Author Topic: BLACK PANTHER MOVIES - BP2 Wakanda Forever... Fans Cry Boycott!  (Read 932259 times)

Offline Ezyo

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If Feige and Disney are SO genuine on paying respect to Chadwick and that no one can be HIS version of T'Challa, so be it let his T'Challa go in a blaze of glory... However, than they use use the multiverse and bring in a different version of T'Challa recasted, they could even go with a more comic accurate Version (with some changes of needed) for instance, on this version, T'Chaka not N'jobu dies early. Klaw steals vibranium and when he sets off the explosions at the border T'Chaka was there and blown up and perished when chasing him. N'jobu becomes BP and T'Challa does not have a sister but is close to N'Jadaka and they grow up as brother's pretty much, T'Challa takes on the Wakandan design group and N'Jadaka takes on war dog missions. T'Challa sees how Wakandan tech can help the world and N'Jadaka becomes radicalized seeing Wakanda tech as a way to liberate Black people. T'Challa challenges for the thrown and takes it, N'Jadaka now going as "Erik Stevens" challenges him saying they should help by using their advancements to change the power dynamic while T'Challa wants to use their advancements to help and open outreach centers. That's where their ideals clash and  T'Challa is the process of changing Wakanda, multiverse stuff happens and this T'Challa gets pulled to this MCU verse. Meets Shuri and co etc and learns what this version of T'Challa was trying to accomplish and wants to see the change he was trying to make here while eventually wanting to go back to his universe (Which could happen at the end of his story to pass the mantle to Shuri of they really wanted to do that)

Pays respect to Chad's version, brings T'Challa back, allows for a More comic version and an interesting story to play out because this version wants the same thing and allows an "exit" at the end of his story for the mantle pass if they want to go that route

Offline supreme illuminati

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If Feige and Disney are SO genuine on paying respect to Chadwick and that no one can be HIS version of T'Challa, so be it let his T'Challa go in a blaze of glory... However, than they use use the multiverse and bring in a different version of T'Challa recasted, they could even go with a more comic accurate Version (with some changes of needed) for instance, on this version, T'Chaka not N'jobu dies early. Klaw steals vibranium and when he sets off the explosions at the border T'Chaka was there and blown up and perished when chasing him. N'jobu becomes BP and T'Challa does not have a sister but is close to N'Jadaka and they grow up as brother's pretty much, T'Challa takes on the Wakandan design group and N'Jadaka takes on war dog missions. T'Challa sees how Wakandan tech can help the world and N'Jadaka becomes radicalized seeing Wakanda tech as a way to liberate Black people. T'Challa challenges for the thrown and takes it, N'Jadaka now going as "Erik Stevens" challenges him saying they should help by using their advancements to change the power dynamic while T'Challa wants to use their advancements to help and open outreach centers. That's where their ideals clash and  T'Challa is the process of changing Wakanda, multiverse stuff happens and this T'Challa gets pulled to this MCU verse. Meets Shuri and co etc and learns what this version of T'Challa was trying to accomplish and wants to see the change he was trying to make here while eventually wanting to go back to his universe (Which could happen at the end of his story to pass the mantle to Shuri of they really wanted to do that)

Pays respect to Chad's version, brings T'Challa back, allows for a More comic version and an interesting story to play out because this version wants the same thing and allows an "exit" at the end of his story for the mantle pass if they want to go that route




All of that is indeed a great story. I like it. The only thing that bothers me about the multiversal T'Challa? Is that fans will say that the lineage of OUR T'Challa has ended. That's why? I lean toward OUR T'Challa being displaced by The Snap...because not only did Wakanda the only country that could and did resist Thanos' invasion, but OUR T'Challa is THE LEADER of this country. Thanos didn't want TChalla setting further "bad" examples, so even in The Snap and the return, T'Challa was displaced from Wakanda. And OUR T'Challa? Lived his whole life in a multiverse where Time ran differently...all the while he was trying to get back to 616 Wakanda.  He had a son. T'Challa JUNIOR. And THIS T'Challa returns to 616 Wakanda. This would be the beginning of the Wakanda that I wrote about in my fanfic...Wakanda Ufalme Wa Nyota in Swahili, and  Ubukumkani Beenkwenkwezi [ I think ] in Xhosa. Wakanda The Empire of the Stars. The Interstellar Empire.

Or? Even better? Some sweet hybrid of the above approaches. I liked the Ultimate Marvel flavor in your story above, my brother.
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Offline Emperorjones

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honestly I think Feige and Disney think that if BP gotn1 billion with a Black male led, the sequel Will do the same with a Black female lead as it covers the same diversity as the first with the extra exposure of the first Black female lead super hero. I'm all for Black female super heros.. just not at the expense of black males. Especially when they are taking over a franchise that is not theirs prematurely. It would be one thing if T'Challas trilogy was complete. I would be fine with Shuri taking over that that point to further explore Wakanda. However, this whole premature ripping the title character away from his franchise that he soley upheld for decades without any help from supporting cast characters, I feel this is a huge disservice and an insult to such an important character. I want the franchise to be successful, I DON'T want it to try and do so by subverting it's title character and using his stories and his characteristics for essentially Brand New characters. That's cheating T'Challa out for no good reason other than greed and shady agendas

I feel what you're saying, and I largely agree. But I must protest some of it because Shuri has been around for almost 20 years now, and she was Black Panther and Queen of Wakanda for several years, and her time on the throne was not that long ago. The BP mantle is part of her legacy and she's held on to the title longer than almost any other BP except for T'Challa, especially when you think about actual adventures depicted in the comics. I don't think Disney, Marvel Studios, or the general audience cares much about the five decades history of T'Challa. Most people didn't even know the character existed until Civil War or the first Black Panther film. They want to be entertained now, by characters they grew to love in the first Black Panther film.

While they will not recast, they could bring another male BP into the lead role, but I think doing so runs into that woke chainsaw that Feige is not trying to turn on. Instead he's wielding that chainsaw for the next round of films and television series. If they made another man BP that still means T'Challa's story will not be told, it then be the story, of say, Kasper Cole, and we would follow his journey. That would be another origin story, and a far less interesting one-IMO-than giving Shuri the mantle. Further, who knows how the audience would react to a T'Challa recast. It's not a guaranteed box office win for Marvel. So I don't see them fighting against the gravity of going with Shuri as BP (to me the biggest impediment to that happening is Letitia Wright herself and if the controversy around her doesn't abate). Multiverse BPs or bringing in a son are not bad ideas, however, I really don't think Marvel is going to put that kind of thought into it. They are going to keep it simple. And the simplest thing to do is to promote someone from the existing cast. I think W'Kabi could be a good choice, and Daniel Kaluuya is getting work right now in Hollywood, though I doubt they would do that and I doubt his character will get much screen time or focus in the next film. IMO, BP2 will be a ladies affair with Shuri, Nakia, Okoye, Ramonda, and I imagine we might get Ayo and Aneka as characters with dialogue and perhaps their romance-if nothing else in the background-in the next film.

I don't want there to be a zero sum game between black male and female characters, but at the same time I think that's the kind of mentality that's out there, and right now, black males are on the losing side of that, though really no one wins in the community by playing this game.

Offline Ezyo

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If Feige and Disney are SO genuine on paying respect to Chadwick and that no one can be HIS version of T'Challa, so be it let his T'Challa go in a blaze of glory... However, than they use use the multiverse and bring in a different version of T'Challa recasted, they could even go with a more comic accurate Version (with some changes of needed) for instance, on this version, T'Chaka not N'jobu dies early. Klaw steals vibranium and when he sets off the explosions at the border T'Chaka was there and blown up and perished when chasing him. N'jobu becomes BP and T'Challa does not have a sister but is close to N'Jadaka and they grow up as brother's pretty much, T'Challa takes on the Wakandan design group and N'Jadaka takes on war dog missions. T'Challa sees how Wakandan tech can help the world and N'Jadaka becomes radicalized seeing Wakanda tech as a way to liberate Black people. T'Challa challenges for the thrown and takes it, N'Jadaka now going as "Erik Stevens" challenges him saying they should help by using their advancements to change the power dynamic while T'Challa wants to use their advancements to help and open outreach centers. That's where their ideals clash and  T'Challa is the process of changing Wakanda, multiverse stuff happens and this T'Challa gets pulled to this MCU verse. Meets Shuri and co etc and learns what this version of T'Challa was trying to accomplish and wants to see the change he was trying to make here while eventually wanting to go back to his universe (Which could happen at the end of his story to pass the mantle to Shuri of they really wanted to do that)

Pays respect to Chad's version, brings T'Challa back, allows for a More comic version and an interesting story to play out because this version wants the same thing and allows an "exit" at the end of his story for the mantle pass if they want to go that route




All of that is indeed a great story. I like it. The only thing that bothers me about the multiversal T'Challa? Is that fans will say that the lineage of OUR T'Challa has ended. That's why? I lean toward OUR T'Challa being displaced by The Snap...because not only did Wakanda the only country that could and did resist Thanos' invasion, but OUR T'Challa is THE LEADER of this country. Thanos didn't want TChalla setting further "bad" examples, so even in The Snap and the return, T'Challa was displaced from Wakanda. And OUR T'Challa? Lived his whole life in a multiverse where Time ran differently...all the while he was trying to get back to 616 Wakanda.  He had a son. T'Challa JUNIOR. And THIS T'Challa returns to 616 Wakanda. This would be the beginning of the Wakanda that I wrote about in my fanfic...Wakanda Ufalme Wa Nyota in Swahili, and  Ubukumkani Beenkwenkwezi [ I think ] in Xhosa. Wakanda The Empire of the Stars. The Interstellar Empire.

Or? Even better? Some sweet hybrid of the above approaches. I liked the Ultimate Marvel flavor in your story above, my brother.

The only problem with that is a T'Challa Jr is still the same issue you you mentioned about mine. It's still not OUR T'Challa it's a completely different character, it's his son, Which I think Kinda complicates things unnecessarily.

I honestly don't think people would out that much stock that it's not Our T'Challa but if it was indeed T'Challa just another universe, that's really all we can Hope for at this point otherwise we just lose T'Challa all together until a reboot

Offline Ezyo

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honestly I think Feige and Disney think that if BP gotn1 billion with a Black male led, the sequel Will do the same with a Black female lead as it covers the same diversity as the first with the extra exposure of the first Black female lead super hero. I'm all for Black female super heros.. just not at the expense of black males. Especially when they are taking over a franchise that is not theirs prematurely. It would be one thing if T'Challas trilogy was complete. I would be fine with Shuri taking over that that point to further explore Wakanda. However, this whole premature ripping the title character away from his franchise that he soley upheld for decades without any help from supporting cast characters, I feel this is a huge disservice and an insult to such an important character. I want the franchise to be successful, I DON'T want it to try and do so by subverting it's title character and using his stories and his characteristics for essentially Brand New characters. That's cheating T'Challa out for no good reason other than greed and shady agendas

I feel what you're saying, and I largely agree. But I must protest some of it because Shuri has been around for almost 20 years now, and she was Black Panther and Queen of Wakanda for several years, and her time on the throne was not that long ago. The BP mantle is part of her legacy and she's held on to the title longer than almost any other BP except for T'Challa, especially when you think about actual adventures depicted in the comics. I don't think Disney, Marvel Studios, or the general audience cares much about the five decades history of T'Challa. Most people didn't even know the character existed until Civil War or the first Black Panther film. They want to be entertained now, by characters they grew to love in the first Black Panther film.

While they will not recast, they could bring another male BP into the lead role, but I think doing so runs into that woke chainsaw that Feige is not trying to turn on. Instead he's wielding that chainsaw for the next round of films and television series. If they made another man BP that still means T'Challa's story will not be told, it then be the story, of say, Kasper Cole, and we would follow his journey. That would be another origin story, and a far less interesting one-IMO-than giving Shuri the mantle. Further, who knows how the audience would react to a T'Challa recast. It's not a guaranteed box office win for Marvel. So I don't see them fighting against the gravity of going with Shuri as BP (to me the biggest impediment to that happening is Letitia Wright herself and if the controversy around her doesn't abate). Multiverse BPs or bringing in a son are not bad ideas, however, I really don't think Marvel is going to put that kind of thought into it. They are going to keep it simple. And the simplest thing to do is to promote someone from the existing cast. I think W'Kabi could be a good choice, and Daniel Kaluuya is getting work right now in Hollywood, though I doubt they would do that and I doubt his character will get much screen time or focus in the next film. IMO, BP2 will be a ladies affair with Shuri, Nakia, Okoye, Ramonda, and I imagine we might get Ayo and Aneka as characters with dialogue and perhaps their romance-if nothing else in the background-in the next film.

I don't want there to be a zero sum game between black male and female characters, but at the same time I think that's the kind of mentality that's out there, and right now, black males are on the losing side of that, though really no one wins in the community by playing this game.

Most people don't know anything other that Shuri became BP at some point in publishing history. So I feel that it's the same as trying to compare to how long T'Challa has been around, except for when people and internet sites try to do "top 10 Shuri stories" they will learn that she doesn't even have that, it's more like top 5 Which is ALL her stories power, klaws, deadliest, and Nnendis story... So not even 5. They will literally steal T'Challas stories to tell Shuris, Which begs the question... Why are they pushing a character who doesn't even have stories to adapt that you need to take stories from the franchise character?

Her tone on the throne ended  6 years ago and her character is only 15 years old.. and her MCU counterpart isn't even geared towards taking the mantle and would require ANOTHER origin story after we just had one from the first movie.

You run into the same problem, of you just keep creating these brand new never before seen characters that don't exist on the comics.. why are you going through so many hoops TO NOT just recast T'Challa, Which we know from DECADE'S of movie history that people WILL accept different takes of the same heroes. Bond Batman super man Spidey hulk.. they are doing a blade remake... As long as the actor channels the characters personality and is charismatic and gripping on their portrayal, people will accept it

Zero sum games are what Chadwick was trying to fight and Disney is trying to reinforce that? What a way to honor Chadwick

Offline Emperorjones

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honestly I think Feige and Disney think that if BP gotn1 billion with a Black male led, the sequel Will do the same with a Black female lead as it covers the same diversity as the first with the extra exposure of the first Black female lead super hero. I'm all for Black female super heros.. just not at the expense of black males. Especially when they are taking over a franchise that is not theirs prematurely. It would be one thing if T'Challas trilogy was complete. I would be fine with Shuri taking over that that point to further explore Wakanda. However, this whole premature ripping the title character away from his franchise that he soley upheld for decades without any help from supporting cast characters, I feel this is a huge disservice and an insult to such an important character. I want the franchise to be successful, I DON'T want it to try and do so by subverting it's title character and using his stories and his characteristics for essentially Brand New characters. That's cheating T'Challa out for no good reason other than greed and shady agendas

I feel what you're saying, and I largely agree. But I must protest some of it because Shuri has been around for almost 20 years now, and she was Black Panther and Queen of Wakanda for several years, and her time on the throne was not that long ago. The BP mantle is part of her legacy and she's held on to the title longer than almost any other BP except for T'Challa, especially when you think about actual adventures depicted in the comics. I don't think Disney, Marvel Studios, or the general audience cares much about the five decades history of T'Challa. Most people didn't even know the character existed until Civil War or the first Black Panther film. They want to be entertained now, by characters they grew to love in the first Black Panther film.

While they will not recast, they could bring another male BP into the lead role, but I think doing so runs into that woke chainsaw that Feige is not trying to turn on. Instead he's wielding that chainsaw for the next round of films and television series. If they made another man BP that still means T'Challa's story will not be told, it then be the story, of say, Kasper Cole, and we would follow his journey. That would be another origin story, and a far less interesting one-IMO-than giving Shuri the mantle. Further, who knows how the audience would react to a T'Challa recast. It's not a guaranteed box office win for Marvel. So I don't see them fighting against the gravity of going with Shuri as BP (to me the biggest impediment to that happening is Letitia Wright herself and if the controversy around her doesn't abate). Multiverse BPs or bringing in a son are not bad ideas, however, I really don't think Marvel is going to put that kind of thought into it. They are going to keep it simple. And the simplest thing to do is to promote someone from the existing cast. I think W'Kabi could be a good choice, and Daniel Kaluuya is getting work right now in Hollywood, though I doubt they would do that and I doubt his character will get much screen time or focus in the next film. IMO, BP2 will be a ladies affair with Shuri, Nakia, Okoye, Ramonda, and I imagine we might get Ayo and Aneka as characters with dialogue and perhaps their romance-if nothing else in the background-in the next film.

I don't want there to be a zero sum game between black male and female characters, but at the same time I think that's the kind of mentality that's out there, and right now, black males are on the losing side of that, though really no one wins in the community by playing this game.

Most people don't know anything other that Shuri became BP at some point in publishing history. So I feel that it's the same as trying to compare to how long T'Challa has been around, except for when people and internet sites try to do "top 10 Shuri stories" they will learn that she doesn't even have that, it's more like top 5 Which is ALL her stories power, klaws, deadliest, and Nnendis story... So not even 5. They will literally steal T'Challas stories to tell Shuris, Which begs the question... Why are they pushing a character who doesn't even have stories to adapt that you need to take stories from the franchise character?

Her tone on the throne ended  6 years ago and her character is only 15 years old.. and her MCU counterpart isn't even geared towards taking the mantle and would require ANOTHER origin story after we just had one from the first movie.

You run into the same problem, of you just keep creating these brand new never before seen characters that don't exist on the comics.. why are you going through so many hoops TO NOT just recast T'Challa, Which we know from DECADE'S of movie history that people WILL accept different takes of the same heroes. Bond Batman super man Spidey hulk.. they are doing a blade remake... As long as the actor channels the characters personality and is charismatic and gripping on their portrayal, people will accept it

Zero sum games are what Chadwick was trying to fight and Disney is trying to reinforce that? What a way to honor Chadwick


If you're adhering to the idea that comic stories need to be adapted for the films, Shuri as Panther is from the comic. They already have had T'Chaka, T'Challa, and Killmonger as Panthers onscreen. So far Cole doesn't exist in this universe, and far as we know, the other uncle who was also a Panther doesn't either (I've said before that Djimon Hounsou would be great for that role). So that leaves Shuri as the only BP from the comics in the MCU that hasn't suited it up, and she already is T'Challa's logical successor as his sister as we've already seen in the comics.

I don't think Top 10 lists on the internet matter that much to Marvel and those folks will adapt. They can just talk about the greatest or most important Shuri stories, or just put Shuri within the larger pantheon of Black Panthers, or talk about black female superheroes or African superheroes, black superheroes, etc. I don't get the aversion among comic book movie fans of creating new stories or villains or other characters. Not everything has to be adapted from old stories. Definitely Marvel and DC have established that precedent for sure, but that doesn't mean they have to stick to it, or not just take old T'Challa stories and amend them for Shuri. People love Easter Eggs and nostalgia, but they also like good stories about characters they care about and I think Shuri is a character that has earned a lot of goodwill so people will stick with a Shuri-led franchise, for the next outing. Depends on how good that would be to see if they would come back for more.

When it comes to the character's age, Letitia Wright is in her late 20s, so who knows when the time of the next film takes place. The MCU is not stuck in time, especially now that they have done Avengers I and Endgame, and are moving into the multiverse. This gives them the freedom to play around with time. Who knows how tightly connected the new films will be, from a linear perspective anyway? Black Panther I was already unstuck in time, and we've had Captain America I and Captain Marvel I set in the past, as will be Black Widow. Endgame jumped into the future and who's to say that in BP2 Shuri won't be in her 20s or even the same age the actress is now?

Feige has said there will be no recast so I'm not considering that happening or holding on to that until I hear otherwise from him, which means that anyone else who gets the BP mantle, in the sequel, will have an origin story. Shuri as BP would need less of an origin story since she was already introduced in the first BP film and has been in Infinity War and Endgame. That gives them the flexibility to do a non-origin origin story for her, since we already know her and the contours of her world and they can focus on her learning how to be the new BP and maybe rule Wakanda as well. It will be a very steep learning curve.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2020, 01:09:26 pm by Emperorjones »

Offline Ezyo

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I have absolutely no issue with Shuri taking over or even having some of T'Challas stories adapted to hers... After T'Challas stories and character arc is told to completion...

I always find it interesting that. Dc and marvel have these methods or rules they adhere to yet Black people are always an exception to the rule... And more often than not it's in a bad way. Also what you described is literally BP 1
« Last Edit: December 17, 2020, 01:48:28 pm by Ezyo »

Offline Emperorjones

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I have absolutely no issue with Shuri taking over or even having some of T'Challas stories adapted to hers... After T'Challas stories and character arc is told to completion...

I always find it interesting that. Dc and marvel have these methods or rules they adhere to yet Black people are always an exception to the rule... And more often than not it's in a bad way


I agree with you there. I can't assume that the 'normal' rules (those for white actors/characters) apply when it comes to black actors/characters.

Offline Ture

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Interesting, thought inducing and well put Emperorjones

I'm not speaking for A. Curry, I can't, but I have my own thoughts about the question Ture posed. I think that for some black feminists there is a toxic fixation on black men. It's not enough for black women to be 'represented' or even genuinely represented, or to shine for them. Black men have to be hurt. Black men have to be called out, we have to lose something, blamed for something, or be 'exposed'. It's like an automatic, Pavlovian response. If a black male character, like Black Lightning, has a series, then instantly their focus is on if the series has any black women and why aren't those black women given 'voice' or 'agency', which is code for why aren't they the characters the series really should be about.

When I think about it, when Storm was the most prominent black superhero on screen I never heard anyone lament that she should be pushed aside for Bishop or Synch or another black male character. No one demanded that Halle's Catwoman share her movie with say Crispus Allen. To be fair, I don't remember anyone saying anything similar about the Blade movies either, though Blade came at a time when comic book movies weren't a thing, and I don't recall the first Blade film touting it's comic book origins even. Further, the internet and social media back then, or even when Blade Trinity, came out, where not at the level they are now. And I should note that while I don't recall any black feminists going after the Blade film, David Goyer made sure to push Blade to the side for the new character Krista Starr in the Blade television series (and Wesley's Blade was forced to share screentime with Ryan Reynolds and Jessica Biel in the hopes they would be spun off into their own franchise), so while black feminism was silent on Blade to my knowledge, feminism overall still won out when it came to the Blade franchise.

I doubt many black feminists know or care much about the black female characters that Ture lists, but the ones who want T'Challa gone in the BP film franchise are only looking at the surface, and because he's a prominent black male character he must be taken down and a black female put in his place. It's a competition to them, and a 'win' for black males equals a 'loss' for black females. Many of them don't want to build anything, they want to take what they perceive black men have, but also what white people have, and they feel they deserve.

This kind of wrathful, illogical envy is based on the idea that black men seemingly have it so great, that there are tons of positive, or they might consider toxically masculine black male depictions in the media while black women are invisible. And it's one-sided. No black feminist calls for greater inclusion of black males or the male perspective in any projects where black women are the focus, especially straight black males. It's just supposed to be accepted that black women can speak and black men are allowed only to do so when spoken to, and can only back up what black women say. That's the kind of positive masculinity that is being pushed for black males, in the media.

This kind of thinking is why some black feminists in one breath can say black men are oppressors even while the more astute of them can also list many of the social ills plaguing black males, which would seem to contradict their assertion that black men have the power to oppress anyone. All this stuff about 'black male privilege' and 'straight black men are the white people of black people' rest easily, in their minds, with the beliefs that black men are the 'weakest link' and 'trash'. It doesn't make a lot of sense, but it's not really supposed to. It's based on emotion and the rationales shift to fit whatever emotional state the feminists find themselves in (when it comes to black men its generally overly judgmental or spiteful) or whatever argument they are trying to make.

It is definitely good to point out that the Shuri as BP backers could be smaller in numbers than their internet presence would suggest, as well as to note that there are also T'Challa backers on the internet too. However, the Shuri side aligns with the pop cultural trend of greater (black) female representation and 'empowerment' so even if those actual numbers might be small, it's backed up by Hollywood and the media in a way that those pushing for a recast, or more positive black male depictions in general are not. Despite the disappointments and even outright flops from this kind of feminist genre entertainment (which even female moviegoers, etc. are not always keen on), Hollywood is hellbent on shoveling more at us, to eventually make us accept it. As much as I admire Margot Robbie as an actress, (and putting her advantages of being an attractive blonde aside) why was she given the Pirates franchise after the performance of her Harley Quinn movie? And why is Ava DuVernay still a thing when it comes to movies? Or that Hollywood blames the failures of feminist marketed genre/action films on male moviegoers, even when men do support some of those films? Because it's about more than money, they are pushing an idea, and they are going to keep pushing it until, or unless, they fall off a financial cliff consistently.

Warner/DC should've been looking at a Vixen film, to get some of that BP shine, and could've beaten Marvel to the punch again like they did with Wonder Woman. Aquaman took inspiration from BP and that got them a billion. On the small screen they've done some nice things with Vixen. I liked her in the Justice League cartoon, and in her own cartoon. Plus they've added to the Vixen mythos in the Arrowverse, creating a line of Vixens, where before I think she was just a singular heroine. I don't think Vixen's world is as fleshed out or as fantastic as BP's but they can build on that. DC Africa does have Gorilla Grodd and Gorilla City and its own African heroes, like the original Batwing. I enjoyed the Vixen graphic novel "Return of the Lion" and if they take that for inspiration that's a good place to begin.


There is oft talk of war. The war of nations; an impending race war; the war of the sexes; humanities' war on nature. Yet still there is another war, the war of cultures. Of all the wars mentioned this final one is the most obfuscated. Cultures filter one's world view and structures the psychology around such. With regards to the superhero genre, we find the defacto culture of choice belonging to the Eurasian, European, American or just plain "white" people if you will. Some would argue that such is the way it should be and of course some would agree. Still others would cry make your own superheroes and stop going to them and again some would agree.

However it is the hub of the bell curve where the battle rages. It is here where the fight for inclusion and representation are being fought. What is being missed is the fact  that this fight is for so called white supremacy and the advancement of so called white privilege and entitlement. While guised in truth and justice, even without saying so, it's still the American way, it remains a culture whose mores facilitate its advancement through through integrating and repurposing those not of its own to fight on its behalf. Black Feminism is one such champion.

Feminism is a valid path for white women to address concerns they have with white men. Why, because they were born of the same historical culture, that is relatively free of impositions and interruption by so called black people; white men and women organically connected to one another and can clearly define their grievance by gender inequality. Black Feminism attempts to ape this approach are hampered by the impact of invasion, colonialism, captivity, enslavement, assimilation and accommodation had on the Afrakan spirit and psyche of both men and women. This grafting or sheathing of white culture with so called black sensibilities is analogous to The Wizard of Oz and The Wiz; Superman and Icon; and to be seasonal, every traditional white Christmas story and Jingle Jangle.   

Woke creatives want a black Jesus; a black Santa Claus; a black Dracula; a black James Bond; a black Dr Who; a black Transformer; a blackity black black black as long as it origins are white. The Black Feminist want all of the above except make them all women, err black women, err lesbians, err black lesbians. Superhero enthusiasts transverse the multiple media expressions of Sci Fi, Fantasy, Anime, Manga, Horror, Wrestling, Gaming and Martial Arts movies to name a few, all in an attempt to find the hero in it. Still after all that rarely if ever do their efforts center on anything Afrakan. These fans are often oblivious or uncaring of the culture that spawned their quest and most often than not, what championing such heroes reflects on them.

Here's an example of a woke creative and his artistry going off the rails.




White women have been at the side of white men through the atrocities committed against the Afrakan.










Feminism began in 1848 and by the 1920's white women weren’t relegated to the women's only of arm of the KKK. In fact one such white woman Mary Elizabeth Tyler was so effective in the power grab for rulership of the Klan that she was suspected of being the true leader of the KKK. What does Black Feminism say about such women and their contemporaries? Are "black" men the only ones being called to task?







Feminism is a philosophy for the representation and inclusion of white women in the affairs of white men; and for charting a path of white women liberation that leads away from sole white male dominance to white women co-supremacy... or so they hope. Black feminist have to be careful so to avoid helping some white women in particular and some white people in general gloss over or erase the legacy of hatred, evil lust and violence unleashed upon Afrakan men and women. Sanitizing historical records and censoring social media is not the answer. Shifting responsibility of blame and arguing credibility is not the answer. Discord over victimization and fighting one another is not the answer.

An ideology born out of the need for equality in so called white supremacy and is capable of contributing to the disruption of the relationship between Afrakan men and women; disintegration and restructuring of the Afrakan family; and destabilization of the Afrakan community sounds like the kind of insidious plot that only a super villain, dare I say an enemy of Afrakan people would  use.

Traditional Afrakan culture was never lost nor forgotten. Some of the captured Afrakans were enslaved and remained so until President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1862 or General Order No. 3 which was read on Monday, June 19, 1865 aka Juneteenth. Some of the captured Afrakans self liberated and developed outlier settlements; fortified encampments; self sustaining communities and Maroon societies throughout Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, the Caribbean and Canadian wilderness.

Traditional Afrakan culture was never lost nor forgotten. Some of the enslaved Afrakans converted to the religion of their enslaver and thus became Christian, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim or whatever religion their capturer embraced. Some of the self liberated Afrakans maintained their spiritual traditions and shrines and continued the practice til this day of Hoodoo (Akan), Juju (Yoruba), Wanga (Ovambo - Gullah), Ngengang (Fang) and Voodoo (Ewe, Fon), Shetaut Neter (Kamau of Khanit and Kemet) and other Traditional Ancestral Religions.

There is a choice upon which mentality, the enslaved or self liberated, the Black Panther and Wakanda should be built upon.

This is why I asked the question why “black feminists and WOKE” creatives are so focused on Black Panther and Wakanda. It is like they want to corrupt an Afrakan society all at the behest of an alien culture. Wakanda is representing an as Afrakan country free of the conflicts inherent in gender inequality. That was until Coates got his hands on Black Panther. The narratives of T'Challa the Black Panther and his nation should be futuristically Afrakan centered; pulling from traditional Afrakan values free of Asian, Arab or European influences; and structured around an uncolonized Afrakan nation like Ethiopia, the Quilombos of South America and the Maroon societies of North America.

Last but not least, don't confuse lack of popularity with absence. Matter of fact traditional Afrakan culture is very popular on social media. It just depends on where one chooses to hang out that determines the algorithm that will be applied to them.

Be Afrakan my friends.






581175

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Offline supreme illuminati

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I have absolutely no issue with Shuri taking over or even having some of T'Challas stories adapted to hers... After T'Challas stories and character arc is told to completion...

I always find it interesting that. Dc and marvel have these methods or rules they adhere to yet Black people are always an exception to the rule... And more often than not it's in a bad way


I agree with you there. I can't assume that the 'normal' rules (those for white actors/characters) apply when it comes to black actors/characters.

I have every single problem with that...because it still leaves the door open for writing off/erasing T'Challa. Is it too much to ask to let someone as BREATHTAKINGLY BRILLIANT AND GIFTED as Ryan Coogler flex his creative muscles and tell all original stories for Shuri WITHOUT eclipsing T'Challa in any way? Sam will NOT eclipse the stories of Steve when Sam becomes Captain America...so what's with the either/or for T'Challa/Shuri? Didn't we all just unanimously agree that such "either/or-ness" is the essence of the problem certain big wig White folks have with us in the first place?
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Interesting, thought inducing and well put Emperorjones

I'm not speaking for A. Curry, I can't, but I have my own thoughts about the question Ture posed. I think that for some black feminists there is a toxic fixation on black men. It's not enough for black women to be 'represented' or even genuinely represented, or to shine for them. Black men have to be hurt. Black men have to be called out, we have to lose something, blamed for something, or be 'exposed'. It's like an automatic, Pavlovian response. If a black male character, like Black Lightning, has a series, then instantly their focus is on if the series has any black women and why aren't those black women given 'voice' or 'agency', which is code for why aren't they the characters the series really should be about.

When I think about it, when Storm was the most prominent black superhero on screen I never heard anyone lament that she should be pushed aside for Bishop or Synch or another black male character. No one demanded that Halle's Catwoman share her movie with say Crispus Allen. To be fair, I don't remember anyone saying anything similar about the Blade movies either, though Blade came at a time when comic book movies weren't a thing, and I don't recall the first Blade film touting it's comic book origins even. Further, the internet and social media back then, or even when Blade Trinity, came out, where not at the level they are now. And I should note that while I don't recall any black feminists going after the Blade film, David Goyer made sure to push Blade to the side for the new character Krista Starr in the Blade television series (and Wesley's Blade was forced to share screentime with Ryan Reynolds and Jessica Biel in the hopes they would be spun off into their own franchise), so while black feminism was silent on Blade to my knowledge, feminism overall still won out when it came to the Blade franchise.

I doubt many black feminists know or care much about the black female characters that Ture lists, but the ones who want T'Challa gone in the BP film franchise are only looking at the surface, and because he's a prominent black male character he must be taken down and a black female put in his place. It's a competition to them, and a 'win' for black males equals a 'loss' for black females. Many of them don't want to build anything, they want to take what they perceive black men have, but also what white people have, and they feel they deserve.

This kind of wrathful, illogical envy is based on the idea that black men seemingly have it so great, that there are tons of positive, or they might consider toxically masculine black male depictions in the media while black women are invisible. And it's one-sided. No black feminist calls for greater inclusion of black males or the male perspective in any projects where black women are the focus, especially straight black males. It's just supposed to be accepted that black women can speak and black men are allowed only to do so when spoken to, and can only back up what black women say. That's the kind of positive masculinity that is being pushed for black males, in the media.

This kind of thinking is why some black feminists in one breath can say black men are oppressors even while the more astute of them can also list many of the social ills plaguing black males, which would seem to contradict their assertion that black men have the power to oppress anyone. All this stuff about 'black male privilege' and 'straight black men are the white people of black people' rest easily, in their minds, with the beliefs that black men are the 'weakest link' and 'trash'. It doesn't make a lot of sense, but it's not really supposed to. It's based on emotion and the rationales shift to fit whatever emotional state the feminists find themselves in (when it comes to black men its generally overly judgmental or spiteful) or whatever argument they are trying to make.

It is definitely good to point out that the Shuri as BP backers could be smaller in numbers than their internet presence would suggest, as well as to note that there are also T'Challa backers on the internet too. However, the Shuri side aligns with the pop cultural trend of greater (black) female representation and 'empowerment' so even if those actual numbers might be small, it's backed up by Hollywood and the media in a way that those pushing for a recast, or more positive black male depictions in general are not. Despite the disappointments and even outright flops from this kind of feminist genre entertainment (which even female moviegoers, etc. are not always keen on), Hollywood is hellbent on shoveling more at us, to eventually make us accept it. As much as I admire Margot Robbie as an actress, (and putting her advantages of being an attractive blonde aside) why was she given the Pirates franchise after the performance of her Harley Quinn movie? And why is Ava DuVernay still a thing when it comes to movies? Or that Hollywood blames the failures of feminist marketed genre/action films on male moviegoers, even when men do support some of those films? Because it's about more than money, they are pushing an idea, and they are going to keep pushing it until, or unless, they fall off a financial cliff consistently.

Warner/DC should've been looking at a Vixen film, to get some of that BP shine, and could've beaten Marvel to the punch again like they did with Wonder Woman. Aquaman took inspiration from BP and that got them a billion. On the small screen they've done some nice things with Vixen. I liked her in the Justice League cartoon, and in her own cartoon. Plus they've added to the Vixen mythos in the Arrowverse, creating a line of Vixens, where before I think she was just a singular heroine. I don't think Vixen's world is as fleshed out or as fantastic as BP's but they can build on that. DC Africa does have Gorilla Grodd and Gorilla City and its own African heroes, like the original Batwing. I enjoyed the Vixen graphic novel "Return of the Lion" and if they take that for inspiration that's a good place to begin.


There is oft talk of war. The war of nations; an impending race war; the war of the sexes; humanities' war on nature. Yet still there is another war, the war of cultures. Of all the wars mentioned this final one is the most obfuscated. Cultures filter one's world view and structures the psychology around such. With regards to the superhero genre, we find the defacto culture of choice belonging to the Eurasian, European, American or just plain "white" people if you will. Some would argue that such is the way it should be and of course some would agree. Still others would cry make your own superheroes and stop going to them and again some would agree.

However it is the hub of the bell curve where the battle rages. It is here where the fight for inclusion and representation are being fought. What is being missed is the fact  that this fight is for so called white supremacy and the advancement of so called white privilege and entitlement. While guised in truth and justice, even without saying so, it's still the American way, it remains a culture whose mores facilitate its advancement through through integrating and repurposing those not of its own to fight on its behalf. Black Feminism is one such champion.

Feminism is a valid path for white women to address concerns they have with white men. Why, because they were born of the same historical culture, that is relatively free of impositions and interruption by so called black people; white men and women organically connected to one another and can clearly define their grievance by gender inequality. Black Feminism attempts to ape this approach are hampered by the impact of invasion, colonialism, captivity, enslavement, assimilation and accommodation had on the Afrakan spirit and psyche of both men and women. This grafting or sheathing of white culture with so called black sensibilities is analogous to The Wizard of Oz and The Wiz; Superman and Icon; and to be seasonal, every traditional white Christmas story and Jingle Jangle.   

Woke creatives want a black Jesus; a black Santa Claus; a black Dracula; a black James Bond; a black Dr Who; a black Transformer; a blackity black black black as long as it origins are white. The Black Feminist want all of the above except make them all women, err black women, err lesbians, err black lesbians. Superhero enthusiasts transverse the multiple media expressions of Sci Fi, Fantasy, Anime, Manga, Horror, Wrestling, Gaming and Martial Arts movies to name a few, all in an attempt to find the hero in it. Still after all that rarely if ever do their efforts center on anything Afrakan. These fans are often oblivious or uncaring of the culture that spawned their quest and most often than not, what championing such heroes reflects on them.

Here's an example of a woke creative and his artistry going off the rails.




White women have been at the side of white men through the atrocities committed against the Afrakan.










Feminism began in 1848 and by the 1920's white women weren’t relegated to the women's only of arm of the KKK. In fact one such white woman Mary Elizabeth Tyler was so effective in the power grab for rulership of the Klan that she was suspected of being the true leader of the KKK. What does Black Feminism say about such women and their contemporaries? Are "black" men the only ones being called to task?







Feminism is a philosophy for the representation and inclusion of white women in the affairs of white men; and for charting a path of white women liberation that leads away from sole white male dominance to white women co-supremacy... or so they hope. Black feminist have to be careful so to avoid helping some white women in particular and some white people in general gloss over or erase the legacy of hatred, evil lust and violence unleashed upon Afrakan men and women. Sanitizing historical records and censoring social media is not the answer. Shifting responsibility of blame and arguing credibility is not the answer. Discord over victimization and fighting one another is not the answer.

An ideology born out of the need for equality in so called white supremacy and is capable of contributing to the disruption of the relationship between Afrakan men and women; disintegration and restructuring of the Afrakan family; and destabilization of the Afrakan community sounds like the kind of insidious plot that only a super villain, dare I say an enemy of Afrakan people would  use.

Traditional Afrakan culture was never lost nor forgotten. Some of the captured Afrakans were enslaved and remained so until President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1862 or General Order No. 3 which was read on Monday, June 19, 1865 aka Juneteenth. Some of the captured Afrakans self liberated and developed outlier settlements; fortified encampments; self sustaining communities and Maroon societies throughout Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, the Caribbean and Canadian wilderness.

Traditional Afrakan culture was never lost nor forgotten. Some of the enslaved Afrakans converted to the religion of their enslaver and thus became Christian, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim or whatever religion their capturer embraced. Some of the self liberated Afrakans maintained their spiritual traditions and shrines and continued the practice til this day of Hoodoo (Akan), Juju (Yoruba), Wanga (Ovambo - Gullah), Ngengang (Fang) and Voodoo (Ewe, Fon), Shetaut Neter (Kamau of Khanit and Kemet) and other Traditional Ancestral Religions.

There is a choice upon which mentality, the enslaved or self liberated, the Black Panther and Wakanda should be built upon.

This is why I asked the question why “black feminists and WOKE” creatives are so focused on Black Panther and Wakanda. It is like they want to corrupt an Afrakan society all at the behest of an alien culture. Wakanda is representing an as Afrakan country free of the conflicts inherent in gender inequality. That was until Coates got his hands on Black Panther. The narratives of T'Challa the Black Panther and his nation should be futuristically Afrakan centered; pulling from traditional Afrakan values free of Asian, Arab or European influences; and structured around an uncolonized Afrakan nation like Ethiopia, the Quilombos of South America and the Maroon societies of North America.

Last but not least, don't confuse lack of popularity with absence. Matter of fact traditional Afrakan culture is very popular on social media. It just depends on where one chooses to hang out that determines the algorithm that will be applied to them.

Be Afrakan my friends.






581175




After this up here...is there anything left to say?

"Be Afrakan, my friends..."

Afrakan spin on Bruce Lee saying: "Be like Water, my friend..."


Which in itself is lifted from the many Afrakan legends which said: "...Be like Water..." literally tens of thousands of years before Bruce was born.

To reiterate: "Be Afrakan, my friends..."

I think that's what we're trying to do, in general. And that's the crux of this whole power struggle, this whole salvation and freedom of the soul, mind, flesh, heart and literally the planet itself.
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Interesting, thought inducing and well put Emperorjones

I'm not speaking for A. Curry, I can't, but I have my own thoughts about the question Ture posed. I think that for some black feminists there is a toxic fixation on black men. It's not enough for black women to be 'represented' or even genuinely represented, or to shine for them. Black men have to be hurt. Black men have to be called out, we have to lose something, blamed for something, or be 'exposed'. It's like an automatic, Pavlovian response. If a black male character, like Black Lightning, has a series, then instantly their focus is on if the series has any black women and why aren't those black women given 'voice' or 'agency', which is code for why aren't they the characters the series really should be about.

When I think about it, when Storm was the most prominent black superhero on screen I never heard anyone lament that she should be pushed aside for Bishop or Synch or another black male character. No one demanded that Halle's Catwoman share her movie with say Crispus Allen. To be fair, I don't remember anyone saying anything similar about the Blade movies either, though Blade came at a time when comic book movies weren't a thing, and I don't recall the first Blade film touting it's comic book origins even. Further, the internet and social media back then, or even when Blade Trinity, came out, where not at the level they are now. And I should note that while I don't recall any black feminists going after the Blade film, David Goyer made sure to push Blade to the side for the new character Krista Starr in the Blade television series (and Wesley's Blade was forced to share screentime with Ryan Reynolds and Jessica Biel in the hopes they would be spun off into their own franchise), so while black feminism was silent on Blade to my knowledge, feminism overall still won out when it came to the Blade franchise.

I doubt many black feminists know or care much about the black female characters that Ture lists, but the ones who want T'Challa gone in the BP film franchise are only looking at the surface, and because he's a prominent black male character he must be taken down and a black female put in his place. It's a competition to them, and a 'win' for black males equals a 'loss' for black females. Many of them don't want to build anything, they want to take what they perceive black men have, but also what white people have, and they feel they deserve.

This kind of wrathful, illogical envy is based on the idea that black men seemingly have it so great, that there are tons of positive, or they might consider toxically masculine black male depictions in the media while black women are invisible. And it's one-sided. No black feminist calls for greater inclusion of black males or the male perspective in any projects where black women are the focus, especially straight black males. It's just supposed to be accepted that black women can speak and black men are allowed only to do so when spoken to, and can only back up what black women say. That's the kind of positive masculinity that is being pushed for black males, in the media.

This kind of thinking is why some black feminists in one breath can say black men are oppressors even while the more astute of them can also list many of the social ills plaguing black males, which would seem to contradict their assertion that black men have the power to oppress anyone. All this stuff about 'black male privilege' and 'straight black men are the white people of black people' rest easily, in their minds, with the beliefs that black men are the 'weakest link' and 'trash'. It doesn't make a lot of sense, but it's not really supposed to. It's based on emotion and the rationales shift to fit whatever emotional state the feminists find themselves in (when it comes to black men its generally overly judgmental or spiteful) or whatever argument they are trying to make.

It is definitely good to point out that the Shuri as BP backers could be smaller in numbers than their internet presence would suggest, as well as to note that there are also T'Challa backers on the internet too. However, the Shuri side aligns with the pop cultural trend of greater (black) female representation and 'empowerment' so even if those actual numbers might be small, it's backed up by Hollywood and the media in a way that those pushing for a recast, or more positive black male depictions in general are not. Despite the disappointments and even outright flops from this kind of feminist genre entertainment (which even female moviegoers, etc. are not always keen on), Hollywood is hellbent on shoveling more at us, to eventually make us accept it. As much as I admire Margot Robbie as an actress, (and putting her advantages of being an attractive blonde aside) why was she given the Pirates franchise after the performance of her Harley Quinn movie? And why is Ava DuVernay still a thing when it comes to movies? Or that Hollywood blames the failures of feminist marketed genre/action films on male moviegoers, even when men do support some of those films? Because it's about more than money, they are pushing an idea, and they are going to keep pushing it until, or unless, they fall off a financial cliff consistently.

Warner/DC should've been looking at a Vixen film, to get some of that BP shine, and could've beaten Marvel to the punch again like they did with Wonder Woman. Aquaman took inspiration from BP and that got them a billion. On the small screen they've done some nice things with Vixen. I liked her in the Justice League cartoon, and in her own cartoon. Plus they've added to the Vixen mythos in the Arrowverse, creating a line of Vixens, where before I think she was just a singular heroine. I don't think Vixen's world is as fleshed out or as fantastic as BP's but they can build on that. DC Africa does have Gorilla Grodd and Gorilla City and its own African heroes, like the original Batwing. I enjoyed the Vixen graphic novel "Return of the Lion" and if they take that for inspiration that's a good place to begin.


There is oft talk of war. The war of nations; an impending race war; the war of the sexes; humanities' war on nature. Yet still there is another war, the war of cultures. Of all the wars mentioned this final one is the most obfuscated. Cultures filter one's world view and structures the psychology around such. With regards to the superhero genre, we find the defacto culture of choice belonging to the Eurasian, European, American or just plain "white" people if you will. Some would argue that such is the way it should be and of course some would agree. Still others would cry make your own superheroes and stop going to them and again some would agree.

However it is the hub of the bell curve where the battle rages. It is here where the fight for inclusion and representation are being fought. What is being missed is the fact  that this fight is for so called white supremacy and the advancement of so called white privilege and entitlement. While guised in truth and justice, even without saying so, it's still the American way, it remains a culture whose mores facilitate its advancement through through integrating and repurposing those not of its own to fight on its behalf. Black Feminism is one such champion.

Feminism is a valid path for white women to address concerns they have with white men. Why, because they were born of the same historical culture, that is relatively free of impositions and interruption by so called black people; white men and women organically connected to one another and can clearly define their grievance by gender inequality. Black Feminism attempts to ape this approach are hampered by the impact of invasion, colonialism, captivity, enslavement, assimilation and accommodation had on the Afrakan spirit and psyche of both men and women. This grafting or sheathing of white culture with so called black sensibilities is analogous to The Wizard of Oz and The Wiz; Superman and Icon; and to be seasonal, every traditional white Christmas story and Jingle Jangle.   

Woke creatives want a black Jesus; a black Santa Claus; a black Dracula; a black James Bond; a black Dr Who; a black Transformer; a blackity black black black as long as it origins are white. The Black Feminist want all of the above except make them all women, err black women, err lesbians, err black lesbians. Superhero enthusiasts transverse the multiple media expressions of Sci Fi, Fantasy, Anime, Manga, Horror, Wrestling, Gaming and Martial Arts movies to name a few, all in an attempt to find the hero in it. Still after all that rarely if ever do their efforts center on anything Afrakan. These fans are often oblivious or uncaring of the culture that spawned their quest and most often than not, what championing such heroes reflects on them.

Here's an example of a woke creative and his artistry going off the rails.




White women have been at the side of white men through the atrocities committed against the Afrakan.










Feminism began in 1848 and by the 1920's white women weren’t relegated to the women's only of arm of the KKK. In fact one such white woman Mary Elizabeth Tyler was so effective in the power grab for rulership of the Klan that she was suspected of being the true leader of the KKK. What does Black Feminism say about such women and their contemporaries? Are "black" men the only ones being called to task?







Feminism is a philosophy for the representation and inclusion of white women in the affairs of white men; and for charting a path of white women liberation that leads away from sole white male dominance to white women co-supremacy... or so they hope. Black feminist have to be careful so to avoid helping some white women in particular and some white people in general gloss over or erase the legacy of hatred, evil lust and violence unleashed upon Afrakan men and women. Sanitizing historical records and censoring social media is not the answer. Shifting responsibility of blame and arguing credibility is not the answer. Discord over victimization and fighting one another is not the answer.

An ideology born out of the need for equality in so called white supremacy and is capable of contributing to the disruption of the relationship between Afrakan men and women; disintegration and restructuring of the Afrakan family; and destabilization of the Afrakan community sounds like the kind of insidious plot that only a super villain, dare I say an enemy of Afrakan people would  use.

Traditional Afrakan culture was never lost nor forgotten. Some of the captured Afrakans were enslaved and remained so until President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1862 or General Order No. 3 which was read on Monday, June 19, 1865 aka Juneteenth. Some of the captured Afrakans self liberated and developed outlier settlements; fortified encampments; self sustaining communities and Maroon societies throughout Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, the Caribbean and Canadian wilderness.

Traditional Afrakan culture was never lost nor forgotten. Some of the enslaved Afrakans converted to the religion of their enslaver and thus became Christian, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim or whatever religion their capturer embraced. Some of the self liberated Afrakans maintained their spiritual traditions and shrines and continued the practice til this day of Hoodoo (Akan), Juju (Yoruba), Wanga (Ovambo - Gullah), Ngengang (Fang) and Voodoo (Ewe, Fon), Shetaut Neter (Kamau of Khanit and Kemet) and other Traditional Ancestral Religions.

There is a choice upon which mentality, the enslaved or self liberated, the Black Panther and Wakanda should be built upon.

This is why I asked the question why “black feminists and WOKE” creatives are so focused on Black Panther and Wakanda. It is like they want to corrupt an Afrakan society all at the behest of an alien culture. Wakanda is representing an as Afrakan country free of the conflicts inherent in gender inequality. That was until Coates got his hands on Black Panther. The narratives of T'Challa the Black Panther and his nation should be futuristically Afrakan centered; pulling from traditional Afrakan values free of Asian, Arab or European influences; and structured around an uncolonized Afrakan nation like Ethiopia, the Quilombos of South America and the Maroon societies of North America.

Last but not least, don't confuse lack of popularity with absence. Matter of fact traditional Afrakan culture is very popular on social media. It just depends on where one chooses to hang out that determines the algorithm that will be applied to them.

Be Afrakan my friends.






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After this up here...is there anything left to say?

"Be Afrakan, my friends..."

Afrakan spin on Bruce Lee saying: "Be like Water, my friend..."


Which in itself is lifted from the many Afrakan legends which said: "...Be like Water..." literally tens of thousands of years before Bruce was born.

To reiterate: "Be Afrakan, my friends..."

I think that's what we're trying to do, in general. And that's the crux of this whole power struggle, this whole salvation and freedom of the soul, mind, flesh, heart and literally the planet itself.

Brother Supreme! I knew you would get my reference.
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Needs repeating.


So for all those clamoring for comic book accuracy and demanding Shuri take the mantle of Black Panther here's a sneak peek of what they could translate on screen.



WAKANDA IN RUINS... POSSIBLY BY FLOOD?!?



T'CHALLA AND SHURI ON THE RUN?!?



SHURI'S UNNECESSARY SACRIFICE?!?



DON'T WORRY THERE IS NO WAY SHE'LL BE ON HER KNEES... W'KABI!!!



THE CLASSIC NOBLE SACRIFICE AND OFF SCREEN SLAYINGI!!!



WHEN NEXT WE SEE SHURI SHE'S IN THE ANCESTRAL PLAIN BUT DON'T WORRY SHE IS STILL THE BLACK PANTHER. ALL THAT'S LEFT IS TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO KILL T'CHALLA AND WHO GOT NEXT?


For all the A.G.E.N.D.A. pushers you may witness the demise of not only T'Challa but Shuri as well. It called killing two Black Panthers ("Black" heroes, "Black" characters) with one vibranium stone. Yea I said it.

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Quote
Simple. And for various reasons.  Most of the characters you have above don’t have the same cultural importance, power, world, or impact that BP and the world of Wakanda does. What’s Monica Rambeau or Misty Knight or Vixen compared to a black Disney princess who is also the tech leader in the world’s most advanced and all black civilization?  Especially one who, in the comics, had the mantle before and can again? Or a bald, black, female general who leads her own all black female army in that same world? Who cares about Wonder Woman and her mostly white amazons when you’ve already got it’s equivalent ready made in wondrous Wakanda? The playing field is vast and already there and ripe for the stories they want to tell.  Hell, it’s the same reason we are more interested in Black Panther than we are Falcon or War Machine.  And why the hell has Marvel not gotten Night Thrasher out of slumber if it’s so much about diversity truly?

Also, Marvel with it’s heavy focus over the last few years on diversity and inclusion has swung open those gates for women of color, but especially black women and especially with Black Panther.  Starting with the feminist and woke slant that Ta-Nehesi took, and all the social fanfare and goodwill a writer of his stature created, it bought in Roxanne Gay, Yona Harvey, Nnedi Okorafor, and who knows how many other black feminist woke writers to work on this, with, as Ezyo said I believe, Vita Ayala being the one of the moment.  Vita, who is millennial, black and Hispanic, gender neutral, and gay. Lol...get ready for Shuri to explore all this in the comics. Not like her (or “their”, as I believe “they” will be referred to soon) sexuality has been defined yet.

None of these writers have shown much interest in T’Challa as much as they have the supporting characters.  Also, funny, none of them from what I know have been asked or shown interest in even writing Wonder Woman, Ms. Marvel, Misty Knight, or others. Wakanda, not necessarily Black Panther but Wakanda, is where it’s at.  (That being said, there is a new Wonder Woman being introduced that is a “woman of color”)

Also, as others made a good point on here, it’s not always about the money.  There is a paradigm shift happening in popular and social culture right now and a lot of it is focusing on black people with the advent of BLM and all (started by black, woke women) but a heavy shift on that is on academic, educated black women in particular.  Black women creatives, activists, politicians, and so forth are hot right now and with a “black” woman one step away from the presidency now, it’s made even bigger.  “Black girl magic” is everywhere, even with a new 007 as one.  And to a certain extent, it’s being done along with the demonizing and dismissal of black men quite a bit.

 And who would benefit moreso by letting die the most powerful black male comics character in comics, period, and letting a “less threatening” woman take over?  White men. It’s no coincidence to me that the major people I see wanting no recast and Shuri to take the mantle are mostly black women and white men

I think you’re underestimating that demand for Shuri, also the woke politics that are going along with it and the goodwill it can buy.  Again, if the case were different Feige would just recast.  Or hold off for awhile.  Don’t tell me this is all out of SO much respect for Boseman when there are ways you can spin it to recast and show Boseman respect.

As for Potter, true.  But at that point you’re creating a whole other character with no history behind it, you’re just changing his sex. They’d probably do better just giving Hermione her own movie, who was almost if not just as popular as Harry in the movies and books.  But that’s the difference, Black Panther is a mantle, Harry Potter is an actual person.  And it’s too easy for a Shuri to just take on that mantle wherein changing Harry’s sex would be more complicated..


A.Curry

Monica Rambeau or Misty Knight or Vixen? Wow you just gonna skip over the obvious. OK lets not.

How does an Afrakan goddess/omega level mutant and former queen sound? We know she's got nothing but potential. Some might say she has Xcellent potential.
Ororo Monroe aka STORM!

How about a genius level scientist, inventor, engineer; former vigilante, adventurer and monarch of Latveria with a potential for gender neutrality and on page lesbian kiss compare? Lets not forget her connects with Stark, always a plus in the MCU.  This is a black Disney princess just waiting to be introduced.
Riri Williams aka IRON HEART!

What if we go with a bilingual, genius level intellect with perfect memory, superhuman intuitive skills, virtually invulnerable (at least enough to withstand common firearms at long range and direct blows of the vastly more powerful Hulk). Add to that she is a formidable hand-to-hand combatant at Class 10 strength. She even has a healing factor. Let me continue. She is a telepath with the ability to read minds, project her thoughts into the minds of others, and defensively mask her mind against telepathic intrusion. She is able to psionically levitate and move herself in the air by force of will, allowing her to fly at supersonic speeds approaching Mach 3 and she manifested minor telekinetic capabilities.
Monet Yvette Clarisse Maria Therese St. Croix aka M

Two out of the three even have direct connects to continental Afrakan countries. Did I neglect to mention that all these woman are "black" with long flowing hair and the potential for interracial relationships? And you are telling me that “black feminists and WOKE” creatives would not want to write these women? Are you implying some elitist sensibilities are in use regarding “black feminists and WOKE” creatives? Or is all about them wanting to change Black Panther and Wakanda at the behest of the A.G.E.N.D.A.?


"Hell, it’s the same reason we are more interested in Black Panther than we are Falcon or War Machine." Interesting how both are now being developed into Disney+ series while T'Challa the Black Panther faces oblivion. Kind of funny how the “black feminists and WOKE” creatives weren't active during the late 90s when the Dora Milaje were introduced or in early 2000s when Shuri debuted.

It is almost as if they didn't care or were perhaps otherwise occupied. Oh, that's right, Storm was all the rage then. Wait, do you think the “black feminists and WOKE” creatives are waiting for Storm to have billion dollar blockbuster with both fans and critical acclaim; not to mention wielding the same social and cultural importance, power and impact that Black Panther did? No, they wouldn't. That would make them not only opportunistic but parasitic.

Well no one can say that ole BP didn't give the feminist and woke creatives their shot at the title. Ta-Nehesi Coates, Roxanne Gay, Yona Harvey, Nnedi Okorafor all took a swing at bat and were struck out. Curious once again who you choose to omit. No mention of another member of that team, Evan Narcisse. He out wrote all of them.

I'll match your Vita Ayala against Geoffrey Thorne. See you in February.

While Shuri is a millennial she's all Afrakan, Wakandan if you will. There's nothing Hispanic about her. Gender neutral, and gay? Naw miss Shuri with that.










"Lol...get ready for Shuri to explore all this in the comics. Not like her (or “their”, as I believe “they” will be referred to soon) sexuality has been defined yet." Whoa, slow down there aquatic sea person. Her gender was defined at the time she was created as a female, a sister and a daughter. Sheesh you can look at her and see that.

You mentioned that the Coates' era of writers didn't show much interest in T’Challa not as much as they had in the supporting characters. Makes sense, especially since they were writing for the A.G.E.N.D.A. You know who wrote T'Challa the Black Panther and made T'Challa, Wakanda and in two cases Shuri the envy of all comic book heroes save maybe Batman... and maybe Deadpool. He's funny about these things. You want to know who?  Priest, Hudlin, McDuffie, Liss and Aaron. Compare that era to Coates and friends.

Roxanne Gay, Yona Harvey, Nnedi Okorafor not being asked to scribe Wonder Woman, Ms. Marvel, Misty Knight, or any others is smart business. I'm just saying.

It's always about the money, just sometimes there are tangents. The paradigm shift happening in popular and social culture and it's focus on so called black people via the advent of BLM requires once again that you have to follow the money. Who are the ones financing the BLM and what is the, dare I say it, A.G.E.N.D.A.?

Are academic, educated black women forwarding an A.G.E.N.D.A.?  Are black women creatives, activists, politicians, and so forth hot right now because of this? Is a “black” woman one step away from the presidency doing something for the betterment of "black" people?.  “Black girl magic” is getting a job from the white man because the white man who did 58 years worth of work building one of the world's most successful franchises and  who held the job previously is taking some much deserved time off. That's not magic, its nothing but smoke and mirrors. The demonizing and dismissal of so called black men is par for the course when so called white supremacy and so called white privilege are paraded as the merits of inclusion and representation. 

"And who would benefit moreso by letting die the most powerful black male comics character in comics, period, and letting a “less threatening” woman take over?  White men. It’s no coincidence to me that the major people I see wanting no recast and Shuri to take the mantle are mostly black women and white men." I must say A., that was a keen observation.

I am not underestimating the demand for Shuri as much as questioning who is giving the order. Shuri is a great character. Having her own movie or series is great and works well for the Black Panther franchise. Its when those with the A.G.E.N.D.A. demand T'Challa's demise as the price for such that I got to call BS.

Shuri too was a whole other character with no history behind her a mere decade and a half ago. Why keep spouting this mantle nonsense as if it has some valence. It is a retcon just like Wakanda being unconquered and T'Challa having a brother.

Complications are the tools and motivator of imagination. Just ask Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Joe Simon, Larry Lieber, Joan Boocock Lee and Joan Celia Lee...  the fathers and mothers of Marvel comics.







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Chadwick Boseman Had Already Committed To BLACK PANTHER 3 Prior To His Death Earlier This Year
Black Panther 2 is moving ahead without recasting Chadwick Boseman's T'Challa, but a new profile reveals that the actor had committed to a third installment of the franchise before his tragic death.

RubyGoldstone | 12/17/2020

Chadwick Boseman tragically passed away earlier this year after a four-year battle with cancer. Marvel Studios and Ryan Coogler are moving ahead with Black Panther 2, and Kevin Feige has confirmed that the actor will not be recast as T'Challa. That means the Black Panther mantle will be passed on to a new hero, presumably Shuri or perhaps even M'Baku.

The Hollywood Reporter has paid tribute to Boseman by catching up with those closest to him, including his agent Michael Greene. The trade reveals that after negotiating a $10 million deal for the Black Panther sequel, he managed to secure a $20 million option for the "then-planned"  Black Panther 3 for his client.

However, for Boseman, playing T'Challa wasn't about the money.

"He always wanted to do things that mattered or were meaningful," explains Greene. "Like, every role, even if it was a series or a TV show, it had to be something that would represent something positive. Because he was always a speaker — on debate teams and so on, he told me."

"And when we went to the Congressional Black Caucus together when 42 came out, he was standing there with Jesse Jackson and it was like he had been doing this for his entire life, he was so comfortable."

The hope among fans is that Marvel will be able to ensure the Black Panther franchise remains a meaningful, inspiring one, even without Boseman being there to spearhead it. T'Challa's legacy is important, and Black Panther 2 will hopefully continue that in some way. With Coogler back at the helm, however, we probably shouldn't worry too much about that.


https://www.comicbookmovie.com/black_panther/black_panther_2/chadwick-boseman-had-already-committed-to-black-panther-3-prior-to-his-death-earlier-this-year-a181028#gs.oe4g7z

Here is the complete The Hollywood Reporter magazine article.
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/chadwick-bosemans-close-confidants-share-untold-memories-of-the-late-actor
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