Author Topic: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Release Date Pushed Back...  (Read 762424 times)

Offline BlackClaw

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Black Panther Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3555 on: September 06, 2021, 03:02:11 am »
I think Martin Freeman was low key trying to warn us when he said how some parts of the script were weird and joked that “hopefully it won’t be terrible”.

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Black Panther Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3556 on: September 06, 2021, 09:58:34 am »
Ture,

I think you make many excellent points here. There’s not much I feel a need to respond to, though I will say some things.

Why Disney seems hellbent on putting out Wakanda Forever next year as opposed to waiting to 2023 or beyond is anyone’s guess. You made a good point about BP fans waiting patiently enough to get the first film, and it’s logical that most would be willing to wait another year or two in order for Marvel to get the sequel right. I think getting the sequel right is more important for many fans. And it’s not like Marvel hasn’t made major adjustments already. I heard they moved Dr. Strange 2, which I heard changed the story for Spider-Man: No Way Home, making that film the start of the MCU multiverse on the big screen. And I heard they also changed Falcon and Winter Soldier, cutting out an end credit scene with Zemo, and I believe that the new Black Widow was going to be in it as well, due to the Black Widow film being pushed back until it premiered after Falcon & Winter Soldier. So, they can change things if they really want to, but for some reason, they don’t want to with this film.

I could speculate that Disney thinks the grief over Chadwick Boseman’s death will make it easier for them to give us Shuri as Black Panther while people are still mourning. The longer wait, the more the idea of a recast might take hold, and it appears Disney doesn’t want to do that.

Looking back over what I had written before, I should’ve used the word ‘complicated’ instead of ‘complex’. While many hands had a role in building this country, the wealth generated by hundreds of years of free labor, which made fortunes North, South, and worldwide, is far more essential to the nation’s creation and stability. I think a great deal of the anger provoked by the New York Times’ 1619 Project is because of its contention that slavery is so important to the American story, whereas many whites (as well as some blacks, and others) want to downplay or ignore how slavery permeated, or rather, despoiled the society, warping it even today.

I do think many of us are caught up with the idea of being the ‘first’ or making ‘history’ in white society, but I can’t fault many black folks for this because this is the way many were taught; making it in the white world, proving ourselves just as good as them, is something drilled into us very early on. Think of many of our elementary school icons, like Jackie Robinson. Robinson’s breaking the color barrier is still hailed, but rarely is the other side of the story, the end of the Negro Leagues, told. I’m not saying we were taught the right way or well but laying out why many black people revere ‘black firsts’; also, the media, academia/educators, and politicians have effectively used the ‘black firsts’ as markers of social progress. How many times has someone threw up President Obama as rejoinder to racism still existing? Or how many have used Oprah’s success to batter down any accusations of racism?

For many of our people, IMO, history does ‘start’ with the Transatlantic slave trade. When I was in school there wasn’t much talk at all about the African/aboriginal origins of black people, and little attention paid to pre-colonial African empires, societies, and cultures. Granted, people should not have been as reliant on the public schools (or even private school system, unless it was an Afrocentric school) to give them some of the history you’ve described here, but that’s the reality. Further, it doesn’t seem we’ve gotten much help from our brothers and sisters in the Diaspora in that regard either. The expectation, if not demand it seems, is that it’s incumbent upon black Americans to reach out, to reconnect with our pre-American roots, but unfortunately sometimes this is done in a high-handed manner, and there’s also the strain of anti-black American sentiment I’ve seen on social media and even a bit on the CBS series Bob Hearts Abishola, which hardens feelings as well. And I also consider that black Americans have been away from the continent for almost a half-millennium. With the racial and cultural mixtures, as well as our divergent (somewhat) histories, we are different from our continental brothers and sisters in many respects. And I don’t think that’s something we should feel ashamed about. Our ancestors went through hell and many did the best they could to get us here and I think we need to do more to honor them.

For me your comparison of Black Panther to black Americans’ history here still doesn’t work. Black Panther is a 50-plus year- old character and while perhaps one could view him, and our feelings about him, as microcosm of the dreams, anxieties, and frustrations that have enthralled and bedeviled millions of blacks for centuries, a comic book character (no matter who created it) doesn’t have the same weight of four centuries of history.

I find it a facile comparison because black creatives fleshing out the world of Black Panther can’t compare to black legislators, activists, and others, creating legislation that granted freedom, expanded it, and improved society for millions of people. There’re levels to this, and while Black Panther (the comics, cartoons, and movie) can and does inspire, it’s not the same as providing lifesaving, lifegiving legislation, etc. to people.

While many of our ancestors did escape slavery or gave their lives in the attempt, the vast majority were in chains, and this was little different across the Diaspora as well, when it came to slavery and colonialism. Many blacks everywhere on the planet endured, and some still enslaved helped out those who had run away I should note. When it comes to black Americans (etc.) going back to Africa as part of colonization/recolonization, I have no problem with the blacks who made that choice, but I also keep in mind that slave owners supported recolonization because it got rid of free blacks too, so they thought their absence would make it easier to create a compliant slave workforce.

I think we have been made to feel ashamed of our enslaved ancestors, when they were the victims, but we also have turned ‘victim’ into a dirty word when it comes to black people today, which ignores reality to boost some’s self-esteem or gain favor in the larger society. I can’t judge most of the enslaved unless it’s the real coonish ones. The enslaved suffered more than ‘indignities’, it was terror of a kind I can barely imagine. It had to be terrifying to make the choice to run, to leave behind your family (not knowing what the slave owners and overseers might do to them), being hunted until you made it to ‘freedom’, but still having to sleep with one eye open to avoid being captured and sent back into slavery. Slavery was meant to break our people, to turn us into mindless automatons, and it never did. It screwed us up, and it broke some, but it never extinguished our humanity. Even the desire to assimilate, whether you agree with it or not, is still an attempt to claim humanity, it’s just using whiteness as the standard for it. So, I think your idea of defying slavery could use some broadening.

I think you do a good job laying out many of the problem’s black legislators, among others of our people, have being a minority group, a despised one at that. Though once again, I don’t think comparing our ownership/investment in this country is not the same as a creative property that belongs exclusively to DC or Marvel. While some of those characters might have been inspired by black artists or characters created by blacks, I have not read anything where they were stolen from black people directly, or that the black creatives created those characters and got no compensation.

As for what you wrote about the debt owed, there very much is a debt owed. Whether it will be paid is another issue. While certainly the original enslavers and many of their descendants don’t believe there is a debt to be paid, there was the small attempt after the Civil War (’40 acres and a mule’), and we’ve seen the government pay reparations to other groups as well, so there’s legal precedent.  While there is no real dollar amount that can make up for centuries of the most horrific abuse, that doesn’t mean the white world should not make the attempt, because they will never be free themselves until they do all they can to make right what their ancestors made so wrong, and which they still benefit from. And black people have the right, no matter what enslavers and their descendants think, to press for restitution, like other people who have suffered greatly have done.

The idea that rejecting a comic book character and forgoing your citizenship, and all that you know, is another comparison I don’t agree with. I’m sure you are well aware of the legal and financial moves you would have to make to leave. And honestly, what African or Caribbean countries today have their arms open for an influx of black Americans? I’m sure many don’t mind us visiting and spending money, but that’s about it.

I think you're on to something indeed when it comes to black creatives moving away from comic book archetypes-even though I like seeing different takes on existing archetypes myself. Getting that kind of independent spark and creating new archetypes, from a black perspective, would be great to see. I think in time we might get more of that. We already see the different aesthetic in things like Afrofuturism and I am seeing more Afrofuturist writers/creators out there taking familiar tropes-many do, admittedly-but still finding something fresh and organically black (though not always organically black IMO)-to say with their art.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2021, 05:08:26 am by Emperorjones »

Offline Ture

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Black Panther Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3557 on: September 15, 2021, 07:32:16 pm »
OK Emperorjones, here is my long coming response.

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Why Disney seems hellbent on putting out Wakanda Forever next year as opposed to waiting to 2023 or beyond is anyone’s guess. You made a good point about BP fans waiting patiently enough to get the first film, and it’s logical that most would be willing to wait another year or two in order for Marvel to get the sequel right. I think getting the sequel right is more important for many fans. And it’s not like Marvel hasn’t made major adjustments already. I heard they moved Dr. Strange 2, which I heard changed the story for Spider-Man: No Way Home, making that film the start of the MCU multiverse on the big screen. And I heard they also changed Falcon and Winter Soldier, cutting out an end credit scene with Zemo, and I believe that the new Black Widow was going to be in it as well, due to the Black Widow film being pushed back until it premiered after Falcon & Winter Soldier. So, they can change things if they really want to, but for some reason, they don’t want to with this film.

The Black Panther films literally have the potential to definitely be in second and maybe even in first place among Marvel's cinematic franchises. The rush to "out" the Black Panther sequel may have another underlying A.G.E.N.D.A.

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I could speculate that Disney thinks the grief over Chadwick Boseman’s death will make it easier for them to give us Shuri as Black Panther while people are still mourning. The longer wait, the more the idea of a recast might take hold, and it appears Disney doesn’t want to do that.

Making Shuri Black Panther begs the question why. The first film delivered a great synergy of male and female balance. Shuri stood out as Shuri. The insistence of some to sacrifice T'Challa is also suspect.

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Looking back over what I had written before, I should’ve used the word ‘complicated’ instead of ‘complex’. While many hands had a role in building this country, the wealth generated by hundreds of years of free labor, which made fortunes North, South, and worldwide, is far more essential to the nation’s creation and stability. I think a great deal of the anger provoked by the New York Times’ 1619 Project is because of its contention that slavery is so important to the American story, whereas many whites (as well as blacks, and others) want to downplay or ignore how slavery permeated, or rather, despoiled the society, warping it even today.

In the building and maintaining a nation there is little difference between forced (there was nothing free about it) labor and cheap labor as both are predicated on exploitation. The success of the latter hinges on the exploited feeling like they have some sort of vested interest. The enslavement of Afrakan people in the USA supposedly ended officially in 1865 and even without so called "free" labor massive amounts of wealth are still being generated.

Some so called black communities could argue the point of a lack of stability for the last few centuries.

Slavery was not the initiating point permeating, despoiling or warping the society of the USA. Prior to that, there was the butchering of the so called Native Americans and the occupation and theft of the land upon which they lived. The starting point was in the minds of those people who believed it was their right to conquer others and take whatever it is they wanted. Later in the 19th century they even gave it a proper name Manifest Destiny.

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I do think many of us are caught up with the idea of being the ‘first’ or making ‘history’ in white society, but I can’t fault many black folks for this because this is the way many were taught; making it in the white world, proving ourselves just as good as them, is something drilled into us very early on. Think of many of our elementary school icons, like Jackie Robinson. Robinson’s breaking the color barrier is still hailed, but rarely is the other side of the story, the end of the Negro Leagues, told. I’m not saying we were taught the right way or well but laying out why many black people revere ‘black firsts’; also, the media, academia/educators, and politicians have effectively used the ‘black firsts’ as markers of social progress. How many times has someone threw up President Obama as rejoinder to racism still existing? Or how many have used Oprah’s success to batter down any accusations of racism?

Those teachings were intended to disorient and distort a group of people for generations. Some Afrakans began the practice of ignoring their ethnicities. They didn't want to identify as Kamau, Yoruba, Akan, Ibo, Fulani, Ewe, Fon, Ovambo and instead became slaves, niggers, negroes, colored, black, Afro American, African American, people of color, melaninated people, decedents of slaves. Those costly lessons graduated too many inferiority driven classes of individuals.

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For many of our people, IMO, history does ‘start’ with the Transatlantic slave trade. When I was in school there wasn’t much talk at all about the African/aboriginal origins of black people, and little attention paid to pre-colonial African empires, societies, and cultures. Granted, people should not have been as reliant on the public schools (or even private school system, unless it was an Afrocentric school) to give them some of the history you’ve described here, but that’s the reality. Further, it doesn’t seem we’ve gotten much help from our brothers and sisters in the Diaspora in that regard either. The expectation, if not demand it seems, is that it’s incumbent upon black Americans to reach out, to reconnect with our pre-American roots, but unfortunately sometimes this is done in a high-handed manner, and there’s also the strain of anti-black American sentiment I’ve seen on social media and even a bit on the CBS series Bob Hearts Abishola, which hardens feelings as well.

It was not so much about being reliant on them as much as making them compliant to the educational needs of the children of the tax payers whose monies help support those institutions.

I also attended such schools, schools deprived of the necessary Afrakan centeredness but my mother made sure that would not continue to be the case. At our public schools she helped organized PTAs; got more Afrakan (so called black) teachers to work at our schools; initiated Afrakan history classes; developed Black History Month and Kwanzaa celebrations. Her sister with her help and others created one of the largest Afrakan street festivals in the USA. Her other sisters even started their own private and charter schools.

Many of our people have worked to forward our historical and cultural learning. In 1972, the Council of Independent Black Institutions (CIBI) was created. This organization became the hub for Afrakan-centered institutions of learning and individuals who supported Afrakan-centered education. Its members are found throughout the United States of America.

As for help from the diaspora, organizations like TransAfrica founded in 1977 by Randall Robinson, Philadelphia OIC founded in 1964 by the Reverend Leon H. Sullivan; The African Socialist International the African People’s Socialist Party (APSP) founded by Omali Yeshetela’ have all had success with getting support and having members from the Afrakan diaspora. Many of the members, participants and supporters of these organizations were and are teachers, professors, concerned parents and volunteers in the school system.

I site the following just to emphasize that Afrakans both continental and in the diaspora recognize their mutual best interests. In the Constitutive Act of the African Union, under amended Article 3(q) of the Act (Objectives), the following is stated regarding the African diaspora: “invite and encourage the full participation of the African Diaspora as an important part of our continent, in building the African Union. In January 2008, the Executive Council suggested that the African diaspora be treated as Africa’s sixth region.

Let us not forget that Afrakans both continental and in the diaspora are under very similar forms of cultural disenfranchisement and dissolution. The aforementioned engenders the "strain" of Anti Afrakan and Afraphobic behaviors being practiced by some of our people. Media whether social or otherwise has constantly and purposefully played a disruptive role in these matters.

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And I also consider that black Americans have been away from the continent for almost a half-millennium. With the racial and cultural mixtures, as well as our divergent (somewhat) histories, we are different from our continental brothers and sisters in many respects. And I don’t think that’s something we should feel ashamed about. Our ancestors went through hell and many did the best they could to get us here and I think we need to do more to honor them.

Consider also that the Dutch, Portuguese, British, German, French and to a lesser extent Italians, Spaniards, Greeks, and Scandinavians have been on the Afrakan continent for almost a half-millennium. They too have ethnic and cultural admixtures and divergent histories filled with internal conflicts. And yet they still impose their culturally specific eurocentric values and advance their ethnic agendas. Their languages, religions, fashions, aesthetics and politics heavily influence and impact Afrakans across the entire continent.

We should never be ashamed of being Afrakan. Our ancestors not only survived one of humanity's most heinous acts but did so maintaining there connections to their heritage and culture. Look at the Afrakans in America practicing their traditions and culture for the past five hundred years despite all the atrocities inflicted upon them. The Akan decedents here in the USA maintaining tradition through Hoodoo; the Yoruba decedents doing the same through Juju; Ewe and Fon decedents via Voodoo; Kamau decedents living the Shetau Neter.
Not only do we honor them we exalt them further remembering and practicing what they did.

The old adage of divide and conquer separate and rule rings clear. What are we if ignore our Afrakan culture and heritage. Why just go back 20 generations and start there as if the 21st , 25th or 30th generations no longer count or existed.

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For me your comparison of Black Panther to black Americans’ history here still doesn’t work. Black Panther is a 50-plus year- old character and while perhaps one could view him, and our feelings about him, as microcosm of the dreams, anxieties, and frustrations that have enthralled and bedeviled millions of blacks for centuries, a comic book character (no matter who created it) doesn’t have the same weight of four centuries of history.

I find it a facile comparison because black creatives fleshing out the world of Black Panther can’t compare to black legislators, activists, and others, creating legislation that granted freedom, expanded it, and improved society for millions of people. There’re levels to this, and while Black Panther (the comics, cartoons, and movie) can and does inspire, it’s not the same as providing lifesaving, lifegiving legislation, etc. to people.

I understand where you are coming from Emperorjones. Both are valid criticisms.

Quote
While many of our ancestors did escape slavery or gave their lives in the attempt, the vast majority were in chains, and this was little different across the Diaspora as well, when it came to slavery and colonialism. Many blacks everywhere on the planet endured, and some still enslaved helped out those who had run away I should note. When it comes to black Americans (etc.) going back to Africa as part of colonization/recolonization, I have no problem with the blacks who made that choice, but I also keep in mind that slave owners supported recolonization because it got rid of free blacks too, so they thought their absence would make it easier to create a compliant slave workforce.

Another valid statement.

Quote
I think we have been made to feel ashamed of our enslaved ancestors, when they were the victims, but we also have turned ‘victim’ into a dirty word when it comes to black people today, which ignores reality to boost some’s self-esteem or gain favor in the larger society. I can’t judge most of the enslaved unless it’s the real coonish ones. The enslaved suffered more than ‘indignities’, it was terror of a kind I can barely imagine. It had to be terrifying to make the choice to run, to leave behind your family (not knowing what the slave owners and overseers might do to them), being hunted until you made it to ‘freedom’, but still haven’t to sleep with one eye open to avoid being captured and sent back into slavery. Slavery was meant to break our people, to turn us into mindless automatons, and it never did. It screwed us up, and it broke some, but it never extinguished our humanity. Even the desire to assimilate, whether you agree with it or not, is still an attempt to claim humanity, it’s just using whiteness as the standard for it. So, I think your idea of defying slavery could use some broadening.

I think we've been made to feel ashamed of being Afrakan. Enslaved Afrakans that fought and successfully self liberated building their own communities; those captive Afrakans who fought and died; the Afrakans that resisted by using their enslavers laws while maintaining their cultural integrity are not being called into question. What is being questioned is the argument that white humanity must supersede its antecedent  Afrakanity.

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I think you do a good job laying out many of the problem’s black legislators, among others of our people have being a minority group, a despised one at that. Though once again, I don’t think comparing our ownership in this country is not the same as the creative property that belongs exclusively to DC or Marvel. While some of those characters might have been inspired by black artists or characters created by blacks, I have not read anything where they were stolen from black people directly, or that the black creatives created those characters and got no compensation.

Being despised is not a problem so long as we do not despise ourselves.

I did not mean to imply that comparing our ownership in this country as the same as ownership of intellectual property belonging to Marvel, only that the two have relatable similarities.

You stated that "It might be a controversial opinion, especially here, but I don't see Black Panther/T'Challa, or his world as organically African/Afrikan/Black. Certainly there is black DNA in the character, franchise, going back to artist Billy Graham, and I do believe Lee and Kirby created him with the best of intentions, but as I always remind myself Black Panther doesn't belong to us, he belongs to them, and they will do, or not do with him, as they wish. And we have the right to accept, reject, or acclimate ourselves to whatever creative decisions they ultimately agree to."

My analogy begged the question, is the USA organically African/Afrikan/Black? If not how do we claim it? We certainly know we have come over a way that with tears has been watered and we too know we have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered. That accounts for the DNA. Based on the Constitution and Bill of Rights the USA may have been introduced with the best of intentions but we are constantly reminded that we are a minority living in a republic where democracy often means majority rule. White people are 76.3% of the population while so called black or African American are 13.4%. The numbers speak for themselves. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/US/PST045219

You also said that "Black people built the country, without receiving the credit and definitely the compensation over centuries, so that's a debt owed." With credit and compensation Black Panther was built by "black people from Billy Graham to Ryan Coogler.

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As for what you wrote about the debt owed, there very much is a debt owed. Whether it will be paid is another issue. While certainly the original enslavers and many of their descendants don’t believe there is a debt to be paid, there was the small attempt after the Civil War (’40 acres and a mule’), and we’ve seen the government pay reparations to other groups as well, so there’s legal precedent.  While there is no real dollar amount that can make up for centuries of the most horrific abuse, that doesn’t mean the white world should not make the attempt, because they will never be free themselves until they do all they can to make right what their ancestors made so wrong, and which they still benefit from. And black people have the right, no matter what enslavers and their descendants think, to press for restitution, like other people who have suffered greatly have done.

I would never argue to the contrary.

Quote
The idea that rejecting a comic book character and forgoing your citizenship, and all that you know, is another comparison I don’t agree with. I’m sure you are well aware of the legal and financial moves you would have to make to leave. And honestly, what African or Caribbean countries today have their arms open for an influx of black Americans? I’m sure many don’t mind us visiting and spending money, but that’s about it.

People move to other countries quite often. Not saying it is simple but it is done.

The African continent is seeing a very rapidly growing number of Chinese immigrants coming to the continent for economic opportunities. Over 1 million Chinese workers currently live in Africa.

As far as welcomes are concerned... Ghana successfully hosted The Year of Return, Ghana 2019, a year-long program of activities to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first recorded enslaved Africans in the State of Virginia in the United States. A second edition called Beyond the Return is being planned. Senegal launched their Juneteenth initiative for African Americans. welcoming them to Dakar for “The Return,” a seven-day event spearheaded by the organization NuWorld. The goal was to encourage members of the African diaspora to return to the continent, both as a form of healing, and to build social and economic ties.
Namibia and the Congo are two more. There are others.

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I think you're on to something indeed when it comes to black creatives moving away from comic book archetypes-even though I like seeing them myself. Getting that kind of independent spark and creating perhaps new archetypes, from a black perspective, would be great to see. I think in time we might get more of that. We already see the different aesthetic in things like Afrofuturism and I am seeing more Afrofuturist writers/creators out there taking familiar tropes-many do, admittedly-but still finding something fresh and organically black (though not always organically black IMO)-to say with their art.

Let's see what develops.




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Offline BlackClaw

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3558 on: October 05, 2021, 11:18:22 am »
Recently was on my bro’s podcast to discuss how they could go about recasting T’Challa in the MCU.

https://youtu.be/szHDvJU5MWo

Offline Emperorjones

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« Last Edit: October 08, 2021, 08:38:14 am by Emperorjones »

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3560 on: October 06, 2021, 01:47:44 pm »
All they had to do was recast T’Challa so it’s all on them.

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3561 on: October 13, 2021, 10:29:53 am »

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3562 on: October 13, 2021, 10:57:29 am »
Girl they caught you in 4K.

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever!
« Reply #3563 on: October 15, 2021, 05:26:17 pm »
Dorothy Steel 95-year-old actress who played tribal elder in ‘Black Panther’ dies
By WSBTV.com News Staff



ATLANTA — A 95-year-old actress who appeared in Marvel blockbuster “Black Panther” has died. Dorothy Steel was 95. She died Friday morning at her home in Detroit. “She went out strong,” her publicist said. Prior to her death, she lived in Atlanta for many years.


Steel played a tribe leader in the fictional land of Wakanda in the film, which was shot in metro Atlanta. Her role in “Black Panther” was her biggest, but she had a handful of credits in other films, including “Jumanji: The Next Level.”

“It was just amazing, it truly was,” Steel told Channel 2 of the experience in 2018. “If anyone would have told me I would be an actor, I would’ve said you got to be out of your mind.”

Steel was born in Detroit in 1926 and didn’t land her first acting role until she was 88 years old. “Black Panther” was her first appearance on the big screen.

She was in the middle of filming “Black Panther 2” when she died, according to her publicist. The Marvel franchise flew her home to Detroit to spend her last moments with loved ones. “This was going to be my last role,” Steel said, according to her publicist. In 2018, Steel told Channel 2 that Marvel casting directors called her just one hour after she sent in her audition tape.


Steel ended up landing the part of the merchant tribal elder who advises the King of Wakanda played by lead actor Chadwick Boseman.

“Chadwick the King. Every day, he would make sure if I was on the set, he would come by and make sure he gave me a big old hug and kiss,” Steel said. Boseman died of colon cancer in 2020. Steel said she became the “grandmother” on the set of ‘Black Panther,’ which she said is not just a movie but a movement.

“We were one big melting pot of black people and we knew we were doing something that had never been done before. Ya know?” she said. Steel said the women of Wakanda ruled ‘Black Panther.’ “We have power and it’s time for us to step up and take over. That’s what we have to do and take over,” she said.

https://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/atlanta/95-year-old-actress-who-played-tribal-elder-black-panther-dies/MJO6K6ODERFO5OJPWXJHFJLUBM/






755491
« Last Edit: October 15, 2021, 05:28:44 pm by Ture »
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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Merchant Tribe leader passes away
« Reply #3564 on: October 15, 2021, 06:07:45 pm »
May you find peace with the ancestors Mrs. Steel. Wakanda Forever.

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Merchant Tribe leader passes away
« Reply #3565 on: October 15, 2021, 07:36:22 pm »
Rest in Peace queen...



Rise in Power ancestress!


Black Panther Wakanda Forever is shaping up to be will a real tearjerker. I am trying to hold on to some faith that Coogler can pull this off but it is sad to say that at this point of information about production and plot I'm almost looking past BP:WF to a future film that ensures T'Challa the Black Panther's legacy.

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Offline Ezyo

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Merchant Tribe leader passes away
« Reply #3566 on: October 16, 2021, 08:11:37 am »
I dunno man, all this stuff around BP 2 just doesn't feel Right. Complete opposite of the first on everything from hype, excitement,
news... This time everything is all negative.

Mrs Steel is just another addition to the list of bad stuff around the movie. Another thing, and maybe I'm reading too much into it, but that comment she made in that interview
Quote
Steel said the women of Wakanda ruled ‘Black Panther.’ “We have power and it’s time for us to step up and take over. That’s what we have to do and take over,” she said

I dunno why but that statement bothers me. Because it should not be a thing of "It's out time to shine" why is it that the women are taking over and taking power? It should be about unity, black men and women are always placed at odds with one another and it's time for them to come together and achieve greatness TOGETHER. Enough with the taking turns
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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Merchant Tribe leader passes away
« Reply #3567 on: October 18, 2021, 08:47:08 am »
May you find peace with the ancestors Mrs. Steel. Wakanda Forever.

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Release Date Pushed Back...
« Reply #3568 on: October 18, 2021, 01:04:59 pm »
Disney Delays 6 MCU Release Dates, Removes 2 Marvel Movies From Slate
The drastic release date changes of 2020 are not over, as Disney has announced the delays of 6 different MCU movies planned for 2022 and 2023.

BY RACHEL LABONTE

However, the MCU's 2022 and 2023 calendars just got a major shakeup. Disney has officially delayed 6 upcoming Marvel movies, starting with Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. Once planned for March 2022, it has now moved to May 6, 2022. That was the date for Thor: Love and Thunder, which will now be released on July 8, 2022, thus taking the spot of Black Panther: Wakanda Forever. That sequel is now scheduled for November 11, 2022. The Marvels, meanwhile, vacated 2022 entirely and will be released on February 17, 2023. Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania was also delayed and is now planned for July 28, 2023.

Full article
https://screenrant.com/disney-mcu-movie-release-dates-delays-2022-2023/
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Offline Emperorjones

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - Wakanda Forever! - Release Date Pushed Back...
« Reply #3569 on: October 19, 2021, 10:58:21 am »
Lupita Nyong'o pays tribute to 'wildly witty' Dorothy Steel, 'Black Panther' star who died at 95

http://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/lupita-nyongo-pays-tribute-wildly-141702073.html