Author Topic: Termination and Liberation for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther Finale  (Read 805477 times)

Offline A.Curry

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A little ginger to clean the pallet...

GQ Magazine: Black Panther, Marvel's First Black Superhero, Is Now the Star of the Year's Most Important Comic

Just over six months ago, Marvel Entertainment shocked the comics and literary worlds alike when it announced that author, Atlantic correspondent, and MacArthur Grant recipient Ta-Nehisi Coates would be writing a year-long Black Panther comic book series alongside acclaimed artist Brian Stelfreeze and colorist Laura Martin. It was huge news that instantly put all sorts of pressure on Black Panther to immediately perform—because while Coates has long professed his love for comics, he writes for an audience that doesn't necessarily read them.

You'd probably be very happy with it, too. Black Panther #1 is a great start to the year-long story that Coates, Stelfreeze, and Martin will tell monthly across eleven issues, and one that's every bit as thoughtful and vivid as you'd expect from the talent assembled. And for the Black Panther, Marvel's first black superhero—it's about damn time the publisher through some serious weight into restoring the character to prominence.

However, despite having such an important, interesting role in the fiction of Marvel's comics, the comics publisher hasn't always made him a prominent part of their comics lineup. To quote Kotaku writer Evan Narcisse's excellent and comprehensive writeup of the character's history and politics, "The Black Panther has gone from being an under-utilized figure in the background of Avengers group shots to arguably being the most fearsome strategist in the Marvel Universe. His elevation to Marvel’s top tier is a fascinating meta-story." So here we are, with what might be the most highly publicized and biggest comic book series launch of the year, and Black Panther is at the center of it all.

Black Panther #1 is everything wonderful about comics. It uses grand, symbolic figures to tangibly attack and dismantle big, important ideas. It's a comic that starts with chaos—recent events in Marvel's assorted comics have left Wakanda in disarray, and its people are restless. They're questioning their king and the very idea of monarchy, and the revolution is being led by women.

It is, cleverly, a story about America and patriarchy set in a nation almost entirely devoid of white faces, a story about a world power humbled and frustrated with their traditions and the establishments built by men who claim thrones. It is about a king who discovers his kingdom has been infected by hate, and no longer seem to want him. But do they need him?

Black Panther is asking big questions out of the gate, questions that are eerily relevant to an American audience also in the middle of a search for new leadership almost entirely defined by a rejection of the previous one, an election cycle defined by passions running high and hateful rhetoric reaching a fever pitch. And therein lies the story Coates, Stelfreeze, and Martin are out to tell: What happens when a nation of people discover that their perception of themselves is no longer true?


Interesting article...the line "it is cleverly, a story about America and patriarchy" is telling about some things I actually do see possibly problematic in Coates possible intentions though I'm eager to see how it plays out.  It looks however that he might be forcing political and social issues into Wakanda that were arguably not there to tell a story addressing these things.  For instance, I don't see the guy Aneka killed being able to do what he did for as LONG as it was suggested he did in Wakanda without no one doing anything...and if the Dora are trusts with guarding the king and the nation, why wouldn't they be able to kill someone for such a heinous crime without the overly harsh sentence of execution?  Coates might be trying to speak on even some harsher political and social things in certain parts of Africa, but that's not and never has been Wakanda in that regard.

Also, "they're questioning the very idea of monarchy, and the revolution is being led by women" I don't mind this at all, and depending on how he goes about addressing the gender and black female revolutionary action along with black feminist issues...it could be a great read.  However these issues shouldn't be handled or be exactly the same as they are in America and especially in certain parts of Africa...the "Boko Haram" type cells in scans shown most definitely should not be Wakanda as such a thing would never happen there...but perhaps it's a call on how Wakanda and its king should get involved in things that are happening in real world parts of Africa like this.  Maybe that's what Coates is going for and if so that would be a good thing...maybe Aneka and Ayo will serve as the impetus for this involvement as I would hope an advanced place like Wakanda WOULD do something about these things happening not far from its borders.

As I've said to you before though...I think Coates is going to end monarchy in Wakanda to establish a democracy...just like in America or other more "democratic", so to speak, parts of the world.  The very idea of this run questioning a monarchy and unrest with its "orphan-King" underscores this.

« Last Edit: April 13, 2016, 05:42:51 am by A.Curry »

Offline A.Curry

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http://blacknerdproblems.com/black-panther-1-the-dora-milaje-come-center-stage/

The above link to this article on black nerd problems site may or may not have been posted on here before, surely read by some, but it's a pretty good article thats not only praising Coates first issue (surprised there isn't some criticism on sites I've seen yet, as it's good but far from perfect) but goes into what he's trying to accomplish and definitely for you Ture (and possibly others) something that has some
points arguably worthy of criticism.

It is of course also taking a particular view of the the Dora couple whom has obviously been a source of discussion and debate on here...
as the following passage from the article shows and makes an arguable point about:

"Black America, like the rest of America, has always had a complicated, stereotyping relationship with our Gay, Lesbian, Trans, Asexual, and other Queer members. We all know the Gay Choir Director or the unmarried Butch Auntie. We have so often pushed these family members to the edges of Black society, allowing them to be erased by the very communities they call home. So for Coates and the rest of the creative team to make not only the Dora Milaje, but two Black lesbian Dora Milaje, one of the primary actors in his series is, dare I say, revolutionary? Or at least so rarely seen as to be damn near? "

Good points though "revolutionary" might be too strong of a word...but it's pretty clear as the point has been made already that Coates is attempting to address real world issues through Wakanda...which could possibly be problematic.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 08:25:03 am by A.Curry »

Offline Ture

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Ta-Nehisi Coates ‏@tanehisicoates  Apr 13
"Then you see panels like this from @colorista and you understand. The energy crackling off Ayo's iwisa sets it off."




If Coats isn't careful Aneka and Ayo are going to steal the show.
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Offline Ezyo

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More BP Stuff. From Dboi from CBR:

Quote from: Dboi654;1943307
Concept art by Ryan Meinerding. Hope we see this in his solo


And some pics from Séb:

Quote from: Séb;1943446
Black Panther costume on display:







More here:

http://hollywoodmoviecostumesandprops.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/chadwick-bosemans-black-panther-costume.html

[/size][/b]

Offline Ezyo

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Courtesy of Dboi & Realdealholy from CBR:

Quote from: Dboi654;1943614
Avengers of the New World hmmmmmm?




Quote from: Realdealholy;1943854


Coates says that he’s already done the first 12 issues and signed a contract just last week to continue working on the book for years.

http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2016/04/love_duty_and_politics_ta_nehisi_coates_takes_on_marvel_s_black_panther.html


Seems like Coates is in it for the long haul. I hope he mines out some very interesting stories with Big Payouts to T'Challa. I look Forward to what he is going to do and where T'challa will stand. I really hope though that happier days aren't too distant in the future
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Offline Ture

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Who Gave The Black Panther His Best Debut In An Ongoing?













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Offline Salustrade

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Who Gave The Black Panther His Best Debut In An Ongoing?
















REGINALD HUDLIN.

Offline Ezyo

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Who Gave The Black Panther His Best Debut In An Ongoing?
















I think Priest had the Beat debut honestly. Followed by RH, then Coates.

What about Best cover between those?

Offline Salustrade

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Coates is a grade A douchebag for this....

BLACK PANTHER #4
TA-NEHISI COATES (W) • BRIAN STELFREEZE (A/C)
DEATH OF X VARIANT COVER BY TBA
CONNECTING VARIANT COVER D BY SANFORD GREENE
• "A NATION UNDER OUR FEET," the first arc of the new hit BLACK PANTHER series, comes to a startling conclusion!
• Suicide bombers terrorize the people of Wakanda, further eroding any last bits of goodwill towards the royal family...
• T'Challa struggles to unite his citizens, who are choosing to side with Zenzi and The People in growing numbers...
• A familiar villain reveals his part in T'Challa's current ruination...and it's not who you think!
32 PGS./Rated T ...$3.99


Offline bluezulu

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Coates is a grade A douchebag for this....

BLACK PANTHER #4
TA-NEHISI COATES (W) • BRIAN STELFREEZE (A/C)
DEATH OF X VARIANT COVER BY TBA
CONNECTING VARIANT COVER D BY SANFORD GREENE
• "A NATION UNDER OUR FEET," the first arc of the new hit BLACK PANTHER series, comes to a startling conclusion!
• Suicide bombers terrorize the people of Wakanda, further eroding any last bits of goodwill towards the royal family...
• T'Challa struggles to unite his citizens, who are choosing to side with Zenzi and The People in growing numbers...
• A familiar villain reveals his part in T'Challa's current ruination...and it's not who you think!
32 PGS./Rated T ...$3.99





Meh. I have to wait and read the issues before and after instead of becoming reactionary. I mean comics are like a swinging pendulum when it comes to story telling. Fast forward in time to the future end of Coates run and when the next writer decides he needs to bring back elements of the Hudlin run or Priest run. The character of the Black Panther has been around for more than 50 years. You would need to develop algorithms to keep up with the continuity and story issues. 

Offline Salustrade

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Coates is a grade A douchebag for this....

BLACK PANTHER #4
TA-NEHISI COATES (W) • BRIAN STELFREEZE (A/C)
DEATH OF X VARIANT COVER BY TBA
CONNECTING VARIANT COVER D BY SANFORD GREENE
• "A NATION UNDER OUR FEET," the first arc of the new hit BLACK PANTHER series, comes to a startling conclusion!
• Suicide bombers terrorize the people of Wakanda, further eroding any last bits of goodwill towards the royal family...
• T'Challa struggles to unite his citizens, who are choosing to side with Zenzi and The People in growing numbers...
• A familiar villain reveals his part in T'Challa's current ruination...and it's not who you think!
32 PGS./Rated T ...$3.99





Meh. I have to wait and read the issues before and after instead of becoming reactionary. I mean comics are like a swinging pendulum when it comes to story telling. Fast forward in time to the future end of Coates run and when the next writer decides he needs to bring back elements of the Hudlin run or Priest run. The character of the Black Panther has been around for more than 50 years. You would need to develop algorithms to keep up with the continuity and story issues.


Post Hudlin, T'Challa has had a virtually uninterupted run of deconstruction wherein practically all of the positives Mr Hudlin brought to the BP mythos have been rolled back and virtually erased.

Forgive me for being scathingly unreceptive to Coates material as far as the BP mythos are concerned.

Offline Ture

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A little ginger to clean the pallet...

GQ Magazine: Black Panther, Marvel's First Black Superhero, Is Now the Star of the Year's Most Important Comic

Just over six months ago, Marvel Entertainment shocked the comics and literary worlds alike when it announced that author, Atlantic correspondent, and MacArthur Grant recipient Ta-Nehisi Coates would be writing a year-long Black Panther comic book series alongside acclaimed artist Brian Stelfreeze and colorist Laura Martin. It was huge news that instantly put all sorts of pressure on Black Panther to immediately perform—because while Coates has long professed his love for comics, he writes for an audience that doesn't necessarily read them.

You'd probably be very happy with it, too. Black Panther #1 is a great start to the year-long story that Coates, Stelfreeze, and Martin will tell monthly across eleven issues, and one that's every bit as thoughtful and vivid as you'd expect from the talent assembled. And for the Black Panther, Marvel's first black superhero—it's about damn time the publisher through some serious weight into restoring the character to prominence.

However, despite having such an important, interesting role in the fiction of Marvel's comics, the comics publisher hasn't always made him a prominent part of their comics lineup. To quote Kotaku writer Evan Narcisse's excellent and comprehensive writeup of the character's history and politics, "The Black Panther has gone from being an under-utilized figure in the background of Avengers group shots to arguably being the most fearsome strategist in the Marvel Universe. His elevation to Marvel’s top tier is a fascinating meta-story." So here we are, with what might be the most highly publicized and biggest comic book series launch of the year, and Black Panther is at the center of it all.

Black Panther #1 is everything wonderful about comics. It uses grand, symbolic figures to tangibly attack and dismantle big, important ideas. It's a comic that starts with chaos—recent events in Marvel's assorted comics have left Wakanda in disarray, and its people are restless. They're questioning their king and the very idea of monarchy, and the revolution is being led by women.

It is, cleverly, a story about America and patriarchy set in a nation almost entirely devoid of white faces, a story about a world power humbled and frustrated with their traditions and the establishments built by men who claim thrones. It is about a king who discovers his kingdom has been infected by hate, and no longer seem to want him. But do they need him?

Black Panther is asking big questions out of the gate, questions that are eerily relevant to an American audience also in the middle of a search for new leadership almost entirely defined by a rejection of the previous one, an election cycle defined by passions running high and hateful rhetoric reaching a fever pitch. And therein lies the story Coates, Stelfreeze, and Martin are out to tell: What happens when a nation of people discover that their perception of themselves is no longer true?



Interesting article...the line "it is cleverly, a story about America and patriarchy" is telling about some things I actually do see possibly problematic in Coates possible intentions though I'm eager to see how it plays out.  It looks however that he might be forcing political and social issues into Wakanda that were arguably not there to tell a story addressing these things.  For instance, I don't see the guy Aneka killed being able to do what he did for as LONG as it was suggested he did in Wakanda without no one doing anything...and if the Dora are trusts with guarding the king and the nation, why wouldn't they be able to kill someone for such a heinous crime without the overly harsh sentence of execution?  Coates might be trying to speak on even some harsher political and social things in certain parts of Africa, but that's not and never has been Wakanda in that regard.

Also, "they're questioning the very idea of monarchy, and the revolution is being led by women" I don't mind this at all, and depending on how he goes about addressing the gender and black female revolutionary action along with black feminist issues...it could be a great read.  However these issues shouldn't be handled or be exactly the same as they are in America and especially in certain parts of Africa...the "Boko Haram" type cells in scans shown most definitely should not be Wakanda as such a thing would never happen there...but perhaps it's a call on how Wakanda and its king should get involved in things that are happening in real world parts of Africa like this.  Maybe that's what Coates is going for and if so that would be a good thing...maybe Aneka and Ayo will serve as the impetus for this involvement as I would hope an advanced place like Wakanda WOULD do something about these things happening not far from its borders.

As I've said to you before though...I think Coates is going to end monarchy in Wakanda to establish a democracy...just like in America or other more "democratic", so to speak, parts of the world.  The very idea of this run questioning a monarchy and unrest with its "orphan-King" underscores this.


The fodder is there to tell due in fact to the many mischaracterizations of the Black Panther presented post Hudlin. I had a thread a few years back entitled The Many Mistakes of Reginald Hudlin in which I stated all the advances and nuances, all the logical conclusions about the Black Panther and Wakanda plied by Hudlin would be seen as things that needed to be corrected,undone i.e. the unconquered nation, the marriage to Storm, the brother and sister relationship with Shuri, the cultural leanings and expressions historical insertions that dealt well with past events. Hudlin even made being a king a cool thing with perks.

"Addressing the gender and black female revolutionary action along with black feminist issues..." are concerns Wakanda should not have. Traditional Afrakan societies exhibited gender equality simultaneously with well defined male and female roles and responsibilities.

This penchant for most writers to have Wakanda in the thralls of revolution at every writing belies any credibility in the writers creativity in visualizing a truly advanced Afrakan nation.

Instead of using contemporary social challenges in a failed attempt to "humanize" the populace and remove the stigma of 'utopia' that supposedly is Wakanda; why not focus on examples of their exemplary achievements in the arts and sciences, in their social and political workings, their economy, environmental conservation, deep space exploration and spirituality as it addresses how their society coexist and communes with their supreme being, deities and ancestors.
 

http://blacknerdproblems.com/black-panther-1-the-dora-milaje-come-center-stage/

The above link to this article on black nerd problems site may or may not have been posted on here before, surely read by some, but it's a pretty good article thats not only praising Coates first issue (surprised there isn't some criticism on sites I've seen yet, as it's good but far from perfect) but goes into what he's trying to accomplish and definitely for you Ture (and possibly others) something that has some
points arguably worthy of criticism.

It is of course also taking a particular view of the the Dora couple whom has obviously been a source of discussion and debate on here...
as the following passage from the article shows and makes an arguable point about:

"Black America, like the rest of America, has always had a complicated, stereotyping relationship with our Gay, Lesbian, Trans, Asexual, and other Queer members. We all know the Gay Choir Director or the unmarried Butch Auntie. We have so often pushed these family members to the edges of Black society, allowing them to be erased by the very communities they call home. So for Coates and the rest of the creative team to make not only the Dora Milaje, but two Black lesbian Dora Milaje, one of the primary actors in his series is, dare I say, revolutionary? Or at least so rarely seen as to be damn near? "

Good points though "revolutionary" might be too strong of a word...but it's pretty clear as the point has been made already that Coates is attempting to address real world issues through Wakanda...which could possibly be problematic.



American Afrakans like many other ethnic groups in the United States of America "has always had a complicated, stereotyping relationship with our" elders, children, fathers, mothers and our historical and cultural identity. The Afrakan family in the USA has been so beleaguered by negative imaging that some mistakenly believe that all too many so called black men want is a white woman, that all too many so called black women want is a white man or to get out of the ghetto, rap or play ball, be Hollywood housewives, drug sellers or play pimps up hoes down.

So for Coates and the rest of the creative team have yet to show T'Challa in a stable, functional relationship with a woman he would consider marrying and having children with. dare I say, that would be revolutionary? Or at least so rarely seen as to be damn near? "
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Offline Ture

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Who Gave The Black Panther His Best Debut In An Ongoing?


















Quote
I think Priest had the Beat debut honestly. Followed by RH, then Coates.

What about Best cover between those?    Ezyo


Quote
REGINALD HUDLIN.     Salustrade


Excellent finds Ezyo on the BP picks from that Cap 75 Anniversary mag.

Hey Kip, which Thanos do you think trashed the Golden City?  ???

My pick for overall debut would have to go to... Hudlin just for the share magnitude he defined Wakanda as being and for telling his inaugural story in the Black Panther's homeland. Not too mention the outright defeat of Cap. All this really hit home with the animated series.
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Offline Ture

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Coates is a grade A douchebag for this....

BLACK PANTHER #4
TA-NEHISI COATES (W) • BRIAN STELFREEZE (A/C)
DEATH OF X VARIANT COVER BY TBA
CONNECTING VARIANT COVER D BY SANFORD GREENE
• "A NATION UNDER OUR FEET," the first arc of the new hit BLACK PANTHER series, comes to a startling conclusion!
• Suicide bombers terrorize the people of Wakanda, further eroding any last bits of goodwill towards the royal family...
• T'Challa struggles to unite his citizens, who are choosing to side with Zenzi and The People in growing numbers...
• A familiar villain reveals his part in T'Challa's current ruination...and it's not who you think!
32 PGS./Rated T ...$3.99





Meh. I have to wait and read the issues before and after instead of becoming reactionary. I mean comics are like a swinging pendulum when it comes to story telling. Fast forward in time to the future end of Coates run and when the next writer decides he needs to bring back elements of the Hudlin run or Priest run. The character of the Black Panther has been around for more than 50 years. You would need to develop algorithms to keep up with the continuity and story issues.


Post Hudlin, T'Challa has had a virtually uninterupted run of deconstruction wherein practically all of the positives Mr Hudlin brought to the BP mythos have been rolled back and virtually erased.

Forgive me for being scathingly unreceptive to Coates material as far as the BP mythos are concerned.


QFT!!! Chaos Bringer, you aint never lied. "Suicide bombers terrorize the people of Wakanda" come on, this is total regression. At least with Thanos you have a planet conquering, star destroying, nigh infinite cosmic powered adversary to contend with. And yes, T'Challa should have found a way to defeat him singlehandedly and save Wakanda. Poor writing about who the Black Panther is what is powering much of Coates' iteration. Again only one issue has made print so until the next one true believers...
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Offline Ture

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Quote
To be perfectly honest, I think the fact that the Dora's were flat out arguing that the chieftans actions were known and ignored is an indication that it's NOT exactly uncommon. It's likely not happening in the middle of the street within the golden city. But I'll wager outside of the golden city, in the more rural areas people can and do get away with a lot more.    CBR's XPac


Quote
None of this BS existed within the BP mythos before Coates showed up so please stop acting like any of the garbage he's importing into said mythos, has any binding weight on what's known to long term BP enthusiasts.

As much as I disliked what Hickman did with T'Challa during his New Avengers run, there's no denying the fact that he left Wakanda in a more hopeful place at the close of Secret Wars II.

This was firmly mirrored in Ewings work in the first issue of the new Ultimates book that clearly illustrated where Wakanda was within the global pecking order.

Coates on the otherhand, has decided to regress Wakanda toa point that flies completely in the face of pre-established continuity while injecting his own personal viewpoints into a mythos that he has already clearly stated to hold in contempt.

Coates doesn't believe in the concept of a Monarchy and naturally decides to run rough shod over what existed within the BP mythos before he came along.

He holds the tradition of the Dora Milaje in disdain as see's same as being "weird" citing the ages of the Dora's as being "problematic" whilst ignoring facts relating to what obtains as the age of consent across the entirety of much of the world outside of North America.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ages_of_consent_in_Europe

And he does all of this with the presumptious arrogance of an explorer who seems to think that he's more knowledgeable about things than the actual people who are about that life.

But then again, why would he not feel so entitled to make the pronouncements he's so fond of making in his interviews?

Afterall, he has been commisioned by the selfsame publishers who had no problem allowing the BP mythos to be dragged through the mud and disregarded until the trend towards the financial viability of actual diversity, forced Marvel into jumping onto the progressive bandwagon.     CBR's Mr Majestic

Again when it's said right, it's said right.
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