Author Topic: Black Panther's Agents of Wakanda  (Read 99856 times)

Offline Mortal Man

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #495 on: February 04, 2018, 05:55:23 am »
Chadwick Boseman & Lupita Nyong'o Feud Over X-Men's Storm In 'Black Panther' Sequel
By BRANDON DAVIS

Though Black Panther director Ryan Coogler has had little time to think about bringing X-Men character Storm into a Black Panther sequel, Chadwick Boseman and Lupita Nyong'o have put plenty of thought into such a move and, like Wakanda, they're not fond of outsiders.

ComicBook.com first asked Boseman if he wants to see the Ororo and T'Challa relationship fans are so very fond of. "Are you trying to break up my relationship with Nakia?" Boseman asked in response. "It sounds like that's what you're doing right now."

Boseman, who is as loyal to his co-stars as Letitia Wright when asked if she wants a standalone film, was quick and wise to suggest sending the same question to Nakia actress Nyong'o. After all, this first Black Panther film offers up a relationship between T'Challa and Nakia which neither character may be eager to give up. "Have you talked to Lupita yet?" Boseman asked. "I challenge you to ask her that question."

Nyong'o was a territorial about her character's man as can be! "I'm not happy to talk about this, at all! I feel very territorial," Nyong'o said. "That's my king!"

As it turns out, Nyong'o and Boseman have already discussed the possibility of Storm coming to Wakanda for a Black Panther sequel in a steal-your-man situation. "I've already told him, he better not have that," Nyong'o said. "He will have a problem on his hands."

For now, fans can look forward to exploring the relationship between T'Challa and Nakia in the first trip to Wakanda set to hit theaters later this month.


http://comicbook.com/marvel/2018/02/01/black-panther-storm-tchalla-nakia-boseman-nyongo-/


I just died and went to heaven.  Ture, you just made my entire day.  No, my entire last 6 months!

Ezyo, I've never felt so attempted to troll some trolls in CBR.  I may have to come out of retirement for a hot second. It'd be premature but OMG...

OMG
How many leaders you said you needed then left ‘em for dead?
Is it Moses, is it Huey Newton or Detroit Red?
Is it Martin Luther, JFK, shooter you assassin
Is it Jackie, is it Jesse, oh I know, it’s King T'Challa, oh!

When ish hit the fan, is you still a fan?

Offline BlindWedjat

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #496 on: February 04, 2018, 08:21:09 am »
Chadwick Boseman & Lupita Nyong'o Feud Over X-Men's Storm In 'Black Panther' Sequel
By BRANDON DAVIS

Though Black Panther director Ryan Coogler has had little time to think about bringing X-Men character Storm into a Black Panther sequel, Chadwick Boseman and Lupita Nyong'o have put plenty of thought into such a move and, like Wakanda, they're not fond of outsiders.

ComicBook.com first asked Boseman if he wants to see the Ororo and T'Challa relationship fans are so very fond of. "Are you trying to break up my relationship with Nakia?" Boseman asked in response. "It sounds like that's what you're doing right now."

Boseman, who is as loyal to his co-stars as Letitia Wright when asked if she wants a standalone film, was quick and wise to suggest sending the same question to Nakia actress Nyong'o. After all, this first Black Panther film offers up a relationship between T'Challa and Nakia which neither character may be eager to give up. "Have you talked to Lupita yet?" Boseman asked. "I challenge you to ask her that question."

Nyong'o was a territorial about her character's man as can be! "I'm not happy to talk about this, at all! I feel very territorial," Nyong'o said. "That's my king!"

As it turns out, Nyong'o and Boseman have already discussed the possibility of Storm coming to Wakanda for a Black Panther sequel in a steal-your-man situation. "I've already told him, he better not have that," Nyong'o said. "He will have a problem on his hands."

For now, fans can look forward to exploring the relationship between T'Challa and Nakia in the first trip to Wakanda set to hit theaters later this month.


http://comicbook.com/marvel/2018/02/01/black-panther-storm-tchalla-nakia-boseman-nyongo-/


Oh s***  LOL!


Offline Ezyo

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #497 on: February 04, 2018, 08:52:56 am »
Need MoS profile pic here for Sure!

Edit: Here we go


« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 09:32:12 am by Ezyo »

Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #498 on: February 04, 2018, 10:41:49 pm »
Chadwick Boseman & Lupita Nyong'o Feud Over X-Men's Storm In 'Black Panther' Sequel
By BRANDON DAVIS

Though Black Panther director Ryan Coogler has had little time to think about bringing X-Men character Storm into a Black Panther sequel, Chadwick Boseman and Lupita Nyong'o have put plenty of thought into such a move and, like Wakanda, they're not fond of outsiders.

ComicBook.com first asked Boseman if he wants to see the Ororo and T'Challa relationship fans are so very fond of. "Are you trying to break up my relationship with Nakia?" Boseman asked in response. "It sounds like that's what you're doing right now."

Boseman, who is as loyal to his co-stars as Letitia Wright when asked if she wants a standalone film, was quick and wise to suggest sending the same question to Nakia actress Nyong'o. After all, this first Black Panther film offers up a relationship between T'Challa and Nakia which neither character may be eager to give up. "Have you talked to Lupita yet?" Boseman asked. "I challenge you to ask her that question."

Nyong'o was a territorial about her character's man as can be! "I'm not happy to talk about this, at all! I feel very territorial," Nyong'o said. "That's my king!"

As it turns out, Nyong'o and Boseman have already discussed the possibility of Storm coming to Wakanda for a Black Panther sequel in a steal-your-man situation. "I've already told him, he better not have that," Nyong'o said. "He will have a problem on his hands."

For now, fans can look forward to exploring the relationship between T'Challa and Nakia in the first trip to Wakanda set to hit theaters later this month.


http://comicbook.com/marvel/2018/02/01/black-panther-storm-tchalla-nakia-boseman-nyongo-/


I just died and went to heaven.  Ture, you just made my entire day.  No, my entire last 6 months!

Ezyo, I've never felt so attempted to troll some trolls in CBR.  I may have to come out of retirement for a hot second. It'd be premature but OMG...

OMG




Yea, it's real.
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Offline Mortal Man

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #499 on: February 05, 2018, 10:02:20 am »
As far as what Claremont was rambling about,

There ain't no "who gets top billing". 

Black Panther gets top billing.

If a brehette ain't down for that then she can get lost



Can't even crack top 4 in her own franchise!  Phhsst!  Delusions of grandeur!!
How many leaders you said you needed then left ‘em for dead?
Is it Moses, is it Huey Newton or Detroit Red?
Is it Martin Luther, JFK, shooter you assassin
Is it Jackie, is it Jesse, oh I know, it’s King T'Challa, oh!

When ish hit the fan, is you still a fan?

Offline MindofShadow

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #500 on: February 05, 2018, 10:05:00 am »
As far as what Claremont was rambling about,

There ain't no "who gets top billing". 

Black Panther gets top billing.

If a brehette ain't down for that then she can get lost



Can't even crack top 4 in her own franchise!  Phhsst!  Delusions of grandeur!!


You are just mad Storm is more populr than Wonder Woman*

*according to an internet poll


Offline Ezyo

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #501 on: February 05, 2018, 10:26:32 am »
As far as what Claremont was rambling about,

There ain't no "who gets top billing". 

Black Panther gets top billing.

If a brehette ain't down for that then she can get lost



Can't even crack top 4 in her own franchise!  Phhsst!  Delusions of grandeur!!


The salt is real, and the x fans cone out in droves to try and place Blame on Hudlin "He didn't capture her voice right and had her just tagging along when CW and the FF stuff went down" Uhh tell me what she was doing again pre, during, and post Hudlin...? Nothing of substance?
Thought so.

But she did win an popularity contest over WW in the 90's..
I mean WW had her own Solo movie and is becoming more iconic then Storm but in the 90s she lost....!

Offline Mortal Man

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #502 on: February 05, 2018, 01:05:28 pm »
The salt is real, and the x fans cone out in droves to try and place Blame on Hudlin "He didn't capture her voice right and had her just tagging along when CW and the FF stuff went down" Uhh tell me what she was doing again pre, during, and post Hudlin...? Nothing of substance?


The nerve and audacity!  "She was just tagging along".  Fine, they can take their hubris and rot in wallpaper obscurity as Kitty Pride's magical negro nanny!

"He didn't capture her voice right" I guess following Logan around like a sad puppy after reenacting Halle Berry's thotterific monster ball scene in a locker room counts as capturing her ideal voice.

Hudlin was the best thing that ever happened to that character since Wonder Woman choked on the biggest stage.

But now, Everyday removed from that marriage is a blessing.  Everyday we get closer to Nakia is a blessing.  Everyday a new adolescent grows unfamiliar with her history to this franchise is a blessing.

How many leaders you said you needed then left ‘em for dead?
Is it Moses, is it Huey Newton or Detroit Red?
Is it Martin Luther, JFK, shooter you assassin
Is it Jackie, is it Jesse, oh I know, it’s King T'Challa, oh!

When ish hit the fan, is you still a fan?

Offline Mortal Man

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #503 on: February 05, 2018, 01:22:30 pm »
By the end of the summer, TNC's run will be in it's death bed.  The Storm solo will be dead on arrival.   And this will be me.  Un-surprised and unmoved. 



But with orange soda in my cup instead.

How many leaders you said you needed then left ‘em for dead?
Is it Moses, is it Huey Newton or Detroit Red?
Is it Martin Luther, JFK, shooter you assassin
Is it Jackie, is it Jesse, oh I know, it’s King T'Challa, oh!

When ish hit the fan, is you still a fan?

Offline Ezyo

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #504 on: February 05, 2018, 04:00:40 pm »
By the end of the summer, TNC's run will be in it's death bed.  The Storm solo will be dead on arrival.   And this will be me.  Un-surprised and unmoved. 



But with orange soda in my cup instead.

I don't know why, but the orange soda comment was just awesome and tied it all together. And i agree 100%

Like someone ignorantly said about the wrong Characters.
"he doesn't need her, Tchalla can stand on his own"

Just let Evans write Nakia, Okoye, W'kabi, and Zuri back into continuity from Limbo and death and let Redjack put in some work


Offline 4sake

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #505 on: February 05, 2018, 06:26:18 pm »
As far as what Claremont was rambling about,

There ain't no "who gets top billing". 

Black Panther gets top billing.

If a brehette ain't down for that then she can get lost



Can't even crack top 4 in her own franchise!  Phhsst!  Delusions of grandeur!!


The salt is real, and the x fans cone out in droves to try and place Blame on Hudlin "He didn't capture her voice right and had her just tagging along when CW and the FF stuff went down" Uhh tell me what she was doing again pre, during, and post Hudlin...? Nothing of substance?
Thought so.

But she did win an popularity contest over WW in the 90's..
I mean WW had her own Solo movie and is becoming more iconic then Storm but in the 90s she lost....!



Namor fans aswell some main ones in that thread talking ish are hardcore Namor & white fragilly fist fans...

But I must say I'm very much enjoying that mod openly troll Namor fans & them all lose their ish in rage..
« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 06:28:57 pm by 4sake »
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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #506 on: February 05, 2018, 06:51:27 pm »
‘Black Panther’s’ Grassroots Marketing Movement Is Unlike Any Other Marvel Movie
By Brent Lang and Ricardo Lopez

When SuCh Charles, a 32-year-old singer and songwriter from Denver, saw a trailer for “Black Panther,” she was moved to organize an event to bring together Denver’s black community. She said that while it’s not a large population, comprising just 2.3% of all residents, it was important to show up in force for the first Marvel movie to feature a black protagonist.

The screening she organized is just one of hundreds of grassroots events across the country being organized by black filmgoers to celebrate the Feb. 16 opening of the historic film and give kids a chance to see it in theaters.

“I needed to do something in which it brings the community together, especially in the political times that we’re in,” Charles said. “We’re always fighting, and there’s not as much a celebration of things, but here we are with something that we’re able to celebrate, something for a joyous moment.”


Charles approached Alamo Drafthouse about renting a single room for a screening, but demand was so high, it has since expanded to three screens.



She emphasizes the importance of a film like “Black Panther” by pointing to her son, who will turn 7 the day the movie bows. “It really hits home for me,” she said, describing the impact John Boyega’s Star Wars character, Finn, had on her son, who was thrilled to see someone who had hair like his in a major Hollywood production.

“It’s so good for children to be able to see this,” she said.

Passion for the film has spurred widespread fundraising efforts. Frederick Joseph, a marketing consultant from New York City, recently created the #BlackPantherChallenge with the aim of raising $10,000 through a GoFundMe page to benefit the Boys and Girls Club of Harlem. Within days, he had surpassed the goal, raising more than $40,000. The hashtag took off on social media.

Now there are over 200 campaigns, including in cities like Toronto, London and Ghana, he said. The campaign has attracted the attention of celebrities like Octavia Spencer and Viola Davis. Spencer  wrote on Instagram that she would rent out a theater in Mississippi so underprivileged children could see the movie on the big screen. Davis lent her voice to a fundraiser in Austin, which just recently raised the entire $4,000 to send 200 kids to see the movie.

“The focus is on kids because kids are extremely impressionable,” Joseph said. “With the current landscape that we’re in, culturally and politically, it’s never been more important in the modern era to combat some of these negative entities, especially for kids of color, and young LGBTQ kids, and women.”

Dominique Jones, executive director of the Harlem Boys and Girls Club, said that because of Joseph’s fundraising, they’ll be able to take about 400 kids to see the film in New York.

“Being engaged with positive media is important,” she said. “For them to not only be entertained, but the messages and themes reinforce what we’re doing here at the club.”


http://variety.com/2018/film/news/black-panther-grassroots-marvel-theaters-1202687225/
« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 06:54:24 pm by Ture »
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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #507 on: February 08, 2018, 02:42:35 am »
Marvel Made a Black Panther Movie Partly Because Reginald Hudlin Put the ‘Black’ in Panther
Todd Steven Burroughs



Editor’s note: This excerpt from Marvel’s Black Panther: A Comicbook Biography, From Stan Lee to Ta-Nehisi Coates (published by Diasporic Africa Press, 2018) talks about the impact black filmmaker Reginald Hudlin had on the character. For the first 32 years of its existence, the Black Panther—created by Marvel Comics legends Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1966—had been written by whites. Christopher Priest and Hudlin, two very talented black writers, drastically changed the direction of the character when they took over his adventures in 1998 and 2005, respectively. Under their collective direction, the character—the king and head priest of a Bast-worshipping, xenophobic African nation who had never been invaded by European colonialists—was infused with an African-centered, self-determining ethos. In his run, Hudlin decided to shake up the Marvel fanbase by making the character a truly “Black” Panther, an unapologetic African man openly opposed to white, Western supremacy.

With the Black Panther happily in vogue, I wanted to point out two important stories written by filmmaker Reginald Hudlin, the former BET executive who made that Black Panther animated miniseries in 2010.

The first story is “Black to the Future,” in the first-ever Panther annual published in 2008. The plot: in one possible future, Hudlin shows one of the Panther’s and Storm’s sons marrying the U.S. President, the daughter of former Avengers leader Luke Cage! This story, much of it told in flashback, answers an honest, real-world question: how did Wakanda escape being colonized without going to war against the entire Western world? The answer: the Wakandans made a pact with the white European colonial powers: if you don’t make war on Wakanda, Wakandans will turn a blind eye to the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and European colonialism of the rest of Africa.

The story, which balanced Wakanda’s past and possible future, seemed to be a return to the serious European colonization themes of Hudlin’s first story arc, “Who is the Black Panther?” a story which he adapted to that cartoon (and has since been novelized).

The second of Hudlin’s greatest Panther stories is one of the greatest Panther stories ever. It used the idea, first developed by Christopher J. Priest (the Panther’s previous writer and Marvel’s first Black editor), then furthered by Hudlin, that an ancestor Panther met Captain America in Wakanda during World War II!

Captain America/Black Panther: Flags of Our Fathers, a 2010 mini-series drawn by Denys Cowan, the African-American artist who was one of the co-founders of Milestone Comics, expands on that story greatly. It tells a tale of white/Aryan racism and American militarism from the point of view of Gabriel Jones, the sole Black member of Sgt. Nick Fury’s “Howling Commandos” U.S. Army Ranger squad. (This the same military unit Steve Rogers led in the first Captain America movie.)

In this story, Captain America and the Howling Commandos are sent to prod Wakanda to the side of the Allies in World War II. Azzuri, the Black Panther (T’Challa’s grandfather), tells the Americans that Wakanda will remain neutral. Meanwhile, the Red Skull and other Aryan supervillains under his command—portrayed as unapologetic white supremacists and open racists—attempt to invade Wakanda, wanting its vibranium.

(Of course, America wants the vibranium, too; Fury tells Jones to spy for America and steal a sample.)

Jones, who is as impressed with Wakanda as Azzuri and the Wakandans are with him, has to decide whose side he will ultimately serve.

As a writer, Hudlin would not win any awards for subtlety. But looking at his complete body of Panther work, why he chose such a ham-fisted but potent approach was not hard to understand.

Hudlin clearly saw comic book writing not as a novel with pictures or a forum for deep psychological insights, but as a romp through the imagination, with the opportunity to strike pop satire notes and illustrate socio-political points. In a way, his approach was not that much different from (Panther creators) Stan Lee’s and Jack Kirby’s in the 1960s, before comic creators became enamored with literary pretentions. Also, Comics were not Hudlin’s day job, so he could—and did—have fun.

In terms of public reach, Hudlin made a much greater mark on the character than anyone before him combined.

Hudlin not only kept the character alive in a title, but because of the digital comic/animated series that aired on BET (with a small-but-important assist from the Panther’s recurring appearances on Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, the animated series which aired on the Disney XD channel from 2010 to 2013), he singlehandedly made him Black America’s best-known Black superhero not named Static or Blade. Black Americans who had never gone, and perhaps never would go, into a comic book shop now knew who the Black Panther was by name; they had seen or heard about the digital comic/animated mini-series that was sold in stores, aired on BET, and, as of 2018, is still available illegally somewhere online. The fact that the Panther was unapologetically Black in that mini-series significantly added to that popularity.

The filmmaker, a huge Black comic book fanboy, did the job he set out to do: he kept Panther’s A-list standing among comic book fans while making him an A-lister in the 21st century Black popular imagination, right next to 20th and early 21st-century Black fantasy male icons like John Shaft, Hawk, and Blade.

He turbo-charged Panther’s coolness factor.

Hudlin acted in the tradition of Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams’s early 1970s Green Lantern/Green Arrow comic book title, in deftly combining bluntly socio-political content with action.

And notably, with the creation (by Hudlin) of T’Challa’s sister, Princess Shuri, who grew into a strong, competent, grown-ass African woman warrior in her own right, he made the Panther title reflect Black feminism in a stronger way. No longer were Black women characters in Black Panther relegated to girlfriends/wives/fiancées, kidnap victims, scorned women, sarcastic teenage sidekicks, or sexy, mostly silent bodyguards.

Until T’Challa’s film debut in 2016’s Captain America: Civil War, it was Hudlin’s (animated) Panther that was the one most non-comic book-reading Black people knew about.

Copyright 2018 by Diasporic Africa Press.


https://www.theroot.com/marvel-made-a-black-panther-movie-partly-because-regina-1822764896
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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #508 on: February 08, 2018, 02:22:17 pm »
The Revolutionary Power Of Black Panther Part 1



Marvel’s new movie marks a major milestone

By JAMIL SMITH

The first movie I remember seeing in a theater had a black hero. Lando Calrissian, played by Billy Dee Williams, didn’t have any superpowers, but he ran his own city. That movie, the 1980 Star Wars sequel The Empire Strikes Back, introduced Calrissian as a complicated human being who still did the right thing. That’s one reason I grew up knowing I could be the same.

If you are reading this and you are white, seeing people who look like you in mass media probably isn’t something you think about often. Every day, the culture reflects not only you but nearly infinite versions of you—executives, poets, garbage collectors, soldiers, nurses and so on. The world shows you that your possibilities are boundless. Now, after a brief respite, you again have a President.

Those of us who are not white have considerably more trouble not only finding representation of ourselves in mass media and other arenas of public life, but also finding representation that indicates that our humanity is multi­faceted. Relating to characters onscreen is necessary not merely for us to feel seen and understood, but also for others who need to see and understand us. When it doesn’t happen, we are all the poorer for it.

This is one of the many reasons Black Panther is significant. What seems like just another entry in an endless parade of super­hero movies is actually something much bigger. It hasn’t even hit theaters yet and its cultural footprint is already enormous. It’s a movie about what it means to be black in both America and Africa—and, more broadly, in the world. Rather than dodge complicated themes about race and identity, the film grapples head-on with the issues affecting modern-day black life. It is also incredibly entertaining, filled with timely comedy, sharply choreographed action and gorgeously lit people of all colors. “You have superhero films that are gritty dramas or action comedies,” director Ryan Coogler tells TIME. But this movie, he says, tackles another important genre: “Superhero films that deal with issues of being of African descent.”

Black Panther features tense action sequences: “There was a point during the movie when my brother turned to me and said, ‘What’s gonna happen?’” Boseman says. “I looked at him like, ‘Just watch the movie!’”

Black Panther is the 18th movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a franchise that has made $13.5 billion at the global box office over the past 10 years. (Marvel is owned by Disney.) It may be the first mega­budget movie—not just about superheroes, but about anyone—to have an African-American director and a predominantly black cast. Hollywood has never produced a blockbuster this splendidly black.

The movie, out Feb. 16, comes as the entertain­ment industry is wrestling with its toxic treatment of women and persons of color. This rapidly expanding reckoning—one that reflects the importance of representation in our culture—is long overdue. Black Panther is poised to prove to Hollywood that African-American narratives have the power to generate profits from all audiences. And, more important, that making movies about black lives is part of showing that they matter.

The invitation to the Black Panther premiere read “Royal attire requested.” Yet no one showed up to the Dolby Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard on Jan. 29 looking like an extra from a British costume drama. On display instead were crowns of a different sort—ascending head wraps made of various African fabrics. Oscar winner Lupita Nyong’o wore her natural hair tightly wrapped above a resplendent bejeweled purple gown. Men, including star Chadwick Boseman and Coogler, wore Afrocentric patterns and clothing, dashikis and boubous. Co-star Daniel Kaluuya, an Oscar nominee for his star turn in Get Out, arrived wearing a kanzu, the formal tunic of his Ugandan ancestry.

After the Obama era, perhaps none of this should feel groundbreaking. But it does. In the midst of a regressive cultural and political moment fueled in part by the white-nativist movement, the very existence of Black Panther feels like resistance. Its themes challenge institutional bias, its characters take unsubtle digs at oppressors, and its narrative includes prismatic perspectives on black life and tradition. The fact that Black Panther is excellent only helps.

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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #509 on: February 08, 2018, 02:22:36 pm »
The Revolutionary Power Of Black Panther Part 2



Back when the film was announced, in 2014, nobody knew that it would be released into the fraught climate of President Trump’s America—where a thriving black future seems more difficult to see. Trump’s reaction to the Charlottesville chaos last summer equated those protesting racism with violent neo-Nazis defending a statue honoring a Confederate general. Immigrants from Mexico, Central America and predominantly Muslim countries are some of the President’s most frequent scapegoats. So what does it mean to see this film, a vision of unmitigated black excellence, in a moment when the Commander in Chief reportedly, in a recent meeting, dismissed the 54 nations of Africa as “sh-thole countries”?

As is typical of the climate we’re in, Black Panther is already running into its share of trolls—including a Facebook group that sought, unsuccessfully, to flood the review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes with negative ratings of the film. That Black Panther signifies a threat to some is unsurprising. A fictional African King with the technological war power to destroy you—or, worse, the wealth to buy your land—may not please someone who just wants to consume the latest Marvel chapter without deeper political consideration. Black Panther is emblematic of the most productive responses to bigotry: rather than going for hearts and minds of racists, it celebrates what those who choose to prohibit equal representation and rights are ignoring, willfully or not. They are missing out on the full possibility of the world and the very America they seek to make “great.” They cannot stop this representation of it. When considering the folks who preemptively hate Black Panther and seek to stop it from influencing American culture, I echo the response that the movie’s hero T’Challa is known to give when warned of those who seek to invade his home country: Let them try.

The history of black power and the movement that bore its name can be traced back to the summer of 1966. The activist Stokely Carmichael was searching for something more than mere liberty. To him, integration in a white-dominated America meant assimilation by default. About one year after the assassination of Malcolm X and the Watts riots in Los Angeles, Carmichael took over the Student Non­violent Coordinating Committee from John Lewis. Carmichael decided to move the organization away from a philosophy of pacifism and escalate the group’s militancy to emphasize armed self-defense, black business ownership and community control.

In June of that year, James Meredith, an activist who four years earlier had become the first black person admitted to Ole Miss, started the March Against Fear, a long walk of protest from Memphis to Mississippi, alone. On the second day of the march, he was wounded by a gunman. Carmichael and tens of thousands of others continued in Meredith’s absence. Carmichael, who was arrested halfway through the march, was incensed upon his release. “The only way we gonna stop them white men from whuppin’ us is to take over,” he declared before a passionate crowd on June 16. “We been saying freedom for six years and we ain’t got nothin’. What we gonna start sayin’ now is Black Power!”

The activist Stokely Carmichael, pictured here at a 1966 rally in Berkeley, Calif., took a stand against white oppression and helped popularize the term black power

Black Panther was born in the civil rights era, and he reflected the politics of that time. The month after Carmichael’s Black Power declaration, the character debuted in Marvel Comics’ Fantastic Four No. 52. Supernatural strength and agility were his main features, but a genius intellect was his best attribute. “Black Panther” wasn’t an alter ego; it was the formal title for T’Challa, King of Wakanda, a fictional African nation that, thanks to its exclusive hold on the sound-absorbent metal vibranium, had become the most technologically advanced nation in the world.

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