Author Topic: BLACK PANTHER MCU - WAKANDA FOREVER - Ture's Review  (Read 1085141 times)

Offline supreme illuminati

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 6192
  • Head Coach Ras, Founder of THE ATACX GYM
    • View Profile
    • A.T.A.C.X. GYM STREET WARRIOR CAPOEIRA
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #90 on: November 21, 2014, 05:49:15 pm »
As far as costume design for the Black Panther is concerned, I think Marvel is going in the right direction with this.



It's texture and patterning gives it a nuance that lends itself to a kind of vibranium effect I would like to see in a live action film. This would be the very definition of vibranium micro weave. Super powered punches, bullets, any kind of blunt force, explosions, falls from great heights can be seen as being absorbed by the suit. Throw in a sophisticated cloaking device and morphing ability and the Black Panther's habit becomes clearly distinguishable from any other super hero's costume, especially Batman's.

No ropes or cables, he can simply run up buildings. The Black Panther can set the precedence since a particular wall crawler is yet to reside in the MCU. He can even walk or run on the surface of water. Sans the utility belt. No hand held communicator. The vibranium necklace, forearm and waist attachments provide the high tech power and means for communication, control of equipment, vehicles and adaptability to multiple environs. Yes, the Black Panther's uniform provides for extended stays under water, frozen wastelands and other hostile environments.



Great reads!  Thanks Ture!

Peace,

Mont


You are more than welcome Kimoyo. Always a pleasure.



LOOOOOOOOVE THIS POST, BRUH!!
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline supreme illuminati

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 6192
  • Head Coach Ras, Founder of THE ATACX GYM
    • View Profile
    • A.T.A.C.X. GYM STREET WARRIOR CAPOEIRA
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #91 on: November 21, 2014, 05:53:39 pm »
depends on your definition of "frills"... yeh, story should be the very best...


The word would carry the same definition that you'd find at Google.

Here... let me help you.

Thanks, Battle! cool! Your help was a... frill?  Degrees & variables? we will see...


I agree that the Panther suit should reflect royalty, but I think the suits he rocked under Priest and some of Hudlin's suits were just fine. I don't particularly care for the old skool not quite matte black Panther habit. I would like a space black Panther habit with Priest era gold highlights, Light Armor, Thrice Blessed, etc.

I think really that TChalla should rock a techno-ka-psi-magic habit, like he does in my fanfics. That way, he's covered to a very significant degree no matter what goes down


Interesting take on the panther suit, Supreme Illuminati. Any examples or references? What you’re describing reminds me of  “Cutler”-- (a character) from the Disney XD animated series Tron: Uprising



 

 

   


Cutler

 cool show. Catch it on Netflix. I think?

edit: Any examples or references? duh! Priest era BP! uhm... luv where he took the character... he's a creative juggernaut, but...



GREEEEAAAAAT post, bruh!! I love it!!

I didn't remember this brutha's name, but Cutler is 1 of 4 visual reference combos that I used for an idea that I [ think ] is an original idea of mine.
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3772
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #92 on: November 21, 2014, 09:49:35 pm »
As far as costume design for the Black Panther is concerned, I think Marvel is going in the right direction with this.



It's texture and patterning gives it a nuance that lends itself to a kind of vibranium effect I would like to see in a live action film. This would be the very definition of vibranium micro weave. Super powered punches, bullets, any kind of blunt force, explosions, falls from great heights can be seen as being absorbed by the suit. Throw in a sophisticated cloaking device and morphing ability and the Black Panther's habit becomes clearly distinguishable from any other super hero's costume, especially Batman's.

No ropes or cables, he can simply run up buildings. The Black Panther can set the precedence since a particular wall crawler is yet to reside in the MCU. He can even walk or run on the surface of water. Sans the utility belt. No hand held communicator. The vibranium necklace, forearm and waist attachments provide the high tech power and means for communication, control of equipment, vehicles and adaptability to multiple environs. Yes, the Black Panther's uniform provides for extended stays under water, frozen wastelands and other hostile environments.



Great reads!  Thanks Ture!

Peace,

Mont


You are more than welcome Kimoyo. Always a pleasure.



LOOOOOOOOVE THIS POST, BRUH!!


Thanks supreme illuminati.

CIVIL WAR IS COMING... SO IS THE BLACK PANTHER!!!
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3772
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #93 on: November 25, 2014, 07:17:35 pm »
The Black Panther movie announcement generates this article from the Atlantic.

Will Film's Black Superheroes Ever Get to Save the World?
In movies, whites protect all of humanity; blacks usually protect their neighborhoods.

DANIEL D. SNYDER NOV 24 2014, 10:17 AM ET



This month, an elderly Steve Rogers relinquished his role as Captain America, a position he held in one capacity or another for some 73 years. Taking up the mantle in his stead is the young black hero Sam Wilson, formerly known as Falcon. In a recent interview with Vox, Captain America comic-book writer Rick Remeder spoke about the significance of transitioning from Steve to Sam in a Marvel universe that’s becoming more and more diverse.

"Sam's wearing the American flag," Remeder said. "That means he represents all of America. And not just that, but the spirit of the character is that he tries to represent all of the world."

Remeder's remarks came after news of Marvel Studios' plan to produce a movie based on Black Panther, the first major black superhero to show up in Marvel's pages, back in 1966. Currently scheduled for 2017, it will be the first superhero film to feature a black lead since Wesley Snipes hung up his vampire-skewering samurai sword and sunglasses in Blade.

What remains to be seen, however, is whether Remeder's philosophy regarding a black superhero's role as a universal representative will carry over into film. Traditionally, movies have done a curious thing with black heroes: Charge them not with saving the world, but rather with protecting their immediate, ethno-specific domains, or, in many cases, to put it bluntly, the ghetto.

The 1977 blaxploitation film Abar, the Black Superman, may be of questionable filmmaking merit, but is essential in defining the tone of black-superhero movies to come. In it, an affluent black doctor and his family move into a white neighborhood, prompting anger, protests, and even threats of violence. A local black leader, Abar, steps into help protect the Kincaids and is able to do so until extreme circumstances force him to take a serum of Dr. Kincaid's creation, granting him invincibility and psychic powers. Abar then goes on a quest to vanquish racism and the machinery of oppression. It’s an (amusing, absurd) empowerment fantasy, but it’s also a limited one—about the men and women next door, not mankind itself.

Black superheroes remained absent from the screen until The Meteor Man and Blankman appeared in 1993 and 1994, respectively. They picked up where Abar left off: "He's come to save the world… one neighborhood at a time," says the trailer for Meteor Man. The 1993 superhero spoof stars Robert Townsend as Jefferson Reed, a Washington, D.C. school teacher who, after receiving some vaguely Superman-esque powers from a falling meteor, resolves to save his neighborhood from a marauding street gang called The Golden Lords. Reed makes short work of the rascally Lords, then sets about shutting down drug dealers, stopping robberies, and brokering a peace treaty between the police, the Crips, and the Bloods (played by Cyprus Hill and Naughty by Nature, respectively). When Reed begins to lose his powers and the Lords return, it's the neighborhood's own residents, now imbued with Reed's courage, who end up saving the day.

Blankman, written by and starring Damon Wayans, is not all that dissimilar. Wayans plays Darryl, an eccentric and nerdy inventor with an undying love of Batman. He uses his skills to turn himself into the movie's incompetent titular hero. Armored in bulletproof long johns and dishwashing gloves, Darryl ventures out to fight crime and save his deteriorating community.

While there is certainly value and meaning behind Meteor Man and Blankman, they are, at their core, spoofs that derived a good deal of their humor from the implied absurdity of a black man in a cape and cowl in a world where white heroes have are the dominant figure of authority. Like Abar, both of these are defined by place and territory, specifically black territory.

The trope returned a few years later, when NBA star Shaq starred in the critically and commercially repellent comic-book adaptation Steel. Directly inspired by the black folk-hero John Henry, Steel begins life as John Henry Irons, a weapons engineer who must protect his home and family after his own deadly creations end up on the streets of his community.

There is obviously nothing wrong with the messages behind these films—that real heroes come from and protect specific places. But taken together, over time, they contribute to the stagnant idea of what a black hero can be to the world. Even when moving outside of the neighborhood-watch paradigm, black heroes still aren't granted the mantle of universal protector bestowed on their counterparts. Spawn (1997) and Catwoman (2004), the latter widely regarded as one of the worst movies ever made, both feature black leads (at least before Spawn's Al Simmons gets turned into cooked burger meat) but their narratives are tied to tales of personal revenge, where any worldly do-gooding is merely incidental.

Even Blade, perhaps the pinnacle of black superhero movies in terms of sheer quality, is characterized by a distinctly urban quality. While his contemporaries soar into cosmic vistas, Snipes's Blade is confined to streets, alleyways, and subway tunnels. The film plays like a strange vampiric tribute to the blaxploitation films of the ‘70s, with vampirism as the poison of the streets. While later movies would make vampirism into an enviable condition of inherent beauty, Blade treats it as a condition akin to a disease or drug addiction. Blade's mother is bitten when he is in the womb, killing her (so he believes) and cursing him with his own addiction as if he’s a vampiric crack baby. His story, like his predecessors, becomes one of personal vengeance against the purveyors of the disease that ruined him.

The most interesting take on black superheroes may actually be 2008's Hancock with Will Smith. In it, Smith plays the titular Hancock, a drunken wreck blessed with super strength, invulnerability, and flight. Though he often attempts to use his powers for good, he remains under constant scrutiny from the public for the collateral damage he causes. The movie spent years in development limbo, undergoing numerous re-writes, and it shows, particularly in its second half when the plot goes incoherent. But the premise, a black hero undergoing an image rehabilitation campaign, remains a clever skewering of the media and the public's relationship with black figures of power. "Life here can be difficult for me," he says during an apologetic press conference. "After all, I'm the only one of my kind. You deserve better from me. I will be better." When was Superman made to apologize for excessive property damage? Or had his origins so publicly scrutinized?

Can Black Panther be a revolutionary step forward for black heroes, or will it succumb to the same narrative tropes as its cinematic predecessors? Stan Lee and Jack Kirby wrote the character as the protector of an ethno-specific domain, the fictional isolated African nation of Wakanda, a nation of high culture and technology but a history of conflict with the outside world, specifically white colonialists looking to exploit its resources. The Black Panther of the print universe had decades to move beyond this narrative, eventually being named official protector of Hell's Kitchen in New York. But if Marvel is intent on starting with his origin story, as it seem inclined to be, his status as a protector of what is essentially an auto-segregated enclave will feature prominently. By contrast, other heroes like Batman or Aquaman have had their characters defined by places like Gotham City or the undersea kingdom of Atlantis, but these definitions are not based in race. Gotham mostly exists as a self-contained universe, of which Batman is an all-encompassing protector.

If Black Panther doesn’t break the pattern, Warner Brothers’ Cyborg movie, currently slated for 2020, might. Created in 1980 by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez, Cyborg (alias: Victor Stone), the son of two scientists who used him for experiments, was never so defined by a locality or ethnicity. Under DC's New 52 continuity reboot, Cyborg will share global responsibility with the likes of Batman, Wonder Woman, and Superman—protectors of all Earth. How novel
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline supreme illuminati

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 6192
  • Head Coach Ras, Founder of THE ATACX GYM
    • View Profile
    • A.T.A.C.X. GYM STREET WARRIOR CAPOEIRA
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #94 on: November 30, 2014, 11:57:43 pm »
The Black Panther movie announcement generates this article from the Atlantic.

Will Film's Black Superheroes Ever Get to Save the World?
In movies, whites protect all of humanity; blacks usually protect their neighborhoods.

DANIEL D. SNYDER NOV 24 2014, 10:17 AM ET



This month, an elderly Steve Rogers relinquished his role as Captain America, a position he held in one capacity or another for some 73 years. Taking up the mantle in his stead is the young black hero Sam Wilson, formerly known as Falcon. In a recent interview with Vox, Captain America comic-book writer Rick Remeder spoke about the significance of transitioning from Steve to Sam in a Marvel universe that’s becoming more and more diverse.

"Sam's wearing the American flag," Remeder said. "That means he represents all of America. And not just that, but the spirit of the character is that he tries to represent all of the world."

Remeder's remarks came after news of Marvel Studios' plan to produce a movie based on Black Panther, the first major black superhero to show up in Marvel's pages, back in 1966. Currently scheduled for 2017, it will be the first superhero film to feature a black lead since Wesley Snipes hung up his vampire-skewering samurai sword and sunglasses in Blade.

What remains to be seen, however, is whether Remeder's philosophy regarding a black superhero's role as a universal representative will carry over into film. Traditionally, movies have done a curious thing with black heroes: Charge them not with saving the world, but rather with protecting their immediate, ethno-specific domains, or, in many cases, to put it bluntly, the ghetto.

The 1977 blaxploitation film Abar, the Black Superman, may be of questionable filmmaking merit, but is essential in defining the tone of black-superhero movies to come. In it, an affluent black doctor and his family move into a white neighborhood, prompting anger, protests, and even threats of violence. A local black leader, Abar, steps into help protect the Kincaids and is able to do so until extreme circumstances force him to take a serum of Dr. Kincaid's creation, granting him invincibility and psychic powers. Abar then goes on a quest to vanquish racism and the machinery of oppression. It’s an (amusing, absurd) empowerment fantasy, but it’s also a limited one—about the men and women next door, not mankind itself.

Black superheroes remained absent from the screen until The Meteor Man and Blankman appeared in 1993 and 1994, respectively. They picked up where Abar left off: "He's come to save the world… one neighborhood at a time," says the trailer for Meteor Man. The 1993 superhero spoof stars Robert Townsend as Jefferson Reed, a Washington, D.C. school teacher who, after receiving some vaguely Superman-esque powers from a falling meteor, resolves to save his neighborhood from a marauding street gang called The Golden Lords. Reed makes short work of the rascally Lords, then sets about shutting down drug dealers, stopping robberies, and brokering a peace treaty between the police, the Crips, and the Bloods (played by Cyprus Hill and Naughty by Nature, respectively). When Reed begins to lose his powers and the Lords return, it's the neighborhood's own residents, now imbued with Reed's courage, who end up saving the day.

Blankman, written by and starring Damon Wayans, is not all that dissimilar. Wayans plays Darryl, an eccentric and nerdy inventor with an undying love of Batman. He uses his skills to turn himself into the movie's incompetent titular hero. Armored in bulletproof long johns and dishwashing gloves, Darryl ventures out to fight crime and save his deteriorating community.

While there is certainly value and meaning behind Meteor Man and Blankman, they are, at their core, spoofs that derived a good deal of their humor from the implied absurdity of a black man in a cape and cowl in a world where white heroes have are the dominant figure of authority. Like Abar, both of these are defined by place and territory, specifically black territory.

The trope returned a few years later, when NBA star Shaq starred in the critically and commercially repellent comic-book adaptation Steel. Directly inspired by the black folk-hero John Henry, Steel begins life as John Henry Irons, a weapons engineer who must protect his home and family after his own deadly creations end up on the streets of his community.

There is obviously nothing wrong with the messages behind these films—that real heroes come from and protect specific places. But taken together, over time, they contribute to the stagnant idea of what a black hero can be to the world. Even when moving outside of the neighborhood-watch paradigm, black heroes still aren't granted the mantle of universal protector bestowed on their counterparts. Spawn (1997) and Catwoman (2004), the latter widely regarded as one of the worst movies ever made, both feature black leads (at least before Spawn's Al Simmons gets turned into cooked burger meat) but their narratives are tied to tales of personal revenge, where any worldly do-gooding is merely incidental.

Even Blade, perhaps the pinnacle of black superhero movies in terms of sheer quality, is characterized by a distinctly urban quality. While his contemporaries soar into cosmic vistas, Snipes's Blade is confined to streets, alleyways, and subway tunnels. The film plays like a strange vampiric tribute to the blaxploitation films of the ‘70s, with vampirism as the poison of the streets. While later movies would make vampirism into an enviable condition of inherent beauty, Blade treats it as a condition akin to a disease or drug addiction. Blade's mother is bitten when he is in the womb, killing her (so he believes) and cursing him with his own addiction as if he’s a vampiric crack baby. His story, like his predecessors, becomes one of personal vengeance against the purveyors of the disease that ruined him.

The most interesting take on black superheroes may actually be 2008's Hancock with Will Smith. In it, Smith plays the titular Hancock, a drunken wreck blessed with super strength, invulnerability, and flight. Though he often attempts to use his powers for good, he remains under constant scrutiny from the public for the collateral damage he causes. The movie spent years in development limbo, undergoing numerous re-writes, and it shows, particularly in its second half when the plot goes incoherent. But the premise, a black hero undergoing an image rehabilitation campaign, remains a clever skewering of the media and the public's relationship with black figures of power. "Life here can be difficult for me," he says during an apologetic press conference. "After all, I'm the only one of my kind. You deserve better from me. I will be better." When was Superman made to apologize for excessive property damage? Or had his origins so publicly scrutinized?

Can Black Panther be a revolutionary step forward for black heroes, or will it succumb to the same narrative tropes as its cinematic predecessors? Stan Lee and Jack Kirby wrote the character as the protector of an ethno-specific domain, the fictional isolated African nation of Wakanda, a nation of high culture and technology but a history of conflict with the outside world, specifically white colonialists looking to exploit its resources. The Black Panther of the print universe had decades to move beyond this narrative, eventually being named official protector of Hell's Kitchen in New York. But if Marvel is intent on starting with his origin story, as it seem inclined to be, his status as a protector of what is essentially an auto-segregated enclave will feature prominently. By contrast, other heroes like Batman or Aquaman have had their characters defined by places like Gotham City or the undersea kingdom of Atlantis, but these definitions are not based in race. Gotham mostly exists as a self-contained universe, of which Batman is an all-encompassing protector.

If Black Panther doesn’t break the pattern, Warner Brothers’ Cyborg movie, currently slated for 2020, might. Created in 1980 by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez, Cyborg (alias: Victor Stone), the son of two scientists who used him for experiments, was never so defined by a locality or ethnicity. Under DC's New 52 continuity reboot, Cyborg will share global responsibility with the likes of Batman, Wonder Woman, and Superman—protectors of all Earth. How novel



These are good points bruh but...didn't BLADE save the world 3 times?

once vs The Blood God

The second vs The Reavers who would massacre every single human as they also sought to devour The Reavers

And once vs Drake/Dracula, who was going to turn the rest of the vampires into Daywalkers by granting them some of the powers of his blood

However.

I have never seen a Black hero in an racially diverse ENSEMBLE cast OF HEROES save the world but I have seen PLENTY of WHITE heroes save the day in a racially diverse ENSEMBLE cast of HEROES.
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline JRCarter

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1780
    • View Profile
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #95 on: December 01, 2014, 04:41:09 pm »
OK, the lead is cast but which support characters from the mythos should be in the movie?

Offline Blanks

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 857
  • Publishing my own comics!
    • View Profile
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #96 on: December 02, 2014, 12:19:03 pm »
Sad thing is, it's been a while since I have read my back issues, I can't really remember the supporting characters at all. I just remember that a lot were slayed in Doomwar...

I got all the single issues and trades of Reggies run, but man oh man, I can't wait for that Priest collection!
« Last Edit: December 02, 2014, 12:21:54 pm by Rajikaru »

Offline supreme illuminati

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 6192
  • Head Coach Ras, Founder of THE ATACX GYM
    • View Profile
    • A.T.A.C.X. GYM STREET WARRIOR CAPOEIRA
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #97 on: December 02, 2014, 03:20:47 pm »
Sad thing is, it's been a while since I have read my back issues, I can't really remember the supporting characters at all. I just remember that a lot were slayed in Doomwar...

I got all the single issues and trades of Reggies run, but man oh man, I can't wait for that Priest collection!

Are they actually and hella belatedly going to collect Priest's run? I need that. I'm missing several of his issues
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline Blanks

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 857
  • Publishing my own comics!
    • View Profile
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #98 on: December 02, 2014, 04:18:25 pm »
It's listed on Amazon. I got it in my wish-list section, and I'm pre-ordering at least 3, two for later holiday gifts for two of my peeps and one for me!

Offline JRCarter

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1780
    • View Profile
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #99 on: December 02, 2014, 10:04:29 pm »

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3772
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #100 on: December 03, 2014, 09:03:12 am »
Cinematically speaking I see three major villains for the Black Panther. First Klaw who without a doubt should be a primary villain for the Black Panther solo film. He starts off human as possibly seen in Avengers Age of Ultron then gets transformed into a being of pure sonic energy. If Andy Serkis is in deed portraying Klaw, it would be a missed opportunity not to have him do a performance captured interpretation of a being made of pure sound.

In addition Klaw must be made into a global threat. The kind of threat that can destroy whole cities, the kind of threat that could send civilization back to the stone age. The kind of threat that warrants the attention of the Avengers. This way you get the Black Panther traveling the world (as some may think a Wakandan centered film too limiting) using unique vehicles, technologies and weapon that distinguish him in regards to both Marvel's and DC's respective cinematic universes. Klaw could be a fail safe or contingency plan of Ultron's or a part of some other groups machinations. 

The second cinematic villain for the Black Panther should in fact be Namor, the Sub Mariner. Again a global threat. For millenniums Wakanda and Atlantis have had a tense relationship as they represented diametrically opposed worldviews based on historical and ideological differences of land versus oceans rights.Circumstances come to a head that bring these two ancient civilizations  to the brink of war.

Marvel would go grand in scope depicting a kind of undersea Star Wars. Demonstrate the Black Panther's costume as having the built in capabilities for under water survival. Display Wakanda with the tech to shield whole cities from inundation. Showcase Namor with the tech to sink whole continents, present the awesome majesty and beauty, not to mention the power of these two great civilizations.

Around this time last year I compiled this list of the Black Panther's villains.

Black Panther's original Sinister Six

Salamander K'ruel
King Cadaver
Sombre
Malice
Baron Macabre
Lord Karnaj

The Supremacists

Barricade,
Captain Blaze,
Harrier,
Hungyr,
Voortrekker
White Avenger


The Femme Fatale Six

Malice
Tanzika
Madame Slay
Nakia
Nightshade
Princess Zanda

The Consortium

Kingpin
V'lad
Anton Pretorius (South African Magistrate of Communications)
John T. Gamelin (president of Roxxon Oil) 
Jonathon Cardinal (owner of Cardinal Technologies)
Hunter the White Wolf


The Revisionist

Killmonger
M"baku
Solomon Prey
Moses Magnum
Achebe
Apocalypse

The Destroyers

Doom
Red Skull
Namor
Mandarin
Klaw
Black Swan

The Conquerors

Thanos
Mephisto
Nightmare
Loki
Shadow King
Black Dragon

With all necessary modifications the Consortium and the Supremacists would be my third choice for Black Panther's cinematic villains. They were the hidden hand manipulating events such as the Super Hero Registration Act, the Ultron Imperative, the creation of Klaw and the war between Wakanda and Atlantis.

As Captain America the Winter Soldier demonstrated characters like Cap and the Black Panther work best within the context of complex, political intrigue. Who better than some hidden hand, an Illuminati like, new world order type of international organization that has their sites set on the Black Panther.

This cabal would be the one's responsible for the death of T'Chaka and the framing of the Atlantean king for the murder. They are the one's responsible for polluting the oceans with waste infused with an carcinogenic deadly to water breathers. Thus the cessation to the hostilities between Wakanda and Atlantis occur when Tchalla offers up the cure for this unique cancer.

There are ample opportunities to give speaking parts to N'Jadka the Killmonger and M'Baku high priest of the Jabari at council and war meetings as they represent their respective nomes. Cameos of Achebe and Hunter the White Wolf can also be made possible.
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline supreme illuminati

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 6192
  • Head Coach Ras, Founder of THE ATACX GYM
    • View Profile
    • A.T.A.C.X. GYM STREET WARRIOR CAPOEIRA
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #101 on: December 03, 2014, 03:29:06 pm »
The Black Panther Villains we CRAVE!

http://moviepilot.com/posts/2014/12/02/the-black-panther-villains-we-crave-2460194?lt_source=external,manual,manual

Who the hell craves Man Ape? Honestly.



I didn't, until Priest wrote him. Now? I would LOVE a ramped up Man-Ape...Grodd with advanced spiritual powers and solid tech.
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline supreme illuminati

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 6192
  • Head Coach Ras, Founder of THE ATACX GYM
    • View Profile
    • A.T.A.C.X. GYM STREET WARRIOR CAPOEIRA
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #102 on: December 03, 2014, 03:32:24 pm »
It's listed on Amazon. I got it in my wish-list section, and I'm pre-ordering at least 3, two for later holiday gifts for two of my peeps and one for me!

Word? Is this the English translation? I read years ago that they got Priest together in FRANCE but NOT in English. I'm on it, checking now.
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3772
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #103 on: December 03, 2014, 07:07:09 pm »
New ‘Avengers: Age of Ultron’ Promo Art Reveals The Vision



Quote
While fans may be still geekgasming over the big events announced for Marvel’s Phase Three lineup, we still have to close out Phase Two with one more new superhero origin (Ant-Man) and another big teamup event film in the form of The Avengers: Age of Ultron.

While the Avengers 2 trailer gave fans plenty of hints about what’s to come of Ultron’s (James Spader) attempt to bring peace to Earth by way of eradication, the sequel still seems to have plenty of secrets stashed under its cape and cowl – with additional villains (Andy Serkis as Ulysses Klaw?) and heroes still waiting to step into the spotlight. And none is more anticipated than a character who will be both hero and villain: The Vision.


Regarding the bolden... perhaps something related to the death of T'Chaka and a view of Tchalla  without the Black Panther costume.

For more http://screenrant.com/avengers-2-age-ultron-poster-vision-paul-bettany-artwork/
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Ture

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3772
    • View Profile
    • Pya Kule Design Group
Re: The Black Panther Movie!!!
« Reply #104 on: December 04, 2014, 06:24:21 pm »
Chadwick Boseman Talks About His Excitement For BLACK PANTHER

It's going to be 2 long years before we see Chadwick Boseman suit up as the Black Panther in Captain America: Civil War.. or will it? Boseman says a little something that might suggest he may show up in the MCU earlier than expected. Come check it out!

By KingPatel - 12/3/2014



As part of Variety's Actors on Actors feature, Logan Lerman (Percy Jackson) sat down with the future Black Panther, Chadwick Boseman, for a few minutes to discuss the role. Boseman is expected to make his debut in 2016's Captain America: Civil War, and will star in his own solo film in 2017. While plot details about his solo adventure are still scarce, Boseman does seem genuinely excited to be the one to bring T'Challa to life and describes the Black Panther as one of the most unique characters he's ever played.

He also lets it slip that "there's a director on the movies that he's introduced." We already know that the Russo brothers are returning to helm Civil War, but when he says "movies," could he be alluding to Joss Whedon and next year's Avengers: Age of Ultron as his first true introduction?

Check out the full video interview below and sound off with your thoughts in the usual spot!



As part of his presentation of the full slate for Phase 3 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige has announced that Chadwick Boseman will bring the Black Panther to life beginning with his role in Marvel’s “Captain America: Civil War,” in theaters May 6, 2016, before starring in his own solo film, Marvel's "Black Panther," on November 3, 2017.
Aesthetics 6250 A.U. - axis afrakan. expression unlimited.
http://pyakule.com/magazine.html
Special Black Panther Edition and more