Author Topic: Racial Terrorism in Charleston  (Read 21286 times)

Offline Metro

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Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« on: June 19, 2015, 06:16:23 am »

How will you prevent 2015 from becoming another bloody summer?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/18/charleston-church-shooting-race_n_7609640.html

Dean Walter Greason
The Honors School
Monmouth University
(twitter) @worldprofessor

Offline michaelintp

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2015, 03:40:07 pm »
Dylann Roof, the perpetrator who murdered those innocent people in the church, wanted to "start a race war."  Let's hope there are not too many fools out there who will allow their reactions to be controlled by the likes of Dylann Roof, in realizing his dream.

The appropriate response is to support the use of the criminal justice system to convict Dylann Roof. Roof's insanity defense is likely out the window. South Carolina defines insanity, or a verdict of "guilty but mentally ill," as lacking "the capacity to distinguish moral or legal right from moral or legal wrong or to recognize the particular act charged as morally or legally wrong." NBC news reports that this evil monster told police that he “almost didn’t go through with it because everyone was so nice to him.”  http://www.scstatehouse.gov/code/t17c024.php

It's now time for South Carolina to "almost" not execute him (which is to say, execute him, after a full and fair trial). Pronto.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2015, 04:25:32 pm by michaelintp »
The spirit of emptiness is immortal.
It is called the Great Mother
because it gives birth to Heaven and Earth.
It is like a vapor,
barely seen but always present.
Use it effortlessly.

Tao Te Ching, Ch. 6

Offline Marvelous

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2015, 06:05:59 pm »
No Jokes.

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a) An idiot who doesn't know what he's talking about.
b) A liar who is a fan who can't admit it to himself or others."

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2015, 04:40:15 am »
JUNE 19, 2015
Charleston and the Age of Obama
BY DAVID REMNICK

Between 1882 and 1968, the year Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated, three thousand four hundred and forty-six black men, women, and children were lynched in this country—a practice so vicious and frequent that Mark Twain was moved, in 1901, to write an essay called “The United States of Lyncherdom.” (Twain shelved the essay and plans for a full-length book on lynching because, he told his publisher, if he went forward, “I shouldn’t have even half a friend left down [South].”) These thousands of murders, as studied by the Tuskegee Institute and others, were a means of enforcing white supremacy in the political and economic marketplaces; they served to terrorize black men who might dare to sleep, or even talk, with white women, and to silence black children, like Emmett Till, who were deemed “insolent.”

That legacy of extreme cruelty and unpunished murder as a means of exerting political and physical control of African-Americans cannot be far from our minds right now. Nine people were shot dead in a church in Charleston. How is it possible, while reading about the alleged killer, Dylann Storm Roof, posing darkly in a picture on his Facebook page, the flags of racist Rhodesia and apartheid South Africa sewn to his jacket, not to think that we have witnessed a lynching? Roof, it is true, did not brandish a noose, nor was he backed by a howling mob of Klansmen, as was so often the case in the heyday of American lynching. Subsequent investigation may put at least some of the blame for his actions on one form of derangement or another. And yet the apparent sense of calculation and planning, what a witness reportedly said was the shooter’s statement of purpose in the Emanuel A.M.E. Church as he took up his gun—“You rape our women and you’re taking over our country”—echoed some of the very same racial anxieties, resentments, and hatreds that fuelled the lynchings of an earlier time.


But the words attributed to the shooter are both a throwback and thoroughly contemporary: one recognizes the rhetoric of extreme reaction and racism heard so often in the era of Barack Obama. His language echoed the barely veiled epithets hurled at Obama in the 2008 and 2012 campaigns (“We want our country back!”) and the raw sewage that spewed onto Obama’s Twitter feed (@POTUS) the moment he cheerfully signed on last month. “We still hang for treason don’t we?” one @jeffgully49, who also posted an image of the President in a noose, wrote.

South Carolina has undergone enormous changes in the decades since Jim Crow, but it is hard to ignore the setting of this rampage, the atmosphere. Seven years ago, as Obama was campaigning in South Carolina, the Times columnist Bob Herbert visited the state, encountering the Confederate flag flying on the grounds of the State Capitol building and, nearby, a statue of Benjamin (Pitchfork Ben) Tillman, a Reconstruction-era governor and senator, who defended white supremacy and the lynching of African-Americans, saying, “We disenfranchised as many as we could.”

“We of the South have never recognized the right of the negro to govern white men, and we never will,” Tillman said, from the floor of the U.S. Senate. “We have never believed him to be the equal of the white man, and we will not submit to his gratifying his lust on our wives and daughters without lynching him.”

The extent to which Roof was aware of the historical dimensions of his hideous act is not yet known; he is still a suspect, and we are just beginning to learn more about him. But no killer could have selected a crime scene more sacred. The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church was built to be the heart of the black community in Charleston, in the early nineteenth century, as black men and women sought to form a spiritual and political refuge divorced from the oppressive white institutions all around them. One of the founders of the Emanuel A.M.E. Church was Denmark Vesey, a preacher, carpenter, and former slave who had purchased his own freedom and who, in 1822, was executed for his role in planning a slave revolt in Charleston. The broader A.M.E. Zion church was not only the spiritual home to the three men and six women Roof gunned down but to the likes of Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Eliza Ann Gardner, and Harriet Tubman.

No small part of our outrage and grief—particularly the outrage and grief of African-Americans—is the way the Charleston murders are part of a larger picture of American life, in which black men and women, going about their day-to-day lives, have so little confidence in their own safety. One appalling event after another reinforces the sense that the country’s political and law-enforcement institutions do not extend themselves as completely or as fairly as they do for whites. In Charleston, the killer seemed intent on maximizing both the bloodshed and the symbolism that is attached to the act; the murder took place in a spiritual refuge, supposedly the safest of places. It was as if the killer wanted to underline the vulnerability of his victims, to emphasize their exposure and the racist nature of this act of terror.


Watching Obama deliver his statement Thursday about the Charleston murders, you couldn’t help but sense how submerged his emotions were, how, yet again, he was forced to slow down his own speech, careful not to utter a phrase that would, God forbid, lead him to lose his equanimity. I thought of that sentence of James Baldwin’s: “To be a Negro in this country and to be relatively conscious is to be in rage almost all of the time.” Obama’s statement also made me think of “Between the World and Me,” an extraordinary forthcoming book by Ta-Nehisi Coates, in which he writes an impassioned letter to his teen-age son—a letter both loving and full of a parent’s dread—counselling him on the history of American violence against the black body, the young African-American’s extreme vulnerability to wrongful arrest, police violence, and disproportionate incarceration.

Obama never affords himself the kind of raw honesty that you hear in the writings of Baldwin and Coates—or of Jelani Cobb and Claudia Rankine and so many others. Obama has a different job; he has different parameters. But, for all of his Presidential restraint, you could read the sadness, the anger, and the caution in his face as he stood at the podium; you could hear it in what he had to say. “I’ve had to make statements like this too many times,” he said. It was as if he could barely believe that he yet again had to find some language to do justice to this kind of violence. It seemed that he went further than usual. Above all, he insisted that mass killings, like the one in Charleston, are, in no small measure, political. This is the crucial point. These murders were not random or merely tragic; they were pointedly racist; they were political. Obama made it clear that the cynical actions of so many politicians—their refusal to cross the N.R.A. and enact strict gun laws, their unwillingness to combat racism in any way that puts votes at risk—have bloody consequences.

“We don’t have all the facts,” he said, “but we do know that, once again, innocent people were killed in part because someone who wanted to inflict harm had no trouble getting their hands on a gun. … At some point, we as a country will have to reckon with the fact that this type of mass violence does not happen in other advanced countries. It doesn’t happen in other places with this kind of frequency.” On race and politics, he was more subtle, but not stinting, either, lamenting the event’s connection to “a dark part of our history,” to events like the Birmingham church bombing, in 1963.

Like many others, I’ve often tried to imagine how Obama’s mind works in these moments. After one interview in the Oval Office, he admitted to me that he was hesitant to answer some of my questions about race more fully or with less caution, for just as a stray word from him about, say, monetary policy could affect the financial markets, so, too, could a harsh or intemperate word about race affect the political temper of the country.

Obama is a flawed President, but his sense of historical perspective is well developed. He gives every sign of believing that his most important role in the American history of race was his election in November, 2008, and, nearly as important, his reëlection, four years later. For millions of Americans, that election was an inspiration. But, for some untold number of others, it remains a source of tremendous resentment, a kind of threat that is capable, in some, of arousing the basest prejudices.

Obama hates to talk about this. He allows himself so little latitude. Maybe that will change when he is an ex-President focussed on his memoirs. As a very young man he wrote a book about becoming, about identity, about finding community in a black church, about finding a sense of home—in his case, on the South Side of Chicago, with a young lawyer named Michelle Robinson. It will be beyond interesting to see what he’s willing to tell us—tell us with real freedom—about being the focus of so much hope, but also the subject of so much ambient and organized racial anger: the birther movement, the death threats, the voter-suppression attempts, the articles, books, and films that portray him as everything from an unreconstructed, drug-addled campus radical to a Kenyan post-colonial socialist. This has been the Age of Obama, but we have learned over and over that this has hardly meant the end of racism in America. Not remotely. Dylann Roof, tragically, seems to be yet another terrible reminder of that.

Nearly all of South Carolina was in mourning Thursday. Flags were at half-mast. Except the Confederate flag, of course, which flew high outside the building where Tillman still stands and the laws of the state are written.

Offline Battle

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2015, 07:25:26 am »
This same incident happened in 2003, Downtown Manhattan in New York where a aspiring African American Congressman, destined to become Mayor was shot to death in the halls of City Hall.

Would You Like To Know More?
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/23/nyregion/23WIRE-HALL.html



What happened in Charleston, South Carolina was no act of random violence...

--- that attack was a assasination.

State Senator Pinckney was being groomed to become South Carolina's first future African-American Governor. His advocacy & vote on installing body cams on all police officers in the entire state was taken away from him.   This is looking suspiciously as if the incident had something to do with police reform.

Please note in South Carolina that there was another Democrat Congressman who was also killed in a drive-by shooting mere months ago.




Fr0m the article:

Quote
JUNE 19, 2015
Charleston and the Age of Obama
BY DAVID REMNICK   

Nearly all of South Carolina was in mourning Thursday. Flags were at half-mast. Except the Confederate flag, of course, which flew high outside the building where Tillman still stands and the laws of the state are written



The gop are truly wretched and evil.





It's cool ...



Every loss comes at a cost. Time to pay up.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 09:50:25 am by Battle »

Offline michaelintp

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2015, 05:31:32 pm »
C'mon. Enough already.

Dylann Roof is a twisted evil hater who represents nobody but himself and a small lunatic fringe in 2015. Not Rebublicans, not White People, not South Carolina and not the United States of America.

The condemnation of his heinous act is universal.



The spirit of emptiness is immortal.
It is called the Great Mother
because it gives birth to Heaven and Earth.
It is like a vapor,
barely seen but always present.
Use it effortlessly.

Tao Te Ching, Ch. 6

Offline Redjack

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2015, 05:55:12 pm »
South Carolina is at a crux point. They have a very slim chance, a very small window to redefine themselves for the present and future. They have a tiny moment where they can choose the bright path and be a lighthouse for the rest of the South.


will they do it? history says no.


but, even though the government claims this guy was "a lone criminal" he is, very clearly part of a continuum of thought and behavior all of us here know well. He did not act alone. His mind was nurtured by like minds who VERY MUCH exist in the world and very much applaud his giving up his one life to take out 9 of us.


He's a terrorist just as much as the Boston Bombers or the Shoe Bomber. He is not insane. He is not a spree killer. We know what he is. It takes Olympic level gymnastics to pretend he's something other than he is.
Soon you will come to know. When the bullet hits the bone.

Offline michaelintp

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2015, 06:15:38 pm »

but, even though the government claims this guy was "a lone criminal" he is, very clearly part of a continuum of thought and behavior all of us here know well. He did not act alone. His mind was nurtured by like minds who VERY MUCH exist in the world and very much applaud his giving up his one life to take out 9 of us.


He's a terrorist just as much as the Boston Bombers or the Shoe Bomber. He is not insane. He is not a spree killer. We know what he is. It takes Olympic level gymnastics to pretend he's something other than he is.

The American Nazi Party also has historical roots. As does the KKK.  All hate groups, and all haters (of all races), are nurtured by broader historical movements and ideologies. No matter how repugnant they are now viewed by most people. 

What is sad is the extent Roof and haters like him still control the perceptions of the people they wish to psychologically and physically dominate. Even though people like Roof are universally condemned in 21st Century America (except by a small fringe now viewed as lunatic).

What is significant, and should be grounds for hope, is this universal repudiation of such haters today.

Another source of hope and inspiration is the reaction of the religious people Roof targeted in his horrific attack. What an incredible community.

https://youtu.be/UVItxoxVyFg
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 11:16:27 pm by michaelintp »
The spirit of emptiness is immortal.
It is called the Great Mother
because it gives birth to Heaven and Earth.
It is like a vapor,
barely seen but always present.
Use it effortlessly.

Tao Te Ching, Ch. 6

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2015, 02:53:27 am »
C'mon. Enough already.

Dylann Roof is a twisted evil hater who represents nobody but himself and a small lunatic fringe in 2015. Not Rebublicans, not White People, not South Carolina and not the United States of America.

The condemnation of his heinous act is universal.
When Jeb Bush, Rick Perry, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum and Nikki Haley, that's four GOP presidential candidates and the GOP governor of the state of the massacre, refuse to admit this was a racial crime...then they are absolutely part of the problem.  They are contradicting the shooter's own admissions.  Why not do the easy, obviously, moral thing and condemn the rationale of a mass murderer?  Because they are scared of offending Republican voters who might sympathize with his reasons, but not his actions. 

That is the problem.

When Mitt Romney, who is NOT running for office, is the only high profile Republican to say take down the Confederate flag, that is pathetic.  For the same reasons. 

Offline Battle

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2015, 05:48:37 am »
What I find most disturbing is that Gilligan lookin' M/Fer ran through the entire state of South Carolina and not one state trooper, police squad or sheriff was willing or able to find him.   

It took a florist, white woman,  to do the job they couldn't do.



On my end of the monitor, I'm seeing bruthas loading neeners, shotties, hammers  and poppin' off rounds and walkin' the streets with heavy pittbull terrirers.


Myself...?

I've got one in the pipe and one in the chamber if anyone wanna rock n' roll.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2015, 08:31:44 am by Battle »

Offline michaelintp

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2015, 08:40:39 am »
Lindsey Graham: "There are bad people in this world who are motivated by hate. Every decent person has been victimized by the hateful, callous disregard for human life shown by the individual who perpetrated these horrible acts.”

Rick Perry: "I think we all come here today with heavy hearts for those individuals in Charleston -- those Charleston Christians -- who were gunned down in an absolute heinous hate crime inside of their place of worship.That deranged individual didn't just take lives of black Americans -- he gunned down nine children of God."

Rick Santorim: ""It was clearly racially motivated. Clearly."

I believe Ben Carson summed it up best:

"I pray for the community scared and hurting. I also pray you and I can conquer hatred. In my lifetime I have seen such great progress. Though racial based hate is still very much alive as last night so violently reminded us. But I worry about a new hate that is growing in our great nation. I fear our intolerance of one another is the new battle ground of evil. Today many feel it is ok to hate someone who thinks differently than you do. The left hates the right. The right hates the left. This attitude is poison. Poison that will sicken all of us."

I wish more people would follow the example of Dr. Carson instead of playing into the hands of haters such as Dylann Roof. By disseminating more hate. Just as Roof intended.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2015, 09:39:34 am by michaelintp »
The spirit of emptiness is immortal.
It is called the Great Mother
because it gives birth to Heaven and Earth.
It is like a vapor,
barely seen but always present.
Use it effortlessly.

Tao Te Ching, Ch. 6

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2015, 11:15:25 am »
Yes, after they were roundly criticised by everyone, then shown up by Mitt's commonsense stance, the Republican presidential field suddenly found their courage and acknowledged the obvious.  But that wasn't their first instinct.  And they still don't have the courage to say get rid of that flag...even Jeb Bush, who got rid of it in his own state.  Their lack of leadership, their nilly willy pandering to the worst parts of their voting base, is disgusting.  They are unfit for office.

As for Ben Carson, he was the first to say it was racially based, then did the bullsh*t false equivalency thing where he treats the left and the right as the same.  They are not.  There is no left wing equivalent to this piece of sh*t who shot people in a church.  None.

His comments about black rapists of white women echo GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump's comments about Mexican immigrants raping women. 

Solving this problem doesn't mean holding hands and singing Kumbaya.  It means dealing with all the broken elements in our culture:

our lack of a national mental health plan

our refusal to enact commonsense gun laws

overhauling our  national education system so young people of all races ere taught about slavery and genocide, and the global contributions of people of color throughout history

restoring the responsibility to tell to the truth in our news media outlets, so it's no linger tabloid sensationalism

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2015, 11:17:13 am »
WHITE MURDERER SAYS NIGGER? “IT’S NOT ABOUT RACE!” BLACK PRESIDENT SAYS NIGGA? “LET’S TALK ABOUT RACE!”
Damon Young, 6/22/15

To give you an idea of how bizarre America’s relationship with race is, consider the following:

1.  The two most talked about stories in the country last week were about…

A) A ridiculous White woman who seems to believe she’s Shirley Chisholm but is just the real-life Kirk Lazarus.

B) A White man who went into a Black church, announced “Hey, Black people. I’m here to kill Black people“…and left a 3,000 word-long note on the internet practically saying “Hey, everyone. I hate Black people, and I might try to kill a few of them“…and still has people actually forming their analog-ass mouths to ooze “Well…we don’t have all the answers yet.”

2. A Black president references the use of “nigga” in an interview to make a very valid point about race. And the use of “nigga” — and not the very valid point about race — becomes the story.

3. Yet, when reporting on this sensationalistic aspect of the this interview (“That nigger said nigga!”), major publications refuse to actually print the words “nigga” or “nigger,” instead using the bitch-ass “n-word” instead.

So you have reflexive pearl-clutching and pseudo-outrage at the use of a word “too explosive to print”…but stories on it are printed anyway, using an abbreviated version that allows everyone to know exactly what they’re talking about…although they’re not mentioning it…although they are talking about it.

I love this country.

Offline michaelintp

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2015, 11:32:27 am »
Blame the folks on this forum, and those who agree with them, who go into an expectorating tizzy whenever a white person, in an appropriate context (discussing racism, for example, or quoting someone else) pronounces the full word "nigger" or the Southern/Black accented "niggah."  Folks here and elsewhere have actively created this asinine world.

Regarding hate, Dr. Carson is spot on. It is just that many folk are tolerant of their own hates (and here I am not talking about hatred of evil). They "cling stubbornly" to them.

There is a lot of work to be done, in several arenas.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2015, 05:37:43 pm by michaelintp »
The spirit of emptiness is immortal.
It is called the Great Mother
because it gives birth to Heaven and Earth.
It is like a vapor,
barely seen but always present.
Use it effortlessly.

Tao Te Ching, Ch. 6

Offline Redjack

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Re: Racial Terrorism in Charleston
« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2015, 01:41:44 pm »
WHITE MURDERER SAYS NIGGER? “IT’S NOT ABOUT RACE!” BLACK PRESIDENT SAYS NIGGA? “LET’S TALK ABOUT RACE!”
Damon Young, 6/22/15

To give you an idea of how bizarre America’s relationship with race is, consider the following:

1.  The two most talked about stories in the country last week were about…

A) A ridiculous White woman who seems to believe she’s Shirley Chisholm but is just the real-life Kirk Lazarus.

B) A White man who went into a Black church, announced “Hey, Black people. I’m here to kill Black people“…and left a 3,000 word-long note on the internet practically saying “Hey, everyone. I hate Black people, and I might try to kill a few of them“…and still has people actually forming their analog-ass mouths to ooze “Well…we don’t have all the answers yet.”

2. A Black president references the use of “nigga” in an interview to make a very valid point about race. And the use of “nigga” — and not the very valid point about race — becomes the story.

3. Yet, when reporting on this sensationalistic aspect of the this interview (“That nigger said nigga!”), major publications refuse to actually print the words “nigga” or “nigger,” instead using the bitch-ass “n-word” instead.

So you have reflexive pearl-clutching and pseudo-outrage at the use of a word “too explosive to print”…but stories on it are printed anyway, using an abbreviated version that allows everyone to know exactly what they’re talking about…although they’re not mentioning it…although they are talking about it.

I love this country.


I like it a lot but love is a long time ago.
Soon you will come to know. When the bullet hits the bone.