Author Topic: Virginia (Race) Riot  (Read 9725 times)

Offline Hypestyle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2017, 04:44:20 pm »
if/when he lasts a full four years (argh), then I guess 45 is getting a library?
Good lord, what the hell is that situation going to look like...  ::)
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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2017, 11:24:47 am »
if/when he lasts a full four years (argh), then I guess 45 is getting a library?
Good lord, what the hell is that situation going to look like...  ::)

Its going to be a bigly liberry. Yuge!
The best liberry.


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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2018, 04:03:34 am »
Statue of doctor who experimented on enslaved women removed from Central Park
by Gabriela Milian

Tuesday April 17th 2018


WHO'S IN CONTROL?


New York (CNN) — A statue of Dr. James Marion Sims is being removed on Tuesday from Central Park.

The decision was approved by New York City's Public Design Commission after Mayor Bill de Blasio created the task force following protests across the country over Confederate statues.

The city will relocate the statue, erected in 1894, to Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York, where Sims is buried, according to the mayor's office.

The design commission on Monday voted unanimously, 7-0, to move the statue.

Sims was a surgeon in the 19th century who conducted experiments on women, usually women of color and mostly enslaved black women.



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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #33 on: May 02, 2018, 11:51:10 pm »
First Attacker Convicted in Beating at Charlottesville Rally

by Daniel Victor

Thursday May 3rd, 2018


jacob s. goodwin, who was accused of brutally beating a Black man at a rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, last year, was convicted on a felony count of malicious wounding on Tuesday, making him the first M/Fer to face judgement for one of the event's most prominent acts of violence.

According to a local NBC affiliate, jurors recommended goodwin, 23, of Ward, Arkansas, face 10 years in prison, a $20,000 fine and a rehabilitation or empathy plan.











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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #34 on: May 04, 2018, 04:26:02 am »
Second white attacker is found guilty in the beating of a Black man in a parking garage during Charlottesville protests

by Ray Sanches & Chuck Johnston, CNN

Thursday May 3rd 2018

A 34-year-old Georgia perp faces up to 20 years in prison after being found guilty in the beating of an African-American man during racially charged protests last summer in Charlottesville, Virginia.

alex michael ramos was among a group of attackers captured on widely shared cell phone video in the August 12 beating of DeAndre Harris.


A Charlottesville Circuit Court jury on Thursday convicted Ramos of malicious wounding, according to court clerk Llezelle Agustin Dugger





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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #35 on: July 30, 2018, 02:28:08 am »
Friday July 17th 2018

Justices: Suit by drumphf backers against police can proceed for essentially inciting a riot
by Associated Press



SACRAMENTO, Ca - A federal appeals court on Friday allowed supporters of then-presidential candidate drumpf to proceed with a lawsuit alleging they were beaten after San Jose police steered them into a crowd of anti-drumphf protesters.








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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2019, 08:29:34 pm »
Tuesday, 15th December 2019
Silent Sam Removed!
by Will Michaels, Elizabeth Baier & Lisa Phili


North Carolina's flagship public university removed the pedestal where a now toppled Confederate statue, known as "Silent Sam," once stood on a main campus quad, early Tuesday morning.
 
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill announced at 1 a.m. that the removal had begun, and by 2:40 it was all over.

A work crew with a large truck, a forklift and floodlights took the last piece of the base from the main quad, leading to cheers from a crowd that had gathered to watch.

The surprise removal was ordered Monday by Chancellor Carol Folt, who also announced that she will step down.

Though Folt said she would resign at the end of the school year, the university's Board of Governors voted on Tuesday to make her resignation effective Jan. 31.

In a conference call with reporters Tuesday, Folt said her resignation is not connected to her decision to remove the remnants of the monument from campus.

She said she did not want her job status to be part of her decision about the monument.

"I have not used it in that way," Folt told reporters.

"That's not how I've thought about it. I try to do the right thing regardless of that effect on my job situation.

And it may be hard to believe, but that's absolutely how I operate."

Folt said she believed it was time for her to move on after checking off a list of accomplishments like meeting fundraising goals and leading the school through an academic scandal.

Board of Governors Chair Harry Smith said the move to end Folt's time at UNC early is not meant to punish the chancellor.

"We just felt strongly that based on where we're at here, in order to move the institution forward that we needed to make a change," Smith said.

"That's not punitive in any way, shape form or fashion.

She resigned and we accepted it.

We just felt it was better to compress the timeline and work more toward a healing process."


The statue had stood on a main campus quad from 1913 until it was torn down by protesters in August 2018.

Folt announced her resignation in a campuswide email and said she was concerned about safety at the site that continues to draw protesters for and against the statue, but she gave no timetable for taking away the massive pedestal and bronze memorial plaques.

The items will go into storage while their fate is decided.

"The presence of the remaining parts of the monument on campus poses a continuing threat both to the personal safety and well-being of our community and to our ability to provide a stable, productive educational environment," Folt said in her letter to the Carolina community.

"The fact that despite our best efforts even since then, threats have continued to grow and place our community at serious risk has led me to authorize this action."

Last month, the board overseeing North Carolina's public universities rejected the UNC Trustees' plan for a center to house a Confederate statue on the Chapel Hill campus.















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https://www.npr.org/2019/01/15/685442684/on-her-way-out-unc-chancellor-authorizes-removal-of-silent-sam-pedestal

Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #37 on: February 20, 2019, 09:00:24 am »
Wednesday, 20th February 2019
Detroit City Council vetoes Autorama stunt, objects to Confederate flag

by Jonathon Ramsey

Detroit's Autorama hot rod show will stage its 67th annual event next month, and wants to kick off with Burt Reynolds tribute.

The plan is to re-create the Mulberry Bridge jump from "Smokey and the Bandit" using a movie-correct 1977 Pontiac Trans Am.

But the Detroit City Council voted 7-1 to prohibit the jump.
Why?


Because the Trans Am's front license plate holder displays the former Georgia state flag, a portion of which is the Confederate national flag, and the city council doesn't like that.

In the movie, Bo "Bandit" Darville was a Georgia driving legend, and the flag on the car was Georgia's flag at the time.

Councilman Scott Benson laid out the council's position when he said that the car "still proudly flies a Confederate flag, which is a symbol of oppression, slavery, as well as home-bred American terrorism.

So this body said we are not going to support that type of symbolism nor the audacity to support that type of activity in the city of Detroit."

It seems part of the council's ire comes from the same event two years ago.

A stunt group called the Northeast Ohio Dukes re-created a "Dukes of Hazzard" jump in 2017 using a series-correct 1969 Dodge Charger, complete with a Confederate flag on the roof.

Benson said the stunt group "expressly said they would not display that [Confederate flag] symbol during the jump."

Not only was it displayed, but when driver Raymond Kohn gave interviews after the jump, his driving suit featured the Stainless Banner on the collar.

Seems the council has been grinding its axe in silence for two years. Now Benson accuses Autorama of "a history of supporting images and symbols of racism, oppression, and white supremacy."

Autorama is certain to take place March 1-3 at Cobo Center.

This year's show will have around 800 cars on display, along with a special exhibit of 17 low riders and a Batmobile built by Flint native Carl Casper.

Even if the Bandit car doesn't make the jump, the Trans Am and other memorabilia from the film will be there.

A spokeswoman for Autorama said, "We are continuing to work to try to resolve this with the city."













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« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 12:28:05 pm by Battle »

Offline Hypestyle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #38 on: February 22, 2019, 08:49:28 am »


The General Lee jump from last year-  It got live coverage from the local TV news stations.

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I missed the North America International Auto show.  Not sure if I'll end up checking this out instead.
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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #39 on: April 28, 2019, 01:35:57 am »
Sunday, 28th April 2019
New Jersey Park Removes Mississippi Flag From Local Display, Denounces Its Confederate Roots

by CBS News NY



(JERSEY CITY, N.J.) – A battle between two governors is brewing over a flag in New Jersey’s Liberty State Park.

Gov. Phil Murphy has ordered the Mississippi state flag removed from a display that includes each of the 50 state flags and overlooks the Statue of Liberty.

The Mississippi flag displays a confederate battle emblem in the upper left corner.

Murphy said, because of that, the flag does not reflect the values of “inclusivity and equality.”

Murphy said he made the decision after Democratic state Sen. Sandra Cunningham raised the issue with him.

Cunningham said in a statement that the flag symbolized “an era of hate, violence, and division.”

On Saturday, Mississippi’s governor, Phil Bryant, said he’s disappointed in the decision and that his state’s voters should decide what is represented on their flag and what is not.

Mississippians, who voted in a 2001 statewide election, chose to keep the flag.

Several Mississippi cities and counties and all eight of the state’s public universities have stopped flying it in recent years amid criticism that the battle emblem is a racist reminder of slavery and segregation.

Supporters of the flag say it represents history. "Yeah... a cowardly, creepy racist history"






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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #40 on: August 28, 2019, 08:04:17 pm »
Wednesday, 28th August 2019
Mississippi seeks review of plan to move Confederate monument
by Jeff Amy





The University of Mississippi said Wednesday that it's moving ahead with plans to transfer a Confederate soldier monument from its central location on campus to a spot near a secluded Confederate cemetery.

In an email sent to students, faculty and staff, interim Chancellor Larry Sparks wrote that the university submitted plans Tuesday to take down, move and reassemble the monument.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History must review and approve the university's plans.

College Board trustees, who govern Mississippi's eight public universities, must also approve the move.

Sparks agreed in March to calls from faculty, students and staff to move the marble soldier and base from near the school's historic heart.

The monument has stood sentry there since 1906, when the United Daughters of the Confederacy commissioned it.

The monument is 29 feet (8.8 meters) tall and weighs 40,000 pounds (18,000 kilograms).

Plans call for moving it outside a cemetery in a less prominent area of the Oxford campus that holds graves of Confederate soldiers killed at the battle of Shiloh.

A new concrete walkway would be built leading to the cemetery, with the monument installed along it.

Founded in 1848, the university has worked in fits and starts the past two decades to distance itself from Confederate imagery.

Since 2016, Ole Miss has installed plaques to provide historical context about the monument and about slaves who built some pre-Civil War campus buildings.

Critics who call the monument a symbol of slavery and white supremacy have pressed for its relocation while others insist it remain standing as a key part of Southern history.

Pro-Confederate groups from outside the university rallied at the statue Feb. 23, calling in part for its preservation, and Ole Miss men's basketball players knelt during the national anthem at a game that day to protest those activities.

Some conservative political groups in Mississippi are pushing for Ole Miss to stop making changes to Confederate symbols.

Similar protests have played out around the country as other Confederate monuments have fallen in recent years, including on some college campuses, following the 2015 racially motivated massacre at a historically black church in Charleston, South Carolina.

The shooter had posted pictures of himself with a Confederate battle flag on social media.

A 2004 Mississippi law says war monuments, including those commemorating the Confederacy, can't be altered.

But they can be moved to a "more suitable location."

Sparks echoed that language in his email.

"I reiterate that this will place the monument in a more suitable location, one that is commensurate with the purpose that is etched on its side," Sparks wrote, referring to an inscription that reads in part,

"To our Confederate dead."



Plans released Wednesday call for placing a 10-foot-high (3-meter-high) screened fence around the current monument while it is disassembled, with university police officers providing security.

Plans propose taking the monument down and moving it on a single truck in one day, and then reassembling it in two more days.

The plaque discussing the monument's historical context is supposed to travel with it.

The plans call for 90 days to complete the whole project, including building the new walkway, with proposals from contractors to be received by October 30, 2019.

It's unclear if the university will have approval to start by then.























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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #41 on: November 20, 2019, 03:28:42 pm »
Wednesday, 20th November 2019
Another Confederate monument comes down, this time in North Carolina

by Jason Hanna and Joe Sutton





A Confederate monument that had stood in front of a North Carolina courthouse for 112 years was taken down overnight after months of debate and protests.

Crews used cranes early Wednesday to remove the monument -- a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier atop a marble pedestal -- from its spot outside the Chatham County courthouse in Pittsboro, roughly a 35-mile drive west of Raleigh.


It was the latest Confederate memorial in the South to be moved in the past few years amid a national debate about their purpose and necessity.

The county Board of Commissioners voted in August to remove the statue, CNN affiliate WRAL reported.

That sparked a court challenge by the group that donated the statue in 1907, the Winnie Davis Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

A judge ruled this month that the group did not give sufficient evidence supporting the monument's continued presence in front of the courthouse, CNN affiliate WTVD reported.


The statue and pedestal "will be transported to a safe location where they will be preserved and stored" until the Winnie Davis chapter "finds a more appropriate location to place them," the county said in a news release.

A few dozen people gathered to watch the removal after the county announced late Tuesday that it was about to happen, CNN affiliates reported.

Robert Butler, a supporter of the monument, told WRAL that its removal was heartbreaking.

"A statue's never hurt a soul, just like a grave memorial. Do they hurt anybody?" he said.

Anderson Ritter told WRAL that he supported the takedown.

"It represents stuff that never really should have happened, and it kind of memorializes and makes it seem good," Ritter told WRAL.

"I and other people don't agree with that."

Debate over the monument's future sparked protests against and for its removal in recent weeks.

A fight erupted Saturday between pro-monument demonstrators and counter protesters, leading to the arrests of 11 people, WTVD reported.















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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #42 on: January 14, 2020, 11:50:12 pm »
Wednesday, 14th January 2020
'Unifying' art replaces mural that featured confederate flag
by BOBBY CAINA CALVAN






(TALLAHASSEE, Florida) - The Florida Senate on Tuesday unveiled a gleaming new piece of art at one of its most-visited corridors in the state Capitol, after removing an old mural that included the Confederate flag.

The new artwork — a huge piece of wood in the shape of the state — represents the latest effort by lawmakers to strip away the divisive symbol from its official emblems amid scrutiny in recent years over public monuments to the Confederacy.

The original “Five Flags” mural was commissioned by the Senate in 1978.

Senate officials said the renovation of the chambers in 2016 prompted the removal of the mural, but it was never returned to the space it occupied for nearly 40 years at the public entrance of the Senate gallery.

The five flags refer to the banners that once flew over the state, including the Confederate flag.

The 10- foot -by-16- foot (3-meter-by-5-meter) mural is now on display about an hour's drive from the capital city, at a bank in downtown Perry, Florida, where Senate officials said,

“it continues to serve as an educational tool, depicting various scenes and figures in our Florida history for patrons and visitors.”

The new artwork also includes the Senate's revamped seal, which was also recently changed to remove the Confederate flag.

In a brief ceremony Tuesday morning, Senate President Bill Galvano noted that the space on the Capitol's fifth floor was among the most visited in the state Capitol.

Galvano called the artwork “timeless, unifying, and welcoming.”

“It was my goal to establish here a piece of artwork that represents the state of Florida, it's uniqueness and its resiliency.”

The commissioned piece was crafted by Tallahassee artist and furniture maker Barry Miller.

The main feature of the installation is a huge block of pecky cypress cut in the shape of the state.

The wood was salvaged from an old fallen cypress dredged from the Ocklawaha River in North Central Florida.

Its wood is streaked with tunnels, giving it visual texture.

The tunneling is especially appropriate because it is adjacent to the galleries from which the public can watch Senate floor proceedings.

The tunnels, often made by insects or fungus, are sometimes referred to as galleries.

“When people visit the Florida Senate, they can take pride as they walk past this and into the chamber,” Galvano said.

“Like the pecky cypress wood from which it was constructed," he said,

"this new sculpture signifies the resilient and enduring spirit of past, present, and future generations of Floridians.”
















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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #43 on: April 19, 2020, 11:37:17 pm »
Monday, 20th April 2o2o
Kentucky courthouse confederate flag removed after criticism
by Associated Press



(BENTON, Kentucky) - A local official in Kentucky has ordered the removal of a Confederate flag outside a county courthouse that has drawn criticism since its recent placement there.













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Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #44 on: April 26, 2020, 04:26:29 pm »
Sunday, 26th April 2o2o
Marine Corps Bans Public Display of Confederate Flag
by Derrick Bryson Taylor





The commandant of the Marine Corps has banned the public display of the Confederate battle flag, a symbol that he said had the “power to inflame” division.

“I am mindful that many people believe that flag to be a symbol of heritage and regional pride,” Gen. David H. Berger said in a letter dated Monday and addressed to his fellow Marines.

“But I am also mindful of the feelings of pain and rejection of those who inherited the cultural memory and present effects of the scourge of slavery in our country.”

The intent behind the ban was not to judge the meaning that individual Marines ascribe to the symbol, he said, but rather to help build “a uniquely capable warfighting team whose members come from all walks of life.”

The flag has the “power to inflame feelings of division,” he said, adding,

“I cannot have that division inside our Corps.”

All Marine Corps installations have regulations prohibiting the display of symbols related to hate speech, guidelines that General Berger said were intended to foster an environment that promotes unity and security.


He ended his letter by asking Marines to focus on the symbols that unite them: the eagle, globe and anchor.

It was not immediately clear if the ban would apply to clothing and cars owned by Marines when they are off base and off duty.

The Marine Corps did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Thursday.

The announcement came two months after General Berger ordered the removal of all Confederate paraphernalia from Marine Corps installations, according to CNN.

It was one of several directives, some of which he announced on Twitter, for “immediate execution.” Among them were revisions of the corps’s paternal leave policy and its enlistment policy, to disqualify applicants with a domestic violence conviction.

General Berger’s announcement follows years of national debate over the removal of Confederate flags and monuments from parks, public squares and college campuses across the South.

In June 2015, Governor Nikki Haley of South Carolina ordered that the Confederate battle flag be permanently lowered from the grounds of the State House after decades of political battles.

Four years later, Ms. Haley was criticized after she told a conservative radio host that the flag had symbolized “service, sacrifice and heritage” for some people in the state until Dylann S. Roof, who fatally shot nine African-American churchgoers in a racially motivated rampage in Charleston in 2015, “hijacked” it.

Statues and other monuments symbolizing the Old South have also been the subject of intense debate.

In November, a Confederate monument in Pittsboro, N.C., was removed from outside a courthouse where it had stood for 112 years, following months of what the chairman of the Chatham County Board of Commissioners described as “high emotions, division and even violence.”

Some cities have even gone so far as to auction off their Confederate statues.