Author Topic: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther  (Read 665798 times)

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4680 on: December 20, 2019, 02:08:18 am »
I will say that artwork looks great, and the dialogue/depictions weren't as frustrating as I've read before. Do they have any Black Panther issues without the dialogue/word balloons? Where you can write your own dialogue?

Also, dead on about Black Lightning. I stopped watching that show. I gave it like one episode this season and that was enough. The first season was much better than I thought it would be. Though going into it, I suspected that when I heard Anissa particularly, but also Jennifer, were going to be on the show, that BL would be sidelined and the show would be more about his daughters, especially Anissa. And even though he was disrespected and checked even in Season 1, by his wife and his daughters, he was reliant on Gambi (a white man, which I'm not tripping too much on because that is like some of the comics I've read; though it does annoy me that Anissa, once again, in particular, never disrespects or challenges Gambi like she does her own father. She's more inclined to listen to his advice. It also is just a pet peeve but I don't like when they call him "Uncle Gambi". Shouldn't it be Uncle Peter or whatever his first name is? I don't feel like looking it up right now to be sure).

There was some good BL moments in Season 1, some nice action, nice social commentary, good soundtrack, Tobias Whale, and the story did try to keep BL as the lead character somewhat. But Season 2 just got boring in spots, and the lack of action, the lack of villain costumes, the lack of superheroics, the poor use, underuse, of characters like The Masters of Disaster and Looker, the focus on family drama above all just lost me.

They even introduced a cool, original character at the end of Season 2, Instant, and I don't think they've even brought him back. From what I saw of Season 3, they had another potential good villain, however he's played by the actor who played Braxton on the Jamie Foxx Show, and it's a failing of mine, but I can't shake Braxton out of my head even though he's did his best, from what I saw, to make this a legit threat to the Pierce Family and to the city of Freeland. Also, Bill Duke is very good as well, but the show is lacking an energy to make it must viewing for me. 

Also, Season 3 opened with Anissa donning a whole new superhero/vigilante identity (with a cool costume) and it felt to me that this is the show the Akils should be writing. Anissa is a much more dynamic, and I'll just say it, masculine, character than Jefferson. They even gave Anissa her own lair and her own Anissamobile. We get to see her various romantic/sexual relationships, she's more rooted in the community (which was supposed to be one of the things that made BL stand out in the comics, IMO). I think both the Anissa and Jennifer actresses are good, and if they had just done a show about an original vigilante character, with the Anissa actress, I might have given that a chance (if I watched the whole pilot of Batwoman I have a high tolerance for pain), and from what I've seen of Anissa the vigilante, she's much more assured and the actress is better.

Like you Emperorjones I thought the show started of better than I expected. Good looking cast; good villains; and they hit a high note on the music selection. Gambi being the brains of the out fit (and even being a reformed agent provocateur) reeked of M.A.N.T.I.S and Blade's folly in that regard. Anissa lesbianism was strident and even her first girlfriend had to drop a comment on being replaced by an Asian chick. I liked the rogues, Lala, Tobias and Jill Scott's characters butI knew trouble was brewing when they took her out so early on. Bill Duke is great.

As far as Black Lightening himself I was able to deal with him as long as he had some agency... being a principal, single dad, husband on the mend, vigilante but when they contrasted all those things is was hard to watch him. The "uncle Gambi" thing is so cloying. The messages and images seen on shows like this speak volume on how Afrakan (so called black) super heroes are repurposed or just straight up purposed to be incomplete and feeble.


Thanks for getting back to me on this. I was eager to see what your thoughts were on the show. I agree with you a lot. I thought Jill Scott-who is underrated as an actress IMO-got underused big time. I know the comics's version of the character was tied to another organization so I was hoping they would bring that piece into it, but it appears they just made Scott's character "Lady Eve" in name only. I do think there have been good actors for the villains, but there's been too little flair. Perhaps the showrunners were going for more realism, but to me, a show about a dude that can shoot lightning out of his hands and wears a costume is already way beyond reality so they should go with it. I think the writing and themes had already set the show apart from the other CW shows, and having more costumed supervillains would not have just turned it into a clone of the Arrowverse shows. Speaking of costumes, I've never loved either of BL's main costumes. When they did that flashback scene like in the first episode, with the comic's accurate costume I thought that was awesome and I wish we had gotten that costume.

The MANTIS comparison is interesting. I loved the original television movie. It had the social commentary, a cool black superhero, and was reminiscent of BL or Luke Cage, now that I think of it. However, I only watched a bit of the television series. I saw that almost every black supporting character (outside of a very beige looking-biracial?-police detective) had been replaced with white characters and that MANTIS had become race-less and generic, so I never kept up with it. It's a shame they didn't get it right there. The MANTIS name, concept, and suit were cool and Carl Lumbly was very good in the role. To a lesser extent, they deracialized Blade, in his own show, starting with Blade Trinity, in the sense that he was sidelined for the new white characters, and this was most egregious in Blade: The Series. Blade Trinity still had Wesley Snipes, and while Kirk Jones was game, he just didn't have the charisma to own the camera even when it was focused on Krista and Marcus.

Back to BL's show, with Anissa being a lesbian I suspected she would get a lot of focus. A "strong black woman" and lesbian to boot, that's Hollywood's jam right now. If she wasn't lesbian she would be with a white male love interest at this point. Though her relationship with Grace is in the comics (I like the depiction there more), Anissa's pro-black politics aren't (from what I've read) and I thought it was sketchy to have her be the most outspoken when it comes to pro-blackness yet dump a black woman for an Asian woman. But that's part of the game too. When you look at Greg Berlanti's shows, he's going to promote homosexuality and interracial relationships and he doesn't have a great track record when it comes to depicting black men. Even after they turned Mr. Terrific gay it took them a couple seasons to not make him a total goof. And now they've turned Batwoman's Luke Fox into a goofy, weak Curtis Holt-like character. James Olsen was poorly handled and the last I saw, he was checked at his job at the Daily Planet, before he left that show. Once they nixed his relationship with Kara all in one episode at the beginning of Season 2, and brought in Mon-El there was no real need or place for the character anymore, so they came up with the Guardian thing to give him something to do, but that ran it's course for them I suppose, and maybe him. He deserves better and more as an actor. Admittedly I did like him as Guardian (really liked that suit; though I wish they had saved the Guardian thing for Arrow's Diggle; and looking back, I wish the actor had been John Henry Irons instead). As for Diggle, there's the interracial thing of course, but him also being super loyal (but not always, to his and the show's credit), and the 'heart' of the team. They made him an ordained minister (I mean, why not? ), an elite soldier who gets showed up constantly by Oliver who only had five years of training on that island, and when Diggle actually becomes Arrow they sort of make him a drug addict who needs some kind of drug (wish they had named it Venom) to stave off nerve damage he had but hadn't told anyone. Martian Manhunter is always being sidelined, forgotten, or punked out, and then they gave him the whole pacifist thing for a second as an excuse for him not to kick ass. Kid Flash and Firestorm were so underused, when they left their respective shows, that didn't mean much at all (I've heard Kid Flash is coming back though).

In comparison, BL gets more focus than any of the other black male CW characters, by dint that he's the 'main' character, but I had a feeling-as I said before-that his daughters would get more shine than him, and we also see his wife fronting on him. Though they've tone that down. In season one, they didn't even let him and his vice-principal have a thing and she was fine. I didn't like the route they took with her character.

I think Joe West-(of course a non-superpowered character) is probably the best depicted black male character in the CW Arrowverse. He had two black wives and he didn't run out or cheat on either of them. He's depicted as a loving father, and he gives good advice, and he's brave and willing to fight to protect others. And Jesse L. Martin usually delivers every time he's on the screen. One could see him fitting the role of the wise old Negro sage to help the white protagonist along (almost a Magical Negro) but still, he's a well-acted, and largely well-written actor.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2019, 02:15:28 am by Emperorjones »

Offline Ture

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4681 on: December 20, 2019, 03:13:44 am »
I will say that artwork looks great, and the dialogue/depictions weren't as frustrating as I've read before. Do they have any Black Panther issues without the dialogue/word balloons? Where you can write your own dialogue?

Also, dead on about Black Lightning. I stopped watching that show. I gave it like one episode this season and that was enough. The first season was much better than I thought it would be. Though going into it, I suspected that when I heard Anissa particularly, but also Jennifer, were going to be on the show, that BL would be sidelined and the show would be more about his daughters, especially Anissa. And even though he was disrespected and checked even in Season 1, by his wife and his daughters, he was reliant on Gambi (a white man, which I'm not tripping too much on because that is like some of the comics I've read; though it does annoy me that Anissa, once again, in particular, never disrespects or challenges Gambi like she does her own father. She's more inclined to listen to his advice. It also is just a pet peeve but I don't like when they call him "Uncle Gambi". Shouldn't it be Uncle Peter or whatever his first name is? I don't feel like looking it up right now to be sure).

There was some good BL moments in Season 1, some nice action, nice social commentary, good soundtrack, Tobias Whale, and the story did try to keep BL as the lead character somewhat. But Season 2 just got boring in spots, and the lack of action, the lack of villain costumes, the lack of superheroics, the poor use, underuse, of characters like The Masters of Disaster and Looker, the focus on family drama above all just lost me.

They even introduced a cool, original character at the end of Season 2, Instant, and I don't think they've even brought him back. From what I saw of Season 3, they had another potential good villain, however he's played by the actor who played Braxton on the Jamie Foxx Show, and it's a failing of mine, but I can't shake Braxton out of my head even though he's did his best, from what I saw, to make this a legit threat to the Pierce Family and to the city of Freeland. Also, Bill Duke is very good as well, but the show is lacking an energy to make it must viewing for me. 

Also, Season 3 opened with Anissa donning a whole new superhero/vigilante identity (with a cool costume) and it felt to me that this is the show the Akils should be writing. Anissa is a much more dynamic, and I'll just say it, masculine, character than Jefferson. They even gave Anissa her own lair and her own Anissamobile. We get to see her various romantic/sexual relationships, she's more rooted in the community (which was supposed to be one of the things that made BL stand out in the comics, IMO). I think both the Anissa and Jennifer actresses are good, and if they had just done a show about an original vigilante character, with the Anissa actress, I might have given that a chance (if I watched the whole pilot of Batwoman I have a high tolerance for pain), and from what I've seen of Anissa the vigilante, she's much more assured and the actress is better.


Like you Emperorjones I thought the show started of better than I expected. Good looking cast; good villains; and they hit a high note on the music selection. Gambi being the brains of the out fit (and even being a reformed agent provocateur) reeked of M.A.N.T.I.S and Blade's folly in that regard. Anissa lesbianism was strident and even her first girlfriend had to drop a comment on being replaced by an Asian chick. I liked the rogues, Lala, Tobias and Jill Scott's characters butI knew trouble was brewing when they took her out so early on. Bill Duke is great.

As far as Black Lightening himself I was able to deal with him as long as he had some agency... being a principal, single dad, husband on the mend, vigilante but when they contrasted all those things is was hard to watch him. The "uncle Gambi" thing is so cloying. The messages and images seen on shows like this speak volume on how Afrakan (so called black) super heroes are repurposed or just straight up purposed to be incomplete and feeble.



Thanks for getting back to me on this. I was eager to see what your thoughts were on the show. I agree with you a lot. I thought Jill Scott-who is underrated as an actress IMO-got underused big time. I know the comics's version of the character was tied to another organization so I was hoping they would bring that piece into it, but it appears they just made Scott's character "Lady Eve" in name only. I do think there have been good actors for the villains, but there's been too little flair. Perhaps the showrunners were going for more realism, but to me, a show about a dude that can shoot lightning out of his hands and wears a costume is already way beyond reality so they should go with it. I think the writing and themes had already set the show apart from the other CW shows, and having more costumed supervillains would not have just turned it into a clone of the Arrowverse shows. Speaking of costumes, I've never loved either of BL's main costumes. When they did that flashback scene like in the first episode, with the comic's accurate costume I thought that was awesome and I wish we had gotten that costume.

The MANTIS comparison is interesting. I loved the original television movie. It had the social commentary, a cool black superhero, and was reminiscent of BL or Luke Cage, now that I think of it. However, I only watched a bit of the television series. I saw that almost every black supporting character (outside of a very beige looking-biracial?-police detective) had been replaced with white characters and that MANTIS had become race-less and generic, so I never kept up with it. It's a shame they didn't get it right there. The MANTIS name, concept, and suit were cool and Carl Lumbly was very good in the role. To a lesser extent, they deracialized Blade, in his own show, starting with Blade Trinity, in the sense that he was sidelined for the new white characters, and this was most egregious in Blade: The Series. Blade Trinity still had Wesley Snipes, and while Kirk Jones was game, he just didn't have the charisma to own the camera even when it was focused on Krista and Marcus.

Back to BL's show, with Anissa being a lesbian I suspected she would get a lot of focus. A "strong black woman" and lesbian to boot, that's Hollywood's jam right now. If she wasn't lesbian she would be with a white male love interest at this point. Though her relationship with Grace is in the comics (I like the depiction there more), Anissa's pro-black politics aren't (from what I've read) and I thought it was sketchy to have her be the most outspoken when it comes to pro-blackness yet dump a black woman for an Asian woman. But that's part of the game too. When you look at Greg Berlanti's shows, he's going to promote homosexuality and interracial relationships and he doesn't have a great track record when it comes to depicting black men. Even after they turned Mr. Terrific gay it took them a couple seasons to not make him a total goof. And now they've turned Batwoman's Luke Fox into a goofy, weak Curtis Holt-like character. James Olsen was poorly handled and the last I saw, he was checked at his job at the Daily Planet, before he left that show. Once they nixed his relationship with Kara all in one episode at the beginning of Season 2, and brought in Mon-El there was no real need or place for the character anymore, so they came up with the Guardian thing to give him something to do, but that ran it's course for them I suppose, and maybe him. He deserves better and more as an actor. Admittedly I did like him as Guardian (really liked that suit; though I wish they had saved the Guardian thing for Arrow's Diggle; and looking back, I wish the actor had been John Henry Irons instead). As for Diggle, there's the interracial thing of course, but him also being super loyal (but not always, to his and the show's credit), and the 'heart' of the team. They made him an ordained minister (I mean, why not? ), an elite soldier who gets showed up constantly by Oliver who only had five years of training on that island, and when Diggle actually becomes Arrow they sort of make him a drug addict who needs some kind of drug (wish they had named it Venom) to stave off nerve damage he had but hadn't told anyone. Martian Manhunter is always being sidelined, forgotten, or punked out, and then they gave him the whole pacifist thing for a second as an excuse for him not to kick ass. Kid Flash and Firestorm were so underused, when they left their respective shows, that didn't mean much at all (I've heard Kid Flash is coming back though).

In comparison, BL gets more focus than any of the other black male CW characters, by dint that he's the 'main' character, but I had a feeling-as I said before-that his daughters would get more shine than him, and we also see his wife fronting on him. Though they've tone that down. In season one, they didn't even let him and his vice-principal have a thing and she was fine. I didn't like the route they took with her character.

I think Joe West-(of course a non-superpowered character) is probably the best depicted black male character in the CW Arrowverse. He had two black wives and he didn't run out or cheat on either of them. He's depicted as a loving father, and he gives good advice, and he's brave and willing to fight to protect others. And Jesse L. Martin usually delivers every time he's on the screen. One could see him fitting the role of the wise old Negro sage to help the white protagonist along (almost a Magical Negro) but still, he's a well-acted, and largely well-written actor.


More than welcome Brother Jones. That is one in-depth article on the state of "Black" CW. This is indicative of their fiction's attempt at termination or at the very least reproductive influence and restructuring of the Afrakan family. First and primary is the removal of ancestral and traditional culture so as to define "black" as just another shade of white. Next is "black" genetic appropriation through inter-racial coupling which despite popular opinion produces bi or multi racial offspring not "black" offspring. I think the point is often overlooked that if a "black" man can produce a "black" child with a white woman it nullifies the need for a "black" woman. Next comes the push for homosexuality which cannot reproduce at all. Thus we witness the so called "black" characters laboring for and venerating the white characters; demonstrating an undying love and devotion while being subordinate and effacing. The message this fiction is promoting is very clear.
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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4682 on: December 25, 2019, 12:50:47 pm »


ALL THE BEST TO THE HEF!
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Offline Emperorjones

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4684 on: December 30, 2019, 03:56:46 am »
I will say that artwork looks great, and the dialogue/depictions weren't as frustrating as I've read before. Do they have any Black Panther issues without the dialogue/word balloons? Where you can write your own dialogue?

Also, dead on about Black Lightning. I stopped watching that show. I gave it like one episode this season and that was enough. The first season was much better than I thought it would be. Though going into it, I suspected that when I heard Anissa particularly, but also Jennifer, were going to be on the show, that BL would be sidelined and the show would be more about his daughters, especially Anissa. And even though he was disrespected and checked even in Season 1, by his wife and his daughters, he was reliant on Gambi (a white man, which I'm not tripping too much on because that is like some of the comics I've read; though it does annoy me that Anissa, once again, in particular, never disrespects or challenges Gambi like she does her own father. She's more inclined to listen to his advice. It also is just a pet peeve but I don't like when they call him "Uncle Gambi". Shouldn't it be Uncle Peter or whatever his first name is? I don't feel like looking it up right now to be sure).

There was some good BL moments in Season 1, some nice action, nice social commentary, good soundtrack, Tobias Whale, and the story did try to keep BL as the lead character somewhat. But Season 2 just got boring in spots, and the lack of action, the lack of villain costumes, the lack of superheroics, the poor use, underuse, of characters like The Masters of Disaster and Looker, the focus on family drama above all just lost me.

They even introduced a cool, original character at the end of Season 2, Instant, and I don't think they've even brought him back. From what I saw of Season 3, they had another potential good villain, however he's played by the actor who played Braxton on the Jamie Foxx Show, and it's a failing of mine, but I can't shake Braxton out of my head even though he's did his best, from what I saw, to make this a legit threat to the Pierce Family and to the city of Freeland. Also, Bill Duke is very good as well, but the show is lacking an energy to make it must viewing for me. 

Also, Season 3 opened with Anissa donning a whole new superhero/vigilante identity (with a cool costume) and it felt to me that this is the show the Akils should be writing. Anissa is a much more dynamic, and I'll just say it, masculine, character than Jefferson. They even gave Anissa her own lair and her own Anissamobile. We get to see her various romantic/sexual relationships, she's more rooted in the community (which was supposed to be one of the things that made BL stand out in the comics, IMO). I think both the Anissa and Jennifer actresses are good, and if they had just done a show about an original vigilante character, with the Anissa actress, I might have given that a chance (if I watched the whole pilot of Batwoman I have a high tolerance for pain), and from what I've seen of Anissa the vigilante, she's much more assured and the actress is better.


Like you Emperorjones I thought the show started of better than I expected. Good looking cast; good villains; and they hit a high note on the music selection. Gambi being the brains of the out fit (and even being a reformed agent provocateur) reeked of M.A.N.T.I.S and Blade's folly in that regard. Anissa lesbianism was strident and even her first girlfriend had to drop a comment on being replaced by an Asian chick. I liked the rogues, Lala, Tobias and Jill Scott's characters butI knew trouble was brewing when they took her out so early on. Bill Duke is great.

As far as Black Lightening himself I was able to deal with him as long as he had some agency... being a principal, single dad, husband on the mend, vigilante but when they contrasted all those things is was hard to watch him. The "uncle Gambi" thing is so cloying. The messages and images seen on shows like this speak volume on how Afrakan (so called black) super heroes are repurposed or just straight up purposed to be incomplete and feeble.



Thanks for getting back to me on this. I was eager to see what your thoughts were on the show. I agree with you a lot. I thought Jill Scott-who is underrated as an actress IMO-got underused big time. I know the comics's version of the character was tied to another organization so I was hoping they would bring that piece into it, but it appears they just made Scott's character "Lady Eve" in name only. I do think there have been good actors for the villains, but there's been too little flair. Perhaps the showrunners were going for more realism, but to me, a show about a dude that can shoot lightning out of his hands and wears a costume is already way beyond reality so they should go with it. I think the writing and themes had already set the show apart from the other CW shows, and having more costumed supervillains would not have just turned it into a clone of the Arrowverse shows. Speaking of costumes, I've never loved either of BL's main costumes. When they did that flashback scene like in the first episode, with the comic's accurate costume I thought that was awesome and I wish we had gotten that costume.

The MANTIS comparison is interesting. I loved the original television movie. It had the social commentary, a cool black superhero, and was reminiscent of BL or Luke Cage, now that I think of it. However, I only watched a bit of the television series. I saw that almost every black supporting character (outside of a very beige looking-biracial?-police detective) had been replaced with white characters and that MANTIS had become race-less and generic, so I never kept up with it. It's a shame they didn't get it right there. The MANTIS name, concept, and suit were cool and Carl Lumbly was very good in the role. To a lesser extent, they deracialized Blade, in his own show, starting with Blade Trinity, in the sense that he was sidelined for the new white characters, and this was most egregious in Blade: The Series. Blade Trinity still had Wesley Snipes, and while Kirk Jones was game, he just didn't have the charisma to own the camera even when it was focused on Krista and Marcus.

Back to BL's show, with Anissa being a lesbian I suspected she would get a lot of focus. A "strong black woman" and lesbian to boot, that's Hollywood's jam right now. If she wasn't lesbian she would be with a white male love interest at this point. Though her relationship with Grace is in the comics (I like the depiction there more), Anissa's pro-black politics aren't (from what I've read) and I thought it was sketchy to have her be the most outspoken when it comes to pro-blackness yet dump a black woman for an Asian woman. But that's part of the game too. When you look at Greg Berlanti's shows, he's going to promote homosexuality and interracial relationships and he doesn't have a great track record when it comes to depicting black men. Even after they turned Mr. Terrific gay it took them a couple seasons to not make him a total goof. And now they've turned Batwoman's Luke Fox into a goofy, weak Curtis Holt-like character. James Olsen was poorly handled and the last I saw, he was checked at his job at the Daily Planet, before he left that show. Once they nixed his relationship with Kara all in one episode at the beginning of Season 2, and brought in Mon-El there was no real need or place for the character anymore, so they came up with the Guardian thing to give him something to do, but that ran it's course for them I suppose, and maybe him. He deserves better and more as an actor. Admittedly I did like him as Guardian (really liked that suit; though I wish they had saved the Guardian thing for Arrow's Diggle; and looking back, I wish the actor had been John Henry Irons instead). As for Diggle, there's the interracial thing of course, but him also being super loyal (but not always, to his and the show's credit), and the 'heart' of the team. They made him an ordained minister (I mean, why not? ), an elite soldier who gets showed up constantly by Oliver who only had five years of training on that island, and when Diggle actually becomes Arrow they sort of make him a drug addict who needs some kind of drug (wish they had named it Venom) to stave off nerve damage he had but hadn't told anyone. Martian Manhunter is always being sidelined, forgotten, or punked out, and then they gave him the whole pacifist thing for a second as an excuse for him not to kick ass. Kid Flash and Firestorm were so underused, when they left their respective shows, that didn't mean much at all (I've heard Kid Flash is coming back though).

In comparison, BL gets more focus than any of the other black male CW characters, by dint that he's the 'main' character, but I had a feeling-as I said before-that his daughters would get more shine than him, and we also see his wife fronting on him. Though they've tone that down. In season one, they didn't even let him and his vice-principal have a thing and she was fine. I didn't like the route they took with her character.

I think Joe West-(of course a non-superpowered character) is probably the best depicted black male character in the CW Arrowverse. He had two black wives and he didn't run out or cheat on either of them. He's depicted as a loving father, and he gives good advice, and he's brave and willing to fight to protect others. And Jesse L. Martin usually delivers every time he's on the screen. One could see him fitting the role of the wise old Negro sage to help the white protagonist along (almost a Magical Negro) but still, he's a well-acted, and largely well-written actor.


More than welcome Brother Jones. That is one in-depth article on the state of "Black" CW. This is indicative of their fiction's attempt at termination or at the very least reproductive influence and restructuring of the Afrakan family. First and primary is the removal of ancestral and traditional culture so as to define "black" as just another shade of white. Next is "black" genetic appropriation through inter-racial coupling which despite popular opinion produces bi or multi racial offspring not "black" offspring. I think the point is often overlooked that if a "black" man can produce a "black" child with a white woman it nullifies the need for a "black" woman. Next comes the push for homosexuality which cannot reproduce at all. Thus we witness the so called "black" characters laboring for and venerating the white characters; demonstrating an undying love and devotion while being subordinate and effacing. The message this fiction is promoting is very clear.


Apologies for not replying sooner, but dead on. It's like you're sitting in an Arrowverse writer's room or something. Though this is a trend that goes far beyond and is almost in every television show or movie now. And I think some of us are so gaga over 'representation' or 'diversity' or 'inclusion' that we will gladly play second fiddle or even humiliate ourselves to either be part of these 'entertainment' offerings or feel 'included' as fans of them.

And I get it, because some of them are sophisticated. They are so close to what I myself want to see, but then there's always some b.s. slid into it. With Black Lightning for example. Great cast, good (but could be better at times) production values and action, have some social consciousness, but there's the other agendas that are being pushed. I imagine HBO's Watchmen to be the same. Or even the more black superheroes (the most we've ever seen at the same time on the small and big screens, but then we see how they are depicted and mostly relegated to the sidelines and it's the same old game again, just with better production values and slightly more 'vocal' at times servant, I mean supporting, characters).

Offline Ezyo

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4685 on: December 31, 2019, 10:21:04 am »
As 2019 is coming to a close, let's look back. What was your favorite badass BP highlights (since there are a ton of moments) of the decade (regardless of the panel or scene that happened next)?

Mine






https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNOP2t9FObw

https://youtu.be/1zdkAdOAhNc


Offline Ture

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4686 on: December 31, 2019, 11:46:34 pm »
Some of mine...

THIS IS


THE BLACK PANTHER


WE HAVE BEEN


WAITING FOR!








THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN ALIVE
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Offline CvilleWakandan

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4687 on: January 01, 2020, 09:46:21 am »
From Stelfreeze for the Marvel voices special. I believe this will be a variant cover. This is the type of non action/drama interactions that Coates is missing.

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Offline Ture

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4688 on: January 03, 2020, 10:26:16 pm »
I will say that artwork looks great, and the dialogue/depictions weren't as frustrating as I've read before. Do they have any Black Panther issues without the dialogue/word balloons? Where you can write your own dialogue?

Also, dead on about Black Lightning. I stopped watching that show. I gave it like one episode this season and that was enough. The first season was much better than I thought it would be. Though going into it, I suspected that when I heard Anissa particularly, but also Jennifer, were going to be on the show, that BL would be sidelined and the show would be more about his daughters, especially Anissa. And even though he was disrespected and checked even in Season 1, by his wife and his daughters, he was reliant on Gambi (a white man, which I'm not tripping too much on because that is like some of the comics I've read; though it does annoy me that Anissa, once again, in particular, never disrespects or challenges Gambi like she does her own father. She's more inclined to listen to his advice. It also is just a pet peeve but I don't like when they call him "Uncle Gambi". Shouldn't it be Uncle Peter or whatever his first name is? I don't feel like looking it up right now to be sure).

There was some good BL moments in Season 1, some nice action, nice social commentary, good soundtrack, Tobias Whale, and the story did try to keep BL as the lead character somewhat. But Season 2 just got boring in spots, and the lack of action, the lack of villain costumes, the lack of superheroics, the poor use, underuse, of characters like The Masters of Disaster and Looker, the focus on family drama above all just lost me.

They even introduced a cool, original character at the end of Season 2, Instant, and I don't think they've even brought him back. From what I saw of Season 3, they had another potential good villain, however he's played by the actor who played Braxton on the Jamie Foxx Show, and it's a failing of mine, but I can't shake Braxton out of my head even though he's did his best, from what I saw, to make this a legit threat to the Pierce Family and to the city of Freeland. Also, Bill Duke is very good as well, but the show is lacking an energy to make it must viewing for me. 

Also, Season 3 opened with Anissa donning a whole new superhero/vigilante identity (with a cool costume) and it felt to me that this is the show the Akils should be writing. Anissa is a much more dynamic, and I'll just say it, masculine, character than Jefferson. They even gave Anissa her own lair and her own Anissamobile. We get to see her various romantic/sexual relationships, she's more rooted in the community (which was supposed to be one of the things that made BL stand out in the comics, IMO). I think both the Anissa and Jennifer actresses are good, and if they had just done a show about an original vigilante character, with the Anissa actress, I might have given that a chance (if I watched the whole pilot of Batwoman I have a high tolerance for pain), and from what I've seen of Anissa the vigilante, she's much more assured and the actress is better.


Like you Emperorjones I thought the show started of better than I expected. Good looking cast; good villains; and they hit a high note on the music selection. Gambi being the brains of the out fit (and even being a reformed agent provocateur) reeked of M.A.N.T.I.S and Blade's folly in that regard. Anissa lesbianism was strident and even her first girlfriend had to drop a comment on being replaced by an Asian chick. I liked the rogues, Lala, Tobias and Jill Scott's characters butI knew trouble was brewing when they took her out so early on. Bill Duke is great.

As far as Black Lightening himself I was able to deal with him as long as he had some agency... being a principal, single dad, husband on the mend, vigilante but when they contrasted all those things is was hard to watch him. The "uncle Gambi" thing is so cloying. The messages and images seen on shows like this speak volume on how Afrakan (so called black) super heroes are repurposed or just straight up purposed to be incomplete and feeble.



Thanks for getting back to me on this. I was eager to see what your thoughts were on the show. I agree with you a lot. I thought Jill Scott-who is underrated as an actress IMO-got underused big time. I know the comics's version of the character was tied to another organization so I was hoping they would bring that piece into it, but it appears they just made Scott's character "Lady Eve" in name only. I do think there have been good actors for the villains, but there's been too little flair. Perhaps the showrunners were going for more realism, but to me, a show about a dude that can shoot lightning out of his hands and wears a costume is already way beyond reality so they should go with it. I think the writing and themes had already set the show apart from the other CW shows, and having more costumed supervillains would not have just turned it into a clone of the Arrowverse shows. Speaking of costumes, I've never loved either of BL's main costumes. When they did that flashback scene like in the first episode, with the comic's accurate costume I thought that was awesome and I wish we had gotten that costume.

The MANTIS comparison is interesting. I loved the original television movie. It had the social commentary, a cool black superhero, and was reminiscent of BL or Luke Cage, now that I think of it. However, I only watched a bit of the television series. I saw that almost every black supporting character (outside of a very beige looking-biracial?-police detective) had been replaced with white characters and that MANTIS had become race-less and generic, so I never kept up with it. It's a shame they didn't get it right there. The MANTIS name, concept, and suit were cool and Carl Lumbly was very good in the role. To a lesser extent, they deracialized Blade, in his own show, starting with Blade Trinity, in the sense that he was sidelined for the new white characters, and this was most egregious in Blade: The Series. Blade Trinity still had Wesley Snipes, and while Kirk Jones was game, he just didn't have the charisma to own the camera even when it was focused on Krista and Marcus.

Back to BL's show, with Anissa being a lesbian I suspected she would get a lot of focus. A "strong black woman" and lesbian to boot, that's Hollywood's jam right now. If she wasn't lesbian she would be with a white male love interest at this point. Though her relationship with Grace is in the comics (I like the depiction there more), Anissa's pro-black politics aren't (from what I've read) and I thought it was sketchy to have her be the most outspoken when it comes to pro-blackness yet dump a black woman for an Asian woman. But that's part of the game too. When you look at Greg Berlanti's shows, he's going to promote homosexuality and interracial relationships and he doesn't have a great track record when it comes to depicting black men. Even after they turned Mr. Terrific gay it took them a couple seasons to not make him a total goof. And now they've turned Batwoman's Luke Fox into a goofy, weak Curtis Holt-like character. James Olsen was poorly handled and the last I saw, he was checked at his job at the Daily Planet, before he left that show. Once they nixed his relationship with Kara all in one episode at the beginning of Season 2, and brought in Mon-El there was no real need or place for the character anymore, so they came up with the Guardian thing to give him something to do, but that ran it's course for them I suppose, and maybe him. He deserves better and more as an actor. Admittedly I did like him as Guardian (really liked that suit; though I wish they had saved the Guardian thing for Arrow's Diggle; and looking back, I wish the actor had been John Henry Irons instead). As for Diggle, there's the interracial thing of course, but him also being super loyal (but not always, to his and the show's credit), and the 'heart' of the team. They made him an ordained minister (I mean, why not? ), an elite soldier who gets showed up constantly by Oliver who only had five years of training on that island, and when Diggle actually becomes Arrow they sort of make him a drug addict who needs some kind of drug (wish they had named it Venom) to stave off nerve damage he had but hadn't told anyone. Martian Manhunter is always being sidelined, forgotten, or punked out, and then they gave him the whole pacifist thing for a second as an excuse for him not to kick ass. Kid Flash and Firestorm were so underused, when they left their respective shows, that didn't mean much at all (I've heard Kid Flash is coming back though).

In comparison, BL gets more focus than any of the other black male CW characters, by dint that he's the 'main' character, but I had a feeling-as I said before-that his daughters would get more shine than him, and we also see his wife fronting on him. Though they've tone that down. In season one, they didn't even let him and his vice-principal have a thing and she was fine. I didn't like the route they took with her character.

I think Joe West-(of course a non-superpowered character) is probably the best depicted black male character in the CW Arrowverse. He had two black wives and he didn't run out or cheat on either of them. He's depicted as a loving father, and he gives good advice, and he's brave and willing to fight to protect others. And Jesse L. Martin usually delivers every time he's on the screen. One could see him fitting the role of the wise old Negro sage to help the white protagonist along (almost a Magical Negro) but still, he's a well-acted, and largely well-written actor.


More than welcome Brother Jones. That is one in-depth article on the state of "Black" CW. This is indicative of their fiction's attempt at termination or at the very least reproductive influence and restructuring of the Afrakan family. First and primary is the removal of ancestral and traditional culture so as to define "black" as just another shade of white. Next is "black" genetic appropriation through inter-racial coupling which despite popular opinion produces bi or multi racial offspring not "black" offspring. I think the point is often overlooked that if a "black" man can produce a "black" child with a white woman it nullifies the need for a "black" woman. Next comes the push for homosexuality which cannot reproduce at all. Thus we witness the so called "black" characters laboring for and venerating the white characters; demonstrating an undying love and devotion while being subordinate and effacing. The message this fiction is promoting is very clear.


Apologies for not replying sooner, but dead on. It's like you're sitting in an Arrowverse writer's room or something. Though this is a trend that goes far beyond and is almost in every television show or movie now. And I think some of us are so gaga over 'representation' or 'diversity' or 'inclusion' that we will gladly play second fiddle or even humiliate ourselves to either be part of these 'entertainment' offerings or feel 'included' as fans of them.

And I get it, because some of them are sophisticated. They are so close to what I myself want to see, but then there's always some b.s. slid into it. With Black Lightning for example. Great cast, good (but could be better at times) production values and action, have some social consciousness, but there's the other agendas that are being pushed. I imagine HBO's Watchmen to be the same. Or even the more black superheroes (the most we've ever seen at the same time on the small and big screens, but then we see how they are depicted and mostly relegated to the sidelines and it's the same old game again, just with better production values and slightly more 'vocal' at times servant, I mean supporting, characters).

My turn to apologize Emperorjones. I will respond to this on my next go round, I haven't forgotten you my friend.
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Offline Ture

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4689 on: January 06, 2020, 11:49:15 pm »
Right on to what you said Emperorjones. Such terms as representation, diversity, inclusion are nothing more than contemporary catchphrases restating assimilation and integration into white culture through the sacrifice Afrakan traditions and cultural norms as manifested here in the US. The Black Panther film easily and clearly demonstrated that such actions are neither necessarily desired nor profitable.

This is why I cape for BP because he has an inherent in-story reason clearly stated by Hudlin as to why such behavior wouldn't apply to the Wakandans and the movie did a fine job of visualizing what such an outlook would be seen as. The Arrowverse and Black Lightening can champion for representation, diversity, inclusion and the LGBTQ while the Black Panther goes all in for Afrakan centered fictional and non-fictional histories and contemporary tales of an unconquered and unbowed nation and its people bathed in Afrofuturism and unfettered Afrakan culture. Something for everyone.
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Offline Emperorjones

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4690 on: January 07, 2020, 12:58:48 pm »
Right on to what you said Emperorjones. Such terms as representation, diversity, inclusion are nothing more than contemporary catchphrases restating assimilation and integration into white culture through the sacrifice Afrakan traditions and cultural norms as manifested here in the US. The Black Panther film easily and clearly demonstrated that such actions are neither necessarily desired nor profitable.

This is why I cape for BP because he has an inherent in-story reason clearly stated by Hudlin as to why such behavior wouldn't apply to the Wakandans and the movie did a fine job of visualizing what such an outlook would be seen as. The Arrowverse and Black Lightening can champion for representation, diversity, inclusion and the LGBTQ while the Black Panther goes all in for Afrakan centered fictional and non-fictional histories and contemporary tales of an unconquered and unbowed nation and its people bathed in Afrofuturism and unfettered Afrakan culture. Something for everyone.


I agree a lot with what you say here Ture, though I am not as enthusiastic about Black Panther, or more so Disney/MCU for the films or Marvel editorial for the comics. I often feel Black Panther and Wakanda has such great potential, but is not consistently realized, and sometimes not realized at all, or much at all.

I will give Black Lightning some credit. It is infused with a black cultural sensibility, but one that is often just below the surface. I won't say its surface level, but more like Cliff Notes, like someone has taken a course or two in African-American Studies. And that's more than what we get on the other Arrowverse shows. It was like once a season James Olsen might talk about race, but I don't recall race ever coming up on Flash (despite Barry being a white man raised in a black household; seems like a no-brainer to actually have him show some fondness for black culture and not just have the hots for Iris, or even have him have experienced some alienation or estrangement, feeling like an outsider, but we don't get that. Instead we get the everyone's the same (white) approach, which still results in black culture/experience being erased), and Diggle has made one joke about his race that I can recall, but in general, race is never mentioned on Arrow either. Legends of Tomorrow has looked at the issue, twice to my recollection, with an episode set in the antebellum South and one during segregation. But in general these shows are pretty white. Instead these shows push a Benetton style illusion.

To be fair, most of these shows don't address other social issues either. From what I've seen, Supergirl has been the most out there when it comes to the "SJW" stuff. I stopped watching Legends, so I don't know how much of the SJW agenda they promote. I get the shows being mostly politically and controversy averse, but I still find it strange that Green Arrow, who has to be the most famous liberal superhero, was pretty apolitical on Arrow, even when he was mayor. I get why the producers were skittish about having him pick a side when his show was just getting started, but to then go the political route and not be true to his comics' political orientation was disappointing and a missed opportunity. They remade Oliver too much into a small screen Bruce Wayne.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2020, 01:04:00 pm by Emperorjones »

Offline Ture

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4691 on: January 18, 2020, 10:14:48 pm »

Marvel Preview: Black Panther #20
“THE INTERGALACTIC EMPIRE OF WAKANDA” WAKANDA UNBOUND part 2! THE DJALIA UNDER ASSAULT – FROM ITS KING?! To unite the two empires of Wakanda, the Black Panther must destroy a vital piece of his own nation — the plane of all Wakandan memory and home to the griot spirits who have guided him throughout his rule as king. Can he do it? Can T’Challa banish his own father’s spirit? And will the cost be worth the gain?















Additional pages courtesy of CBR's KingNomarch







This helps to explain why Iron Heart is in Wakanda building WMD.

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Offline Ture

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4692 on: January 23, 2020, 04:16:43 pm »
Coates' BLACK PANTHER #20
in no particular order


Coates must have some sort of imperative that T'Challa be reminded of fear, rage, despair and shame. Don't forget the obligatory bowed head and depressed facial expression.



Armada?!? Five Flights (whatever those are), three Mackandal flagships, marroon tech arms, Midnight Angels gear upgrade and they paid for this?!? How far Wakanda has fallen.





Luke Cage, Falcon, Photon and Misty Knight are who you call when you're about to engage in a war with a five galaxies spanning empire bred for combat over thousands of years.

That imperative I made mention of must extend to the reading audience as we too are forced to remember the Black Order assault; the Desturi revolution; Namor's inundation. All that is missing is Doomwar.



Storm is the goddess, Storm is the key, Storm is fearsome, Storm is the inspiration. I forgot who's comic book this is.



Killvenom looking at the man in the mirror and asking him to make a change.



Oh wait a battle scene... never mind.



The sense shattering ending.


It's just more of the same.


Speaking of such here is an upcoming cover.



Doesn't look like t'Challa will have the power. SMH.
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Offline CvilleWakandan

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4693 on: January 23, 2020, 04:55:43 pm »
Lackluster for sure. If they had said they were building space fighters and upgrading N'Yami Carriers for deep space with the intention of having a DS9 style battle It'd make sense. Ground forces should be good with what they already have. The only one of those allies that is truly useful in this situation is Monica. And in this fight she's more of a threat than Stoem.

Doomwar was part of the Destari revolution so it's in there too. Lol.

I saw one review give it a 4 out of 10. Basically saying the same stuff we say.
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Offline Ezyo

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Re: Cosmic Revelations and Enslavement for the Damisa-Sarki Coate's Black Panther
« Reply #4694 on: January 23, 2020, 06:47:45 pm »
I think it's a tragedy that when someone finally has bast get questioned for why she bounced, it's not T'Challa, and worse yet she is portrayed as a child both physically and mentally as well. And yeah, Coates goes on to gush all about Storm. How much praise he gave you would think this was her book and Eden was her main supporting cast. Since theybare so critical to the success of Wakanda