Author Topic: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch  (Read 81176 times)

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #285 on: March 27, 2021, 07:20:53 am »
Saturday, 27th March Twenty One
Baltimore will no longer prosecute drug possession, prostitution, low-level crimes
by Jon Schuppe







A year ago, as COVID-19 began to spread across Maryland, Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby stopped prosecuting drug possession, prostitution, minor traffic violations and other low-level offenses, a move aimed at curbing Covid-19's spread behind bars.

That shift — repeated by prosecutors in many other cities — didn’t just reduce jail populations.

In Baltimore, nearly all categories of crime have since declined, confirming to Mosby what she and criminal justice experts have argued for years:

Crackdowns on quality-of-life crimes are not necessary for stopping more serious crime.

On Friday, Mosby announced that she was making her pandemic experiment permanent, saying Baltimore — for decades notorious for runaway violence and rough policing — had become a case study in criminal justice reform.

In the 12 months since she ordered scaled-back enforcement, violent crime is down 20 percent and property crime has declined 36 percent, she said.

Homicides inched down, though Baltimore still has one of the highest homicide rates among cities nationwide.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University found sharp reductions in calls to police complaining about drugs and prostitution, she said.

“Clearly, the data suggest there is no public safety value in prosecuting low-level offenses,” Mosby said at a news conference.

But whether Baltimore is indeed an experiment that can be replicated elsewhere remains to be seen.

Enforcement of low-level crimes has dropped in many parts of the country over the past year, as police limited operations to avoid contracting and spreading the virus and as prosecutors and judges sought to contain the virus’s spread in jails.

But Baltimore is one of the few big cities where violence did not increase.

In dozens of cities, homicides and shootings rose in 2020.

While many prosecutors have maintained their pandemic suspensions on low-level offense prosecutions, few have said those shifts will remain in place in perpetuity.

Some newly elected prosecutors, though, have vowed to abandon low-level cases permanently.

At Friday's news conference, Mosby also faced questions about a federal investigation into her campaign finances, as well as the finances of her husband, a city councilman.

Her attorney has called the investigation "politically motivated."

Mosby dismissed a reporter's questions about the probe, saying she wanted to focus on her new policy.

She said the Baltimore Police Department will be a partner in this shift away from low-level prosecutions, in which officers and prosecutors will focus on violent crime and drug trafficking as courts begin holding criminal trials again.

“Our understanding is that the police are going to follow what they’ve been doing for the past year, which is not arresting people based on the offenses I mentioned,” Mosby said.

At the same time, law enforcement will work with a local nonprofit, Baltimore Crisis Response Incorporated, to provide services to people suffering from mental illness, homelessness and drug addiction.

The Baltimore Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Police Commissioner Michael Harrison told The Washington Post that the policy had been difficult for officers to accept when it was implemented last year, and that he expected crime to rise.

He told the Post that he now believed the pullback may have worked.

A spokeswoman for the local police officers union did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Kobi Little, head of the Baltimore chapter of the NAACP, said at the news conference that Mosby’s move was a recognition that decades of heavy-handed enforcement in Baltimore had done more harm than good.

“We want to see more elected officials stand up on these issues,” he said.

Kim Foxx, the state's attorney in Cook County, Illinois, said Mosby’s announcement was the culmination of years of discussion among reformers seeking ways to reduce focus on low-level offenses.

“Covid provided a real opportunity to test it, to move from theory to practice,” she said.

























Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #286 on: March 27, 2021, 10:37:20 am »
Saturday, 27th March Twenty One
New York City makes it easier to sue cops for misconduct
by Tyler Kendall







The New York City Council has passed legislation aimed at reforming the New York Police Department by making it easier to sue police officers for misconduct.

The council on Thursday voted to limit qualified immunity, which became a focal point of the debate to reform policing across America last summer.

Qualified immunity is a decades-old legal doctrine that's often shielded police officers in cases of excessive force or unreasonable search and seizure.

The newly-passed legislation allows victims of alleged police misconduct in New York City to bypass qualified immunity standards needed to bring a case.

"I have clients who have definitely suffered unlawful arrests, unlawful searches and excessive force," Sam Feldman, a New York City public defender, told CBS News.

"I would say it's not common for those people to sue about that, even when it's happened to them, because it's so difficult to win those cases."

Qualified immunity was originally created by the Supreme Court in 1967 to provide a "good faith" defense for government officials if they believed their conduct was legal.

But opponents of the doctrine say it's since been co-opted.

The rule now requires a victim to show their "clearly established" constitutional or statutory rights were violated.
 
This means finding an existing court decision that ruled the specific action in question is unconstitutional, which opponents say can be difficult, if not impossible in some cases.

New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson said qualified immunity has been "used to deny justice to victims of police abuse" for decades.

"It should never have been allowed, but I'm proud that we took action today to end it here in NYC," Johnson tweeted.

In New York City's case — lawmakers have created a law at the local level that pertains solely to the conduct of city police.

Plaintiffs could still be blocked by qualified immunity if they sue under federal law, which Feldman said is likely to prompt more suits in city courts. 

The measure only eliminates qualified immunity for police and does not extend to other government workers such as corrections officers or officials from child services.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said he supports the bill and that "a lot of work" went into aligning it with the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which House Democrats approved earlier this month.

That measure would also limit qualified immunity.

"These reforms will confront centuries of over-policing in communities of color and strengthen the bonds between police and community," de Blasio said in a statement Thursday.

"Together, we'll make our city safer and fairer for generations to come."

The resolution is part of a broader package of police reforms, including providing the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which investigates misconduct, the resources to focus on racial bias in policing.

The City Council also approved the mayor's $72 million plan to improve police accountability and transparency.

Critics of reforming qualified immunity say the doctrine gives officers the discretion to make split-second decisions when their lives could be at risk.

Those critics believe reform will hurt the recruitment and retention of qualified officers.

"Every bill that they put in is making it more difficult for our detectives and the police in the street to do their job," said Paul DiGiacomo, the president of the Detectives Endowment Association, a union that represents thousands of NYPD officers.

New York City spends roughly $170 million each year on police misconduct settlements, according to a report from the Marshall Project and FiveThirtyEight.

That's because the city often bears the responsibility to pay damages for the alleged misconduct of police officers.

The city's newly-passed bill doesn't mandate specific disciplinary actions for officers who commit misconduct.
 
Criminal justice advocates consider limiting qualified immunity a step forward — but are still fighting for progress toward long-lasting reform.

"If a doctor gets sued, they don't have to pay out-of-pocket but they may no longer be able to afford their malpractice insurance," said Susan Kang, an associate professor of political science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

"That's a really strong incentive for them to be extremely cautious in their practice of medicine. But this bill doesn't have that sort of individual disciplinary component to it."





















Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #287 on: March 28, 2021, 03:56:42 am »
Sunday, 28th March Twenty One


Here's something that almost NEVER happens in the corrupt world of American law enforcement; deputies caught & arrested for evidence tampering (which they engage in very often).


The Polk County Sheriff's Office says three deputies are facing charges for evidence tampering in relation to a December arrest.











« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 10:39:13 pm by Battle »

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #288 on: March 29, 2021, 07:25:08 pm »
Monday, 29th March Twenty One
New York City moves to end qualified immunity
by ABC News







The city of New York moved to end qualified immunity, making it the first city in the United States to do so.

Qualified immunity is the practice of not being able to file a civil lawsuit against a government official performing his or her official duties unless they "clearly established statutory or constitutional rights of which a reasonable person would have known."

In New York, the City Council voted to end the practice for New York Police Department officers.

The NYPD is the largest police force in the United States, with some 36,000 officers.

The move came days ahead of the start of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's murder trial.

The killing of George Floyd while in police custody sparked international protests and a debate over policing reform across the U.S. last summer.

In an interview on WNYC's "The Brian Lehrer Show," Mayor Bill DeBlasio stressed that the bill won't have officers personally responsible.

"It makes it easier if someone has a concern to bring a legal action, but it does not put the individual financial penalty on the officer," the mayor said.

"It puts it on the department and the city, and that's what I was comfortable with."

City Council speaker Corey Johnson lauded the move saying that the practice of qualified immunity was rooted in the nation's systemic racism.

"Qualified immunity was established in 1967 in Mississippi to prevent Freedom Riders from holding public officials liable even when they broke the law," Johnson tweeted.

"Rooted in our nation's history of systemic racism, qualified immunity denied Freedom Riders justice and has been used to deny justice to victims of police abuse for decades. It should never have been allowed, but I'm proud that we took action today to end it here in NYC."


























Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #289 on: April 02, 2021, 07:01:21 pm »
Friday, 2nd March Twenty One
Dumb Cop Suspended Over TikTok Video Declaring confederate Flag Not Racist Despite Slavery Symbolism
by Zack Linly






white people, I need you to listen.

No, seriously; lean in close, hear this and hear this well...

*clears throat*

POSTING STUPID AND RACIST SH!T ONLINE WILL FUK WITH YOUR EMPLOYMENT!!!

I’m not even telling you to stop being stupid and racist—this is America, the land of stupidity and racism, after all—I’m actually trying to do you a favor by clueing you in to the fact that the digital age hasn’t been very kind to oblivious white people, especially public servants and public officials who insist on sharing any and all dumbass thoughts that come to their out-of-touch minds.

A Pennsylvania police officer has been suspended because, in 2021, he still doesn’t understand how social media works outside of how to press “record” and “send.”

The officer in question had the nerve to take his white-and-blue ass on Lil Nas X’s internet and post a TikTok video from inside his police car where he whitesplains that the confederate flag is not racist and that the negroes need to “get the f*ck over themselves.”

NBC affiliate WETM reports that Officer Brian Gossert of the Mansfield Borough Police Department was suspended for “making racist, sexual, and inflammatory comments about slavery, liberals, and several other controversial topics” while in full uniform and in his patrol car.

“I don’t understand how [the confederate flag] is racist; it represents the South,” Officer Nooses-for-handcuffs said in his ill-advised video, which has since been removed from TikTok’s platform.

“Just like the Union flag represents the North. No one says that the Union flag is racist. So why are we saying the confederate flag is racist?”

He then proceeds to answer his own dumbass question before going on to pretend anything he had to say was worth a damn.

“So yeah, technically they fought for slavery, I guess you could say, but again, that’s been over 200 years ago,” Great Value Mark Fuhrman continued.

“I think it’s time that people just like, get the f*ck over themselves. Because, if, if that’s true—if the symbolism behind that flag is still that hurtful now, then we should still hate the South. So, why hate them for something that no one is alive from anymore?”

For the record: 1865—the year slavery was legally abolished—was not “over 200 years ago,” but I’m sure no one expects this idiot to be good at math.


So here we have a white man who is in charge of policing neighborhoods where Black people likely exist who doesn’t think slavery was a big enough deal for people to still be offended by a flag that represents white people’s attempt at preserving it.

There’s been a national spotlight on systemic racism in policing since last summer, and there’s currently a whole-ass highly publicized trial going on in connection to the case that arguably sparked America’s racial awakening, but Officer The-South-will-rise-again thought this was a good time to get controversial online.

Of course, no whiny right-winger diatribe would be complete without the man who just came off of a “the past is the past” rant mentioning that Democrats are responsible for slavery and the domestic terrorist group known as the kkk.

“You want to know who started the kkk, the f*cking Democrats, probably the same party that you agree with,” Caucasity Cop said.

“So again, get f*cked, like read a f*cking history book. Everyone wants to call cops racist but yeah you know who starts racism, Democrats.”

I’m not sure why conservatives think it matters that Democrats were in favor of slavery—especially since they were the same “Dixiecrats” from the same South that Gossert was just defending—but I’m not interested in wasting time explaining to willfully obtuse white people how the “Southern strategy” changed the Republican and Democrat Party platforms.

It’s also not lost on me that a guy who doesn’t even seem to know when slavery ended is telling people to
“read a f*cking history book.”

Anyway, according to WETM, “Gossert made additional graphic comments regarding violence and sexual references while in his police car,” and he only paused from his display of slavery apologist nonsense to arrest someone for an apparent drug offense.

“Oh, fun stuff. This is why you don’t do meth,” Officer But-somebody-had-to-pick-the-cotton said on video after he got back in his car, according to the New York Post.





















Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #290 on: April 07, 2021, 08:13:20 pm »
Wednesday, 7th April  Twenty One
New Mexico Is the Second State to Ban Qualified Immunity
by Daniele Selby







New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed the New Mexico Civil Rights Act — also known as House Bill 4 — advancing fair and equal treatment under the law on Wednesday.

The legislation effectively bans qualified immunity — a judicial doctrine that shields state actors, including law enforcement officials, from liability, even when they knowingly break the law.

New Mexico is now the second state to ban qualified immunity, following Colorado which enacted legislation to end the practice in June 2020.

Under New Mexico’s new law, a person has the right to sue the state, a city, or county, when their rights under the state’s constitution have been violated, such as in cases involving police misconduct.

With the passing of this law, residents of New Mexico will finally be able to hold officials who engage in wrongdoing accountable.

“We will soon have a clear path to justice and a meaningful way to hold government accountable,” New Mexico Speaker of the House Brian Egolf, who introduced the bill, tweeted after the bill’s passage.

“This is a bright day for the New Mexico Constitution.”

Police officers rarely face criminal charges or even internal disciplinary measures when they engage in misconduct.

When misconduct goes unchecked, officers may continue to abuse their powers.

Often, when police misconduct is discovered in one case, several more instances of misconduct committed by the same officer are uncovered in other cases.

For example, several convictions in cases investigated by former Chicago officer Jon Burge and his team have been overturned due to repeated misconduct that went unpunished for many years.

Nearly 37% of exoneration cases since 1989 involved police misconduct, the National Registry of Exonerations reported.

“The new law puts a price tag on police misconduct and creates a strong incentive for agencies to adopt and enforce policies that prevent abuses which can lead to wrongful convictions,” said Innocence Project State Policy Advocate Laurie Roberts.

“It also provides exonerees with the financial justice they deserve after having their rights violated by government officials and having their freedom unjustly taken away.”

A bipartisan coalition of organizations including the Innocence Project, Americans for Prosperity, American Civil Liberties Union, Institute for Justice, National Police Accountability Project, and Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield — co-founders of Ben & Jerry’s — championed the bill.

Qualified immunity has prevented New Mexicans from holding police officers who commit misconduct accountable through civil lawsuits for too long.

Such avenues for remedy are crucial for wrongfully convicted people and everyday citizens to seek justice for violations of their rights.

Ron Keine, for example, was wrongfully convicted in Bernalillo County, due to police misconduct so egregious it actually did lead to the firing of several sheriff’s deputies.

Mr. Keine came within nine days of being executed for a murder he didn’t commit.

Later, despite the fact that he was exonerated and officers involved in his case were fired, Mr. Keine’s lawsuit against the county and the sheriffs who helped secure his wrongful conviction were dismissed.

“Eliminating the legal doctrine of qualified immunity not only provides financial justice to victims of police abuse, including people who have been wrongfully convicted, but it also incentivizes police agencies to properly hire, train, and supervise law enforcement to prevent abuses from occurring in the first place,” said Rebecca Brown, the Innocence Project’s director of policy.

“While Congress must end qualified immunity nationwide, many states — recognizing the urgency of this reform — are taking action on their own.”

By passing the New Mexico Civil Rights Act, the state has adopted a reform that assures accountability while preventing harm — a major step toward more equal justice for all.




















Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #291 on: April 10, 2021, 03:37:05 pm »
Saturday, 10th April  Twenty One
REPEALED: Maryland Legislature overrides Governor Hogan veto
by Ben Leonard






Maryland’s Democrat-controlled legislature on Saturday moved to pass a sweeping police reform package that repealed the state’s police Bill of Rights, becoming the first state in the nation to do so and overriding Republican Governor larry hogan’s vetoes in the process.

The state’s police Bill of Rights covered due process for officers accused of misconduct.

Advocates for repeal have called it "one of the most extreme in the nation.”

The new law will also give more oversight power to civilians.

 




















« Last Edit: April 10, 2021, 03:39:35 pm by Battle »

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #292 on: April 12, 2021, 03:49:26 am »
Monday, 12th April  Twenty One
Pig Who Handcuffed And Pepper-Sprayed Black Army Lieutenant Is Fired
by Matthew S. Scwartz, Emma Bowman & Steve Brodner





Army Lieutenant Caron Nazario, who is Latino and Black, was threatened, knocked down and pepper sprayed by two police officers during a traffic stop near Windsor, Virginia.

A lawsuit has been filed in the United States District Court of Norfolk, charging the offenders with violations to Nazario's Constitutional rights.



















Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #293 on: April 12, 2021, 01:01:21 pm »
Monday, 12th April  Twenty One
California cop fired after attending domestic terrorist rally
by Kate Feldman






A Fresno, California, cop who was photographed at a rally with the domestic terrorist group known as the proud boys has been fired, his department announced Friday.

Rick Fitzgerald was identified in photos and videos last month at a counter protest against a group protesting the sale of the famed Tower Theatre to an anti-LGBTQ church and was put on paid administrative leave.

“I stand by and reassert my prior comments in strongly disapproving of any police officer affiliating with hate groups, or any group known for engaging in violent criminal behavior,” Fresno Police Chief Juan Balderrama said in a statement.

“Such ideology, behavior, and affiliations have no place in law enforcement and will not be tolerated within the ranks of the Fresno Police Department. The integrity and legitimacy of our police department must be maintained.”

Fitzgerald claims that he left the rally as soon as the domestic terrorist group known as the proud boys showed up.























Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #294 on: April 12, 2021, 08:55:18 pm »
Monday, 12th April  Twenty One
Apparently, the head of the Boston Police union is a child molester since 1995 but got drowned out about police killing innocent Black motorists...
A Boston patrol cop abused a 12-year-old in 1995
by Sarah Al-Arshani






The Boston Police Department knew its union leader had previous allegations of sexual assault against a minor before a man and his daughter went to a police station last summer to report she had been molested, the Boston Globe reported.

In 1995, the father had also alleged Patrick M. Rose Sr. assaulted him when he was 12 years old. 

The police department at the time filed a criminal complaint against Rose and investigated the accusations.

They found that it was likely that Rose had committed a crime.

The boy was reportedly pressured to recant his story and the criminal investigation was dropped in 1996, but a police internal affairs investigation continued and found that Rose broke the law.

Additionally, court records showed that after the criminal case was dropped, Rose's abuse of the boy continued and also "escalated," but the department has not said what disciplinary action if any was taken.

Despite this, he was still able to keep his badge and work as a patrolman for 21 more years, and also served as the head of the Boston Police Patrolmen's Association from 2014 until he retired in 2018, the Globe reported.


Rose was arrested in August of last year after the daughter's allegations.

Since then, five more people have come forward with allegations against him.

Mass Live reported last August that the girl, now 14, alleged she was repeatedly assaulted by Rose between the ages of 7 and 12.

He's now in jail and faces 33 counts of sexual abuse.

The six victims range from 7 to 16 years old.

Three of the victims who came forward said Rose assaulted them in the 1990s and another said the assault took place in recent years, Mass Live reported.

"My client maintains his innocence to all of the charges that have been brought against him and he maintains his innocence to what was alleged to have transpired back in 1995," his attorney, William J. Keefe, told the Globe.

The Boston Police Department did not reply to Insider's request for comment at the time of publication.

The Globe learned that despite the known allegations and internal review results, Rose was still allowed contact with children in his role, in some cases being dispatched to assist minors in sexual assault cases.

In 1999 he was sent to help a 14-year-old girl who called police crying, reporting that she'd been raped.

He was also the arresting officer in a 2006 child sex assault case.

"What we're describing here is an example of an institutional and systemic failure," former Boston police lieutenant Tom Nolan told the Globe. 

"The department had a responsibility to ensure that this individual was no longer employed in the ranks of the Boston Police Department."

Rose is currently being held in the Berkshire County Jail on $200,000 cash bail.
























« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 08:42:31 pm by Battle »

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #295 on: April 13, 2021, 05:28:28 am »
Tuesday, 13th April  Twenty One

According to a Washington Journal poll on Twitter, "Yes or no, should qualified immunity for police be eliminated?"



The results of this snapshot poll:

Yes 79.3%
No 20.7%
« Last Edit: April 13, 2021, 05:30:16 am by Battle »

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #296 on: April 14, 2021, 05:43:22 pm »
Wednesday, 14th April  Twenty One
Black Buffalo police officer fired for trying to stop chokehold wins ruling to get pension
by Evan Simko-Bednarski






A Black police officer in Buffalo, New York, who was fired in 2008 for intervening when a White colleague employed a chokehold will be given back pay and a pension, a New York judge ruled.

The officer, Cariol Horne, was fired following a 2006 incident in which she tried to stop an officer from using a chokehold on a handcuffed suspect.

Horne served on the Buffalo police force for 19 of the 20 years required to receive a pension.

"The message was sent that you don't cross that blue line and so some officers -- many officers don't," Horne said in a 2020 interview with CNN's Brianna Keilar.

"I had five children and I lost everything but [the suspect] did not lose his life," Horne said then.

"So, if I have nothing else to live for in life, at least I can know that I did the right thing and that [he] still breathes."

Tuesday's ruling restored Horne's pension and vacated an earlier court ruling upholding her dismissal.

Michael J. DeGeorge, spokesman for Buffalo, told the Buffalo News:

"The City has always supported any additional judicial review available to Officer Horne and respects the court's decision."

Neither the Buffalo Police Department nor the Buffalo Police Benevolent Association immediately responded to a request for comment.

"The legal system can at the very least be the mechanism to help justice prevail, even if belatedly," Erie County Supreme Court Judge Dennis E. Ward wrote in his decision.

Ward referenced the cases of George Floyd -- who died after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee on his neck for nearly nine-and-a-half minutes -- and Eric Garner-- the New York man who died after being placed in a chokehold -- among other alleged instances of excessive force by police.

"One of the issues in all of these cases is the role of other officers at the scene, and particularly their complicity in failing to intervene to save the life of a person to whom such unreasonable physical force is being applied," Ward wrote.

Ward referenced Buffalo lawmakers who penned a law obligating police officers to intervene in instances of excessive force and named the legislation after Horne.

In so doing, Ward wrote, the city "has thus already determined that Officer Horne intervened to save the life of a civilian."

Horne addressed the court decision in a statement issued through her attorney.

"My vindication comes at a 15 year cost, but what has been gained could not be measured," she said.

"I never wanted another Police Officer to go through what I had gone through for doing the right thing."

She called on lawmakers nationwide to pass similar legislation to Buffalo's "Cariol's Law," which obligates officers to intervene and seeks to legally protect those who do.


























Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #297 on: April 16, 2021, 04:20:31 am »
Friday, 16th April  Twenty One

On this day in 1963, Tuesday, Dr. Martin Luther King wrote a letter to a special person from a Birmingham jail cell,

"Injustice anywhere is an injustice everywhere."

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #298 on: April 20, 2021, 02:49:57 pm »
Tuesday, 20th April   Twenty One

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11167
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Disappearing Excellence: The Senate & Loretta Lynch
« Reply #299 on: April 20, 2021, 05:03:43 pm »
Tuesday, 20th April  Twenty One
Relieved Of Duty
by David Matthews






A Norfolk, Virginia, police officer has been “relieved of duty” after he expressed support for Kenosha shooter Kyle Rittenhouse and donated to his defense fund.

Norfolk city manager Chip Filer announced Tuesday he had accepted police chief Larry Boone’s recommendation to fire former Lt. William Kelly following a Guardian report last week that named many police officers and public who had donated to Rittenhouse.

Kelly, who donated $25 using his department email address, also wrote a message of encouragement to Rittenhouse.

Kyle Rittenhouse listens to defense attorney John Pierce during an extradition hearing in Lake County court on October 30th, 2020 in Waukegan, Illinois.

Rittenhouse is accused of multiple murders after crossing state lines and shooting protesters at an anti-police rally in Kenosha, Wisconsin after Jacob Blake was shot by police in August.

Kelly was previously the department’s executive officer of internal affairs

In a statement, city manager Filer said Kelly’s actions were against city and department policies.

“His egregious comments erode the trust between the Norfolk Police Department and those they are sworn to serve,” Filer said.

“The City of Norfolk has a standard of behavior for all employees, and we hold staff accountable.”