Author Topic: What teachers really want to tell parents  (Read 8694 times)

Offline sherelled

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2013, 06:06:06 am »
I am praying that we get our children back too. I see signs though minuscule there are some who will go on against the odds to help the masses. Change the world. If this does not happen. The world as we know it will implode! :'(

Offline The Griot

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2013, 07:01:44 am »
There are are a few schools out there...
They're just not public schools..

I disagree. There are good public schools out there. My children attended a good public school system and benefited greatly from it. Unlike some we were fortunate enough to be able to relocate to the school district. That being said, a school is the product of the community. It will not be successful unless everyone works together to make it so. It takes a focused effort from principals, teachers, parents and students.
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Offline Mr. Peejay

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2013, 10:40:27 am »
There is a holistic approach toward education that will never be implemented in America. The issue of nutrition in schools alone is indicative of this reality. You have millions of kids entering school from a physical and mental deficit all because of diet. I think in the history of the world there hasn't been so many malnourished people who consume so much food.

The anti-intellectualism of this country is also something that msut be taken into account. It is easy to scapegoat Black youth as being pre-occupied with materialism and debauchery as though their White counterparts are not. The difference is that one group sets the rules and can determine whose practice is more sanctified than the others.
There are are a few schools out there...
They're just not public schools..

I disagree. There are good public schools out there. My children attended a good public school system and benefited greatly from it. Unlike some we were fortunate enough to be able to relocate to the school district. That being said, a school is the product of the community. It will not be successful unless everyone works together to make it so. It takes a focused effort from principals, teachers, parents and students.


You are right to say that there have to be schools out there achieving these goals, or school systems serving our children the way that they need to be successful pillars of their communities... But as a whole, Inner City Schools are suffering. The frequency in which Public schools take this seriously, is so low, that it is next to nil.... At least in Chicago...or Boston.... or Baltimore... Or where there are a majority of Black and Brown children. I went to public schools, my childhood is what is strive to make for OUR children. I have taught at schools where the needs of the children have come first, but the never stay strong. It is hard to find this, and you are lucky to have your children amongst "their people" and in a school that serves them well. ONE shouldn't have to move to get a good school system. Charter Schools are not the answer, Chicago's Plan is not the answer.... not the answer for the System to uplift the children... anyway...

Offline The Griot

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2013, 04:37:19 am »
"Their people?"  Can't deny it, our kids did go to school in a majority white school district. However there are majority black schools in the Metro Atlanta area that are serving students well also. If we had been close to them they would have been on the list. Again, I feel it's a community issue. I went to black schools all my life until we forced to integrate in the '70s. The education I received afterwards was no better or worse. I graduated from a black college and my career has been as good as or better than my friends who attended predominately white colleges.

It's harder for us, no doubt. But there used to be a commitment toward education among us, no matter what level. Somewhere along the line we lost that. The bottom line is no one is going to fix it for us. We have to fix it ourselves.
"Happiness is dancing when the drumming is good."

Offline Vic Vega

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2013, 01:53:22 pm »
If the Parents don't care, how can anybody else be expected to fix the school?

That is the problem. If you don't have an engaged group of Parents, the school board
will just dump anybody on that school.

So if you have an incompetant Admin, indifferent Parents are your best friends.

 

Offline Mr. Peejay

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2013, 03:17:37 pm »


If the Parents don't care, how can anybody else be expected to fix the school?

That is the problem. If you don't have an engaged group of Parents, the school board
will just dump anybody on that school.

So if you have an incompetant Admin, indifferent Parents are your best friends.

 
It's harder for us, no doubt. But there used to be a commitment toward education among us, no matter what level. Somewhere along the line we lost that. The bottom line is no one is going to fix it for us. We have to fix it ourselves.
Couldn't be more right..

I have always thought that BECAUSE of bussing we have this problem...
My facts are not formed/compiled yet.. Don't hate that statement yet.

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2013, 06:10:03 pm »
It's harder for us, no doubt. But there used to be a commitment toward education among us, no matter what level. Somewhere along the line we lost that. The bottom line is no one is going to fix it for us. We have to fix it ourselves.

I wonder, is there really less of a commitment toward education among us? For instance, it seems to me that more of us are earning college degrees than ever before. While that is only one measure of "commitment", what else should we look at?

Although I haven't found a definitive source on the question of black college graduation rates over time, here's some evidence:

From The Root: Debunking Education Myths About Blacks
Quote
So far we have learned that black males' representation in college is proportional to their representation in the general population, yet the attainment of four-year college degrees among adult black males is only 16 percent. Meanwhile, 20 percent of black females and 32 percent of white males have completed college.

However, there is a silver lining. Every decade, the number and percentage of black men who earn a college degree increases. In 1990 the proportion of black males over age 25 who had completed college was 11.1 percent. By year 2000 it was 13.2 percent, and by 2010, 15.8 percent had completed college (Ruggles et al).

Also this from the National Center for Education Statistics:
Quote
The percentage of American college students who are Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Black has been increasing. From 1976 to 2010, the percentage of Hispanic students rose from 3 percent to 13 percent, the percentage of Asian/Pacific Islander students rose from 2 percent to 6 percent, and the percentage of Black students rose from 9 percent to 14 percent. During the same period, the percentage of White students fell from 83 percent to 61 percent. Race/ethnicity is not reported for nonresident aliens, who made up 2 percent and 3 percent of total enrollment in 1976 and 2010, respectively.

And this also from the National Center for Education Statistics:
Quote
Among U.S. residents, the number of associate's degrees earned by Hispanic students more than doubled from academic years 19992000 to 200910 (increasing by 118 percent), and the number earned by Black students increased by 89 percent. As a result, Blacks earned 14 percent and Hispanics earned 13 percent of all associate's degrees awarded in 200910, up from 11 percent and 9 percent, respectively, in 19992000. During the same time period, the number of bachelor's degrees awarded to Black students increased by 53 percent, and the number awarded to Hispanic students increased by 87 percent. In 200910, Black students earned 10 percent and Hispanics earned 9 percent of all bachelor's degrees conferred, versus the 9 and 6 percent, respectively, earned in 19992000. Similarly, the numbers of master's degrees earned by Black and Hispanic students more than doubled from 19992000 to 200910 (increasing by 109 percent and 125 percent, respectively). As a result, among U.S. residents in 200910, Black students earned 12 percent and Hispanics earned 7 percent of all master's degrees conferred, up from 9 percent and 5 percent, respectively, in 19992000. In addition, the number of doctor's degrees awarded increased by 60 percent for Hispanic students and by 47 percent for Black students.

These sources all seem to indicate that more African Americans (by number and by percentage) are receiving degrees at all levels than at any time in the past. That doesn't seem consistent with the assertion that our commitment to education is lessening. Or maybe it's more complicated than that. Any thoughts?
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Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2013, 09:57:52 pm »
As a dad with young kids, here's my take on it. 

The bar is rising for kids to compete. 

The level of work that high achieving kids have to do is harder than my childhood. 

I have no idea how any kid in an average school competes unless he or she is just exceptional.


Offline Metro

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2013, 03:44:55 pm »
The bar is rising for kids to compete. 
The level of work that high achieving kids have to do is harder than my childhood. 

Supplemental education is the answer for families with children in underperforming schools.  The extra 20-30 hours of school work per week (approx. 800 hours / year) enhances standard performance during the school year and good 4-12 week programs in the summer multiply the effect.

Due to supplemental programs, in fourth grade, I was doing 8th grade work.  In eighth grade, I did 1st year college assignments.  When I started college and enrolled for graduate work, I was easily six years ahead of my peers.

Doing the same work for my fourth grader (CLDE-status), he is approximately two years ahead academically, despite attending four different schools.  We begin the real acceleration process this summer.  My two-year-old is already midway through standard kindergarten preparation.

The same principle applies in my university classrooms -- my seniors have been doing masters/early doctoral work for the last decade.  My sophomores/juniors do early graduate work.  My first years (and accelerated juniors/seniors in high school) are doing 3rd/4th year university curricula from c. 2005.

Yet I definitely see that most educators remain trapped in their own preparation and fear of appearing incompetent, so they stick with outdated data, methods, and assessments.  Sadly, even most of the professional development events I attend with engaged/motivated instructors fail to teach them how to accelerate student learning. 

I've had to start designing and selling whole seminars on this topic.  The next one (6 seats left) is in early August in Princeton, NJ.  If you know anyone who might be interested, just let me know.
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Offline Maxine Shaw

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2013, 05:00:32 pm »
Yet I definitely see that most educators remain trapped in their own preparation and fear of appearing incompetent, so they stick with outdated data, methods, and assessments.  Sadly, even most of the professional development events I attend with engaged/motivated instructors fail to teach them how to accelerate student learning.

Pretty sure that falls in the laps of the administrators, not the teachers. If the administration wants you to teach Bink Says Boo, your ass damn well better be teaching Bink Says Boo. If you get busted teaching Bink Says Boo-Boo, you're humped. I'm speaking from personal experience here. There is no accelerated student learning - and there sure as hell isn't any in Texas, where every class has to be on the same unit every week, and is not allowed to stay behind to go over the material again, nor jump ahead.
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Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #25 on: June 11, 2013, 08:39:58 am »
As a dad with young kids, here's my take on it. 

The bar is rising for kids to compete. 

The level of work that high achieving kids have to do is harder than my childhood. 

I have no idea how any kid in an average school competes unless he or she is just exceptional.
I agree that the goal posts are moving and that our expectations of "the education system" are rising also. Another thing bugs me a little is that we often speak of "the education system" as though it is a monolithic thing instead of an aggregate of local districts and states. That is, it's not a uniform experience by any stretch. Although I do think there are some patterns that are mostly consistent.

I like Metro's suggestions. We have more or less done that with our children as well. Less structured but always cultivating interest and encouragement to learn about whatever strikes them. I bet that one of the principles of Metro's program is mastery learning, i.e. you work on a thing until you get it however long (or short) that takes. In other words, the direct opposite of the Texan system described by Maxine Shaw.
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Offline Battle

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2013, 10:38:11 am »
I like Metro's suggestions. We have more or less done that with our children as well. Less structured but always cultivating interest and encouragement to learn about whatever strikes them. I bet that one of the principles of Metro's program is mastery learning, i.e. you work on a thing until you get it however long (or short) that takes. In other words, the direct opposite of the Texan system described by Maxine Shaw.





Agreed.

Offline Metro

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2013, 06:24:34 am »

Mastery learning in higher ed circles tends to come back to Adam Smith's idea of specialization.  I tend to argue against Smith's idea of specialization because it generates professionalization (hierarchy) and overspecialization (fragility).  My model layers different specializations (up to 8, depending on student preferences/aptitudes) in 4-6 year cycles with a resilient, interdependent mastery normally achieved between ages 24 and 30.

For me, the initial fields were leadership, program design, religion, and history.  More recently, I've moved into finance, genetics, and media literacy.  The interplay between subject areas deepens the learning experience for me as well as many of my students.
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Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: What teachers really want to tell parents
« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2013, 03:53:10 pm »
We might have had a disconnect on what is meant by "mastery learning". I meant it in this sense:
Quote
In Mastery learning, "the students are helped to master each learning unit before proceeding to a more advanced learning task" (Bloom 1985) in contrast to "conventional instruction".

As opposed to moving on when the schedule calls for it regardless of whether the material or concept has actually been learned.
Wikipedia article
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."