Author Topic: White Christian men commit most mass shootings, so why not racially profile them  (Read 1531 times)

Offline imchills

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Speaking on CNN this Monday, commentator and political activist Van Jones addressed presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump’s most recent call for “racial profiling” of Muslim Americans, referring to data that shows mass shootings are predominantly carried out by mostly white men who happen to be Christian.

“I just think it’s really interesting that we’re talking about racially profiling in the context of mass shootings,” Jones said. “The vast majority of the people who are doing the mass shootings in America aren’t Muslims at all.”

“Young white men…” CNN host Brooke Baldwin interjected.

“You are seven times more likely to be killed by a right wing extremist — a racist or an anti-government nutjob — seven times more likely than a Muslim,” Jones continued.

“If I came on TV and said let’s start racially profiling white men, let’s start racially profiling young, white men who are loners with bowl haircuts, people would think, ‘Wow, that’s a pretty unfortunate conclusion for you to come to.’ If a Christian shoots somebody, we don’t say a Christian shot them. But if a Muslim shoots somebody, we say a Muslim shot them. I think that’s starting to muddy the waters.”


http://deadstate.org/van-jones-white-christian-men-commit-most-mass-shootings-so-why-arent-we-profiling-them/

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Is anybody else bothered by this headline? I mean that in the headline, there is a quote attributed to Van Jones that he did not say in the clip.

My take on it is that he was not advocating an "improved" racial profile; he was rather pointing out how absurd it is to racially profile mass shooters period.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline stanleyballard

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The news is so biased and has been since its inception....of course the majority of crimes are covered up and the most dangerous felons never go to jail because the system is terribly flawed and per the obvious information in history rigged.  When you have so much disinformation and propaganda running people and how they act then there's no surprise that Christian crimes are not going to be revealed or treated as the crime that other religions are accused of often.

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Is anybody else bothered by this headline? I mean that in the headline, there is a quote attributed to Van Jones that he did not say in the clip.

My take on it is that he was not advocating an "improved" racial profile; he was rather pointing out how absurd it is to racially profile mass shooters period.

To clarify, the headline is:
Van Jones: ‘White Christian men commit most mass shootings, so why not racially profile them?’

When I listen to the clip, Mr. Jones never utters that phrase (or I missed it completely). So then, isn't the headline a lie? Furthermore, it distorts his point (IMO of course).
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline Battle

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Tuesday, 16th February Two Thousand and Twenty One

Brooke Baldwin to Depart CNN in April
by Brian Steinberg





Brooke Baldwin, a CNN anchor who for a time became the face of the cable-news outlet’s daytime schedule, announced on air Monday that she intended to leave the WarnerMedia-backed outlet by the middle of April.

“The next chapter of my life will be focused on what I love the most about my work: amplifying the lives of extraordinary Americans,” she said as she opened her Monday afternoon broadcast.

She  added:

“There is just more I need to do… outside the walls of this place, a place I have been privileged to call home for 13 years. Yep, we’re still in a pandemic. No, I don’t have a job I’m jumping right into. Yes, I’m feeling very vulnerable.” 

Baldwin has a new book, “Huddle,” slated to debut in early April.

It looks at how women come together to solve problems or enact meaningful change.

She departs as many expect CNN to unveil some sort of reworking of its daytime schedule that could have early-afternoon anchor Brianna Keilar going to co-host “New Day,” the network’s morning show, while Alisyn Camerota, currently on in the morning, could shift into afternoons.

Other moves are also possible.

Baldwin has been with CNN since 2008, and was originally based in Atlanta.

But she gained new prominence at the network after moving to New York in 2014, when she started to lead two hours in the afternoon.

She proved popular enough with viewers to challenge Fox News Channel in the ratings, and was able to hold her own with breaking news or extend herself to lifestyle topics, including music.

She was also an early proponent of digital storytelling, relaying an account of her climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to viewers and anchoring some streaming series on interesting female figures.

“I really focus on giving the viewers compelling television, and hope that more and more people watch,” Baldwin told Variety in 2015.

The anchor was lampooned on “Saturday Night Live” and became part of CNN’s annual New Year’s Eve coverage, when she and fellow anchor Don Lemon would anchor proceedings after midnight, spurring viewers to guess if they were over-imbibing.

And she became an object of national interest when she detailed her fight with COVID-19 last April.

As CNN placed more of its focus on the 2020 election and politics, however, Baldwin was seen less on the air.

CNN expanded the early-afternoon hours of Keilar and even took Baldwin off the air for a time to give more air to anchor Jake Tapper.

In recent days, CNN has announced new programming led by many of its Washington anchors, including Pam Brown and Jim Acosta.