3!

Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline MindofShadow

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2624
    • View Profile
    • Black Panther Fan Blog
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4263 on: December 05, 2017, 02:31:20 pm »
Interesting way to make nyami relevant



Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4264 on: December 05, 2017, 08:27:33 pm »
Fleshing out N'Yami is a definite plus. I also like that MCU look for Killmonger as an update/upgrade was needed.



I hope he does the same with T'Challa and uses the MCU costume drawn to detail of course.
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ezyo

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2153
    • View Profile
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4265 on: December 06, 2017, 02:33:28 am »
It would seem the MCU Version still hasn't transfered over to the comic side yet.. which sucks because I want to see more details on the having and. Not just pure Black with Maybe the necklace or top half of his face having details

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4266 on: December 06, 2017, 06:58:58 pm »
BLACK PANTHER: RETURN OF THE MACKS
Published Dec 6, 2017 By Dominic Griffin



Three legendary writers book return trips to Wakanda!

With writer Ta-Nehesi Coates doing stellar work on the current BLACK PANTHER series and T’Challa making his solo film debut in February, three of the most iconic writers to ever pen stories for Wakanda return to the hero they helped make a household name; in February 18’s BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1, three distinct eras of the Panther will be revisited.

Don McGregor, the foundation-building scribe behind stories like “Panther’s Rage,” teams up with artist Daniel Acuna for a tale that takes King T’Challa out of Wakanda and onto the streets of New York for a gripping mission. Then, former BLACK PANTHER writer Christopher Priest will be joined by artist Mike Perkins for a story starring friend of Wakanda Everett K. Ross. And last but not least, the man behind “Who is The Black Panther?” and the director the recent film “Marshall”—starring the MCU’s T’Challa himself, Chadwick Boseman—will reunite with artist Ken Lashley for a sequel of sorts to their classic, “Black To The Future!”

We reached out to each of these legends to pick their brains about coming to a character they left such indelible marks on.

Marvel.com: What excited you most about returning to Black Panther?

Reginald Hudlin: When I was told that the book would feature me, Christopher Priest, and Don McGregor each doing Black Panther stories, it just felt historic. I knew I had to be a part of it.

Christopher Priest: Nothing. Seriously, nothing at all. It was terrifying.

My original run, especially the Marvel Knights installments, have finally found an audience. When we were actually doing the book, we literally couldn’t give copies away. There was enormous sales resistance and a lot of literal hate—and threats—from fans outraged that we gave Panther an iPhone. Seriously; there was this anti-tech backlash, “purists” who, from what I could tell, were confusing Black Panther with Tarzan. Panther is not Tarzan.

So, in those days, I’d spend a lot of energy engaging these fans and trying to please, please, sir, get them to go read FANTASTIC FOUR #52 and learn who Panther really is rather than who so many fans apparently believed he was—some kind of caveman or maybe Ka-Zar. He’s not Ka-Zar. He is ruler of one of the most technologically advanced societies in the world. Yes, dude, he can use an iPhone.

Don McGregor: It was excitement I felt when [editor] Wil Moss first approached me about coming back to write the Panther after being away from T’Challa for decades. I loved writing him, and I spent years with T’Challa’s voice in my head, trying to “hear” not only him, but all the characters in Wakanda around him.

I actually wrote that I was of the mind not to do it up on my Facebook page. I did not want to disappoint the readers who held such love for these characters, and how much, over the years, these stories had meant to them. The worst fear the storyteller can have, I suppose, is that you come back with a short piece and the reaction is “Man, Don had it back then; he should have left it alone!” But, when I wrote about it in the social media so many people responded that they wanted me to do it, I began to re-appraise accepting while I was visiting my daughter in California.

Marvel.com: How do you feel about the character’s growing pop cultural profile, with his appearance in “Captain America: Civil War” and now his own upcoming film?

Don McGregor: I think it’s terrific! The Panther has always been an important super hero in opening up the comics medium to the different kinds of characters and stories that can be told. I spent years of my life with him, so there becomes an intimacy of daily contact with each other, of staying open to what you can do as you continue to write the next issue. You often spend more time with the title characters of your series than you do with many of the people you know. It becomes a part of you, facing the next page, the next panel, trying to get it as right as you can in the moment you are creating it.

I thought Chadwick Boseman [brought] the right combination of grace and momentum and solemnity and strength to The Black Panther that was always the way I saw him. I am so glad [Marvel staffer] Peter Charpentier made it possible for me to meet with Chadwick during the San Diego Comic-Con this last summer.

Christopher Priest: Well, I certainly think it’s great. Chadwick Boseman’s end-of-innocence portrayal of a young T’Challa elevated the game for African—and African American—super heroes.

Reginald Hudlin: I remember all the Black Panther scripts that had been developed over the years. Almost all of them horrible. There were drafts where he grew up in housing projects in America with no idea of his royal heritage. Just ghastly perversions of the original concept.

So, when then-Executive Editor Axel Alonso and I sat down to talk about what was originally conceived to be a [limited series], I wanted to tell the story right. I didn’t know if there would ever be a movie, but I wanted to create a document that would tell fans who he was and be a blueprint for what a movie should be. I haven’t seen the film, but looking at how Klaw is portrayed and the inclusion of characters I created like Shuri, it looks like that is the case.

Marvel.com: Are there differences to how you approach the character now versus your original run on the book?

Don McGregor: Surely. You don’t have to do months of research to write a 12 page story as compared with a nearly 200 page graphic novel like “Panther’s Rage.” Back when I was first given the Panther to write there were multiple decisions that I had to make before I wrote one finished page. I not only read the comics; I had to research everything that would create the intricate details of Wakanda. Jack [Kirby] and Stan [Lee] had established it, but it was more a concept in those early stories, since they had a lot of characters with the Fantastic Four to interact with the Panther and whatever super villain they were fighting.

It was during those initial weeks that I discovered not one story had ever had anything to do with
Ramonda, the Panther’s mother, and I decided then that I would not mention her during “Panther’s Rage,” that this would be one big complete story, and then I would do a story dealing with South Africa and Apartheid. This would become “Panther’s Quest,” a story of a son, T’Challa, searching for his mother in an oppressive, racist regime, and how difficult such a place could make on the emotional turmoil of a son searching for a mother he has lost since childhood, a human theme I hoped everyone could relate to, and care about. As you can see, I was already concerned about where T’Challa’s life would go after “Panther’s Rage,” and before I wrote Book One of that series, I needed to know I had somewhere to go as a writer that would challenge me, but also make sure I was not writing the same story issue after issue.

Christopher Priest: Well, yes, I suppose. When I was writing the character 20 years ago, the mission was simpler: this is a story about a guy you think you know but you’ve, in fact, got him all wrong. Skip ahead 20 years, and now everybody is in on the joke. Reader expectation is different. Marvel Knights readers expected an overly serious homily on African culture, so we played against those expectations. Today’s audience already knows T’Challa is a capable—and deadly—adversary and technological genius, so I can’t write those “I can’t believe he took out Mephisto with one punch!” stories because, today’s audience knows he can.

Reginald Hudlin: Some fans on my web site asked me what story I would write if I ever came back to the character. There are a few I have in mind, but my favorite is a big epic story called World War Wakanda. It would be one of the big companywide crossovers. I only had six pages to tell my story, so I did an epilogue where you get glimpses of the result of the story  It also functions as a follow up to the “Black to The Future” story I wrote for the very first BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL.

Marvel.com: What do you think makes Black Panther such an iconic figure?

Don McGregor: I suspect many people love the idea of a character who can move with such power and grace and [certainty], and look absolutely terrific doing so! But, I have the feeling, also, for many people that they admire and want a leader who truly does want to represent as many of his people as he can, and doesn’t merely luxuriate in his power and abilities. I suspect we wish there were politicians that acted as honorably and with concern about all the people in their land.

Reginald Hudlin: He’s the African equivalent of Captain America. In the same way Cap embodies all that is good about America, The Panther symbolizes all that is great about Africa.

Christopher Priest: He’s the black guy. C’mon, let’s be honest. He’s the black guy. And he’s not angry, he doesn’t use slang or “Ebonics,” he pulls his pants up, he keeps his word. Black Panther shames us—all of us—by his nobility. He may well be the single most noble guy on Earth. Do your best. Keep your word. It’s all anyone can ask of you.

T’Challa’s, like, the last noble man on earth. I am by no means anywhere near that noble, but I aspire to be well, if not good, at least as good as I personally can manage. That’s the best any of us can do. Dude: be as good as you personally can manage. Eat your vegetables. Do your best. Keep your word.

Don’t miss BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1, from Don McGregor, Christopher Priest, Reginald Hudlin, and their artistic collaborators, on February 18!
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline JRCarter

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1448
    • View Profile
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4267 on: December 06, 2017, 07:15:48 pm »
Quote

With writer Ta-Nehesi Coates doing stellar work on the current BLACK PANTHER series


! No longer available
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 10:07:19 pm by JRCarter »

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4268 on: December 06, 2017, 09:58:47 pm »
Quote
Don McGregor, the foundation-building scribe behind stories like “Panther’s Rage,” teams up with artist Daniel Acuna for a tale that takes King T’Challa out of Wakanda and onto the streets of New York for a gripping mission. Then, former BLACK PANTHER writer Christopher Priest will be joined by artist Mike Perkins for a story starring friend of Wakanda Everett K. Ross. And last but not least,[Reginald Hudlin], the man behind “Who is The Black Panther?” and the director the recent film “Marshall”—starring the MCU’s T’Challa himself, Chadwick Boseman—will reunite with artist Ken Lashley for a sequel of sorts to their classic, “Black To The Future!”

Hudlin makes the strongest argument concept wise. Man...we get the annual and a new mini. All is good.
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4269 on: December 07, 2017, 08:46:53 am »


Ideally if Evan Narcisse's Rise of the Black Panther hits the mark and demonstrates that he comprehends who the T'Challa the Black Panther is and is able to advance the mythos and gives the Black Panther and Wakanda some significant feats... he should continue the series under that title and explore the recent past  and missing chapters of T'Challa's life.



Ideally Hudlin should come back and take World of Wakanda back to its true roots and do the maxi series mega crossover event World War Wakanda. This could be followed up with the ground breaking Black Panther Milestone crossover event.




#BLACK PANTHER FOREVER
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ezyo

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2153
    • View Profile
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4270 on: December 07, 2017, 09:25:24 am »
Evans  series is the first time since Coates has been on that I have been excited to read. I would be nice to Move past deflated Panther and get the Real BP back

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1658
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4271 on: December 09, 2017, 07:47:54 am »
RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER: RISE AND SHINE
Published Dec 8, 2017 By Dominic Griffin



Writer Evan Narcisse uncovers T’Challa’s first days as king!

We’ve all come to know and love T’Challa as the King of Wakanda, but few Black Panther stories have shown us how he came to the throne—and how he evolved into a leader—in the first place.

On January 8, RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER #1 kicks off a limited series that dives into the early days of T’Challa’s life and reign. Writers Evan Narcisse and Ta-Nehisi Coates join artist Paul Renaud to explore how the death of King T’Chaka changed both his son and the nation of Wakanda forever.

We spoke with Narcisse about his process, his collaborators, and writing an icon like Black Panther.

Marvel.com: You’re jumping from comic book journalism to writing comics themselves. How does it feel to make that transition?

Evan Narcisse: This is my first creative writing—my first published creative writing, I should say—and my first time writing comic scripts. Doing this job, I had researched what comic scripts looked like before. One of the things that was so daunting and encouraging ended up being that there’s no set format—everybody does it a little differently. Some people have really rich, florid descriptions in terms of art direction and what the characters think and feel. Some people have very lean pages. Mine probably tended more towards the former than the latter. It’s a lot harder than it looks from the outside looking in. It’s a hybrid beast that looks like a movie script but also has to do some actual storytelling in the document. You have to guide the artist but not restrict them. It’s a lot more surprising and eye opening than I thought.

Marvel.com: BLACK PANTHER writer Ta-Nehisi Coates has been working with you on this book. What’s that relationship like?

Evan Narcisse: He’s mostly consulting; the vast majority of the plot and the script come from me. I’ll run stuff by him and we’ll make sure we’re in sync in terms of whether T’Challa would do something this way or that. But, yeah, most of it comes from me. I’m a huge T’Challa fan and I have been for years, so I feel like I have a good internal sense of where I want him to be and how I want him to come across in this work.

Marvel.com: How does it feel to work with artist Paul Renaud on your first Marvel book?

Evan Narcisse: We met for the first time in New York City. I’ve seen his work around on CAPTAIN AMERICA: SAM WILSON stuff and loved it. I saw what he did on GENERATIONS: THE AMERICAS and thought it looked really great and felt super excited to find out he was going to be the guy on this book.

Marvel.com: Describe your process of creating RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER alongside Ta-Nehisi and Paul.

Evan Narcisse: The process of honing your skills happens in installments. What I’m thinking of now is, like, wanting to do things a little bit differently in an issue means you have to work ahead to iterate to see if you actually accomplished the ambitions you set for yourself or if it’ll going to put you behind schedule. It can be a really intense learning process.

I have the advantage of talking to Ta-Nehisi every day. We’re friends so we talk about comic book stuff anyway. He told me, “In a year’s time, when you’re still doing this, you’ll look back on these scripts and see how much better they could have been.” It’s been really fun just figuring out the tools and what tools work best for me and what tools I feel like I want to try out.

Also, it can be weird. I’ve realized that your fandom comes out not just textually but mechanically. So, the kind of comic book writing I’ve enjoyed since childhood has been coming out of me organically. Which isn’t to say my stuff will read like Denny O’Neil or my favorite writers, but there are certain rhythms I feel like I’m doing my own spin on.





Marvel.com: Which writers have influenced your work? Do you count any prior BLACK PANTHER scribes among them?

Evan Narcisse:  You can’t talk about BLACK PANTHER in 2017 without talking about Christopher Priest. He gave T’Challa a really intense refocusing and reimagining that is impossible to ignore. It’s masterful. As a comic book critic, I’ve written about Priest’s work many times over the years and, even though he’s been resurgent in 2017, he’s still underappreciated. I tweeted out earlier that I reread the “Storm und Drang” storyline from BLACK PANTHER #26–#29, where T’Challa brings the world to the brink of war. Magneto, Dr. Doom, Deviant Lemuria, and Namor, all heads of state, powerful heads of state, jostle around each other with all these different agendas. I think it’s one of the best examples of geopolitical storytelling and the idea of statecraft in super hero comics. So, Priest for sure.

Someone who seems unsung, not in general, but in terms of shepherding a certain vision of T’Challa, is Jonathan Hickman. He wrote T’Challa in his FANTASTIC FOUR run, setting up the King of the Dead aspect of the character. That fed into NEW AVENGERS—one of the best Avengers comics ever, but a low-key T’Challa book. That version of the Illuminati met in Wakanda. Again, his wants and needs clashed with the duty he had to do as a super hero in his rivalry with Namor.

One other thing that’s important to me about Black Panther and his creative legacy is his importance as a character that black creators could touch and leave an imprint on. I feel like every time a black writer or artist or editor has worked on a Black Panther book, the sensibilities of the characters got strengthened. You can go back to Billy Graham as the artist on that amazing Don McGregor run in JUNGLE ACTION. He was a superlative artist for his time; his draftsmanship and the tools in his storytelling are all super ambitious and genius level compared to some of the other work from the 1970s. From him, to Priest, to Reginald Hudlin and now to Ta-Nehisi…it’s important. Black Panther has always been symbolically important and I think black creators feel opportunity, responsibility, and a sense of kindred energy when working on the character. I certainly do.

Marvel.com: Do writers from outside the world of comics influence you? What other writers—or even just books or films—inform your comic writing?

Evan Narcisse: Probably my favorite movie of all time is Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil,” this really dark, satirical fable about living in a dystopian society. Unfortunately, it feels pretty relevant, in terms of the control of information and the constant battle for political narrative supremacy, to where we find ourselves nowadays.

There’s a novel from 1981 called “The Chaneysville Incident” by an author named David Bradley. A good friend in college gave it to me to read and it blew my mind. It’s this story about a black historian who goes back to his hometown in the rural South to dig into his old family history. He finds out about the way that his forbearers grew up under Jim Crow and the kind of stuff they had to endure and rebel against and the personal cost of all of that on his family. It’s a very dark book, beautifully written. It has stayed in my mind while writing RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER because the story I’m writing is, in part, a generational one. It’s about T’Challa grappling with his own history.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie wrote a book called “Half of a Yellow Sun.” She’s an amazing Nigerian writer. One of the things I have to think about when writing BLACK PANTHER is the idea of diaspora. It may seem a little counterintuitive, because Wakanda has kept to itself and not a lot of Wakandans live outside of Wakanda, but I want to explore what it’s like when that does happen. What does it mean to come from an isolationist country? It can be exceptional and aspirational, but it’s xenophobic to a certain extent, by virtue of necessity. They’re on a continent where every other country got colonized and invaded. So there ends up being a certain warrior sociopolitical mindset that they’ve had to adopt and iterate on in order to maintain their status. But also, how long can you maintain yourself as an “island”?

That’s one of the things T’Challa has to grapple with. It’s not a spoiler to say that T’Challa’s big decision in the series will be to open up the country and declare their existence to the Western world and simultaneously deal with all the repercussions that happen internally and externally as a result.

Marvel.com: How did you land on telling the story of this liminal time in T’Challa’s life? It seems to have certain parallels with the upcoming “Black Panther” film.

Evan Narcisse: My conversations with Wil Moss, my editor, early on, were about an “early years” T’Challa story and the place I landed ended up being his first year as king. The first conversations we had were about T’Chaka and I came on the idea that T’Chaka’s assassination, his death, had to be a major political event in Wakanda’s history. It’d be like JFK’s assassination—the kind of thing that changes an entire country’s mindset. It’s the kind of event where you mark off time between everything that came before it and what comes after it. In the first issue, we explore some of what came before it, with T’Chaka in his prime—something we haven’t seen much. We’ve seen flashbacks and we’ve seen him a little older and we’ve seen him as a ghost. The “after” stuff will obviously be T’Challa’s reign. It’s an established part of the character that his father being this amazing king wears heavy on him. At the same time, he deals with threats his father never dealt with. So, that informs his decision to open up Wakanda.

And I’m super excited for the “Black Panther” movie. I can’t wait—I know this sounds corny—but I can’t wait for fans everywhere to explore this character and learn about him, because I think T’Challa is one of the best super heroes ever created. I think he’s thematically rich and an exciting character to watch evolve throughout his history. And I’m so honored to be a part of that evolution.

RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER #1, by Evan Narcisse, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and artist Paul Renaud, kicks off on January 3!


https://news.marvel.com/comics/81776/rise-black-panther-rise-shine/
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline CvilleWakandan

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 832
    • View Profile
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4272 on: December 09, 2017, 08:32:16 am »
RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER: RISE AND SHINE
Published Dec 8, 2017 By Dominic Griffin

  Ta-Nehisi every day. We’re friends so we talk about comic book stuff anyway. He told me, “In a year’s time, when you’re still doing this, you’ll look back on these scripts and see how much better they could have been.”It’s been really fun just figuring out the tools and what tools work best for me and what tools I feel like I want to try out.

This is the part that stands out for me.
1. Coates knowns the first arc is trash.
2. Evan could be the hand picked successor.

Offline Ezyo

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2153
    • View Profile
Re: BP710:THE PROTOCOLS - Rise of the Black Panther - Ourstory!
« Reply #4273 on: December 09, 2017, 08:37:56 am »
RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER: RISE AND SHINE
Published Dec 8, 2017 By Dominic Griffin



Writer Evan Narcisse uncovers T’Challa’s first days as king!

We’ve all come to know and love T’Challa as the King of Wakanda, but few Black Panther stories have shown us how he came to the throne—and how he evolved into a leader—in the first place.

On January 8, RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER #1 kicks off a limited series that dives into the early days of T’Challa’s life and reign. Writers Evan Narcisse and Ta-Nehisi Coates join artist Paul Renaud to explore how the death of King T’Chaka changed both his son and the nation of Wakanda forever.

We spoke with Narcisse about his process, his collaborators, and writing an icon like Black Panther.

Marvel.com: You’re jumping from comic book journalism to writing comics themselves. How does it feel to make that transition?

Evan Narcisse: This is my first creative writing—my first published creative writing, I should say—and my first time writing comic scripts. Doing this job, I had researched what comic scripts looked like before. One of the things that was so daunting and encouraging ended up being that there’s no set format—everybody does it a little differently. Some people have really rich, florid descriptions in terms of art direction and what the characters think and feel. Some people have very lean pages. Mine probably tended more towards the former than the latter. It’s a lot harder than it looks from the outside looking in. It’s a hybrid beast that looks like a movie script but also has to do some actual storytelling in the document. You have to guide the artist but not restrict them. It’s a lot more surprising and eye opening than I thought.

Marvel.com: BLACK PANTHER writer Ta-Nehisi Coates has been working with you on this book. What’s that relationship like?

Evan Narcisse: He’s mostly consulting; the vast majority of the plot and the script come from me. I’ll run stuff by him and we’ll make sure we’re in sync in terms of whether T’Challa would do something this way or that. But, yeah, most of it comes from me. I’m a huge T’Challa fan and I have been for years, so I feel like I have a good internal sense of where I want him to be and how I want him to come across in this work.

Marvel.com: How does it feel to work with artist Paul Renaud on your first Marvel book?

Evan Narcisse: We met for the first time in New York City. I’ve seen his work around on CAPTAIN AMERICA: SAM WILSON stuff and loved it. I saw what he did on GENERATIONS: THE AMERICAS and thought it looked really great and felt super excited to find out he was going to be the guy on this book.

Marvel.com: Describe your process of creating RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER alongside Ta-Nehisi and Paul.

Evan Narcisse: The process of honing your skills happens in installments. What I’m thinking of now is, like, wanting to do things a little bit differently in an issue means you have to work ahead to iterate to see if you actually accomplished the ambitions you set for yourself or if it’ll going to put you behind schedule. It can be a really intense learning process.

I have the advantage of talking to Ta-Nehisi every day. We’re friends so we talk about comic book stuff anyway. He told me, “In a year’s time, when you’re still doing this, you’ll look back on these scripts and see how much better they could have been.” It’s been really fun just figuring out the tools and what tools work best for me and what tools I feel like I want to try out.

Also, it can be weird. I’ve realized that your fandom comes out not just textually but mechanically. So, the kind of comic book writing I’ve enjoyed since childhood has been coming out of me organically. Which isn’t to say my stuff will read like Denny O’Neil or my favorite writers, but there are certain rhythms I feel like I’m doing my own spin on.





Marvel.com: Which writers have influenced your work? Do you count any prior BLACK PANTHER scribes among them?

Evan Narcisse:  You can’t talk about BLACK PANTHER in 2017 without talking about Christopher Priest. He gave T’Challa a really intense refocusing and reimagining that is impossible to ignore. It’s masterful. As a comic book critic, I’ve written about Priest’s work many times over the years and, even though he’s been resurgent in 2017, he’s still underappreciated. I tweeted out earlier that I reread the “Storm und Drang” storyline from BLACK PANTHER #26–#29, where T’Challa brings the world to the brink of war. Magneto, Dr. Doom, Deviant Lemuria, and Namor, all heads of state, powerful heads of state, jostle around each other with all these different agendas. I think it’s one of the best examples of geopolitical storytelling and the idea of statecraft in super hero comics. So, Priest for sure.

Someone who seems unsung, not in general, but in terms of shepherding a certain vision of T’Challa, is Jonathan Hickman. He wrote T’Challa in his FANTASTIC FOUR run, setting up the King of the Dead aspect of the character. That fed into NEW AVENGERS—one of the best Avengers comics ever, but a low-key T’Challa book. That version of the Illuminati met in Wakanda. Again, his wants and needs clashed with the duty he had to do as a super hero in his rivalry with Namor.

One other thing that’s important to me about Black Panther and his creative legacy is his importance as a character that black creators could touch and leave an imprint on. I feel like every time a black writer or artist or editor has worked on a Black Panther book, the sensibilities of the characters got strengthened. You can go back to Billy Graham as the artist on that amazing Don McGregor run in JUNGLE ACTION. He was a superlative artist for his time; his draftsmanship and the tools in his storytelling are all super ambitious and genius level compared to some of the other work from the 1970s. From him, to Priest, to Reginald Hudlin and now to Ta-Nehisi…it’s important. Black Panther has always been symbolically important and I think black creators feel opportunity, responsibility, and a sense of kindred energy when working on the character. I certainly do.

Marvel.com: Do writers from outside the world of comics influence you? What other writers—or even just books or films—inform your comic writing?

Evan Narcisse: Probably my favorite movie of all time is Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil,” this really dark, satirical fable about living in a dystopian society. Unfortunately, it feels pretty relevant, in terms of the control of information and the constant battle for political narrative supremacy, to where we find ourselves nowadays.

There’s a novel from 1981 called “The Chaneysville Incident” by an author named David Bradley. A good friend in college gave it to me to read and it blew my mind. It’s this story about a black historian who goes back to his hometown in the rural South to dig into his old family history. He finds out about the way that his forbearers grew up under Jim Crow and the kind of stuff they had to endure and rebel against and the personal cost of all of that on his family. It’s a very dark book, beautifully written. It has stayed in my mind while writing RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER because the story I’m writing is, in part, a generational one. It’s about T’Challa grappling with his own history.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie wrote a book called “Half of a Yellow Sun.” She’s an amazing Nigerian writer. One of the things I have to think about when writing BLACK PANTHER is the idea of diaspora. It may seem a little counterintuitive, because Wakanda has kept to itself and not a lot of Wakandans live outside of Wakanda, but I want to explore what it’s like when that does happen. What does it mean to come from an isolationist country? It can be exceptional and aspirational, but it’s xenophobic to a certain extent, by virtue of necessity. They’re on a continent where every other country got colonized and invaded. So there ends up being a certain warrior sociopolitical mindset that they’ve had to adopt and iterate on in order to maintain their status. But also, how long can you maintain yourself as an “island”?

That’s one of the things T’Challa has to grapple with. It’s not a spoiler to say that T’Challa’s big decision in the series will be to open up the country and declare their existence to the Western world and simultaneously deal with all the repercussions that happen internally and externally as a result.

Marvel.com: How did you land on telling the story of this liminal time in T’Challa’s life? It seems to have certain parallels with the upcoming “Black Panther” film.

Evan Narcisse: My conversations with Wil Moss, my editor, early on, were about an “early years” T’Challa story and the place I landed ended up being his first year as king. The first conversations we had were about T’Chaka and I came on the idea that T’Chaka’s assassination, his death, had to be a major political event in Wakanda’s history. It’d be like JFK’s assassination—the kind of thing that changes an entire country’s mindset. It’s the kind of event where you mark off time between everything that came before it and what comes after it. In the first issue, we explore some of what came before it, with T’Chaka in his prime—something we haven’t seen much. We’ve seen flashbacks and we’ve seen him a little older and we’ve seen him as a ghost. The “after” stuff will obviously be T’Challa’s reign. It’s an established part of the character that his father being this amazing king wears heavy on him. At the same time, he deals with threats his father never dealt with. So, that informs his decision to open up Wakanda.

And I’m super excited for the “Black Panther” movie. I can’t wait—I know this sounds corny—but I can’t wait for fans everywhere to explore this character and learn about him, because I think T’Challa is one of the best super heroes ever created. I think he’s thematically rich and an exciting character to watch evolve throughout his history. And I’m so honored to be a part of that evolution.

RISE OF THE BLACK PANTHER #1, by Evan Narcisse, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and artist Paul Renaud, kicks off on January 3!


https://news.marvel.com/comics/81776/rise-black-panther-rise-shine/

O feel overall.. Evan gets it.. I wish people would also talk about the other unsung heroes of BP is Hudlin, McDuffie, and Liss, but especially Hudlin. I feel he gets the least amount of recognition for how important an impact he made on BP and how he is being exposed to this day. Priest obviously gets his credit but Hudlin doesn't as much and it's a shame Because without him, Priest run wouldn't get he exposure it deserved.

But ultimately, o like what he is saying, and if his words are backed up by showings of competent and powerful Tchalla,
then I hope his series breaks out like Hudlin's as a second ongoing, one that can be listed among Priest, Hudlin and. Liss