Poll

Should the MCU Recast T'Challa the Black Panther

Yes, for an actor who will further the Black Panther tradition started by Chadwick Boseman
5 (83.3%)
No, because there is no MCU Black Panther without Chadwick Boseman.
0 (0%)
Too soon for me to say.
1 (16.7%)

Total Members Voted: 6

Author Topic: HEF of BP - Alex Simmons on the History of Black Panther  (Read 33190 times)

Offline Ture

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Re: HEF of BP - There may be some who know better than others...
« Reply #150 on: November 24, 2020, 10:19:56 pm »


Imagine R to the H (if I may Supreme?) doing his own live action Disney+ Black Panther series with an all new cast. World War Wakanda would work so well especially with the whole multiverse opening up.

Could this be an answer to the future of the BP franchise.

Maybe Marvel doesn't do any more BP films with the original cast. For all we know Letia may not even want to play Shuri taking the mantle of Black Panther. Maybe Civil War, Black Panther, Infinity War and Endgame conclude the Boseman era. They instead do a reboot on Disney+. Would that satisfy those claiming respect for Chadwick Boseman's legacy?

How about possibly delaying the film for another 2 years to get the first season out and explain this is another universe, I don;t know possibly the 710 universe (shameless plug...) and have that universe's T'Challa be exchanged with the MCU universe known as Earth-199999 by some strange magic or what have you. Possibly solving the recast situation.

What if Marvel keeps BP Disney+ separate from the BP movie franchise? What if Earth-199999 T'Challa got lost in space and winds up doing the Empire of Wakanda more along the lines of Hudlin's Black to the Future on the streaming service and what if because of this Shuri has to become the new BP in the MCU verse for the next film. Would that appease the "fans"?

Or, or they could simply recast T'Challa go forward with original movie franchise for several films and do a wholly original take based on Priest's BP and go Game of Thrones with Wakanda on their streaming platform. Marvel must know by now that the world can't get enough of the Black Panther, That is why they can't kill T'Challa. Black Panther Forever.







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Re: HEF of BP - There may be some who know better than others...
« Reply #151 on: November 29, 2020, 04:05:52 pm »


Imagine R to the H (if I may Supreme?) doing his own live action Disney+ Black Panther series with an all new cast. World War Wakanda would work so well especially with the whole multiverse opening up.

Could this be an answer to the future of the BP franchise.

Maybe Marvel doesn't do any more BP films with the original cast. For all we know Letia may not even want to play Shuri taking the mantle of Black Panther. Maybe Civil War, Black Panther, Infinity War and Endgame conclude the Boseman era. They instead do a reboot on Disney+. Would that satisfy those claiming respect for Chadwick Boseman's legacy?

How about possibly delaying the film for another 2 years to get the first season out and explain this is another universe, I don;t know possibly the 710 universe (shameless plug...) and have that universe's T'Challa be exchanged with the MCU universe known as Earth-199999 by some strange magic or what have you. Possibly solving the recast situation.

What if Marvel keeps BP Disney+ separate from the BP movie franchise? What if Earth-199999 T'Challa got lost in space and winds up doing the Empire of Wakanda more along the lines of Hudlin's Black to the Future on the streaming service and what if because of this Shuri has to become the new BP in the MCU verse for the next film. Would that appease the "fans"?

Or, or they could simply recast T'Challa go forward with original movie franchise for several films and do a wholly original take based on Priest's BP and go Game of Thrones with Wakanda on their streaming platform. Marvel must know by now that the world can't get enough of the Black Panther, That is why they can't kill T'Challa. Black Panther Forever.







29522


My reaction to all the goodness contained in the above post:




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Re: HEF of BP - There may be some who know better than others...
« Reply #152 on: December 05, 2020, 04:34:25 pm »
That's wassup Bro. Supreme. Thanks for the luv.
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Re: HEF of BP - There may be some who know better than others...
« Reply #153 on: December 05, 2020, 05:38:26 pm »
Marvel star Letitia Wright LIKES tweets calling for her to be recast and Black Panther sequel to be cancelled as she is slammed online for sharing COVID anti-vax video asking if the vaccine will implant 5G antennas inside people...

Black Panther star Letitia Wright, 27, is facing calls for her to be recast in the movie's sequel after her online comments about a COVID-19 vaccine. The British actress herself liked tweets that read ‘cancel Black Panther 2 immediately’ and ‘nah she needs to be recast’. Wright faced the backlash after she posted a YouTube clip that questioned the efficacy of the coronavirus jab on Thursday night. She was even slammed by Marvel co-star Don Cheadle who called it 'garbage'. Wright doubled down Friday, saying she wanted to raise her fears about vaccines. She added that people are 'canceled' as soon as they 'don't conform to popular opinions', possibly referencing the calls for her to be recast. Marvel Studios or its owners Disney have not commented on the controversy. The franchise has previously replaced actors such as Edward Norton who was replaced by Mark Ruffalo as The Hulk.

By FRANCES MULRANEY and CHRIS JEWERS and JAMES GANT FOR MAILONLINE

full article
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9019729/Marvel-star-Letitia-Wright-LIKES-tweets-calling-recast-Black-Panther-sequel.html
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Re: HEF of BP - Eric Jerome Dickey Has Died
« Reply #154 on: January 05, 2021, 11:42:16 pm »
Author Eric Jerome Dickey Has Died At 59
HE PASSED AWAY ON JANUARY 3 AFTER A LENGTHY ILLNESS.



We are saddened to report on the January 3 death of New York Times bestselling author Eric Jerome Dickey. The news was confirmed by his publicist. He was 59 years old.

“I am heart broken. My cousin, Eric Jerome Dickey passed away on yesterday,” wrote La Verne Madison Fuller on social media. “Guys, when God tells you to do something, just do it. Just a few weeks ago, God woke me up to text him and say that I loved him. He let me know that he loved us too.”

Dickey was the man behind several classic books about the more tender realities of Black life, including “Sister, Sister,” “Friends & Lovers” and “Between Lovers.” In 2020, “Sister, Sister” was honored by Essence as one of the 50 most impactful books of the past 50 years.

Over 7 million of his books have been published worldwide.

Dickey was a native of Memphis, Tennessee and attended Memphis State University. He began writing stories in 1989, 7 years before his debut novel was published. At the time, he was still working as an engineer, following through on his college major.

After leaving the engineering field to work as a comedian and actor, Dickey moved to Los Angeles. He wrote his own comedic material, deepening his connection to writing.

It was through his work that many Black people were able to feel seen and an outpouring of love has began on social media since the news broke of his death.

“I am truly saddened to hear about the passing of Eric Jerome Dickey,” author Roxane Gay wrote on Twitter. “His were some of the first novels I ever read about black people that weren’t about slavery of civil rights. He was a great storyteller.”

Journalist Ernest Owens also paid tribute, writing, “Eric Jerome Dickey” was one of the first “grown folks” book authors I used to sneak to read when I was in middle school. A unique literary voice that left a mark in Black culture for ever.”

In a 2019 interview, Dickey spoke on the purpose behind his stories. “I don’t intentionally write a book with an idea of ‘the moral to this story is,’ because I’m more focused on letting the people in the book live,” he said. “I just try to do my best. I never know if I’ve hit the nail on the head, if it’s really worked, until I put it out there for people to read.”

We are sending love to Dickey’s family and all those that knew him.


https://www.essence.com/news/eric-jerome-dickey-obituary/


Of course we here at the HEF will always remember him for...














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Offline Ture

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Daniel Kaluuya on When He Realized ‘Black Panther’ Was Bigger Than Just a Movie

By Ramin Setoodeh



Daniel Kaluuya first realized that “Black Panther” would become a cultural phenomenon when he was shooting the 2018 Marvel superhero movie.

In an interview for Variety’s Actors on Actors, Kaluuya and Tom Holland spoke together about their latest projects. In “Judas and the Black Messiah,” Kaluuya stars as civil rights leader Fred Hampton. And in “Cherry,” Holland playing a war veteran suffering from PTSD and drug addiction.

During the conversation, the two actors talked about their experiences making Marvel movies. Holland is Spider-Man, of course. And Kaluuya played W’Kabi, the best friend to T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), in a movie that shattered box office records, grossing $1.3 billion worldwide.

“I think it’s something that we were aware that was bubbling,” Kaluuya says, when asked if knew how big “Black Panther” would be. “There was one day, we did the waterfall scene, and obviously in between takes, everyone just stays on set, and there were hundreds of people on set. And we had actual drummers in between the takes. They would play the beat for Snoop Dogg’s ‘Drop It Like It’s Hot.’”

Kaluuya remembers how everyone on the set suddenly came together. “And then everyone would go ‘Snoop!’” Kaluuya says. “Like, hundreds of people would literally do that, and when I saw that, I was like — yeah, this isn’t going to be quiet. There was just an energy. Everyone was so privileged to be part of this moment.”

“It felt like a moment,” Kaluuya adds. “We’re able to show this world in a way that we see us, and it being a Marvel film. You’re bringing something into the world that doesn’t exist, and that’s just really difficult because there’s no blueprint, there’s no template. And there’s some pains in doing that. But when people receive it and people take it as their own, and kids and families are going dressed to the cinemas, it makes everything worth it.”

For our full interview with Kaluuya


https://variety.com/2021/film/news/daniel-kaluuya-black-panther-1234888250/










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Offline Ture

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Re: HEF of BP - Nikki Giovanni Writes Black Panther Story For Tales Of Wakanda
« Reply #156 on: February 01, 2021, 07:21:59 am »
Nikki Giovanni Creates Black Panther Story For Tales Of Wakanda
Posted on February 1, 2021 | by Rich Johnston

This month, Titan Comics is publishing a new short-story anthology, Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda, dubbed "a ground-breaking anthology from the African Diaspora", edited by Jesse J. Holland. A regular on C-SPAN's Washington Journal program, in 2017 he published both The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves in The White House and Black Panther: Who Is the Black Panther?, the first prose novel about the character. He is also contributing a story to the volume.

Other contributors include Sheree Renée Thomas, the new editor of the long-running Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Danian Darrell Jerry,  a member of the hip-hop collective Iron Mic Coalition. Troy L. Wiggins, a veteran contributor to such genre magazines as Uncanny and Beneath Ceaseless Skies. And Nikki Giovanni, 77, the poet and activist known as "The Poet of the Black Revolution" for her Black Power-inspired writings of the 1960s and '70s.




A ground-breaking anthology celebrating Marvel's beloved Black Panther and his home of Wakanda, penned by an all-star cast of authors such as Sheree Renée Thomas and Nikki Giovanni.

T'Challa faces the gods of his parents. Vampires stalk Shuri and a Dora Milaje in voodoo-laced New Orleans. Erik Killmonger grapples with racism, Russian spies, and his own origins. Eighteen brand-new tales of Wakanda, its people, and its legacy.

The first mainstream superhero of African descent, the Black Panther has attracted readers of all races and colors who see in the King of Wakanda reflections of themselves. Storytellers from across the African Diaspora—some already literary legends, others who are rising stars—have created for this collection original works inspired by the world of the Panther and its inhabitants. With guest stars including Storm, Monica Rambeau, Namor, and Jericho Drumm, these are stories of yesterday and today, of science and magic, of faith and love.

These are the tales of a king and his country. These are the legends whispered in the jungle, myths of the unconquered men and women and the land they love.

These are the Tales of Wakanda.

Featuring stories by Linda D. Addison, Maurice Broaddus, Christopher Chambers, Milton J. Davis, Tananarive Due, Nikki Giovanni, Harlan James, Danian Jerry, Kyoko M., L.L. McKinney, Temi Oh, Suyi Davies Okungbowa, Glenn Parris, Alex Simmons, Sheree Renée Thomas, Cadwell Turnbull and Troy L. Wiggins.

The collection will be published next week by Titan Books in the UK, but will only make it to the US in March.

https://bleedingcool.com/comics/nikki-giovanni-creates-black-panther-story-for-tales-of-wakanda/










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Re: HEF of BP - Nikki Giovanni Writes Black Panther Story For Tales Of Wakanda
« Reply #157 on: February 01, 2021, 07:47:31 am »
Jesse Holland is editing so hopefully he keeps the writers on an action adventure track and steers clear of introspective prose.

But the writer of the article didnt mention that the novel he wrote was based off of Hudlins first story.

And a vampire story in New Orleans? Think I read that somewhere before. Lol
« Last Edit: February 01, 2021, 07:53:46 am by CvilleWakandan »
Reggie Hudlin-
 "I think my Panther run traumatized a lot of folks with its explicit blackness.  But you can't win unless you commit to something."

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Re: HEF of BP - Nikki Giovanni Writes Black Panther Story For Tales Of Wakanda
« Reply #158 on: February 01, 2021, 10:42:32 am »
Jesse Holland is editing so hopefully he keeps the writers on an action adventure track and steers clear of introspective prose.

But the writer of the article didnt mention that the novel he wrote was based off of Hudlins first story.

And a vampire story in New Orleans? Think I read that somewhere before. Lol


Despite the fact that the new story focuses on an Afrikan female duo...Shuri and a unnamed Dora Milaje...as the protagonists, I had the exact same thought as Brother Cville.

And I'm worried that TurnCoates may have found brand new denigrating ways to stick it to T'Challa before he leaves BP forever [ "Idumiso Bast!"..."Praise Bast!" ], and I am still very much worried that they'll find someone vomitous to replace TurnCoates, instead of letting amazing scribes like Redjack run with BP. With Redjack rockin BP in his own series and Aaron rockin BP and BLADE in Avengers? Brethren. Things might finally start turning up roses for us; a scent I haven't whiffed regarding BP in is own series since Hudlin and Liss' departure.
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Re: HEF of BP - Def Jam and Marvel team for special Black Panther stories
« Reply #159 on: February 17, 2021, 08:59:01 pm »
Def Jam and Marvel team for special Black Panther stories leading to series finale
By Newsarama Staff

The iconic recording label and comic book publisher team-up for special stories in the last three issues of Black Panther



Def Jam Recordings and Marvel Comics announced an upcoming collaboration designed to "integrate the voices of young Black creatives with one of the most transformative characters and storylines in graphic arts history: Black Panther."

In February 24's Black Panther #23, Marvel and Def Jam celebrate Black History Month with South-Central Los Angeles singer/songwriter Saint Bodhi (joined by co-writer Danny Lore, artist Alitha Martinez, and colorist Rachelle Rosenberg) sharing her take on Storm "for an emotional story grounded in tragedy and acceptance." Bodhi's debut story will also be included in Marvel's Voices: Legacy #1, a celebration of Black voices and artists, on sale the same day.

In March's Black Panther #24, Dallas-native rapper Bobby Sessions tells a story about Black Panther himself. 

And in the series' finale issue #25 in April, 'Toxic R&B' artist Kaash Paige will "forge a tale about Wakandan Princess Shuri and the power of knowledge."

"Aligned with the Def Jam Forward initiative to promote social, economic, and educational equality, each three-page story will also feature an exclusive one-page Def Jam artist profile," reads Marvel's announcement.




"Bringing these two logos together was a dream,” says Def Jam partnerships consultant Jonathan Rheingold about the team-up. "There was a mutual desire to unite these two great brands for a mission and a cause — leveraging Def Jam's rising stars and the legendary Marvel characters to tell powerful stories that would make an emotional connection with fans of both cultures."

While Marvel says Bodhi, Sessions, and Paige are telling their first Marvel Comics stories, each of the artists has a "long-standing passion" for Marvel and the world of comics and graphic arts in general. Black Panther is one of the many black superheroes that changed the face of comic books.


https://www.gamesradar.com/def-jam-and-marvel-team-for-special-black-panther-stories-leading-to-series-finale/

11 months since the last issue of BP's ongoing and they decide Storm should be the first special released in their collaboration. How very typical of life for the Black Panther in the Coatesverse.

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Offline Ture

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Re: HEF of BP - Alex Simmons on the History of Black Panther
« Reply #160 on: Yesterday at 06:14:23 pm »
Alex Simmons on the History of Black Panther

A friend and collaborator of Billy Graham and Don McGregor, comics creator and author Alex Simmons reflects on the story, and the people, who redefined Black Panther.

BY BEN MORSE

Since his 1966 debut in the pages of FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #52 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, King T’Challa, better known as the Black Panther, has been breaking down boundaries in comics and pop culture. The first mainstream Super Hero of African descent, Black Panther would be a popular guest star for the Fantastic Four as well as a member of the title team in AVENGERS for over a decade. But it wasn’t until 1973’s JUNGLE ACTION #6 that T’Challa gained the solo spotlight.

Over the course of 13 consecutive issues in JUNGLE ACTION, writer Don McGregor along with artists Rich Buckler, Gil Kane, and Billy Graham constructed “Panther’s Rage,” largely considered to be the first serialized “graphic novel” in comics. The story explored T’Challa’s Wakanda with a significant role for American-born love interest Monica Lynne, plus introduced readers to Erik Killmonger for the first time.

Following the conclusion of “Panther’s Rage,” McGregor and Graham would go on to produce “Panther vs. the Klan,” a bold story pitting Marvel’s most prominent Black hero against the infamous hate group. Again, this tale made history, addressing critical social issues and treading on ground previously considered out of bounds for comics.

Graham represents a fascinating figure in the history of comics as one of the less heralded pillars in Black Panther’s identity. An accomplished actor, playwright, and award-winning set designer, he occupied rarified space in the 1960s as Art Director of Warren Publishing. In the '70s, Graham left his mark on Marvel, illustrating not only JUNGLE ACTION, but helping to launch Luke Cage into his HERO FOR HIRE ongoing.

An award-winning comic book creator as well as the co-author of Black Panther Psychology: Hidden Kingdoms, Alex Simmons had a front row seat for “Panther’s Rage” as a friend and collaborator of Graham and McGregor. We spoke to Simmons about his experiences with Black Panther and JUNGLE ACTION, as well as his memories surrounding these creators and their landmark work.

Why were Don McGregor and Billy Graham such a potent team on Black Panther?

AS: The answer to this question is that they cared. Don cared about the stories he was telling and the people he was writing about. Don spent time with people of color. Not just me and not just Billy, and then he went home to a white existence.

Billy lived the life some of us only read about. He'd been seen as the only Black artist in a particular office or field at the time. He was still one of the few Black professional artists in comic books. He cared about his people. Billy loved life and he fought for a particular quality of life. He judged people by their actions and not necessarily by their words. And he cared about his friends. Don cared passionately about his friends. You put those two people together and you wind up with a hell of a story both in real life and in their work.




What is your background and history with the character of Black Panther?

Honestly, I don't remember the first time I became a fan of Black Panther. But I do remember seeing him in an issue of the FANTASTIC FOUR. He had joined them in the Baxter Building and there was a conversation going on between him, Reed Richards, and Sue Storm. And somehow Wyatt Wingfoot, a Native American character that was active in the FF storyline at that time, was also involved in the tale.

Now honestly I don't remember the story. But I do remember being fascinated by this Black character in a major comic book series. Even though it wasn't his book, being in this all black costume, and having the same name as a political group that existed at that time [in] 1966...

I'm not particularly political. Meaning I don't think about politics and social issues every time I inhale and exhale. I was even that way back when I was 14 or so and social change was all around me. It was a time of protest for Civil Rights and equal rights and the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. In many ways the United States was facing its identity and clashing with itself on a grand scale. There I was in the middle of that trying to figure out who I was as a boy, and as a Black teen growing up with a mom and no dad.

So the Black Panther character, this warrior king Super Hero, was a major discovery for me personally, not necessarily as a political figure standing up for all Black people or all Black males. I just saw him and enjoyed it and was fascinated by it and wanted more.




What role did you play working on the JUNGLE ACTION run with Don McGregor?

I will say this in my own words, but Don is actually the person to tell the story. There were people at Marvel who were not thrilled at all with what Don was doing with the character. I heard them say things and I saw the impact those times had on McGregor. 

For those who have no idea what Don McGregor looks like, well he was—and still is—a short white guy from Rhode Island. Don was also fiery and passionate about doing justice to this character, to this king, this Black Super Hero and the world in which he existed. The Black Panther and the supporting characters that made up his world of Wakanda were not stereotypes to Don, and I believe that cost him dearly.

Getting back to your question about its effect on me, or my position in it, Don and I were great friends by that time in 1976. We had even worked on some independent projects together. But when he got this assignment to write a Black Panther series, Don knew he had to see the kingdom of Wakanda as a real geologic location. He had to know the position of the palace, the Vibranium mines, and every other aspect of that land so that he could represent it properly in every story.

My one artistic involvement in that series was limited to one area only. As Don was developing the layout of Wakanda, I was called upon to lightly sketch out some of the images in his head. And my meager thumbnail sketches and Don’s notes went to artist Rich Buckler. He was the one who embellished it all, as well as drew a few issues of the series.




What was your relationship like with Billy Graham as well as Don?

Buckler was great on the book, but I was especially thrilled when Billy Graham joined the series for two reasons: One, the lush artwork that he created just took Black Panther to another level. Two: Well, let me set up a little backstory on the relationships [between] Don, Billy, and me.

I met Don McGregor at Phil Seuling's New York Comic Con in 1969. I was in my last year of high school and I believe Don was about 20 or 21. We met in the hotel room of a particular artist, whose name I'll mention in a moment.

This artist had invited a number of people to come up there and hang out while he told great stories from his experience. He did this while performing a remarkable series of magic tricks. This incredible individual was Jim Steranko. I want you to understand that this room was packed with people and I happened to be sitting next to Don and his wife. We were all watching Jim do his thing. But somehow we got to exchanging some thoughts, and the next thing we both knew we were talking like we were the only two people there.

We talked about comics and films and TV shows, and all these things that we were creatively fans of. Let's face it—we loved our heroes saving people in distress, which was part of what made up our imagination, our lives, and our code.

A year later Don and I are at another Phil Seuling Comic Con, but this time we

had a comic book project that we’d just worked on together. This was the first ever issue of DETECTIVES INCORPORATED, the series that Don created and wrote, and has since produced more stories with some really spectacular artists.

But at that time I was his artist and had Illustrated and printed the first issue in Rhode Island, stapled them together, and we brought them to Comic Con that year to show off the books.

And we sat in on a panel for a publishing company called Warren Publications. They did a series of black-and-white comic magazines such as Creepy, and Eerie, and Vampirella. To name a few.

You can't put the two of us anywhere and expect normality to reign. James Warren was on the panel and he talked afterwards and I approached him. We were talking, and at some point we open our big mouths and inserted both our feet and said something playfully teasing about this artist that they had at Warren Publications. Warren saw a great opportunity to fry our butts, called over the artist and said, “Well, say that to his face.” That artist was Billy Graham, possibly one of the few if not the only Black artists working in comic books at that time. Certainly he was the only Black art director in comics.

Rather than punch us both out, the four of us wound up joking and talking. We went out to eat together and over the next few months Don, Billy, and I became good friends.

There are a thousand and one wonderfully outrageous buddy stories I could tell you about Don and Billy and I hanging out in Harlem, in the West Village of Manhattan, and on the road from New York to Rhode Island. But you don't have enough time in your [article] for that. So here I'll simply say that my being there and watching all of this come together and sometimes having the opportunity to discuss aspects of the stories with Don or Billy or both... those were some of the most exciting times I had in those years.




Why is T'Challa such a seminal and enduring character?

It seems like I've answered this question 100 times over the years, and I don't know that I’ve said exactly the same thing any two times. Why do I think the Black Panther is such an enduring character? Simply put he's fascinating, dynamic, awe-inspiring, and unique in several ways. Over the many decades we’ve seen stories of Super Heroes who are aliens or of this Earth. You can go back through literary fiction a 100 years or more and find stories of kings from Europe and from fantastic worlds and fictional worlds and alien worlds. And yes, some African kings and queens have been mentioned, but seldom have they been brought into a situation where their land is rich in minerals, superior in technology, brilliant in education, environmental and scientific awareness, with a multi-generational lineage of strength, integrity and isolationism rather than conquest. And almost never has that king or queen [been a] Super Hero who has then ventured out into the rest of the world and fought against or alongside some of the greatest powers on the planet. That in and of itself is unique.

T'Challa, the Black Panther, is not bombastic. He is not ego-driven, maniacal or misogynistic. He is ethical, and vulnerable, and committed to his people and to a code moral or otherwise. He will sacrifice himself for the greater good. These are admirable traits in anyone, and yes they existed in Black people throughout history, but the population of this planet has been systematically starved of such images. Up until this character appeared in popular fiction one had to dig deep into family tales and specifically generated publications for Blacks and African Americans to find anything about characters like this.




What is the legacy of this work?

You have to understand that Don doing “Panther’s Rage” the way he did was unique—it was not the every issue norm. And so it stood out for a number of reasons, not the least of them being it's about a Black hero in a predominantly Black world. No “Sheena” running around in leotards with blond hair and blue eyes telling the dark skin folks what to do. In the 1970s that was still amazing.

What is your favorite moment from “Panther's Rage”?

It's more the fact that the story is so genuine and multi-leveled that appeals to me. From the Black Panther against Killmonger and Cadaver, to Monica Lynne, an African American woman trying to deal with the attitudes being shown to her by the Africans in Wakanda. People in this story respond like people. But they're people in an extremely extraordinary circumstance. It's science fiction and fantasy all over the place except where the characters are dealing with one another as human beings. Love, hate, honor, mistrust, twisted loyalties, fear, envy and revenge—these are all human characteristics and traits that we as people can identify with. And that's what I enjoyed the most about “Panther’s Rage.” It was a comic book series that I could read like one of the best novels. And that was a gift at that time.


https://www.marvel.com/articles/comics/alex-simmons-black-panther-history-marvel-unlimited










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