Author Topic: HISTORY IS MADE: WORLD OF WAKANDA, A SECOND BLACK PANTHER ONGOING IS ANNOUNCED  (Read 20063 times)

Offline The Wakandan

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Arc 2 is going to be key for Coates run. If you saw his two most recent interviews they have been the most positive ones to date in regards to T'Challa, and it sounds like he may be coming correct (depending on how well he transitions what he writes and the art to follow it) and having T'challa drive the story more. We will see, i hope he gets it right because at this point i don't think new readers can stand T'Challa not getting a win after 4 issues. 

The underlined is so true, starting with issue 5. If it doesn't happen then, I doubt it'll happen in the next arc.

Only a week away, thankfully.

Offline Emperorjones

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.

I will say though that I understand the sentiment about getting Geoff Johns. That one moment with Red Skull was more affirming than anything Coates's has written thus far. Coates to me has turned Black Panther from a potential black (lowercase b) power (lowercase p) power fantasy into a smorgasbord of intriguing ideas but dubious execution that he thinks will appeal to his white liberal friends and bosses. Only Priest and Hudlin have come closest to fulfilling Black Panther's potential to be an Afrofuturistic kick ass title that affirms black life, and inside of that black manhood in a way that many white comics do all the time for various characters.

So far the War Machine funeral issue written by Nick Spencer was one of the 'blackest' comic book issues I've read in a long time. And for the most part Spencer has treated Wilson's Cap with a respect that Coates has not for Black Panther. I recently subscribed to the Cap book to show my support. And while I haven't cared for David Walker's Power Man and Iron Fist, his second issue of Nighthawk hit it on the head in dealing with police brutality. The book has a political consciousness that captures Nighthawk's (black) anger fairly well for a mainstream comic. Why Coates, who made his bones writing about black issues, has yet to come up with something remotely close to that is beyond me. I know he has it in him yet he refuses to put it on the page. Right now is definitely not the time to show the most powerful black man on the planet beaten, on his knees, bleeding, or dithering, unable to defend himself or his people.

Coates is the Obama of comic books, lol. Didn't really do anything for black people unless you were gay as Dr. Umar Johnson has built on. What War Machine funeral issue are you referring to and I really need to check out NightHawk

I think it was Sam Wilson Captain America #10. Coates is the comic book industry Obama. Man that's cold.  ;D

Offline A.Curry

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In a way I'm glad for this new series because maybe Coates can now focus more on T'Challa and this book gives space for Ayo and Aneka to grow as characters without sucking up so much oxygen in the Panther series.

As for the success of the series I'm skeptical. For one we all know how tough it is traditionally for non-white characters to sell, and its worst for black female characters. Plus the characters are non-American and that's another knock for their saleability.

The homosexual aspect will be interesting to see if that alters how the book will sell. While Batwoman floundered I think Midnighter is still selling, however that might not have any impact on this series do to the racial and nationality makeup of the Midnight Angels.

I will say though that I understand the sentiment about getting Geoff Johns. That one moment with Red Skull was more affirming than anything Coates's has written thus far. Coates to me has turned Black Panther from a potential black (lowercase b) power (lowercase p) power fantasy into a smorgasbord of intriguing ideas but dubious execution that he thinks will appeal to his white liberal friends and bosses. Only Priest and Hudlin have come closest to fulfilling Black Panther's potential to be an Afrofuturistic kick ass title that affirms black life, and inside of that black manhood in a way that many white comics do all the time for various characters.

So far the War Machine funeral issue written by Nick Spencer was one of the 'blackest' comic book issues I've read in a long time. And for the most part Spencer has treated Wilson's Cap with a respect that Coates has not for Black Panther. I recently subscribed to the Cap book to show my support. And while I haven't cared for David Walker's Power Man and Iron Fist, his second issue of Nighthawk hit it on the head in dealing with police brutality. The book has a political consciousness that captures Nighthawk's (black) anger fairly well for a mainstream comic. Why Coates, who made his bones writing about black issues, has yet to come up with something remotely close to that is beyond me. I know he has it in him yet he refuses to put it on the page. Right now is definitely not the time to show the most powerful black man on the planet beaten, on his knees, bleeding, or dithering, unable to defend himself or his people.

Coates is the Obama of comic books, lol. Didn't really do anything for black people unless you were gay as Dr. Umar Johnson has built on. What War Machine funeral issue are you referring to and I really need to check out NightHawk

Lol...kinda funny though one possibly could argue Obama did some things for black people on the low key...like how he diminished a lot of minor sentences for prisoners and freed them (sure a good deal of them were black), appointed black people to certain posts, and other things that were under the guise of helping many.  Agree he Could've done more...but it's not like he could be Huey P. Newton and be president.  Heck, some whites think he's secretly a black nationalist as it is.

Seriously though, Dr. Umar Johnson?  Dude is problematic mostly when it comes to certain arguments.  Saw him at a forum once and he couldn't back up most of his theories with anything more than hyperbole and dismissive rhetoric when questioned by real academics.  As divisive a "prophet" as they come.  Though yes, I know he actually has a PHD.

It's unfortunate though that Coates couldn't address the issues he obviously feels a need to without diminishing T'Challa and Wakanda...as I said before...this could've been done WAY better and more intelligently if he had a better understanding and appreciation for the character and Wakanda.  He could've used the vision of Wakanda and Panther along with the two Doras to address the very REAL gender and queer issues existing in real neighboring African countries instead of having rape camps in Wakanda.

To quote my boy Ture from the "reparations" thread: "Coates' penchant for talking points around monarchies, democracy, feminism, and such can all be read just not at the expense of T'Challa the Black Panther nor Wakanda".

Also agree about Spencer and Sam Wilson...even his writing of Misty Knight is on point...though I do hope sooner or later Sam can go back to or get his own identity without borrowing from the legacy of Cap's name.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2016, 02:56:00 pm by A.Curry »