Author Topic: HISTORY IS MADE: WORLD OF WAKANDA, A SECOND BLACK PANTHER ONGOING IS ANNOUNCED  (Read 16774 times)

Offline The Wakandan

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

It appears that will be the case. Coates said on Thursday that Aneka and Ayo won't be showing up as much from #5 onward. Same with Zenzi.

It explains why the MAs and Zenzi will be featured first in the new book.

Offline Emperorjones

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.



Homosexuals beg beg beg for books about them.

Now we will see if they will put their money where their mouth is honestly. And will it being an african couple affect that?

Issue #1 will be SUPER telling.

I think the first issue will be a big seller, like how Black Panther #1 was a big seller. I don't think see the Midnight Angels book selling as well or higher, but still the first issue should do well. I'm more curious about how it will do after that. I do think it will be interesting to see what audience, if any exists for this book, and if it will be supported by LGBTQ readers, black feminist readers, and white liberals, which I think are the audiences this book might appeal to the most, and will likely need their support to be successful. So I am very curious indeed if the support is there for black/African lesbian characters in stories that take place in Africa.

I mean if a white American lesbian like Batwoman, and that wasn't a bad book from what I read of it, didn't connect with audiences, Marvel is taking a chance with the Midnight Angels. That being said, I can at least give Marvel credit for taking a chance. For years they have been very skittish, but perhaps they realize they are going to have to be more bold (yet largely within the confines of white male control) to reach diverse audiences and to get headlines and buzz.

Though right off it seems like Marvel didn't have super confidence in the Midnight Angels idea because they used Black Panther to set the stage and even their own book is not called Midnight Angels or Ayo & Aneka. World of Wakanda sounds too vague and more like an anthology series. So there seems to be a bit of obfuscation around this project, first using Black Panther and now hiding them behind a vague title. If they are just going to do their series, name it the Midnight Angels. It sounds cooler.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2016, 05:32:38 pm by Emperorjones »

Offline MindofShadow

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im curious to see how many T'challa fans pick it up...


Offline The Wakandan

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im curious to see how many T'challa fans pick it up...

T'challa fans specifically? Ehhhh.....not as many as one would think.

Offline Emperorjones

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I will say though that I understand the sentiment about getting Geoff Johns. That one moment with Red Skull was more affirming than anything Coates's has written thus far. Coates to me has turned Black Panther from a potential black (lowercase b) power (lowercase p) power fantasy into a smorgasbord of intriguing ideas but dubious execution that he thinks will appeal to his white liberal friends and bosses. Only Priest and Hudlin have come closest to fulfilling Black Panther's potential to be an Afrofuturistic kick ass title that affirms black life, and inside of that black manhood in a way that many white comics do all the time for various characters.

So far the War Machine funeral issue written by Nick Spencer was one of the 'blackest' comic book issues I've read in a long time. And for the most part Spencer has treated Wilson's Cap with a respect that Coates has not for Black Panther. I recently subscribed to the Cap book to show my support. And while I haven't cared for David Walker's Power Man and Iron Fist, his second issue of Nighthawk hit it on the head in dealing with police brutality. The book has a political consciousness that captures Nighthawk's (black) anger fairly well for a mainstream comic. Why Coates, who made his bones writing about black issues, has yet to come up with something remotely close to that is beyond me. I know he has it in him yet he refuses to put it on the page. Right now is definitely not the time to show the most powerful black man on the planet beaten, on his knees, bleeding, or dithering, unable to defend himself or his people.

I was just about to type a similar sentiment. That he's writing a milquetoast black power character, as so not to upset the sensibilities of white liberals/moderates who are open-minded but have been proven to be easily shaken when there's just "too much blackness" all at once. ESPECIALLY when it comes to fantasy that shows that they're not being relied on by blacks.

As for Nick Spencer and Captain America #10. The fact that he was "blacker" than Coates, the writer who IS KNOWN for "blacking it up", just re-affirms that Coates is playing it safe. It's pathetic. The same thing with these three issues of Nighthawk by Walker. Neither of them are as timid and as tepid as Coates is being.

With Coates, the black writer who is known for preaching about how bad it is for black folks, the fact that he's too timid to write a fullblown black fantasy remedy of that, is more telling than he thinks.

Good point about the audience, though I don't know how open minded they really are if they only want to see a shackled T'Challa. So right about people not liking the idea of blacks not needing them, of not being in a subordinate position. I wonder if Coates is under the false belief that he has to prove himself to his white patrons by not being too black or writing too black with Panther.

Offline Emperorjones

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im curious to see how many T'challa fans pick it up...

Yeah. I'm curious about that too. Right now, I'm skipping it.

Offline Salustrade

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I really thank God for HEF.

This is the one place I can come to discuss about the BP mythos freely.

Offline MindofShadow

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With Coates, the black writer who is known for preaching about how bad it is for black folks, the fact that he's too timid to write a fullblown black fantasy remedy of that, is more telling than he thinks.



Offline The Wakandan

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.



Homosexuals beg beg beg for books about them.

Now we will see if they will put their money where their mouth is honestly. And will it being an african couple affect that?

Issue #1 will be SUPER telling.

I think the first issue will be a big seller, like how Black Panther #1 was a big seller. I don't think see the Midnight Angels book selling as well or higher, but still the first issue should do well. I'm more curious about how it will do after that. I do think it will be interesting to see what audience, if any exists for this book, and if it will be supported by LGBTQ readers, black feminist readers, and white liberals, which I think are the audiences this book might appeal to the most, and will likely need their support to be successful. So I am very curious indeed if the support is there for black/African lesbian characters in stories that take place in Africa.

I mean if a white American lesbian like Batwoman, and that wasn't a bad book from what I read of it, didn't connect with audiences, Marvel is taking a chance with the Midnight Angels. That being said, I can at least give Marvel credit for taking a chance. For years they have been very skittish, but perhaps they realize they are going to have to be more bold (yet largely within the confines of white male control) to reach diverse audiences and to get headlines and buzz.

Though right off it seems like Marvel didn't have super confidence in the Midnight Angels idea because they used Black Panther to set the stage and even their own book is not called Midnight Angels or Ayo & Aneka. World of Wakanda sounds too vague and more like an anthology series. So there seems to be a bit of obfuscation around this project, first using Black Panther and now hiding them behind a vague title. If they are just going to do their series, name it the Midnight Angels. It sounds cooler.

I don't think the BP: WoW book is intended to be a Midnight Angels book. From what I understand, it'll be a BP book that focuses on BP supporting characters. It just so happens that the MAs (and Zenzi for the first issue) are the focus for the first arc, probably to coincide with their appearance in the main BP book.

They have plenty of options after the first arc. The next arcs can focus on Shuri, Tetu, Changamire, Ramonda, T'Chaka and the Previous Panthers, the Dora Milaje as a unit, characters from the Priest run (Okoye, QDJ, Hunter, Kasper Cole), Taku, or any combination of those characters. Either way, I think it'll be a book in which characters who don't get much shine or don't show up in the main book can have some exposure and development, which is a good thing in the long run for the BP franchise.

Offline Ezyo

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.



Homosexuals beg beg beg for books about them.

Now we will see if they will put their money where their mouth is honestly. And will it being an african couple affect that?

Issue #1 will be SUPER telling.

I think the first issue will be a big seller, like how Black Panther #1 was a big seller. I don't think see the Midnight Angels book selling as well or higher, but still the first issue should do well. I'm more curious about how it will do after that. I do think it will be interesting to see what audience, if any exists for this book, and if it will be supported by LGBTQ readers, black feminist readers, and white liberals, which I think are the audiences this book might appeal to the most, and will likely need their support to be successful. So I am very curious indeed if the support is there for black/African lesbian characters in stories that take place in Africa.

I mean if a white American lesbian like Batwoman, and that wasn't a bad book from what I read of it, didn't connect with audiences, Marvel is taking a chance with the Midnight Angels. That being said, I can at least give Marvel credit for taking a chance. For years they have been very skittish, but perhaps they realize they are going to have to be more bold (yet largely within the confines of white male control) to reach diverse audiences and to get headlines and buzz.

Though right off it seems like Marvel didn't have super confidence in the Midnight Angels idea because they used Black Panther to set the stage and even their own book is not called Midnight Angels or Ayo & Aneka. World of Wakanda sounds too vague and more like an anthology series. So there seems to be a bit of obfuscation around this project, first using Black Panther and now hiding them behind a vague title. If they are just going to do their series, name it the Midnight Angels. It sounds cooler.

I don't think the BP: WoW book is intended to be a Midnight Angels book. From what I understand, it'll be a BP book that focuses on BP supporting characters. It just so happens that the MAs (and Zenzi for the first issue) are the focus for the first arc, probably to coincide with their appearance in the main BP book.

They have plenty of options after the first arc. The next arcs can focus on Shuri, Tetu, Changamire, Ramonda, T'Chaka and the Previous Panthers, the Dora Milaje as a unit, characters from the Priest run (Okoye, QDJ, Hunter, Kasper Cole), Taku, or any combination of those characters. Either way, I think it'll be a book in which characters who don't get much shine or don't show up in the main book can have some exposure and development, which is a good thing in the long run for the BP franchise.

I would be fine with the book if when T'Challa showed up he was portrayed as he looks in other books he makes guest appearances in tbh

Offline The Wakandan

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.



Homosexuals beg beg beg for books about them.

Now we will see if they will put their money where their mouth is honestly. And will it being an african couple affect that?

Issue #1 will be SUPER telling.

I think the first issue will be a big seller, like how Black Panther #1 was a big seller. I don't think see the Midnight Angels book selling as well or higher, but still the first issue should do well. I'm more curious about how it will do after that. I do think it will be interesting to see what audience, if any exists for this book, and if it will be supported by LGBTQ readers, black feminist readers, and white liberals, which I think are the audiences this book might appeal to the most, and will likely need their support to be successful. So I am very curious indeed if the support is there for black/African lesbian characters in stories that take place in Africa.

I mean if a white American lesbian like Batwoman, and that wasn't a bad book from what I read of it, didn't connect with audiences, Marvel is taking a chance with the Midnight Angels. That being said, I can at least give Marvel credit for taking a chance. For years they have been very skittish, but perhaps they realize they are going to have to be more bold (yet largely within the confines of white male control) to reach diverse audiences and to get headlines and buzz.

Though right off it seems like Marvel didn't have super confidence in the Midnight Angels idea because they used Black Panther to set the stage and even their own book is not called Midnight Angels or Ayo & Aneka. World of Wakanda sounds too vague and more like an anthology series. So there seems to be a bit of obfuscation around this project, first using Black Panther and now hiding them behind a vague title. If they are just going to do their series, name it the Midnight Angels. It sounds cooler.

I don't think the BP: WoW book is intended to be a Midnight Angels book. From what I understand, it'll be a BP book that focuses on BP supporting characters. It just so happens that the MAs (and Zenzi for the first issue) are the focus for the first arc, probably to coincide with their appearance in the main BP book.

They have plenty of options after the first arc. The next arcs can focus on Shuri, Tetu, Changamire, Ramonda, T'Chaka and the Previous Panthers, the Dora Milaje as a unit, characters from the Priest run (Okoye, QDJ, Hunter, Kasper Cole), Taku, or any combination of those characters. Either way, I think it'll be a book in which characters who don't get much shine or don't show up in the main book can have some exposure and development, which is a good thing in the long run for the BP franchise.

I would be fine with the book if when T'Challa showed up he was portrayed as he looks in other books he makes guest appearances in tbh

And that's fine, I def understand that perspective. That said, the barometer of success for this book shouldn't just be how T'Challa is portrayed, whenever he shows up. If the supporting character don't get good showing along the way, especially if they are the focus of the book, it defeats the book's purpose.

It's no different than the dynamic we've saw with the first arc of the main BP book. A lot of the supporting characters got great looks but if T'Challa doesn't get his along the way when its all said and done, especially as the supposed focus of the book, it defeats the purpose of him having his book.

Lastly, it's possible that the book may focus on characters that may have an unfavorable view of T'Challa (MAs and Zenzi are possibilities of that. Tetu too if they go there, or even Hunter if they ever touch on him). That T'Challa isn't portrayed in the most favorable light would be understandable, being that it's from their perspective (he should still be competent regardless of who's perspective we're reading it from). Hence why it's important for the main BP to balance it out a bit, as it will focus more on T'Challa's perspective.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2016, 11:39:05 am by The Wakandan »

Offline Salustrade

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From this.....




To this.




How many points is that for T'Challa again?

Offline The Evasive 1

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LOL! As disappointed I am in Coates right now, I do find it humorous that I am seeing more and more folks on here with the same negative feelings. first, I thought it was just me. Then, I saw there were a few others. Even with the usual ones who stand by whatever writer that comes along and "keep hope alive" regardless of the continuing proof that a writer is not doing justice to the BP mythos, there are more folks not accepting any writer who claims they are fan of BP without proof in writing. I've been on some other forums and Facebook pages all supposedly honoring BP, but alot of the folks there are recent BP fans and have no real concept of how deep the mythos goes. They're all on board with Coates because to them they're just happy there is a black super hero they fell in love with on screen and they believe a black writer of urban social issues is going to do justice to the comic. You wouldn't believe the false facts you still see from supposed BP fans that when someone who has followed the characters for years challenges them they either don't know how to answer or double down in their ignorance. Heck, alot of them never even picked up a comic before Coates showed up. Now this hand picked feminist by Coates is coming along and I am wary as to what honor (or damage) she will do to the BP mythos. It's really disheartening because I want to support black comic writers, but I think Marvel has gotten in the habit of not picking actual comic writers but rather go for a black person known in another venue and throw them at black comic characters regardless of whether that's a character they will take to heart and write well. I guess the idea is as long as they're black, fans (especially black fans) will just roll with it and be happy with what they got. Maybe they're right. I guess the jury is still out.

Anyway, to echo someone's earlier post, I am glad there is the HEF where I can read, discuss or comment with actual longtime and new fans (who read up on BP history even pre-Priest) to have actual meaningful debates and discussions.

Offline True Father 7

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.

I will say though that I understand the sentiment about getting Geoff Johns. That one moment with Red Skull was more affirming than anything Coates's has written thus far. Coates to me has turned Black Panther from a potential black (lowercase b) power (lowercase p) power fantasy into a smorgasbord of intriguing ideas but dubious execution that he thinks will appeal to his white liberal friends and bosses. Only Priest and Hudlin have come closest to fulfilling Black Panther's potential to be an Afrofuturistic kick ass title that affirms black life, and inside of that black manhood in a way that many white comics do all the time for various characters.

So far the War Machine funeral issue written by Nick Spencer was one of the 'blackest' comic book issues I've read in a long time. And for the most part Spencer has treated Wilson's Cap with a respect that Coates has not for Black Panther. I recently subscribed to the Cap book to show my support. And while I haven't cared for David Walker's Power Man and Iron Fist, his second issue of Nighthawk hit it on the head in dealing with police brutality. The book has a political consciousness that captures Nighthawk's (black) anger fairly well for a mainstream comic. Why Coates, who made his bones writing about black issues, has yet to come up with something remotely close to that is beyond me. I know he has it in him yet he refuses to put it on the page. Right now is definitely not the time to show the most powerful black man on the planet beaten, on his knees, bleeding, or dithering, unable to defend himself or his people.

Coates is the Obama of comic books, lol. Didn't really do anything for black people unless you were gay as Dr. Umar Johnson has built on. What War Machine funeral issue are you referring to and I really need to check out NightHawk
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Offline Ezyo

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Arc 2 is going to be key for Coates run. If you saw his two most recent interviews they have been the most positive ones to date in regards to T'Challa, and it sounds like he may be coming correct (depending on how well he transitions what he writes and the art to follow it) and having T'challa drive the story more. We will see, i hope he gets it right because at this point i don't think new readers can stand T'Challa not getting a win after 4 issues.