Author Topic: Black Panther's Agents of Wakanda  (Read 105534 times)

Offline 4sake

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther #6
« Reply #570 on: June 09, 2018, 11:28:29 am »
So, Rise Of The Black Panther #6.…

I have good news and bad news.

The good news is, Narcisse is a better writer than Coates, and this issue is probably the strongest of the mini. It holds together pretty well, although there's a bit of handwaving, and the ending is soft. I'm sure some of you will like the feats Evan has T'Challa & Shuri pull off.

The bad news is, it's still not a very good story. Taken as a whole, it reads like a laundry list of cameos and Easter Eggs. There was literally no need for Namor, Doom, or Storm (for example) to appear in this tale at all, other than a desire to portray as many BP supporting characters and rogues as possible. In fact, there are 4 characters that probably SHOULD have been in this, but were foisted off with dialogue.

I would have been much happier if the Killmonger plot had taken center stage more, and there were fewer bits designed to appeal to long-term fans (or folks who liek to memorize handbooks & wiki pages  )

Anyway, I'm not sure I'd follow him to an ongoing. Dude needs more seasoning. But the point is moot, I guess, as TNC has a stranglehold on the main title (Galley Slaves of the Galaxy), and the only spin-off is that Wakanda Forever mini written by Nnedi Okorafor (who I don't particularly care for). So I'm basically done with comics for a while.

Laters, brothers.

What four characters do you think should have appeared
Pull List

Offline Beware Of Geek

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther #6
« Reply #571 on: June 09, 2018, 12:12:38 pm »
What four characters do you think should have appeared

I'm sure if you shine a torch on Panther's history, you'll come up with something.  It might be a bit of a stretch, but the answer isn't invisible. :D

Offline Ezyo

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther #6
« Reply #572 on: June 09, 2018, 12:41:24 pm »
What four characters do you think should have appeared

I'm sure if you shine a torch on Panther's history, you'll come up with something.  It might be a bit of a stretch, but the answer isn't invisible. :D

Why do I feel the Thing the series is missing would of definitely made it more interesting    8)

Offline Ture

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther - Danai Gurira Speaks!
« Reply #573 on: June 30, 2018, 10:18:02 am »
Danai Gurira Views ‘Black Panther’ As The Story Of An Africa That Could Have Been

BY RYAN HARKNESS



“The thing that really connected me in a powerful way was her love and her loyalty to this thing called Wakanda. This nation that was never colonized, and consequently became the most advanced nation on the globe, and used its resources for its own people, which Africa never got to do. The idea of being a guardian of that place, of being a protector alongside Black Panther, to me, that just resonated so deeply. Africans always wonder, who would we have been if we weren’t colonized?

“I’m just thankful I got to be a part of it. It sort of shows that world where we think beyond whatever trauma we’ve experienced as a continent and we reclaim ourselves and our greatness and we find our way to our best modernity. This continent is powerful and wealthy and has astounding potential. We have to reclaim ourselves, reclaim the power of who we are.”


Full Article here
https://uproxx.com/hitfix/danai-gurira-black-panther-story-uncolonized-africa/
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Offline Ture

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther - Danai Gurira Speaks!
« Reply #574 on: June 30, 2018, 10:21:36 am »
DANAI GURIRA RECALLS WHEN ZIMBABWE WAS THE REAL-LIFE WAKANDA
By Sean Braswell



WHY YOU SHOULD CARE
Because the actress and other storytellers are trying to help a continent regain its sense of potential.

Danai Gurira is taking a break from promoting her blockbuster film Black Panther to talk to a group that does not include any Hollywood reporters. But the playwright turned movie megastar is not actually taking a break from talking about the movie: She is sharing the film’s message with an audience that probably appreciates it more than any other will. “The thing I love about that film,” Gurira tells a group of wide-eyed teenagers at the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, is that it “shows that world where we think beyond whatever trauma we’ve experienced as a continent, and we reclaim ourselves and our greatness.”

Black Panther may be a box-office success, but it is all about the power of storytelling to inspire that act of reclamation. And so is Gurira, whose remarkable journey to stardom is the subject of this week’s episode of Breaking Big, airing at 8.30 p.m. ET Friday on PBS. “This continent is powerful and wealthy and has astounding potential,” Gurira, 40, informs the energized audience.

And it is a potential she has witnessed swelling — and diminishing — firsthand in recent decades. Gurira’s home nation of Zimbabwe was far from the real-life Wakanda of Africa during her early life there in the 1980s and ’90s, but the resource-rich southern African nation once represented the promise of that continent. Until, that is, it endured a social and economic free fall that set Gurira and millions of others adrift and on a long-term quest to reclaim their homeland’s greatness.

Zimbabwe’s longtime dictator, Robert Mugabe, once said that he would rule the southern African nation until “God says come.” Last November, however, it was not the hand of death but his own hand (following a military coup) that finally deposed the autocrat after 37 years of rule. Like another post-apartheid leader, Nelson Mandela, Mugabe was a political prisoner who helped liberate his people from white colonial rule. After Zimbabwe gained independence from Great Britain in 1980, he endorsed racial reconciliation and was even nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.

At the time Zimbabwe held enormous promise: It had paved roads, airports and a strong education system, not to mention rich soil that helped make it the “breadbasket” of the continent. Mugabe himself recognized that he helmed the “jewel of Africa.” It was into this propitious atmosphere that 5-year-old Danai Gurira, born to Zimbabwean expats in rural Iowa, returned in 1983. Gurira tells OZY Editor-in-Chief Carlos Watson that she had an “idyllic childhood” in many respects. “Zimbabwe was in a very prosperous place,” she says, and she enjoyed a good education at an all-girls Catholic school in Harare. “Zimbabwe’s kind of known for being the nerd nation of the continent,” she quips.

Gurira, a self-described “Zamerican,” and her siblings performed plays in their backyard, and in the seventh grade she made her theatrical debut. Still, as a young person, the star of the hit television show The Walking Dead was more interested in being an activist than an actress. “I grew up in a home where I was allowed to assert my opinions and feel confident that they mattered,” she says — her high school friends even nicknamed her Megaphone. Gurira soon learned, though, that her voice was not valued so much outside of her family and friends. “I was in a society where women had less of a space to do that [speak out]. And I felt that incongruence very quickly, and it jarred me,” she says.

Meanwhile, Robert Mugabe was jarring an entire nation. The strongman began a brutal crackdown of political opponents and a violent program of seizing white-owned farms and redistributing them to his cronies. By 2008, a country that had enjoyed one of the highest economic growth rates in the world in the 1990s suffered from hyperinflation. Millions, including Gurira, who returned to the American Midwest to attend Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, fled the country during that period.

Mugabe may be gone, but it will take years, maybe even decades, for Zimbabwe to reclaim its promise. And in that process of restoring a nation, and a continent, stories matter: The stories that African children see on their screens and stages — and that shape how they view their own potential — matter.

In addition to her work in film and television, Gurira has written several staged plays, including the Tony-nominated Eclipsed, which tells the story of five Liberian women caught in the middle of a civil war. Gurira says that she wants to continue to tell African women’s stories, and there are so many more stories to tell. It’s clear from the reception her words receive at the African Leadership Academy that she is not just a storyteller but a leader too.

So does the vocal expat still want to be an activist, or even a politician? “I’m not saying I wouldn’t,” she allows, “but, right now, I feel like I have to get these stories told. I’ve got these stories right here that need to get told.”


https://www.ozy.com/flashback/danai-gurira-recalls-when-zimbabwe-was-the-real-life-wakanda/87678
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Offline Ture

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther - Danai Gurira Speaks!
« Reply #575 on: June 30, 2018, 10:25:12 am »
Just Because...

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Offline CvilleWakandan

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther - Danai Gurira Speaks!
« Reply #576 on: June 30, 2018, 11:43:04 am »
Danai Gurira Views ‘Black Panther’ As The Story Of An Africa That Could Have Been

BY RYAN HARKNESS



“The thing that really connected me in a powerful way was her love and her loyalty to this thing called Wakanda. This nation that was never colonized, and consequently became the most advanced nation on the globe, and used its resources for its own people, which Africa never got to do. The idea of being a guardian of that place, of being a protector alongside Black Panther, to me, that just resonated so deeply. Africans always wonder, who would we have been if we weren’t colonized?

“I’m just thankful I got to be a part of it. It sort of shows that world where we think beyond whatever trauma we’ve experienced as a continent and we reclaim ourselves and our greatness and we find our way to our best modernity. This continent is powerful and wealthy and has astounding potential. We have to reclaim ourselves, reclaim the power of who we are.”


Full Article here
https://uproxx.com/hitfix/danai-gurira-black-panther-story-uncolonized-africa/

If she is a comic reader, I think she would a primarily Hudlin fan.
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Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: RISE OR DIE: Rise of the Black Panther - Danai Gurira Speaks!
« Reply #577 on: June 30, 2018, 03:49:42 pm »
Danai Gurira Views ‘Black Panther’ As The Story Of An Africa That Could Have Been

BY RYAN HARKNESS



“The thing that really connected me in a powerful way was her love and her loyalty to this thing called Wakanda. This nation that was never colonized, and consequently became the most advanced nation on the globe, and used its resources for its own people, which Africa never got to do. The idea of being a guardian of that place, of being a protector alongside Black Panther, to me, that just resonated so deeply. Africans always wonder, who would we have been if we weren’t colonized?

“I’m just thankful I got to be a part of it. It sort of shows that world where we think beyond whatever trauma we’ve experienced as a continent and we reclaim ourselves and our greatness and we find our way to our best modernity. This continent is powerful and wealthy and has astounding potential. We have to reclaim ourselves, reclaim the power of who we are.”


Full Article here
https://uproxx.com/hitfix/danai-gurira-black-panther-story-uncolonized-africa/

If she is a comic reader, I think she would a primarily Hudlin fan.


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Offline Ture

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Netflix's 'Luke Cage' season two disappoints by avoiding any real conversations on race
"Luke Cage" is less an heir to "Black Panther" than it is a follow-up to the pre-"Black Panther" status quo.
by Noah Berlatsky

The Marvel film “Black Panther” is, among other things, a passionate critique of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) for its failure to engage with or think about racial injustice. The film's charismatic villain, Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan), excoriates the advanced African nation of Wakanda for its isolationism. In Killmonger's view, Wakanda should use its advanced tech to help oppressed black people worldwide. But Killmonger is also, by implication, demanding that the creators of the MCU address actual injustice, rather than just having Iron Man or Thor blast away at conveniently labeled supervillains. Director Ryan Coogler was telling his own story, but he was also speaking to the franchise. A story about justice in this world, “Black Panther” says, needs to be a story about racism, too.

If the MCU wanted to expand on the success and the insights of “Black Panther,” the second season of “Luke Cage” seems like a good place to start. Like "Black Panther," Netflix’s "Luke Cage" is centered on a black hero and a virtually all-black cast. But while "Black Panther" confronted racism head-on, "Luke Cage" mostly spends its second season avoiding the issue. As a result, the season feels deliberately aimless. Characters shuffle from plot point to plot point, carefully stepping around any real conversations, or any real stakes.

While "Black Panther" confronted racism head-on, "Luke Cage" mostly spends its second season avoiding the issue.

In the first season, the bulletproof Luke Cage (Mike Colter) was on the run from the police, which gave the series a chance to engage at least fitfully with the Black Lives Matter movement and its concerns about police brutality. In the second season, though, Cage is a celebrity, whose heroic bona fides are known throughout Harlem. The police are presented as allies in his effort to prevent a war between a Jamaican gang led by Bushmaster (Mustafa Shakir) and the local Harlem criminal enterprise of first season villain Black Mariah (Alfre Woodard.)

The series, in short, decides to put aside concerns about law enforcement in order to focus for 13 episodes on that conservative shibboleth, black-on-black crime. Crime in most cities has been dropping for decades, but you couldn't tell that from "Luke Cage's" Harlem, which is a throwback not so much to the violence of the 1990s as to the prohibition-era 1920s. Ethnic gangs — Korean, Jamaican, Italian — bring military arsenals to turf battles, while Cage and the cops try desperately to reimpose order. Black people in Luke Cage suffer because of (hyperbolic, anachronistic) crime, not because of racism.

Of course, racism — in the form of segregation, enforced poverty and an antagonistic relationship with the police — is intimately tied to high crime rates and gun violence in black neighborhoods. "Luke Cage," though, never makes that connection. Racism is brought up in the show, but it isn't connected to the main plot.

Instead, the occasional expression of antiracism is presented as a diversion, or even as a dangerous temptation to anger. Cage’s most explicit denunciation of racism and prejudice comes in a discussion with his girlfriend, Claire (Rosario Dawson). Recounting the prejudice he faces as a black man leads Cage to an outburst of anger that in turn threatens their relationship. Antiracism in this case isn't a source of inspiration; instead, it undermines Cage’s character.

Antiracism in the narrative is most directly associated with Mariah — who is, again, the villain. Mariah is a Harlem politician and owner of what appears to be the only musical venue in the neighborhood. Her philanthropy, and her work to advance and celebrate black women in particular, provides a front for her gun-running and general brutality. In a particularly telling scene, she auctions off W.E.B Dubois' original copy of "The Souls of Black Folks" in a money-laundering scheme. Antiracism in Luke Cage isn't a living tradition or a serious moral commitment; it's a scam.

Killmonger's methods were questionable, but his hatred of racism and injustice were sincere and powerful. That's what made him, by far, the MCU's greatest villain.

This is especially painful because Mariah is a character with huge potential. The 65-year-old Alfre Woodard plays her with intelligence, vulnerability and a simmering, conflicted sexuality. Mariah was abused by her uncle when she was a child, and she is torn between hatred of her family crime business and an overwhelming desire to use its power to protect herself. If she were allowed to connect her own turmoil and pain to a larger struggle for justice, she could be the moral center of the series, just as Killmonger is the moral center of "Black Panther."

Killmonger's methods were questionable, but his hatred of racism and injustice were sincere and powerful. That's what made him, by far, the MCU's greatest villain, and arguably it's greatest character. Mariah, in contrast, and for all her suffering, is just a hypocrite. After much vacillation, the series decides that the only thing it can do with her is hate her. Literally everyone who loves her turns on her in an orgy of loathing, as if terrified of where sympathy for Black Mariah might lead.

"Luke Cage" is less an heir to "Black Panther," then, than it is a follow-up to the pre-"Black Panther" status quo. It's in line with the second season of Netflix’s "Jessica Jones," in which a discussion of racial discrimination was sidelined in favor of a lament about the prejudice experienced by (white) people with superpowers. It's also in line with Netflix's "Iron Fist," which cast the remarkably underwhelming Finn Jones as billionaire Danny Rand, a white guy who became the greatest master of a mysterious Asian martial art, because white guys are always the best.


"Black Panther" showed that the MCU could confront racism directly, and by so doing tell different kinds of stories. "The world’s going to start over, and we’re going to be on top!" Killmonger declared. "Luke Cage," though, either didn't hear the announcement or decided to ignore it. The result is a series about crime fighting that has no idea what justice is, and doesn't seem to care.

Noah Berlatsky is a freelance writer. He edits the online comics-and-culture website The Hooded Utilitarian and is the author of the book "Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Marston/Peter Comics, 1941-1948."


https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/netflix-s-luke-cage-season-two-disappoints-avoiding-any-real-ncna885716
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Offline supreme illuminati

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I see where Noah is coming from, and I respect his opinion. But I disagree that Luke AVOIDS the issue of Blackness/Afrikanness in Season 2. Instead, there's a different story to tell wherein being Afrikan is of course a very large part of the story [ could you imagine Bushmaster being White, speaking with the Jamaican accent and slang, his family White, etc? Naaahhh. Not working. Same with the slick reworking of The Deadly Nightshade's origin, etc ] but just in a different way.

Multiple times, Luke Cage says he can't do such and such or he's aware that if he does do such and such it'll be looked upon differently because "I'm a bulletproof, super strong, Black ex-felon..." and IT'S REAL. Very organic to the story, etc. The whole story of Harlem is inexplicably the story of race.
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Offline Ture

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I see where Noah is coming from, and I respect his opinion. But I disagree that Luke AVOIDS the issue of Blackness/Afrikanness in Season 2. Instead, there's a different story to tell wherein being Afrikan is of course a very large part of the story [ could you imagine Bushmaster being White, speaking with the Jamaican accent and slang, his family White, etc? Naaahhh. Not working. Same with the slick reworking of The Deadly Nightshade's origin, etc ] but just in a different way.

Multiple times, Luke Cage says he can't do such and such or he's aware that if he does do such and such it'll be looked upon differently because "I'm a bulletproof, super strong, Black ex-felon..." and IT'S REAL. Very organic to the story, etc. The whole story of Harlem is inexplicably the story of race.

Well said SI. I concur with your sentiments regarding Luke Cage's inclusion of the issue of race. I find the difference between Black Panther and Luke Cage's racial centering lies in their respective points of view. Luke Cage's racial foci are all grounded in victimization, while Black Panther's locus of race stays grounded in isolation and its ensuing autonomy.

Both BP and LC give respect to Afrakan culture as it manifests on the Afrakan continent courtesy of Wakanda, Jamaica via Booshmaster and Harlem USA by one MARIAH STOKES! Luke Cage himself doesn't really come off reppin' Harlem to me. Maybe third season.

Afrakan culture as it presents itself in the states is often obfuscated by the preponderance of those accepting integration into the Eurocentric cultural normative and not those that maintained, adapted and advanced traditional ancestral beliefs and values.

For example when so called Black religion is spoken of in the US, Christianity and to lesser degrees Islam, Judaism, Hebrewism are clarion when compared to Voodoo, Hoodoo, Juju, Wanga and Gris Gris. Many of us maintained our ethnic and cultural identities through captivity, enslavement and self liberation.
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Offline Ture

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Marvel and IDW to Create New Comic Books For the Next Generation of Readers. The new comic book line featuring Spider-Man, The Avengers, and Black Panther will be available starting this November.

SAN DIEGO, CA AND NEW YORK, NY (July 17, 2018) – Marvel Entertainment and IDW Publishing announced today that the two companies will develop middle-grade comic books designed for younger readers. Featuring some of Marvel’s most popular characters, the monthly issues and trade paperback collections, published by IDW, will be available for sale at local comic book shops and book retailers across the country, expanding opportunities for the next generation of Super Heroes to experience the Marvel Universe.
 
Launching in November 2018, the Marvel and IDW collaboration will kick off with a Spider-Man series featuring both Peter Parker and Miles Morales, followed by an Avengers series beginning in December and a Black Panther series in January 2019. Each of these titles will serve as an easily-accessible jumping-on point for younger readers to follow the adventures of their favorite characters.

Story details and creative teams for the new line of middle-grade comic books will be announced at a later date.


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Offline Ture

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme
« Reply #582 on: August 13, 2018, 07:42:19 pm »
In  a March 16, 2018 interview with Vogue Nnedi Okorafor made a poignant statement. 

Though it’s true that the timing has never been better for a story showcasing strong female characters, expect plot to come first—not the politics. “It’s not going to be a diatribe that is going to say ‘these are the issues that are important’ and have the characters exist to make a point,” says Okorafor. “The writing will feature those things within the story, but it’s an adventure narrative.”
https://www.vogue.com/article/black-panther-dora-milaje-comic-series-preview

Since 2016's emergence of the Coatesverse, the Black Panther's sector of the Marvel Universe has been written by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxanne Gay,  Evan Narcisse and  Nnedi Okorafor.  Four writers, seven titles. Two writers, Coates and Gay, have blatantly used the characters of the Black Panther as fodder for their respective political salvos. Gay's pathetic attempt was easily seen as a misfire while Coates simply changed guns.

While Okorafor purports an authentic Afrakan sci fi  perspective her handling of the Black Panther and the Dora Milaje is pedestrian at best. I fear for Shuri. Thus far only Narcisse has delivered, this owing to the fact that he kept the family together. By this I mean supporting characters are at their best when they play their role which is giving depth, scale and upliftment to the main character.

Shuri and the Dora Milaje are characters designed to enrich the Black Panther. They are in context when in relationship to the Black Panther. To further illustrate the point I'll use the X-Men. Arthur Curry and I used to discuss them at length. The X-Men were the ultimate team book because each character was formulated to contribute to the whole, the whole being the team. Break the team up... you have primarily a bunch of supporting characters whose popularity wanes as they become further removed from the team.

There are exceptions of course. Batman has a long list of supporting characters that became popular enough to hold their own. This was achieved by the consistent character development of the main character while simultaneously expanding his world. Thus Batman was a presence in Nightwing, Robin, Catwoman and Gotham (the comic book) even if he wasn't in the comic book itself. The umbilical and connective fibers of Batman were never severed with his supporting characters even if they were on the periphery they still remained an extension of Batman.

This is what made the Black Panther movie so enjoyable. How cool was it that we got see T'Challa, Nakia, Shuri and Okoye on missions together. That's a team. Want more? Toss in W'Kabi and M'Baku. Turn that in a comic book. Instant hit.

During the Hudlin years the Black Panther had tales penned by Reginald Hudlin, Dwayne McDuffie and Eric Jerome Dickey. They tried in many respects were successful in transferring the supporting character Storm from the X-Men to the Black Panther. Something happened however. It was somehow acceptable for Ororo to be a supporting character in X-Men books but it was not agreeable for her to be such in the pages of Black Panther.

Let's keep the Black Panther family together. Black Panther: action oriented insular adventures with occasional invites; Black Panther - World of Wakanda: BP's affect and influence at home and across the motherland, first season setting up World War Wakanda; Black Panther - The Crew: spy v spy, global, urban drama; and finally... Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme: deep space cosmic advetures and the true Intergalactic Empire of Wakanda. Nuff said, make it so. 
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Offline Ture

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme
« Reply #583 on: August 13, 2018, 09:46:30 pm »
There was an idea...
To bring together, a group of remarkable people from the HEF
To see if we could create something more...
So that when the Black Panther needed us, we could write the battles...
That they never could.


RISE OR DIE

BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
Black Panther.
King, Scientist, Warrior.
As a comic book character, barely alive.
Family, we can rebuild him.
We have the talent.
We have the capability to re-imagine comic's first Afrakan super hero.
Black Panther will be that hero.
Better than he was before.

CULTURAL!
FUTURISTIC!
EXCITING!

NEW ORIGINAL STORY
NEW ORIGINAL ART

Written by Ture'
Illustrated by Apexabyss
Critiqued and Reviewed by Supreme Illuminati

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Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme
« Reply #584 on: August 14, 2018, 06:59:32 pm »
There was an idea...
To bring together, a group of remarkable people from the HEF
To see if we could create something more...
So that when the Black Panther needed us, we could write the battles...
That they never could.


RISE OR DIE

BP710:THE PROTOCOLS
Black Panther.
King, Scientist, Warrior.
As a comic book character, barely alive.
Family, we can rebuild him.
We have the talent.
We have the capability to re-imagine comic's first Afrakan super hero.
Black Panther will be that hero.
Better than he was before.

CULTURAL!
FUTURISTIC!
EXCITING!

NEW ORIGINAL STORY
NEW ORIGINAL ART

Written by Ture'
Illustrated by Apexabyss
Critiqued and Reviewed by Supreme Illuminati

Dropping Wakanda Wednesday!




I LOVE IT!!! MAKE WAY FOR A PANTHER!!!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Itt7UZup4D8
« Last Edit: August 14, 2018, 07:02:01 pm by supreme illuminati »
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw