Author Topic: Black Panther's Agents of Wakanda  (Read 99740 times)

Offline CvilleWakandan

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #525 on: February 17, 2018, 05:12:06 pm »
Well let's see what they do with the Kitty and Colossus marriage. Written by surprise Chris Claremont. lol
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Offline Salustrade

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #526 on: February 17, 2018, 05:40:39 pm »
Advance Review: The Black Panther Annual Is A Purr-fect Combination Of Past, Present And Future
by Oliver MacNamee



With the movie out this weekend, it seemed fitting to shine a light on next week’s Black Panther Annual #1 that brings together some of T’Challa’s most famous scribes as well as three top notch artists too, in three tales that not only set up the next story arc for the regular series, but also a story from an ‘alternate past’ and one from an ‘alternate future’ that surely must be returned back to at a later date, given how intriguing the future looks with Black Panther and Wakanda standing tall as rulers of the world! But, more on this very fascinating story later.

First, the main event, and the only story set in current continuity. Christopher Priest, who’s kicking it on DC’s Deathstroke, brings back a very familiar face to Panther fans in Everett K. Ross (who just happens to make an appearance in the new film as played by Bilbo Baggins), a character Priest himself created and one who, in this opener, sees himself promoted and therefore no longer a kitty sitter. Yet, that still doesn’t stop this wise-cracking Fed getting into trouble and back into a partnership with Panther. He runs across some of Wakanda’s Special Police, led by hard ass, Hunter the White Wolf and ends up trapped and about to be fed to sharks. As you do. Great old-school take down, Priest. But, where were the lasers on their heads?




Mike Perkins’ art, with its swathing and swarthy shadows and menacing mood reminds us that the stakes here are high, even if Ross would rather be anywhere else. After all, as he continually tells us (well, no-one’s listening to him in the story, that’s for sure) he’s been promoted to a C-7; he doesn’t do this kinda thing anymore.

It’s fine line one treads when injecting humour into so much potential deadly drama, but Priest does it easily. And, I imagine Ross will continue to add comedic relief from the forthcoming action as this story unfolds in the next issue. The final splash page, by Perkins, really captures the strength, agility and power of a hero who has rightfully earned his place amongst Marvel’s powerhouses. You can almost feel his thigh muscles tighten as he’s about to pounce. I can forgive him not giving the sharks lasers for this one shot alone.




Meanwhile, in an alternate past, writer Don McGregor and artist Daniel Acuña tell the tale of a younger T’Challa and one of remembrance, acceptance and tragedy that no hero – super, royal, or otherwise – could ever be prepared for, let alone fight, as The Black Panther remembers his past love, Monica Lynne. Its a story made even more poignant with the heartfelt remembrance McGregor places at the start of this clearly personally felt story to Rich Buckler and Billy Graham, with Buckler only lost to us last year. Graham past in 1999, but those of us who have lost loved ones never forget.

Acuña’s art is far more defined than I remember it, with stronger outlines around the figures that pop out against the shadings and almost painted backgrounds. Hats off to Will Moss for placing this as the second story. Its a bit of a weepie and one you wouldn’t want to finish on. Not when the final strip (only 6 pages long!) gives us a vision of an alternate future (aren’t they all alternate?) that is well realised, logically plotted (thanks to Reggie Hudlin) and, in the context of the Marvel Universe, a promising future in which King T’Challa becomes benevolent ruler of the world almost by accident rather than by design.

And, in its race to tell decades worth of untold stories, it will leave any reader wanting more! I must admit, this is part 2, but I haven’t read the first part, nor do you need to, given it was published in 2008’s Black Panther Annual. This is very much a done in one story. For now. But, like a vibranium mine, its too rich, too tantalising a story not to dig into at some future date, I imagine. Just don’t go leaving it another ten years, Reggie, please.




Ken Lashley on art duties packs a lot into these pages, with a future in which Panther and Storm were still married and tried to unite not only the world but Mutant kind, too. Although, like many other wars of the past, at a very human cost. Who needs Old Man Logan when surely Marvel will soon be working on an Old Man T’Challa series once this book drops on February 21st and fans, like myself, will call for more!

So, as you make your way to your local cinema or multiplex this weekend, maybe tell that non-comic-buying friend of yours about this top title. A comic that pays homage to the past, looks to a possible future and kicks off the next high octane fueled adventure in the present too. A purr-fect combination and a great jump on point for anyone wanting more of Wakanda, T’Challa and Black Panther. And, like LL Cool J, you too can walk with a panther!




Black Panther Annual #1 is out Wednesday, the 21st of February from Marvel Comics.

http://www.comicon.com/2018/02/14/advance-review-the-black-panther-annual-is-a-purr-fect-combination-of-past-present-and-future/


And solid present for me as the 21st of February is my Birthday.  8)

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #527 on: February 18, 2018, 10:02:06 am »
Advance Review: The Black Panther Annual Is A Purr-fect Combination Of Past, Present And Future
by Oliver MacNamee



With the movie out this weekend, it seemed fitting to shine a light on next week’s Black Panther Annual #1 that brings together some of T’Challa’s most famous scribes as well as three top notch artists too, in three tales that not only set up the next story arc for the regular series, but also a story from an ‘alternate past’ and one from an ‘alternate future’ that surely must be returned back to at a later date, given how intriguing the future looks with Black Panther and Wakanda standing tall as rulers of the world! But, more on this very fascinating story later.

First, the main event, and the only story set in current continuity. Christopher Priest, who’s kicking it on DC’s Deathstroke, brings back a very familiar face to Panther fans in Everett K. Ross (who just happens to make an appearance in the new film as played by Bilbo Baggins), a character Priest himself created and one who, in this opener, sees himself promoted and therefore no longer a kitty sitter. Yet, that still doesn’t stop this wise-cracking Fed getting into trouble and back into a partnership with Panther. He runs across some of Wakanda’s Special Police, led by hard ass, Hunter the White Wolf and ends up trapped and about to be fed to sharks. As you do. Great old-school take down, Priest. But, where were the lasers on their heads?




Mike Perkins’ art, with its swathing and swarthy shadows and menacing mood reminds us that the stakes here are high, even if Ross would rather be anywhere else. After all, as he continually tells us (well, no-one’s listening to him in the story, that’s for sure) he’s been promoted to a C-7; he doesn’t do this kinda thing anymore.

It’s fine line one treads when injecting humour into so much potential deadly drama, but Priest does it easily. And, I imagine Ross will continue to add comedic relief from the forthcoming action as this story unfolds in the next issue. The final splash page, by Perkins, really captures the strength, agility and power of a hero who has rightfully earned his place amongst Marvel’s powerhouses. You can almost feel his thigh muscles tighten as he’s about to pounce. I can forgive him not giving the sharks lasers for this one shot alone.




Meanwhile, in an alternate past, writer Don McGregor and artist Daniel Acuña tell the tale of a younger T’Challa and one of remembrance, acceptance and tragedy that no hero – super, royal, or otherwise – could ever be prepared for, let alone fight, as The Black Panther remembers his past love, Monica Lynne. Its a story made even more poignant with the heartfelt remembrance McGregor places at the start of this clearly personally felt story to Rich Buckler and Billy Graham, with Buckler only lost to us last year. Graham past in 1999, but those of us who have lost loved ones never forget.

Acuña’s art is far more defined than I remember it, with stronger outlines around the figures that pop out against the shadings and almost painted backgrounds. Hats off to Will Moss for placing this as the second story. Its a bit of a weepie and one you wouldn’t want to finish on. Not when the final strip (only 6 pages long!) gives us a vision of an alternate future (aren’t they all alternate?) that is well realised, logically plotted (thanks to Reggie Hudlin) and, in the context of the Marvel Universe, a promising future in which King T’Challa becomes benevolent ruler of the world almost by accident rather than by design.

And, in its race to tell decades worth of untold stories, it will leave any reader wanting more! I must admit, this is part 2, but I haven’t read the first part, nor do you need to, given it was published in 2008’s Black Panther Annual. This is very much a done in one story. For now. But, like a vibranium mine, its too rich, too tantalising a story not to dig into at some future date, I imagine. Just don’t go leaving it another ten years, Reggie, please.




Ken Lashley on art duties packs a lot into these pages, with a future in which Panther and Storm were still married and tried to unite not only the world but Mutant kind, too. Although, like many other wars of the past, at a very human cost. Who needs Old Man Logan when surely Marvel will soon be working on an Old Man T’Challa series once this book drops on February 21st and fans, like myself, will call for more!

So, as you make your way to your local cinema or multiplex this weekend, maybe tell that non-comic-buying friend of yours about this top title. A comic that pays homage to the past, looks to a possible future and kicks off the next high octane fueled adventure in the present too. A purr-fect combination and a great jump on point for anyone wanting more of Wakanda, T’Challa and Black Panther. And, like LL Cool J, you too can walk with a panther!




Black Panther Annual #1 is out Wednesday, the 21st of February from Marvel Comics.

http://www.comicon.com/2018/02/14/advance-review-the-black-panther-annual-is-a-purr-fect-combination-of-past-present-and-future/

C’mon kids! I swear I can’t make this stuff up! WWO fan-comic Christmas 2017. The fan-fic is about the PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE BP-- "An X-Miss Carol"! These legendary creators came-up with a great book (concept) -- Black Panther Annual #1. I will be purchasing.   

WWO wins again (creatively). I want all BP creators to know one thing...






Still haven't seen the movie. it's gonna be fun
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 10:04:03 am by APEXABYSS »

Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #528 on: February 18, 2018, 12:59:20 pm »
Advance Review: The Black Panther Annual Is A Purr-fect Combination Of Past, Present And Future
by Oliver MacNamee



With the movie out this weekend, it seemed fitting to shine a light on next week’s Black Panther Annual #1 that brings together some of T’Challa’s most famous scribes as well as three top notch artists too, in three tales that not only set up the next story arc for the regular series, but also a story from an ‘alternate past’ and one from an ‘alternate future’ that surely must be returned back to at a later date, given how intriguing the future looks with Black Panther and Wakanda standing tall as rulers of the world! But, more on this very fascinating story later.

First, the main event, and the only story set in current continuity. Christopher Priest, who’s kicking it on DC’s Deathstroke, brings back a very familiar face to Panther fans in Everett K. Ross (who just happens to make an appearance in the new film as played by Bilbo Baggins), a character Priest himself created and one who, in this opener, sees himself promoted and therefore no longer a kitty sitter. Yet, that still doesn’t stop this wise-cracking Fed getting into trouble and back into a partnership with Panther. He runs across some of Wakanda’s Special Police, led by hard ass, Hunter the White Wolf and ends up trapped and about to be fed to sharks. As you do. Great old-school take down, Priest. But, where were the lasers on their heads?




Mike Perkins’ art, with its swathing and swarthy shadows and menacing mood reminds us that the stakes here are high, even if Ross would rather be anywhere else. After all, as he continually tells us (well, no-one’s listening to him in the story, that’s for sure) he’s been promoted to a C-7; he doesn’t do this kinda thing anymore.

It’s fine line one treads when injecting humour into so much potential deadly drama, but Priest does it easily. And, I imagine Ross will continue to add comedic relief from the forthcoming action as this story unfolds in the next issue. The final splash page, by Perkins, really captures the strength, agility and power of a hero who has rightfully earned his place amongst Marvel’s powerhouses. You can almost feel his thigh muscles tighten as he’s about to pounce. I can forgive him not giving the sharks lasers for this one shot alone.




Meanwhile, in an alternate past, writer Don McGregor and artist Daniel Acuña tell the tale of a younger T’Challa and one of remembrance, acceptance and tragedy that no hero – super, royal, or otherwise – could ever be prepared for, let alone fight, as The Black Panther remembers his past love, Monica Lynne. Its a story made even more poignant with the heartfelt remembrance McGregor places at the start of this clearly personally felt story to Rich Buckler and Billy Graham, with Buckler only lost to us last year. Graham past in 1999, but those of us who have lost loved ones never forget.

Acuña’s art is far more defined than I remember it, with stronger outlines around the figures that pop out against the shadings and almost painted backgrounds. Hats off to Will Moss for placing this as the second story. Its a bit of a weepie and one you wouldn’t want to finish on. Not when the final strip (only 6 pages long!) gives us a vision of an alternate future (aren’t they all alternate?) that is well realised, logically plotted (thanks to Reggie Hudlin) and, in the context of the Marvel Universe, a promising future in which King T’Challa becomes benevolent ruler of the world almost by accident rather than by design.

And, in its race to tell decades worth of untold stories, it will leave any reader wanting more! I must admit, this is part 2, but I haven’t read the first part, nor do you need to, given it was published in 2008’s Black Panther Annual. This is very much a done in one story. For now. But, like a vibranium mine, its too rich, too tantalising a story not to dig into at some future date, I imagine. Just don’t go leaving it another ten years, Reggie, please.




Ken Lashley on art duties packs a lot into these pages, with a future in which Panther and Storm were still married and tried to unite not only the world but Mutant kind, too. Although, like many other wars of the past, at a very human cost. Who needs Old Man Logan when surely Marvel will soon be working on an Old Man T’Challa series once this book drops on February 21st and fans, like myself, will call for more!

So, as you make your way to your local cinema or multiplex this weekend, maybe tell that non-comic-buying friend of yours about this top title. A comic that pays homage to the past, looks to a possible future and kicks off the next high octane fueled adventure in the present too. A purr-fect combination and a great jump on point for anyone wanting more of Wakanda, T’Challa and Black Panther. And, like LL Cool J, you too can walk with a panther!




Black Panther Annual #1 is out Wednesday, the 21st of February from Marvel Comics.

http://www.comicon.com/2018/02/14/advance-review-the-black-panther-annual-is-a-purr-fect-combination-of-past-present-and-future/

C’mon kids! I swear I can’t make this stuff up! WWO fan-comic Christmas 2017. The fan-fic is about the PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE BP-- "An X-Miss Carol"! These legendary creators came-up with a great book (concept) -- Black Panther Annual #1. I will be purchasing.   

WWO wins again (creatively). I want all BP creators to know one thing...






Still haven't seen the movie. it's gonna be fun







« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 01:02:29 pm by supreme illuminati »
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Offline KIP LEWIS

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #529 on: February 18, 2018, 05:42:37 pm »
You know the guy who played the young T'Chaka/BP?  In just the few moments he was on screen was enough to make me want to see more of him.

Offline Beware Of Geek

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #530 on: February 18, 2018, 05:52:33 pm »
Atandwa Kani, who happens to be the son of the actor who played the older T'Chaka (John Kani)

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2818492/

Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #531 on: February 22, 2018, 12:23:48 am »
This Black Panther Annual read as if each McGregor, Priest and Hudlin never stopped writing their iteration of the Black Panther. The voice and uniqueness of each legendary Black Panther writer reads with a clarity that reminds us of why their work was so instrumental.

PRIEST


I had my doubts going in about reading another Ross centered BP story but Priest was able to make it work all over again. His 2018 BP read like his 1998 BP and that made it a good read. Priest gave me the feeling and presence of the Black Panther with very little on panel placement devoted to the titular King of Wakanda. Priest brought back Hunter and Malice and segued his story effortlessly with the events of the Coatesverse. Mike Perkins art echoed Jae Lee's work and the tone of it encapsuled a mood of a darkness, a lithe, all encompassing mood that was sleek and threatening as illustrated by Andy Troy. The story made me want to see more of his renderings of Black Panther. This team is a keeper. Priest appears capable of writing a Black Panther series that I would read.

HUDLIN



While our host had the least amount of pages to work with, he none the less outshone all other in terms of the bad assery of the Black Panther and reminded us that Wakanda is still that place you don't mess with. As we stroll the trophy room with T'Challa and his granddaughter, Hudlin is emphatic that T'Challa the Black Panther killed Doom and thus discredited the team of heroes supposedly ending the reign of the Latverian ruler. I feel this was a wink to those of us here at the HEF.

But why stop there, Hudlin has T'Challa add the mutant master of magnetism to his list of fallen would-be conquerors. Consistent themes of family, the importance of children, sanctity of marriage and the martial prowess of an Afrakan society capable of beneficent guidance and leadership drape the narrative. Lashley's art is optimistic and empowering. The characters wield an Afro Futuristic majesty while effortlessly flowing through the throes of a world war's aftermath. Matt Milla's coloring is bright, vibrant and simply beautiful. An inspiring story that has whetted our appetite for Hudlin's World War Wakanda.


MCGREGOR



The return of the multiple panels, two page splash page and the ever agile Black Panther. McGregor represented in true form hearkening back to those harrowing adventures of the Black Panther in the pages of Jungle Action. McGregor's tale was a sad one as we witness the death of long time love interest Monica Lynne. No doubt the emotional loss is felt. I appreciated seeing the intimate brotherhood  shared among T'Challa, W'Kabi and Taku once again on panel. That's one of the things missing in Coates run, T'Challa doesn't seem to have any friends. Almost every scene is a reminder or commentary on the signature style that Buckler, Graham and Turner all in tune with McGregor imbued the Black Panther with. Panther's Heart was aptly titled.

Reading this took me back to the Annuals and Giant Size comic books of years past when I got to read multiple stories of my favorite hero in one comic book. I enjoyed Black Panther Annual #1. If Priest McGregor and Hudlin can't write an ongoing... specials and mini series would be in order. The Black Panther comic book community could certainly use their new contributions.
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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #532 on: February 22, 2018, 11:43:33 pm »
REVIEWS

Black Panther Annual Pays Tribute to Creators Who Made T’Challa a Star
by Alex Spencer 02.21.2018

If you stood outside a showing of Black Panther, and listened in on the conversations of people as they came out of the theater, you’d likely hear the same thing over and over. Aside from, “Man, that was great,” and “Damn, Michael B Jordan is hot,” I mean.

A single common question: “Where do I start with the Black Panther comics?” Ta-Nehisi Coates and his artistic collaborators have spent the last couple of years making sure that “just pick up the current series” is a good answer to this question. But what if you want to dig into the Black Panther’s back catalogue?

Black Panther Annual #1 seems designed specifically to answer this. Its three stories are positioned as tales of T’Challa’s present, past and future, but really this comic is a primer on the most influential stories in the character’s publishing history. There’s a story each written by Christopher Priest, Don McGregor and Reginald Hudlin — arguably the three most important Black Panther writers from the long period between his creation by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, and the beginning of Coates’ run.

First up: Priest, who reinvented Black Panther — and in particular Wakanda as a nation — in a five-year run over the turn of the millennium. As well as concepts like the Dora Milaje, Priest created Everett K. Ross, portrayed by Martin Freeman in the movie, who returns as the narrator and main character in Priest’s story here.

Titled “Back in Black” and illustrated by Mike Perkins, the story ties into Wakanda’s current status quo in the Marvel Universe. More importantly, though, it serves as an intro to Priest’s style. Equally comfortable referencing gangsta rap and the workings of constitutional monarchies, it’s politically minded plotting and heavy on the quips, all told through Ross’ narrative captions. Plus, a shark gets kicked in the face.

The second story comes from Don McGregor, writer of the underrated ’70s classic “Panther’s Rage”. McGregor revitalized T’Challa and gave him a nemesis — Erik Killmonger — who tried to overthrow the Wakandan government. If you’ve seen the movie, that might just sound familiar.

The Annual teams up McGregor with Daniel Acuña for a spiritual sequel to that story, “Panther’s Heart”. Dealing with the death of Monica Lynne, T’Challa’s love interest in that era, the story even flashes back to images lifted straight from “Rage”.

It’s nearly a silent comic, in terms of dialogue– there are a dozen speech bubbles — with most of the storytelling done through third-person narration. It’s a device that has fallen out of favor since the ‘70s, and along with McGregor’s wonderfully purple prose, the whole thing feels a little old-fashioned.

Finally, we get “Black to the Future Part II,” a direct follow-up to a 2008 story written by Reggie Hudlin. As well as writing Black Panther comics, at a time when T’Challa was married to Ororo “Storm” Munroe, and introducing the character of Shuri, Hudlin produced a 2010 animated TV series starring the character.

This sequel reunites Hudlin with Ken Lashley, one of the artists on the original story, and revisits the future timeline where Wakanda — led by T’Challa and Storm — rules the world. Its themes of imperialism chime with the Black Panther movie, but it’s the shortest story in the Annual, and feels more like a recap of that story than a real development.

As standalone stories, with their own narrative arcs, none of these stories are incredibly strong. But this doesn’t feel like their purpose. Each is a sampler of that writer’s take on Black Panther. If you enjoy the style, supporting characters or themes, chances are you’ll enjoy the past comics.

For a character who has often failed to get his due, with many of these stories long out of print — something that’s finally changing now T’Challa is setting box-office records — Black Panther Annual is a very welcome signpost of what you might want to read next.


https://www.cbr.com/black-panther-annual-1-review-2018/



Black Panther Annual #1 Review: A Celebration of King T’Challa
Posted by Joshua Davison February 22, 2018

Priest, Perkins, and Troy’s work feels incomplete, yet it does accomplish a solid ending. You don’t figure out the specifics of the mystery, even that’s the consequence of Ross’s perspective. Priest does impressively recapture the feeling of his old series. There’s a lot of dry humor, Malice makes a return, and you have a quiet moment between Ross and T’Challa. It’s nostalgic, and that moment between Ross and T’Challa does feel meaningful.

The major downsides are the plot points intentionally left dangling as well as Malice reminding me how absolutely terrible Nakia’s plotline was in Marvel Knights: Black Panther.

Perkins and Troy make the story absolutely gorgeous, and it really comes together when the Black Panther himself shows up. Seeing T’Challa rendered by Perkins and Troy is an absolute treat.

McGregor and Acuna’s piece has the sweeping narration and intense tone of his old Jungle Action fair.

One wonders if this story was his intended ending to his Jungle Action stories. The continuity is complicated. There is a living character who is dead in current comics, and there is a dead character who is alive in current comics.

In any case, it is an emotionally weighty comic, and it’s a solid send-up of Black Panther.

Acuna’s art and color work here are among his best I’ve ever seen. The suit looks great, the colors are muted yet well-balanced, and he attributes more depth to the scenery than what one would expect.

“Black to the Future II” by Hudlin, Lashley, and Milla has this odd balance of a narrative that seems to praise Wakanda’s conquest but leaves it on a note that seems to offer an equally weighted criticism. It is worth mentioning that villains like Doctor Doom, Baron Zemo, and Apocalypse have attempted what T’Challa and Ororo accomplished here.

The story itself is a summarized look at how Wakanda accomplished this feat. It is interesting. There is a grim undertone in the methods of Wakanda, but the tone of the entry implicitly argues its merits. It isn’t until the ending itself where the comic tips it in ever-so-slightly in favor of “the ends don’t justify the means.”

Lashley and Milla make it all look pretty great. The color leans on brighter tones, and Lashley’s detailing is great.

The overall product is easily recommendable. It’s a fun celebration of Black Panther by some of its greatest scribes accompanied by talented artists. Given Coates’s different take on Panther, it would likely confuse new readers. However, an experienced follower of T’Challa will find a lot to enjoy. Give it a read.


https://www.bleedingcool.com/2018/02/22/black-panther-annual-1-review/



BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 REVIEW
BY JESSE SCHEDEEN FEB. 21, 2018

Apparently there's some movie out and now everybody loves Black Panther? Who knew? Black Panther Annual #1 is ostensibly another effort by Marvel to capitalize on the record-breaking success of the film. This oversized issue serves as a fitting celebration of the character's long comic book history, but it's not necessarily geared towards those who aren't already familiar with said history. If you're new to the Black Panther comics, you're better off looking elsewhere for a jumping-on point.

The idea with this issue is that Marvel has brought back three classic BP writers to craft stories that serve as epilogues to their respective runs. No doubt the biggest selling point for many fans is the fact that Christopher Priest has returned to revisit the property he did so much to shape in the late '90s and early '00s. Priest never had the opportunity to give his long run the conclusion it deserved. His story here doesn't really address the open threads from that series. What's the point, after all this time? Yet this story does serve as a fitting end-cap to Priest's run all the same.

Priest revisits that always enjoyable dynamic between Agent Everett K. Ross (now a mid-level bureaucrat) and T'Challa. Everything about this story, from the gritty art style to the chapter breaks to Ross' disjointed retelling of events to the presence of characters like Hunter the White Wolf and the Hatut Zeraze make this feel like vintage Marvel Knights Black Panther. Yet Priest's script also reflects the passage of time and the ways in which Ross and T'Challa's positions have evolved. Mike Perkins' shadowy art also serves as a fitting throwback to the time. Unfortunately, the garish, heavy-handed coloring is a bit too adept at making this story look like a relic of the late '90s.

Next up is a blast from T'Challa's more distant past, with Don McGregor and Daniel Acuna revisiting the love affair between our hero and Monica Lynne. The tone of this story veers a little bit too far in the melodramatic direction, but it nonetheless serves as a poignant examination of a happier, simpler time in T'Challa's life. Acuna's depiction of Black Panther and the world of Wakanda never fails to impress, especially as he depicts the character leaping from tall heights and playing the acrobat.

Finally, Reginald Hudlin and Ken Lashley reunite to craft a sort of What If? tale set in a world where Black Panther and Storm stayed married. An intriguing concept, to be sure, though not one that can really be done justice in such a confined space. Hudlin's script relies heavily on T'Challa narrating events that would be better served with a more visual approach. The lack of consistency in T'Challa's voice is also frustrating, with his dialogue constantly shifting between casual and formal modes of speech. Where the previous two stories make the most of the space allotted, this story feels more like a case of untapped potential.

THE VERDICT
How much Black Panther Annual #1 appeals to you as a reader may depend on how familiar you are with the different eras being referenced. Priest and Perkins' story is a great coda to a classic run, but not one that does much to stand on its own. Of the three, McGregor and Acuna's story does the best job of standing on its won two feet, while Hudlin and Lashley's tale reads like it needed a much larger platform to really breathe.


http://za.ign.com/black-panther-annual-2016-current-1/116658/review/black-panther-annual-1-review

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #533 on: February 23, 2018, 09:38:39 am »
Thanks!
Looks like i'll be getting this annual.
I'm glad that 2nd & Charles still calls me whenever a Panther book comes out...even though i told them to cancel me subscription.


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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #534 on: February 26, 2018, 10:29:04 pm »
Thanks!
Looks like i'll be getting this annual.
I'm glad that 2nd & Charles still calls me whenever a Panther book comes out...even though i told them to cancel me subscription.

You're welcome. Here's another.

The Heart of T’Challa is Revealed in BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1
By Maite Molina

BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 features the intersection of three distinctive stories starring King T’Challa. Now, if you’re expecting tales filled with action and dramatic confrontations with bad guys, prepare to be surprised. The stories featured in this issue are personal. They dig deep into Black Panther’s psyche and inner conflicts. As a result, we are gifted with some fantastic stories that will certainly stay with you long after reading.

Once We Were Friends
BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 is split into three separate narratives. The first, called “Back in Black,” comes from the writer Priest. It is a tale that takes place in the present and features the relationship between Black Panther and Everett Ross. The two haven’t spoken in a while, but a new conflict has brought them together.

What conflict, you ask?

Well, Wakanda houses a device that is capable of ending global warming. However, King T’Challa fears that if the nation were to release this device to the rest of the world, other nations would use it as a weapon. “Back in Black” presents an immersive narrative primarily through the perspective of Ross. It is a thought-provoking tale, one that challenges T’Challa himself in his role as king and hero. Because of this, I enjoy how dialogue-based this story is. Priest manages to expertly flesh out the conflict as well as its impact on Ross and Black Panther who do not share the same perspective. Despite this though, are either one of them wrong?

A Past Unseen
The second narrative is entitled “Panther’s Heart” and is written by Don McGregor. The story takes place sometime in an alternate past. It follows Black Panther as he retrieves a heart-shaped herb with great power. He plans on bringing the herb to the final resting place of his former lover, Monica Lynne, who died from cancer. Interestingly though, his retrieval of the herb is not intended to restore her to life. Rather, he is retrieving it to honor her life in death.

Differing from the first story of this issue, “Panther’s Heart” centralizes on a third person narration of T’Challa’s internal struggle. To me, the story reminded me of the works of Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale in DAREDEVIL: YELLOW and SPIDER-MAN: BLUE. McGregor’s narrative sheds light on a new facet of Black Panther’s character. He is a man in mourning. As a result, he does not necessarily know how to cope. All he can do is honor the legacy Monica has left on his life through a simple act of leaving an herb in her coffin.
A Future to Be Had
The final story is called “Black to the Future Part II” by Reggie Hudlin. As the title suggests, this tale takes place sometime in an alternate future. It is primarily a retrospective work that looks back on the legacy of Storm and Black Panther as, in this story, they are now elderly. Their journeys as heroes have left behind plenty of good. However, the costs of enacting that much good were high. Of the three works in BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1, I found this particular one to be the weakest. In my opinion, it did not flow as well as the other two works. The exposition of this work came across as a tad forced. Along with this, I would have enjoyed more characterization of an older T’Challa and Storm after years and years of heroism and struggle.

However, it is still a solid, thought-provoking narrative that challenges the definition of a hero.

The Many Hues of BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1
The artwork throughout BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 is phenomenal. My personal favorite work is in “Back in Black” from artists Mike Perkins and Andy Troy. I love the shadowing throughout the story that emphasizes the darker tone of the narrative. Despite this dark tone, Troy’s coloring is never dull. I also love the panel featuring Black Panther upon the end of the story that is featured above. It is a formidable, immersive image that captures Black Panther’s greatness.

As a result of the fantastic imagery in “Back in Black,” the artwork of its subsequent tales did not leave as heavy of an impact. Despite this though, there are still some beautiful panels. The opening sequence of “Panther’s Heart” from artist Daniel Acuña is gorgeous as it follows T’Challa’s journey in a cold, icy land. The final panels of that work are also especially poignant since they capture T’Challa’s mourning.

In regard to the final work of the issue, I especially enjoy its vibrancy thanks to artists Ken Lashley and Matt Milla. “Black to the Future Part II” slightly alters the tone present in the first two narratives. It is more vibrant and hopeful so, as a result, the issue ends on a more uplifting tone that encapsulates the overall positive legacy of Black Panther, which the third story emphasizes.

What Lies Beyond
BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 is a phenomenal comic that is definitely worth reading. Even when you think you know all there is to know about King T’Challa, think again. The three narratives within this issue will depict new aspects of the superhero we thought we knew, and that is a great thing.

BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 BY PRIEST, MIKE PERKINS, ANDY TROY, DON MCGREGOR, DANIEL ACUÑA, REGGIE HUDLIN, KEN LASHLEY, & MATT MILLA
Art   
Characterization   
Plot   
SUMMARY
BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 is near-perfection to say the least. Its narratives will bring you new revelations regarding our titular hero that will make you fall in love with him even more.
95 %
PHENOMENAL

https://comicsverse.com/black-panther-annual-1/

Well said and I agree.
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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : BET Re-Releases Hudlin's Black Panther Cartoon
« Reply #535 on: March 02, 2018, 08:32:12 pm »
BET Re-Releases 2010's 'Black Panther' Animated Series
By CHARLIE RIDGELY - March 2, 2018

BET is helping fill that panther-sized hole in your life, by releasing episodes of an animated series inspired by the Black Panther Marvel comics.

No, this isn't a new series jumping on the success of the movie. This Black Panther originally aired back in 2010, though episodes have been hard to find since then. Fortunately, BET is looking out, and has started uploading the series to its Facebook page.

The series was written and created by Reginald Hudlin, a name comic fans are probably familiar with. The author is well-known for his run on Black Panther where he famously married T'Challa and Storm, and introduced Black Panther's tech-savvy younger sister, Shuri.

Black Panther initially aired in Australia in 2010, and later in the United States in 2011. The story follows T'Challa on a quest to find out who killed his father, the former king T'Chaka. Eventually, Klaw attempts to take over Wakanda, and puts together a band of villains to help him achieve that goal. In addition to the characters you were introduced to in the Black Panther movie, the series also features appearances from Juggernaut, Captain America, and Wolverine.

While you may have never known that this series existed, it boasts an all-star cast of names you will surely recognize. Oscar nominee Djimon Hounsou (Blood Diamond, Amistad) stars as T'Challa/Black Panther. Hounsou is joined by Kerry Washington (Scandal) as Shuri, Alfre Woodard (Luke Cage) as Dondi, and Jill Scott (Black Lightning) as Storm. Stan Lee is even featured as the voice of an American general in the first episode.

At this time, only two episodes are currently posted to BET's Facebook page, but the network has stated plans to upload the entire six episode series. The box office has made it clear that people want to see more Black Panther, and the numbers on BET's video posts go a long way in furthering that notion. At the time of writing this article, just 17 hours after it was posted, the first episode of the series has over one million views.

http://comicbook.com/marvel/2018/03/02/black-panther-animated-series-available/

If you want to binge the entire Black Panther series, and don't want to wait for BET to upload all six episodes, you can purchase them individually from Amazon for just $2.99 each. You can check out the first episode in the video above!


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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Black Panther vs Infinity Wars
« Reply #536 on: March 08, 2018, 10:52:57 pm »
As we await Reginald Hudlin's WORLD WAR WAKANDA (the true war for the Black Panther) another scrimmage maybe brewing...

BLACK PANTHER VERSUS AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR



'Civil War' Scribe Mark Millar Predicts 'Black Panther' Will Make More Than 'Avengers: Infinity War'

In spite of the most massive list of superheroes ever assembled on the big screen and a publicity campaign that started almost before the movie was in production, comic book writer Mark Millar thinks this summer's Avengers: Infinity War will finish out its box office run without surpassing the mark set by Black Panther.

"I'm going to make a bold, crazy prediction and you can giggle all you want: But I think Black Panther is going to outgross Avengers: Infinity War," Millar tweeted earlier today. "I can feel it in my BONES."

The idea might sound farfetched, but there are a few reasons to believe it is not crazy.

First of all, Black Panther is currently the second-highest-grossing Marvel Studios movie of all time at the domestic box office (behind the first Avengers movie and ahead of the second). It is expected to have another strong weekend, and the idea of it becoming #1 -- it would need to make another $100 million or so in North America before it ends its theatrical run -- is far from crazy.

That would mean that, in order to surpass Black Panther's record-setting take, Infinity War would have to be the highest-grossing Marvel Studios movie of all time. Certainly, there are probably a good number of analysts at Disney who are hoping for that possibility, possibly even expecting it. It is not, however, guaranteed.

At a time when Marvel's box office fortunes seemed to be ever-increasing, Avengers: Age of Ultron made a spectacular $459 million at the domestic box office, which still left it far short of its predecessor's domestic total. An international haul of nearly $950 million helped Age of Ultron to come close to Avengers's $1.52 billion worldwide gross, but it never did catch up globally either.

In the time since Marvel's The Avengers broke the $1 billion mark and became one of the highest-grossing films of all time, only Captain America: Civil War and Iron Man 3 have come anywhere close to Black Panther in terms of solo film grosses, but Black Panther has already passed both of them at the domestic box office.

In its first two full weeks at the box office, Black Panther outgrossed The Avengers by a little over $30 million. It is not projected to have as massive a third week as Avengers did -- in part due to competition from A Wrinkle in Time at the box office this weekend -- but the odds are not bad that it will pass the Avengers' all-time domestic take of $623 million (some of which came from a theatrical re-release) before all is said and done. Black Panther is poised to break through the $550 million mark domestically and the $1 billion mark worldwide by the end of this weekend.

There is no guarantee that Black Panther will overtake The Avengers either domestically (although it seems likely) or internationally (less so). It will almost certainly outperform at least Captain America: Civil War and Iron Man 3 globally, knocking at the door of the lofty worldwide totals only the combined might of the Avengers have so far been able to unlock.

So what about Infinity War?

The expectations for the film are difficult to judge so far -- as they have often been with Marvel movies. At one point, there was debate as to whether Avengers could break $100 million in its opening weekend (it made over twice that). Later, many analysts thought Age of Ultron was a shoo-in to beat its predecessor (it didn't, opening at $191 million). Early analysis assumed Black Panther would hover around the $75 million to $100 mark ($202 million).

But what we have to work with so far -- admittedly an imperfect science -- is an estimate that the film will open huge, with between $200 million and $225 million, but sink faster than Black Panther or The Avengers did due to summer competition and end up with a domestic take somehwere between $500 and $600 million.

Obviously if Black Panther manages to pass the $623 million of The Avengers, it would require Infinity War to overperform pretty significantly against those expectations in order to match that. Of course, there is nothing to say that it won't...but Disney might do well to remember that lightning rarely strikes twice in the same place, and Black Panther's massive performance relative to expectations may be difficult to duplicate.

Another factor might be the length of Infinity War, which is said to be the longest Marvel movie to date. We saw with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice that extremely long movies, even if they sell out most of their opening-weekend screenings, have a difficult time generating the truly monster openings that you can get with an extra showing on each screen all weekend long.

Whether or not it manages to best Black Panther seems largely academic as long as Disney is happy with the film's performance in its own right, but certainly the conversation about Black Panther's appeal and its takedown of so much Hollywood conventional wisdom will have another dimension if it stands -- at least for a while -- as the biggest superhero movie of them all.

At this point, Black Panther is writing its own history as a Marvel Cinematic Universe milestone - and its cultural impact will be felt for years to come. We look forward to seeing how long this victory lap can last - how about you? Let us know your thoughts on Black Panther in the comments section!

Black Panther is now in theaters. It will be followed by Avengers: Infinity War on April 27th, Ant-Man and the Wasp on July 6th, Captain Marvel on March 8th, 2019, the fourth Avengers movie on May 3rd, 2019, the sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming on July 5th, 2019, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 in 2020.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 10:57:08 pm by Ture »
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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA :New David Liss Interview
« Reply #537 on: April 05, 2018, 10:39:16 am »
San Antonio Author David Liss On Writing Black Panther: The Man Without Fear for Marvel Comics
Posted By Sanford Nowlin on Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 11:00 am



Before Black Panther was a $1.3 billion box office breakout, he was a mid-level Marvel Comics superhero — ranking somewhere between Spider Man and, say, Moon Knight. And a few years before he clawed his way onto the silver screen, David Liss — a San Antonio author best known for historical thrillers like The Whiskey Rebels — was his principal writer.

After being approached by a Marvel editor who’d fanboyed over his thrillers, Liss agreed to pen some titles for the comics company. That led to a two-year (2010-2012) run with Black Panther: The Man Without Fear, which transported T’Challa into the urban jungle of Hell’s Kitchen. His work on the character is now compiled in Black Panther: The Man Without Fear – The Complete Collection, released in December as a trade paperback.

Liss, who recently finished the Y.A. trilogy Randoms, still works for Marvel, now creating video game content. We asked him talk about his time with Black Panther, often billed as the first black superhero.

Why does Black Panther resonate with so many people right now?

When I was working on the character, Marvel was struggling to figure out how to get him more exposure. Certainly, we couldn’t imagine that the moment would soon be upon us that he would be a household name. Of course, the film helps. But it’s also just a different cultural moment right now. In the post-Ferguson world, people want this character. There’s a cultural hunger. They’re ready for this character who represents a kind of black empowerment we haven’t seen before.


You took Black Panther out of Wakanda, the fictional African country where he’s king, and stripped him of his support system. Was that dictated by Marvel?

It had been established by other writers in a different story line that Black Panther reached a point where he decided to abdicate the throne. Marvel wanted to get more eyes on him by having him take over for Daredevil in Hell’s Kitchen. Matt Murdoch, the character of Daredevil, has his own crisis and he leaves, so T’Challa agrees to fill in. That’s what I was handed, and within that framework, I had the power to do what I wanted. One of the first decisions I got to make was whether to depower him: Does he get to keep his Black Panther powers? I decided to take everything — take his money, take his power. To me, the interesting thing was, here’s this guy who has all these abilities, all these resources and all this political power. If you strip all that away, what do you get? Narratively, I liked the idea of someone used to having a great deal of authority being brought to his lowest point and clawing his way back up.

How did that go over with the fans?

There are a few active comic book discussion boards and most writers stay away from them, but when I was writing Black Panther, I didn’t. I wanted to know what the fans thought and who the fans were. That’s when I discovered there was this group of really active and dedicated fans all over the world. They were from the Caribbean and Africa and all over the black diaspora. Initially, almost all of the hardcore fans were against it, because here was this figure of black empowerment who was suddenly depowered. But, later, a lot of those guys went on to speak very favorably about my run. I had all these conversations online where they said, “Marvel handed you a concept that was terrible, but we like what you did with it.” I always said, “Well, I really liked the concept, but thanks anyhow!”


https://www.sacurrent.com/ArtSlut/archives/2018/04/05/san-antonio-author-david-liss-on-writing-black-panther-the-man-without-fear-for-marvel-comics
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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA :New David Liss Interview
« Reply #538 on: April 05, 2018, 12:17:11 pm »
San Antonio Author David Liss On Writing Black Panther: The Man Without Fear for Marvel Comics
Posted By Sanford Nowlin on Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 11:00 am



Before Black Panther was a $1.3 billion box office breakout, he was a mid-level Marvel Comics superhero — ranking somewhere between Spider Man and, say, Moon Knight. And a few years before he clawed his way onto the silver screen, David Liss — a San Antonio author best known for historical thrillers like The Whiskey Rebels — was his principal writer.

After being approached by a Marvel editor who’d fanboyed over his thrillers, Liss agreed to pen some titles for the comics company. That led to a two-year (2010-2012) run with Black Panther: The Man Without Fear, which transported T’Challa into the urban jungle of Hell’s Kitchen. His work on the character is now compiled in Black Panther: The Man Without Fear – The Complete Collection, released in December as a trade paperback.

Liss, who recently finished the Y.A. trilogy Randoms, still works for Marvel, now creating video game content. We asked him talk about his time with Black Panther, often billed as the first black superhero.

Why does Black Panther resonate with so many people right now?

When I was working on the character, Marvel was struggling to figure out how to get him more exposure. Certainly, we couldn’t imagine that the moment would soon be upon us that he would be a household name. Of course, the film helps. But it’s also just a different cultural moment right now. In the post-Ferguson world, people want this character. There’s a cultural hunger. They’re ready for this character who represents a kind of black empowerment we haven’t seen before.


You took Black Panther out of Wakanda, the fictional African country where he’s king, and stripped him of his support system. Was that dictated by Marvel?

It had been established by other writers in a different story line that Black Panther reached a point where he decided to abdicate the throne. Marvel wanted to get more eyes on him by having him take over for Daredevil in Hell’s Kitchen. Matt Murdoch, the character of Daredevil, has his own crisis and he leaves, so T’Challa agrees to fill in. That’s what I was handed, and within that framework, I had the power to do what I wanted. One of the first decisions I got to make was whether to depower him: Does he get to keep his Black Panther powers? I decided to take everything — take his money, take his power. To me, the interesting thing was, here’s this guy who has all these abilities, all these resources and all this political power. If you strip all that away, what do you get? Narratively, I liked the idea of someone used to having a great deal of authority being brought to his lowest point and clawing his way back up.

How did that go over with the fans?

There are a few active comic book discussion boards and most writers stay away from them, but when I was writing Black Panther, I didn’t. I wanted to know what the fans thought and who the fans were. That’s when I discovered there was this group of really active and dedicated fans all over the world. They were from the Caribbean and Africa and all over the black diaspora. Initially, almost all of the hardcore fans were against it, because here was this figure of black empowerment who was suddenly depowered. But, later, a lot of those guys went on to speak very favorably about my run. I had all these conversations online where they said, “Marvel handed you a concept that was terrible, but we like what you did with it.” I always said, “Well, I really liked the concept, but thanks anyhow!”


https://www.sacurrent.com/ArtSlut/archives/2018/04/05/san-antonio-author-david-liss-on-writing-black-panther-the-man-without-fear-for-marvel-comics



This is a really good find, and I am glad that we finally have from Liss himself what were the strictures he worked under, and why they were there. That resolves a bunch of debates and discussions.  Like most hardcore followers, I still don't love the premise that Liss was handed, but I like how he handled it.

Liss seems more knowledgeable of and comfortable with Afrikan people's perspectives and issues than other White authors are. His mention of Ferguson is telling.

I had no idea that he still works for Marvel, but making video. Good for him.
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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA :New David Liss Interview
« Reply #539 on: April 05, 2018, 12:40:08 pm »
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