Author Topic: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch  (Read 12149 times)

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #90 on: July 08, 2019, 02:32:55 pm »
Monday, 8th July 2019
Ex-LMPD cop Kenneth Betts sentenced on state charges
by Natalia Martinez





(LOUISVILLE, KY) - A former Louisville Metro Police Department officer who pleaded guilty to the sex abuse of children in the department's Explorer Program receives yet another sentence.

Kenneth Betts appeared in court Monday to face sodomy charges brought by the state.

He was sentenced to five years for two counts of sodomy in the third degree.

That sentence is on top of the 16 years he was handed down by a federal judge.

The five year sentences will run concurrent to the time he’ll serve in his federal sentence.

The state's sentence resulted from the accusations of two underage victims dating back to 2007 and 2012.

They were both in the police department's Explorer Cadet program at the time.

Betts was a supervisor in the program.

He was one of several other officers accused in the debacle.

Betts faced up to 25 years in prison for the state's charges.

The plea agreement was reached for five instead.
 
Betts pleaded guilty to both the federal and state charges.

Brian Butler, Betts' attorney, said his client is glad to put this behind him and that he's apologized to the victims.

A co-defendant, former LMPD officer Brandon Wood, was sentenced to 70 months in prison on the federal charges.

Following that proceeding, Wood headed over to state court to face seven counts of sexual abuse involving a minor.

Wood had previously pleaded guilty to those charges and was sentenced to five years for each of those counts to run concurrently.

He will serve 10 years of supervised release after his federal sentence.












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https://www.wave3.com/2019/07/08/ex-lmpd-cop-kenneth-betts-sentenced-state-charges/

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #91 on: July 13, 2019, 10:25:33 am »
Friday, 12th July 2019
Former Correctional Officer Pleads Guilty To Misdemeanor Battery In Beating Of Jail Inmate

by CBS Chicago



(Chicago) - A former Cook County correctional officer caught on video repeatedly punching an inmate has pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge.

Miguel Ortiz was charged with two felony counts of official misconduct in 2016.

Instead, he pleaded guilty Thursday to a misdemeanor charge of battery.
Ortiz resigned from the Cook County Sheriff’s office not long after the beating.

Miguel Ortiz, a Cook County Sheriff’s correctional officer, is charged with felony official misconduct and misdemeanor battery in the beating of inmate Litroy Bolton.

Avoiding a felony conviction means Ortiz might keep his pension.


On Jan. 17, 2014, Ortiz was caught on video as he beat Litroy Bolton in a cell in the medium-security wing of the Cook County Jail.

The video showed Bolton did nothing to antagonize Ortiz, who repeatedly punched the inmate in the head, according to the sheriff’s office, which had moved to fire him before his resignation in 2016.

Officers put Bolton in handcuffs after the beating.

Sheriff’s officials said video contradicted Ortiz’s statement that Bolton took a fighting stance before he was punched.

Bolton told investigators he had refused to get into a cell, because it wasn’t cleaned properly after a sick inmate earlier was held in the cell.

“Maybe somebody was sick, it was contagious, but at that time, Officer Ramos did inform Ortiz not to put me in there,” Bolton told CBS 2 after Ortiz was charged in the case.

“I just felt helpless, defenseless, like I couldn’t do nothing, was nothing going to happen about this, ain’t nothing going to never ever happen, and they just going to beat me up, and they’re going to get away with it.”

Bolton’s attorney had accused the sheriff’s Office of Professional Review, which investigated the incident, of dragging out the case for more than 2 ½ years before ruling Ortiz used excessive force.

Ortiz was found to have assaulted ten other inmates before he was de-deputized in 2015.















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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #92 on: July 14, 2019, 07:59:57 am »
Thursday, 11th July 2019
Maryland police agencies have for years broken law mandating reporting of excessive force, charges against officers
by Kevin Rector



In the wake of Freddie Gray’s death from injuries suffered in police custody and the subsequent protests and rioting in Baltimore in 2015, state lawmakers passed a law mandating police agencies across Maryland report when officers use excessive force or injure someone and cases of officers’ criminal misconduct, among other data.

However, dozens of agencies — including the Baltimore Police Department — never did so.

That’s resulted in extreme undercounting of such encounters in annual reports mandated by the law and collated by the Maryland Police Training and Standards Commission.

In 2018, 42 of 148 agencies required to submit data did not, according to the commission.

“There was a misunderstanding here about which unit was responsible for submitting,” said Matt Jablow, a Baltimore Police spokesman, after The Baltimore Sun asked this week about the agency’s failure to comply with the law.

Jablow said the agency has since reported its figures to the commission.

Its doing so more than doubles the statewide totals for 2017 and 2018 in several key categories, including instances of serious injury or death of an officer or someone who came in contact with police, as well as the number of officers who faced criminal charges.

For instance, in 2018, the commission’s statewide report noted 11 cases in which contact with an officer resulted in injury or death.

The Baltimore Police Department’s recently submitted figures included 15 such incidents in the city alone.

The 2018 statewide report noted 20 cases in which criminal charges were filed against officers.

Now, the Baltimore Police Department’s 34 such incidents are added to that number.

Several lawmakers who backed the legislation mandating the reporting in 2016 said that the lack of compliance with the law is unacceptable — and that the legislature should amend it to add repercussions for agencies that fail to comply.

“This is indicative of the problem that you have when you pass legislation with no accountability mechanism in place,” said State Senator Jill Carter, a Baltimore Democrat who was a state delegate at the time of the bill’s passage and who contributed some of the law’s language.

“The legislature must revisit this and entertain sanctions for noncompliance. Otherwise, the work that we’ve done up until now, the effort we’ve put in up until now, is absolutely futile.”

Delegate Curt Anderson, a Baltimore Democrat who also backed the bill, said he intends to have the House Judiciary Committee, of which he is a member, revisit the language of the law to see what can be done to strengthen it.

“As a member of the legislature, you assume that at least the police would comply with laws that are passed. But maybe we made a mistake by not putting some kind of compliance enforcement in the bill,” he said.

“That’s something we’re going to have to take a look at.”

A full list of agencies out of compliance obtained by The Sun showed they run the gamut statewide from big agencies like the Baltimore Police to much smaller ones — like those in small towns, at public universities in the city and at mental health hospitals.

Several large agencies from the suburban counties around Washington that were not on the list only complied recently, after being questioned about their failure to comply by WTTG-TV in Washington.

Heads of several agencies that didn’t report their information said they hadn’t known about the requirement and would rectify their failure to comply immediately — including Leonard Hamm, head of the Coppin State University Police in Baltimore, and his son Akil Hamm, head of the Baltimore City Public Schools Police.

Several said they did not have significant use-of-force cases to report, and hadn’t heard from the commission that they were out of compliance.

“If we don’t have anything of any significance, and the training commission don’t ask us for it, it can slip our mind,” the elder Hamm said.

Gregg Todd, deputy secretary of operations for the Maryland Department of Health, which oversees state mental health hospitals and their police agencies, several of which were out of compliance, said the reporting requirements were “simply not picked up” in the past, but that the department has begun submitting the required information.

He also said the health department is in the process of unifying all of its police operations under one command, which he said will improve compliance with the reporting law.

Gerard Shields, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, of which the commission is a part, defended the commission’s role in overseeing the reporting program.

He said all police agency heads are notified in January that the previous year’s data is to be submitted, and that in 2018, the commission “sent out two follow-up communications to them.”

Also, verbal reminders were given at gatherings of law enforcement agencies in the state, Shields said.

He said the commission has found that “some agencies do not believe they have to file if they did not have an incident” to report, but that is not correct.

They must report even a lack of incidents, he said.

Anderson said not properly understanding the law is no excuse for noncompliance.


“Police agencies by their nature are the ones who you would think would follow the law, and it’s disturbing that so many agencies have either ignored it or are ignorant of it,” he said.


“Of course, ignorance of the law is no excuse.”

Delegate Erek Barron, a Prince George’s County Democrat who has pushed for increased police transparency in the state, said the noncompliance of the police agencies does not come as a surprise given the yearslong, concerted effort from many of them to prevent additional reporting requirements around instances of excessive force and misconduct at the state level.

“It’s a consistent stance by many of these agencies to hide how often there are instances, and how these instances are investigated," he said,

“which is a big problem.”






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https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/investigations/bs-md-sun-investigates-police-records-20190711-wd7vizyrhbg7xiphsrpqcxebvy-story.html

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #93 on: July 15, 2019, 07:34:33 pm »
Monday, 15th July 2019
South Bend police officer who fatally shot black man resigns
by Tom Stelloh




A white police officer who fatally shot a black man last month in South Bend, Indiana, has resigned, officials said Monday.

Police union president Harvey Mills said that job-related stress, a lawsuit, national media attention and "hateful things said on social media have been difficult" for the officer, 19-year veteran Sgt. Ryan O'Neill, and his family.

O'Neill shot 53-year-old Eric Logan to death on June 16 after he allegedly approached the officer with a knife, authorities said.

The killing sparked fury among black residents in South Bend, with many frustrated over a body camera initiative launched by Democratic presidential nominee Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

The program was intended to help repair frayed relations between the city's police department and minorities, yet O'Neill didn't have his camera switched on and Logan's killing was not recorded. "That's called Obstruction of Justice..."

The killing and its aftermath rekindled South Bend's racial tensions for Buttigieg, who had already faced criticism for demoting the city's first black police chief.

He canceled presidential fundraisers and policy roll-outs to head back to South Bend — and was heckled by angry residents when he got there.

Asked during last month's presidential debate why just six percent of South Bend's police officers are black when 26 percent of its population is black, Buttigieg said:


"I couldn't get it done."

Mills said that O'Neill is the subject of a special prosecutor investigation, a civil rights lawsuit, and possible department discipline over the killing — "fights" that are "just too much for Sgt. O'Neill and his family to undertake right now," Mills said.

"Resigning will allow him to focus on these challenges, as well as assist his wife with their three children, one of whom is a newborn," Mills added.

Mills said that he was confident than an investigation into the shooting will determine that O'Neill actions were justified.














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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #94 on: July 18, 2019, 01:24:54 pm »
Thursday, 18th July 2019
13 Philadelphia officers to be fired over racist, offensive online posts
by Minyvonne Burke






Thirteen Philadelphia police officers are to be fired for making racist or offensive Fakebook posts.

The 13 are among 72 officers in the city who had been placed on administrative duty after an online database called the Plain View Project shared more than 5,000 Fakebook posts and comments on June 1 2019 by current and former law enforcement officers in Philadelphia and seven other jurisdictions around the country.

Some of the posts were homophobic.

Others advocated violence or were deemed racist.

In one post from 2014, a Philadelphia officer wrote that a suspect "should be taken out back and put down like the rabid animal he is," according to the Plain View database.

Another officer shared a photo in November 2015 that said Islam was a "cult" that glorified "death."

In a recent post from February, an officer with the city's police department commented on a news article about an alleged murderer, writing,

"hang him."

Plain View Project said the Fakebook posts and comments "could undermine public trust and confidence in our police."

The Philadelphia Police Department conducted an internal investigation with a law firm to determine if some of the posts by its officers were constitutionally protected speech.

The department announced disciplinary actions Thursday that depended on how egregious the Fakebook posts by those individual officers were.

Some of the 72 officers who had been placed on administrative duty will be suspended for five days, police Commissioner Richard Ross Jr. said at a news conference Thursday.

Seventeen others will face more severe disciplinary action, including the 13 who will be suspended with the intent to dismiss, according to Ross.

The remaining four will receive a 30-day suspension, he said.

"I continue to be very angered and disappointed by these posts," Ross said. The 13 officers to be fired made posts that "advocated violence."

The highest ranking official to be fired is a sergeant, Ross told reporters.

He declined to identify any of the 13 by name.

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said many of the posts were "deeply disturbing."

"We have a duty to represent ourselves and our city," he said at the news conference.

"We will not allow this incident to break down the progress we have made and we pledge to do better."

Ross said every member of the police department will have to watch a training video about social media and policies on off-duty behavior.

The Plain View Project scoured 3,500 public accounts from officers in Dallas, Texas; St. Louis, Missouri; Phoenix, Arizona; York, Pennsylvania; Twin Falls, Idaho; Denison, Texas; and Lake County, Florida.

In June, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner added 22 names to her "exclusion list" of officers banned from bringing cases to her office after the Fakebook posts were made public.

In a letter sent to Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards and St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden, Gardner said seven of those 22 were "permanently banned."






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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #95 on: July 18, 2019, 09:25:25 pm »
Thursday, 18th July 2019
4 more Chicago cops fired for alleged cover-up of fatal police shooting of Laquan McDonald
by Jeremy Gorner





The Chicago Police Board fired a sergeant and three officers Thursday night over the alleged cover-up of the murder of Laquan McDonald by a police officer.

The decision appeared to turn on the infamous police dashboard camera video of the fatal shooting that contradicted the officers’ police reports.

The nine-member board found that the officers exaggerated the threat posed by the 17-year-old McDonald in order to justify the actions of Officer Jason Van Dyke in shooting the teen 16 times.

McDonald was high on PCP when he refused police commands to drop a knife while walking away from officers on a Southwest Side street in October 2014.

The board voted unanimously to fire Officers Ricardo Viramontes and Janet Mondragon as well as Sgt. Stephen Franko for several rules violations, most importantly making false statements.

All but one board member voted to fire Officer Daphne Sebastian as well for bringing discredit to the department and preventing the department from achieving its goals, though the board held that she did not make a false statement.

The decision likely marks the final punishment to be meted out following two historic criminal trials that saw Van Dyke become the first Chicago police officer in half a century to be convicted of an on-duty murder and a judge clear three other officers — including Van Dyke’s partner — of criminal conspiracy charges in a controversial ruling in January.

The officers can challenge their dismissals by filing lawsuits in Cook County Circuit Court.

Patrick Murray, first vice president of the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police, slammed the board’s decision, saying the officers did nothing wrong.

“It is obvious that this Police Board has out-served its usefulness,” he said.

The video of McDonald’s shooting roiled the city after a Daley Center judge ordered its release in November 2015, more than a year after the teen’s death.

The U.S. Department of Justice later issued a scathing report about Police Department inadequacies, paving the way for a federal consent decree mandating a series of reforms that will be overseen by a federal judge.


Largely on the strength of the video, Van Dyke was criminally charged with McDonald’s killing, while a separate special prosecutor indicted Van Dyke’s partner, Joseph Walsh; lead detective David March; and Officer Thomas Gaffney on charges they conspired to cover up for Van Dyke.

Meanwhile, a disciplinary investigation by city Inspector General Joseph Ferguson’s office recommended that 11 officers in all — including Van Dyke, now serving a 6 ¾-year sentence in federal prison — be fired.

But six of them — including the two highest-ranking, Deputy Chief David McNaughton and Chief of Detectives Eugene Roy — left the department before Superintendent Eddie Johnson could move to discipline them.

In 2016, Johnson sought to fire Franko, Mondragon, Sebastian and Viramontes but opted not to bring department charges against the 11th officer.

The board’s 55-page decision Thursday night comes three months after Franko and the three officers fought the disciplinary charges at a three-day hearing in which testimony and evidence were presented.

Unlike the more stringent reasonable doubt standard to prove guilt in a criminal trial, the Police Board found the officers violated department rules based on a preponderance of evidence, meaning it was more likely than not.

The Police Board found that Mondragon, Sebastian and Viramontes — all at the scene when McDonald was shot — lied or exaggerated what they saw that night to protect Van Dyke, while Franko, a supervisor, signed off on their false police reports.

Soon after the shooting, Mondragon told a detective that she didn’t see which officer opened fire on McDonald because she was putting her squad car in park.

About a year and a half later, she stood by her account with Ferguson’s investigators, who scoffed at her claim, noting that Van Dyke took about 14 seconds to unload his 16-shot gun.

Sebastian, Mondragon’s partner that night, told the detective that McDonald continued to move after he was shot and fell to the street.

In recommending the department charges against Sebastian, Ferguson’s investigators said the dashboard camera video — taken from her police SUV — showed that claim was misleading “at best.”

Viramontes also told the detective that McDonald continued to move after he was shot and fell to the street.

The officer went even further, saying the teen tried to get up with the knife still in his hand.

When Ferguson’s investigators showed him video of the shooting, Viramontes stood by his statements.

In his interview with Ferguson’s investigators, Franko tried to draw a distinction in the level of his involvement, telling them he only “reviewed” the officers’ reports but “did not approve anything.”

He told Ferguson’s investigators he didn’t check the police reports for accuracy but defended describing three officers as battery victims because the reports didn’t offer an alternative to the word “battered.”

While admitting he approved one report that falsely listed Van Dyke as being injured during the encounter with McDonald, Franko claimed he had simply overlooked that detail in signing off on the report.

On the last day of the Police Board hearing in April, Tiffany Fordyce, a city lawyer, sought to poke holes in Viramontes’ claim that McDonald tried to get up after he was shot.

“He was on the ground twitching from the 16 bullets in his body,” she said in her closing remarks.

“He did not get up.”

Fordyce also pointed out inconsistencies in Sebastian’s statements.

While Sebastian told the detective after the shooting that McDonald continued to move after he was shot, she testified at the Police Board hearing that the teen didn’t pose a threat, Fordyce noted.

The city attorney also said that Franko, “utterly failed" to ensure the accuracy of the police reports, pointing out he had an opportunity to view the video of the shooting before his review.

Franko testified at the Police Board hearing that he had seen only a bit of the video.

In their closing arguments, the officers’ lawyers said the city had failed to prove their clients covered up the details of the shooting or even lied.

“If a police officer doesn’t see every single thing on video, it doesn’t make them a liar,” said William Fahy, Mondragon’s lawyer.

Thomas Pleines, Franko’s attorney, questioned how his client could have been part of an alleged conspiracy if he wasn’t even at the shooting.

Viramontes’ attorney, Jennifer Russell, pointed to an FBI-enhanced slow-motion version of the video that she said showed he was telling the truth.

Sebastian’s lawyer, Brian Sexton, said the city tried to prove its case by “Monday morning quarterbacking.”

Sexton said Sebastian’s perception — not the video — was crucial.

In Sebastian’s view, Sexton said, McDonald was “not walking away, getting away. He’s preparing for a confrontation.”






Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/criminal-justice/ct-laquan-mcdonald-chicago-cops-discipline-20190718-46q2fyuxh5eqfph4uhvm3kewsa-story.html

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #96 on: July 23, 2019, 12:32:27 pm »
Monday, 22nd July 2019
Two dumb Louisiana cops fired after Facebook post saying Representative Ocasio-Cortez 'needs a round'
by Rebecca Morin



(WASHINGTON) – Two Louisiana police officers were fired Monday, just days after one of them wrote in a Facebook post that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a "vile idiot" who should be shot.
 
Gretna, La., police officers Charlie Rispoli, who create the post, and Angelo Varisco, who liked the post online, were fired, police chief Author Lawson announced in a press conference Monday.


"These officers have certainly acted in a manner which was unprofessional, alluding to the violent act to be conducted against a sitting U.S. congressman, a member of our government, we're not going to tolerate that," Lawson said at the news conference, according to the New York Times.

"This incident, we feel, has been an embarrassment to our department."

Rispoli, a 14-year veteran of the department, shared a blog post that falsely claims the New York Democrat said

"We pay soldiers too much," according to a screenshot of the post taken by The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate.













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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #97 on: July 23, 2019, 01:14:48 pm »
Tuesday, 23rd July 2019
Videos show NYC cops doused with water & hit with buckets
by Caitlin O'Kane





Videos showing New York City police officers being doused with water while responding to calls over the weekend have gone viral online – and sparked widespread outrage in the city.

One video, taken in Harlem over the weekend, shows two officers being doused with water and pelted with empty buckets while making an arrest.

NYPD Chief Terrence Monahan responded to the incident on Twitter.

"The videos of cops being doused with water and having objects hurled at them as they made an arrest in #Harlem is reprehensible," Monahan wrote.

"NYC's cops & communities have made remarkable progress — together — but every New Yorker must show respect for our cops. They deserve nothing less." 

Another video, taken in Brooklyn on Saturday and posted on Instagram Monday, shows two drenched officers walking away from a group of people, who follow them and continue to pour buckets of water over the officers' heads.
The officers involved in the incident were responding to a call about a disorderly conduct, CBS New York reports.

Mayor Bill de Blasio also responded to the incidents on Monday night.

"Throwing things at NYPD officers is not only not acceptable, it can lead to charges. All of those actions can lead to charges," he said, according to CBS New York.

No arrests were made in either cases, and the NYPD is investigating, the police department said.





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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #98 on: July 23, 2019, 01:22:54 pm »
From the YouTube comments section in the above article:



FACTS.

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #99 on: August 07, 2019, 05:28:17 pm »
Wednesday, 7th August 2019
Denver PD officer loses appeal of suspension for illegal choke hold
by Rob Low



An officer with the Denver Police Department was suspended for 30 days after he used excessive force on a man during an arrest, which goes against DPD policy.



Officer Rudolph Suniga`s effort to appeal the decision was denied.











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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #100 on: August 13, 2019, 06:38:23 am »
Tuesday, 13th August 2019
Black man framed by NYPD for rape and robbery at 17 awarded nearly $10 million after 30 years in prison
by Kia Morgan-Smith







Mark Denny is celebrating his bittersweet victory after he was released from prison nearly 30 years after he was wrongly convicted of rape and robbery.

The NYC man entered into a settlement that was approved by the Comptroller Scott Stringer who agreed to pay out $9.75 million settlement to stave off a $50 lawsuit Denny was aiming to file against the city and the NYPD.

Denny claimed he was framed by cops for a crime he didn’t commit, according to records obtained by The NY Post through the Freedom of Information Law.

On May 24, Denny gave up his rights to sue or hold the city liable in exchange for the settlement.

“It was in the best interest of the city to settle pre-litigation,” Stringer spokeswoman Hazel Crampton-Hays told the outlet.

Denny was convicted of robbing a Brooklyn Burger King, along with three others back in 1987 when he was 17.

He was also accused of raping an 18-year-old female employee.

Denny maintained his innocence but was convicted and sentenced up to 57 years in prison in 1989.

The Innocence Project, which helped the now exonerated Central Park Five prove their own innocence, took up Denny’s case after he argued he was “targeted and framed” by dozens of NYPD detectives.

The Kings County district attorney’s Conviction Review Unit found that Denny wasn’t on the scene that night.

He was freed December 2017.








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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #101 on: August 16, 2019, 04:07:09 pm »
Friday, 16, August 2019
Retired Cabell County deputy, son indicted on drug charges
by Tiersa Davis






(HUNTINGTON, West Virginia) — U.S. Attorney Mike Stuart announced that a retired Cabell County deputy and his son were indicted on drug charges.

Larry McCallister, 76, and Steven Dale McCallister, 45, were indicted by a federal grand jury Thursday, according to a news release from the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Larry McCallister is a retired Cabell County deputy sheriff.

Larry McCallister was charged with maintaining a drug-involved premises and aiding and abetting the possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

Steven McCallister was charged with distribution of fentanyl, possession with the intent to distribute 400 grams or more of fentanyl, possession with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine, possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking and felon in possession of a firearm.

Both suspects were present Monday at a home in Barboursville during the execution of the search warrant.

Law enforcement seized about 1.2 kilograms of fentanyl, 300 grams of methamphetamine and more than $8,000 in cash.

A revolver and a Cadillac also were seized.

If convicted, Steven McCallister faces 10 years to life in prison.

His father faces five to 40 years in prison if he is convicted.

The investigation was conducted by members of the Metropolitan Drug Enforcement Network Team, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Violent Crime and Drug Task Force West and the West Virginia State Police.












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https://wchstv.com/news/local/retired-cabell-county-deputy-son-indicted-on-drug-charges

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #102 on: August 19, 2019, 08:35:40 am »

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #103 on: August 19, 2019, 09:03:08 am »

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Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #104 on: August 19, 2019, 09:16:00 am »
Monday, 19th August 2019
NYPD judge rules Officer Pantaleo should be fired, was ‘untruthful’ in Eric Garner case
by Kirstin Cole



he NYPD's Deputy Commissioner of Trials Rosemarie Maldonado has ruled Officer Daniel Pantaleo's use of a chokehold in the July 2014 arrest of Eric Garner was misconduct, and the cause of 43-year-old Garner's death, according to her full 46-page report, first obtained by the New York Times on Sunday.

Writing of Pantaleo's actions during Garner's arrest, Maldonado said "this tribunal found it to be reckless -- a gross deviation from the standard of conduct established for a New York City police officer."

The judge called Pantaleo "untruthful" during the investigation and called fellow police officers who testified in the case "unhelpful or unreliable."

The report comes just over two weeks after Pantaleo was suspended after sources said at the time that Maldonado recommended he be terminated from the police force.

Earlier this summer, Attorney General William Barr declined to bring federal charges against the embattled officer.

Although Maldonado issued the recommendation, Police Commissioner James O’Neill has the final say.

News could come as soon as Monday if Pantaleo is officially fired.

Garner died on July 17, 2014, after police attempted to arrest the 43-year-old father of six, who was allegedly selling loose cigarettes illegally on Staten Island, a crime for which he previously he had been arrested.

In the video, Pantaleo can be seen wrapping one arm around Garner's shoulder and the other around his neck before jerking him back and pulling him to the ground.

As Pantaleo forces Garner's head into the sidewalk, Garner can be heard saying,

"I can't breathe. I can't breathe."

Activists and lawyers for the Civilian Complaint Review Board call the maneuver Pantaleo used on Garner an illegal chokehold.

But union officials and the officer's lawyers describe it as a "seatbelt hold" -- a takedown move taught to rookies at the police academy -- and blame Garner's death on his poor health.














Would You Like To Know More?
https://pix11.com/2019/08/19/nypd-judge-rules-officer-pantaleo-should-be-fired-was-untruthful-in-eric-garner-case/