Author Topic: Black Panther #World War Wakanda  (Read 11616 times)

Offline The Wakandan

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #30 on: November 04, 2016, 01:12:21 pm »
BP: WoW Preview (Zenzi's story)






Offline Ture

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2016, 10:29:25 pm »
These variants are looking good.









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Offline Ture

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #32 on: November 09, 2016, 08:30:53 am »
Comicverse wise the light of the Black Panther and Wakanda continues to dim. The supposed love story of the Midnight Angels is told with the simplicity of a Spidey Super Stories tale. There is little depth in which to intrigue readers into the world of Wakanda. Generic conversations high lite overly trite training sessions. The back up story while reading somewhat better still suffered the same malady. This may be the kind of book queer black females want to read but it is most certainly not a book a Black Panther enthusiast looking for insight into the most scientifically and technologically advanced country on the planet would want to read.



Like its sister book Black Panther, the potential of BP:WOW was there to exploit (arguably still is); the opportunity to expound on the significance of Wakanda was ripe for the picking... all to no avail. A slight and I do mean slight glimmer of change resides in the comments made in the letter page. It read that BP:WOW will be exploring all kinds of Wakandan characters, areas and time periods bought to us by Ta-Nehesi Coates and a roster of creative talent. Let us see if this creative talent will enliven, nuance and expound on T'Challa and Wakanda or continue hedging the potential of the Black Panther to the point that we may loose any affinity to who and what he is supposed to represent.
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Offline Ture

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2016, 08:08:27 am »
Two reviews that support the dissolution of the Black Panther.

Quote
Buy This Comic: Black Panther: World of Wakanda #1
BY AVRY OTT



It has been a long week, and it is only Wednesday. Thankfully, Wednesday is the best day of the week, being that it is new comic book day. A bunch of great comics came out today, but this column is meant to focus on that one particular, must have comic that should be in everyoneís stack for the week. For my first installment, I am looking at Black Panther: World of Wakanda #1, by writers Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxanne Gay, and Yona Harvey, as well as artists Alitha Martinez and Afua Richardson.

World of Wakanda is an unprecedented comic, for a lot of reasons. Letís get this out of the way right now, World of Wakanda is a good comic book. I would go as far as to say a great comic. It is worth buying on those merits alone. Beautifully written, with great art on the main story and the backup, it is one of the best books I have read from Marvel or DC in awhile. However, what makes World of Wakanda especially interesting is the context in which it exists.

To begin, it is a spin-off of Marvelís recent, successful Black Panther series, also written by Ta-Nehisi Coates. Black Panther is one of the first examples of a character that was previously relegated to being a C or D lister, elevated to the frontlines of superhero comic books through his inclusion in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Similar to how Doctor Strange recently received not only his own solo-series but also a spin-off series called Doctor Strange and the Sorcerers Supreme, right around the same time that his movie released. WoW is also made by a creative team comprised solely of people of color. The comic book industry, especially superhero comics, tend to be a straight, white, able-bodied men. This makes Roxanne Gay, who is coming off of her success with her book Bad Feminist, is one of the first woman of color to work for the company in a creative sense. Lastly, it starts two African women of color who are also in a same-sex relationship, further setting itself apart from the ďtraditionalĒ superhero comic.

Again, the book is great on its own. It manages to be a fun introduction to Wakanda, while also doing wonders with the characters, having the reader solidly invested in the leads by the end of issue one. This book is special, and even if it isnít your cup of tea, we need more comics created by and starring, people of color, and we need to support those comics, especially when they are as great as this one.



Quote
Comicosity Review: BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #1

Black Panther: World of Wakanda #1 takes us into the lives of the Dora Milaje, showing us what it looks like as they arrive, as they are initiated, and as they form the capacity for intimacy beyond serving together. I like how each of the story elements work together and that there are two primary stories that donít have to compete for attention. We have the romance between Ayo and Aneka which changes the flair of each character as they train, but also the development of this force as a whole. Itís nice to see so many black women on the page and that they show us a range of emotionality. I look forward to seeing more personalities emerge and how they fit within the larger picture.

Roxanne Gayís thoughtfulness in crafting the characters, particularly Ayo and Aneka, is exemplary to the point that I wish more writers would follow suit. Reading about the development of women tasked with being their countryís warriors was enough, as I liked the emergence of their unique skills. This relationship, though, is what I wanted to read the comic for and Gay provides an inclusive and authentic exploration into sexual orientation and how it manifests. Charactersí interactions seem fitting for the setting and nature of the story, and Gay has proven that writing these types of stories is absolutely possible.

Yona Harvey and Ta-Nehisi Coatesí exploration into Zenziís past reveals more of her motivations within the pages of Black Panther. World of Wakanda feels like the appropriate place to look at her past, providing a new context for her other appearances. This story reflects the pain and struggle of division and how we stratify culture even among the same people. Zenzi as a character is evocative and compelling, and Harvey and Coates explain her motivations and connections to Wakanda in a manner which reveals her as much less a villain than someone with a passionate determination to right the wrongs that surrounded her life.

Alitha E. Martinez hits many important touchstones when portraying black women. Their hairstyles are different, their bodies are different, and they reflect a range of emotionality and sensitivity. These cultural touchstones in art provided by Martinez pushes World of Wakanda #1 to a place we need more of in comics. I love Rachelle Rosenbergís polished take on color. This entire issue is clean and fresh, offering an everyday kind of appeal to the visuals. Rosenbergís style changes in the last page, the gloss of warm colors and shadows evoking the dread we will eventually face in the next issue, taking us from the normal day-to-day for Dora Milaje initiates into the reality of their role in Wakanda.

Afua Richardsonís art embraces Zenziís experiences growing up, including the complicated emotions which lead her to where she is now. With parts emotion, parts realism, and parts superhuman, Richardson conveys the various parts of Zenziís history which impact who she is now. The transitions from soft lines to the jagged appearance of emotion touch on the complexity of living in Wakanda and the fact that moments may quickly change from the soft veneer of everyday life to the rugged struggle for survival.  Tamra Bonvillain tonally guides the reader through an emotional experience mirroring that of Zenziís. From the first page of the backup story to its foreshadowing ending, Bonvillain evokes feelings through colors which convey the joy of youth, the sadness of isolation, and the slight serenity of promise and dedication.

I appreciate the care and deliberation evident in the writing and art of this inaugural issue. In a world and in a time where people donít respect nuance, World of Wakanda is daring to showcase the varying presentations we offer the world. The Dora Milaje is not a bevy of women solely cast as sexual objects; they are warriors, they are cunning, and they are different. This was an excellent creative team to give justice to the women of Wakanda and they have crafted something important in the context of comic and society.

The Verdict: 10/10

http://www.comicosity.com/black-panther-world-of-wakanda-1/

http://www.geek.com/comics/buy-this-comic-black-panther-world-of-wakanda-1-1678822/


It is all too apparent that in comic books the Black Panther and Wakanda are to be made the stereotypical scapegoats of a destructive cultural paradigm transcribed and illustrated by so called black authors lacking any true depth, insight, creativity or imagination in defining an Afrofuturist, Afrakan centered, sovereign Afrakan nation who's title character is exemplary in all facets of leadership and heroism. These reviews read like the writings of non comic book readers who are complacent with seeing so called diversity and so called people of color literally littering the pages of  a comic book. These reviewers posses a penchant for heralding and promoting the inconsequential  and sub par works thus presented.

My two cents. (trademark and copyrights Mont aka Brother Kimoyo ;))
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Offline MindofShadow

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #34 on: November 10, 2016, 09:30:21 am »
So basically, people are afraid to criticize non comic writers

If the rushed, horrible dialogue, garbage by Gay is 10/10 then... god wtf man?

Offline Ezyo

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #35 on: November 10, 2016, 11:43:19 am »
Since brother Sal isn't here i'll do it for him



The only thing moderately correct about the reviews were about Yona's story about Zenzi, Now THAT had potential and i would of much rather read a full issue and even a few issues about Zenzi's Story and what she is about. Yona did a good job with the pages she was alloted to make Zenzi come off interesting.. Gay's depiction.. Bad, bad bad bad. Read like a poorly done Highschool drama, completely transparent and predictable in how everything went down. Lack of character development that felt real. I mean it read like a cheesy fan made love story cliche, but placed into a mythos that it did not fit or belong. I did not feel like i was getting info on Wakanda, It felt like one of those cheap Here is what Wakanda would look like (as a joke) if it were set in a highschool setting with a western view.

Really whats with all the ass patting? because she is a non comic writer and had success with her book means she cannot be realistically criticized so that she can actually get better? Same for Coates everyone acts like they are doing ground breaking stuff and eat it up without looking at it from the other side, where they aren't showing black community unity but dysfunction and pitting men vs women when the mythos established that they are very much equal in Wakanda and both are held in high respect.

I would like to see a true BP fan write a REAL review on this. Not some fluffy "Support this because its POC writing it, no matter how sh*tty it is" and get some brothahs and sistahs who are truly woke, and want to push BP to new heights 

Offline Ture

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #36 on: November 10, 2016, 03:07:10 pm »
Well done Brotha Ezyo. Maj would've been proud.
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Offline The Wakandan

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #37 on: November 10, 2016, 04:43:57 pm »
Whoooaaaa, a 10/10?!?!

I get stuff like this is subjective...but a 10/10?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

Yoooooo, that's BS.

Offline Ezyo

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2016, 06:55:34 pm »
Whoooaaaa, a 10/10?!?!

I get stuff like this is subjective...but a 10/10?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

Yoooooo, that's BS.

They be reaching. They want it to work which is why they gave it a 10/10. They even said support it anyways Even if it isn't your cup of tea. Why? Because the book sucks (Gay's part) but they want more poc on books. Which is good and all but we need Poc who are actually woke to bring the mythos to new levels

Offline Booshman

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #39 on: November 11, 2016, 02:41:55 pm »
So basically, people are afraid to criticize non comic writers

If the rushed, horrible dialogue, garbage by Gay is 10/10 then... god wtf man?

These critics are akin to "someone who just took a bite into a warm piece of sh*t, and are desperately trying to convince themselves that it was really fudge."

Offline Kimoyo

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #40 on: November 11, 2016, 09:08:05 pm »

It is all too apparent that in comic books the Black Panther and Wakanda are to be made the stereotypical scapegoats of a destructive cultural paradigm transcribed and illustrated by so called black authors lacking any true depth, insight, creativity or imagination in defining an Afrofuturist, Afrakan centered, sovereign Afrakan nation who's title character is exemplary in all facets of leadership and heroism. These reviews read like the writings of non comic book readers who are complacent with seeing so called diversity and so called people of color literally littering the pages of  a comic book. These reviewers posses a penchant for heralding and promoting the inconsequential  and sub par works thus presented.

My two cents. (trademark and copyrights Mont aka Brother Kimoyo ;))


Happy to share "My two cents" with my illustrious brother Ture seeing eye to eye as we usually do.  The reference to a "Spidey" type narrative was particularly astute.  I got the same kinda vibe from the A story while the B story was eerily reminiscent, in story and art, of the Marvel Comics Presents MacGregor run, Panther's Quest.  The featured reviewers do seem.....accommodating?

Peace,

Mont

Offline Ture

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #41 on: December 31, 2016, 12:46:44 am »
The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***    The Vibranium Trumpet   *** Sounding the alarm... ***
*** A Vibranium Trumpet Exclusive***
T'Challa the Black Panther Talks to Roxane Gay





Why are you doing this?


"I'm a bad feminist."


I won't ask a second time.


"I was just so excited to write black queer women into the Marvel Universe..."

Claws slide out


"Ta-Nehisi first approached me..."


Are you serious? I haven't got time for this BS. I got a movie set to drop.


" I do not want to see any more movies about slavery. I have written about this a few times. I understand how horrible slavery was. I understand what it did to the black body, mind and spirit. I understand how the effects of slavery can still be seen in contemporary America."


My film is about an unconquered Afrakan nation whose people were never enslaved.


"I do not need to see another black woman violated or degraded."


Obviously you have not read Coates' iteration of the Black Panther before taking the job. His version is...


"Historically inaccurate, with one-dimensional women characters whose sexual violation is used as the catalyst..."



And still you ride with him?


"I have no doubt that [Coates] past has affected [Black Panther] but even more damaging has been his willfully dismissive attitude in the aftermath. He doesnít seem to understand why so many people are troubled..."


Not only that, he lacks the motivation and essential rectitude to write my story from an Afro Futurist perspective, instead claiming high sales numbers as if they represent high art.
 

"This brings us to the burden of black art, which is expected to be consumed mindlessly and uncritically so that it might succeed so that more black art can be made. This isnít how the creation of black art should work. "


You and Coates don't talk much do you?


Gay's quoted exerts from
http://roxanegay.tumblr.com/
http://ew.com/article/2016/11/02/roxane-gay-world-wakanda-marvel/
page xi of Black Feminist
« Last Edit: January 02, 2017, 09:26:05 am by Ture »
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Offline MindofShadow

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #42 on: December 31, 2016, 06:54:04 am »
gotdamn lol hahha

Offline Booshman

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2016, 07:28:08 am »
And now everyone in the office is looking at me like I'm insane, because I'm laughing hysterically, after having read that.

Offline JRCarter

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Re: Gay's World of Wakanda
« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2016, 08:06:17 am »
LMAO