Author Topic: Black Panther's Agents of Wakanda  (Read 99919 times)

Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #510 on: February 08, 2018, 02:22:59 pm »
The Revolutionary Power Of Black Panther Part 3

It was a vision of black grandeur and, indeed, power in a trying time, when more than 41% of ­African Americans were at or below the poverty line and comprised nearly a third of the nation’s poor. Much like the iconic Lieutenant Uhura character, played by Nichelle Nichols, that debuted in Star Trek in September 1966, Black Panther was an expression of Afrofuturism—an ethos that fuses African mythologies, technology and science fiction and serves to rebuke conventional depictions of (or, worse, efforts to bring about) a future bereft of black people. His white creators, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, did not consciously conjure a fantasy-world response to Carmichael’s call, but the image still held power. T’Challa was not only strong and educated; he was also royalty. He didn’t have to take over. He was already in charge.

“You might say that this African nation is fantasy,” says Boseman, who portrays T’Challa in the movie. “But to have the opportunity to pull from real ideas, real places and real African concepts, and put it inside of this idea of Wakanda—that’s a great opportunity to develop a sense of what that identity is, especially when you’re disconnected from it.”

The character emerged at a time when the civil rights movement rightfully began to increase its demands of an America that had promised so much and delivered so little to its black population. Fifty-two years after the introduction of T’Challa, those demands have yet to be fully answered. According to the Federal Reserve, the typical African-American family had a median net worth of $17,600 in 2016. In contrast, white households had a median net worth of $171,000. The revolutionary thing about Black Panther is that it envisions a world not devoid of racism but one in which black people have the wealth, technology and military might to level the playing field—a scenario applicable not only to the predominantly white landscape of Hollywood but, more important, to the world at large.

The Black Panther Party, the revolutionary organization founded in Oakland, Calif., a few months after T’Challa’s debut, was depicted in the media as a threatening and radical group with goals that differed dramatically from the more pacifist vision of civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Lewis. Marvel even briefly changed the character’s name to Black Leopard because of the inevitable association with the Panthers, but soon reverted. For some viewers, “Black Panther” may have undeservedly sinister connotations, but the 2018 film reclaims the symbol to be celebrated by all as an avatar for change.

The urgency for change is partly what Carmichael was trying to express in the summer of ’66, and the powers that be needed to listen. It’s still true in 2018.


On set, Coogler works with star Gurira. “Black Panther is about a guy who works with his family and is responsible for a whole country,” he says. “That responsibility doesn’t turn off.”

Moviegoers first encountered Boseman’s T’Challa in Marvel’s 2016 ensemble hit Captain America: Civil War, and he instantly cut a striking figure in his sleek vibranium suit. As Black Panther opens, with T’Challa grieving the death of his father and coming to grips with his sudden ascension to the Wakandan throne, it’s clear that our hero’s royal upbringing has kept him sheltered from the realities of how systemic racism has touched just about every black life across the globe.

The comic, especially in its most recent incarnations as rendered by the writers Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, has worked to expunge Euro­centric misconceptions of Africa—and the film’s imagery and thematic material follow suit. “People often ask, ‘What is Black Panther? What is his power?’ And they have a misconception that he only has power through his suit,” says Boseman. “The character is existing with power inside power.”

Coogler says that Black Panther, like his previous films—including the police-brutality drama Fruitvale Station and his innovative Rocky sequel Creed—explores issues of identity. “That’s something I’ve always struggled with as a person,” says the director. “Like the first time that I found out I was black.” He’s talking less about an epidermal self-awareness than about learning how white society views his black skin. “Not just identity, but names. ‘Who are you?’ is a question that comes up a lot in this film. T’Challa knows exactly who he is. The antagonist in this film has many names.”


That villain comes in the form of Erik “Killmonger” Stevens, a former black-ops soldier with Wakandan ties who seeks to both outwit and beat down T’Challa for the crown. As played by a scene-­stealing Michael B. Jordan, Killmonger’s motivations illuminate thorny questions about how black people worldwide should best use their power.

In the movie, Killmonger is, like Coogler, a native of Oakland. By exploring the disparate experiences of Africans and African Americans, Coogler shines a bright light on the psychic scars of slavery’s legacy and how black Americans endure the real-life consequences of it in the present day. Killmonger’s perspective is rendered in full; his rage over how he and other black people across the world have been disenfranchised and disempowered is justifiable.

Coogler, who co-wrote the screenplay with Joe Robert Cole, also includes another important antagonist from the comics: the dastardly and bigoted Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis). “What I love about this experience is that it could have been the idea of black exploitation: he’s gonna fight Klaue, he’s gonna go after the white man and that’s it—that’s the enemy,” Boseman says. He recognizes that some fans will take issue with a black male villain fighting black protagonists. Killmonger fights not only T’Challa, but also warrior women like the spy Nakia (Nyong’o), Okoye (Danai Gurira) and the rest of the Dora Milaje, T’Challa’s all-female royal guards. Killmonger and Shuri (Letitia Wright), T’Challa’s quippy tech-genius sister, also face off.

T’Challa and Killmonger are mirror images, separated only by the accident of where they were born. “What they don’t realize,” Boseman says, “is that the greatest conflict you will ever face will be the conflict with yourself.”

Both T’Challa and Killmonger had to be compelling in order for the movie to succeed. “Obviously, the superhero is who puts you in the seat,” Coogler says.

“That’s who you want to see come out on top. But I’ll be damned if the villains ain’t cool too. They have to be able to stand up to the hero, and have you saying, ‘Man, I don’t know if the hero’s going to make it out of this.’”

“If you don’t have that,” Boseman says, “you don’t have a movie.”

This is not just a movie about a black superhero; it’s very much a black movie. It carries a weight that neither Thor nor Captain America could lift: serving a black audience that has long gone under­represented. For so long, films that depict a reality where whiteness isn’t the default have been ghettoized, marketed largely to audiences of color as niche entertainment, instead of as part of the mainstream. Think of Tyler Perry’s Madea movies, Malcolm D. Lee’s surprise 1999 hit The Best Man or the Barbershop franchise that launched in 2002. But over the past year, the success of films including Get Out and Girls Trip have done even bigger business at the box office, led to commercial acclaim and minted new stars like Kaluuya and Tiffany Haddish. Those two hits have only bolstered an argument that has persisted since well before Spike Lee made his debut: black films with black themes and black stars can and should be marketed like any other. No one talks about Woody Allen and Wes Anderson movies as “white movies” to be marketed only to that audience.

Black Panther marks the biggest move yet in this wave: it’s both a black film and the newest entrant in the most bankable movie franchise in history. For a wary and risk-averse film business, led largely by white film executives who have been historically predisposed to greenlight projects featuring characters who look like them, Black Panther will offer proof that a depiction of a reality of something other than whiteness can make a ton of money.

The film’s positive reception—as of Feb. 6, the day initial reviews surfaced, it had a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes—bodes well for its commercial prospects. Variety predicted that it could threaten the Presidents’ Day weekend record of $152 million, set in 2016 by Deadpool.

Some of the film’s early success can be credited to Nate Moore, an African­-American executive producer in Marvel’s film division who has been vocal about the importance of including black characters in the Marvel universe. But beyond Wakanda, the questions of power and responsibility, it seems, are not only applicable to the characters in Black Panther. Once this film blows the doors off, as expected, Hollywood must do more to reckon with that issue than merely greenlight more black stories. It also needs more Nate Moores.

“I know people [in the entertainment industry] are going to see this and aspire to it,” Boseman says. “But this is also having people inside spaces—gatekeeper positions, people who can open doors and take that idea. How can this be done? How can we be represented in a way that is aspirational?”

Because Black Panther marks such an unprecedented moment that excitement for the film feels almost kinetic. Black Panther parties are being organized, pre- and post-film soirées for fans new and old. A video of young Atlanta students dancing in their classroom once they learned they were going to see the film together went viral in early February. Oscar winner Octavia Spencer announced on her Insta­gram account that she’ll be in Mississippi when Black Panther opens and that she plans to buy out a theater “in an underserved community there to ensure that all our brown children can see themselves as a superhero.”

Many civil rights pioneers and other trailblazing forebears have received lavish cinematic treatments, in films including Malcolm X, Selma and Hidden Figures. Jackie Robinson even portrayed himself onscreen. Fictional celluloid champions have included Virgil Tibbs, John Shaft and Foxy Brown. Lando, too. But Black Panther matters more, because he is our best chance for people of every color to see a black hero. That is its own kind of power.

Jamil Smith is a journalist born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio. He lives in Los Angeles.

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Offline Metro

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #511 on: February 10, 2018, 08:59:55 am »
I'm looking for an employment spike among black writers, artists, producers, and technicians over the next decade.
let's build together.
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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #512 on: February 10, 2018, 04:45:12 pm »
I'm looking for an employment spike among black writers, artists, producers, and technicians over the next decade.
let's build together.

That would be good Metro. I would like to see Afrakans (aka Blacks) building institutions that are autonomous (owned and operated by them) engaged in cultural empowerment through... economic development based on bartering and trade agreements, in house credit investments and the divestment from loan and debt acquisition; building a political party complete with political action committees, lobbyists, a list of demands from the people for the person who requests the vote, a war chest and a leadership cadre made up of proven civic leaders; a sustained social movement grounded in Afrakan centered education; more free Afrakan centered health and counselling centers within the next ten years. I hope this film can inspire such.
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Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #513 on: February 10, 2018, 05:18:26 pm »
Who want next?

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Offline KIP LEWIS

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #514 on: February 11, 2018, 10:10:17 am »
Who want next?



Only if it's the real Hulk!

Offline Metro

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #515 on: February 11, 2018, 05:45:04 pm »
I'm still laughing at Blue Marvel dropping Ultimate Hulk.
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Offline Ezyo

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #516 on: February 11, 2018, 07:17:54 pm »
I was disappointed, not because Blue Marvel beat him, but because he one shot hi. And that was the most action BM did in the entire series. He barely cut loose at all

Offline Ture

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #517 on: February 12, 2018, 01:19:23 am »




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Offline KIP LEWIS

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #518 on: February 12, 2018, 05:55:18 pm »
I was disappointed, not because Blue Marvel beat him, but because he one shot hi. And that was the most action BM did in the entire series. He barely cut loose at all

The lame artwork of that punch disappointed me.  Imagine that punch by Kirby, Byrne or JRJR. 

Offline Ezyo

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #519 on: February 12, 2018, 06:08:08 pm »
Hell Rocaforts punch would of been good too. I hated how the Ultimates felt like guests in the book, all the stuff ewing Said he was going to explore he got distracted but abstract talking heads

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #520 on: February 15, 2018, 10:50:50 am »
Advance Review: The Black Panther Annual Is A Purr-fect Combination Of Past, Present And Future
by Oliver MacNamee



With the movie out this weekend, it seemed fitting to shine a light on next week’s Black Panther Annual #1 that brings together some of T’Challa’s most famous scribes as well as three top notch artists too, in three tales that not only set up the next story arc for the regular series, but also a story from an ‘alternate past’ and one from an ‘alternate future’ that surely must be returned back to at a later date, given how intriguing the future looks with Black Panther and Wakanda standing tall as rulers of the world! But, more on this very fascinating story later.

First, the main event, and the only story set in current continuity. Christopher Priest, who’s kicking it on DC’s Deathstroke, brings back a very familiar face to Panther fans in Everett K. Ross (who just happens to make an appearance in the new film as played by Bilbo Baggins), a character Priest himself created and one who, in this opener, sees himself promoted and therefore no longer a kitty sitter. Yet, that still doesn’t stop this wise-cracking Fed getting into trouble and back into a partnership with Panther. He runs across some of Wakanda’s Special Police, led by hard ass, Hunter the White Wolf and ends up trapped and about to be fed to sharks. As you do. Great old-school take down, Priest. But, where were the lasers on their heads?




Mike Perkins’ art, with its swathing and swarthy shadows and menacing mood reminds us that the stakes here are high, even if Ross would rather be anywhere else. After all, as he continually tells us (well, no-one’s listening to him in the story, that’s for sure) he’s been promoted to a C-7; he doesn’t do this kinda thing anymore.

It’s fine line one treads when injecting humour into so much potential deadly drama, but Priest does it easily. And, I imagine Ross will continue to add comedic relief from the forthcoming action as this story unfolds in the next issue. The final splash page, by Perkins, really captures the strength, agility and power of a hero who has rightfully earned his place amongst Marvel’s powerhouses. You can almost feel his thigh muscles tighten as he’s about to pounce. I can forgive him not giving the sharks lasers for this one shot alone.




Meanwhile, in an alternate past, writer Don McGregor and artist Daniel Acuña tell the tale of a younger T’Challa and one of remembrance, acceptance and tragedy that no hero – super, royal, or otherwise – could ever be prepared for, let alone fight, as The Black Panther remembers his past love, Monica Lynne. Its a story made even more poignant with the heartfelt remembrance McGregor places at the start of this clearly personally felt story to Rich Buckler and Billy Graham, with Buckler only lost to us last year. Graham past in 1999, but those of us who have lost loved ones never forget.

Acuña’s art is far more defined than I remember it, with stronger outlines around the figures that pop out against the shadings and almost painted backgrounds. Hats off to Will Moss for placing this as the second story. Its a bit of a weepie and one you wouldn’t want to finish on. Not when the final strip (only 6 pages long!) gives us a vision of an alternate future (aren’t they all alternate?) that is well realised, logically plotted (thanks to Reggie Hudlin) and, in the context of the Marvel Universe, a promising future in which King T’Challa becomes benevolent ruler of the world almost by accident rather than by design.

And, in its race to tell decades worth of untold stories, it will leave any reader wanting more! I must admit, this is part 2, but I haven’t read the first part, nor do you need to, given it was published in 2008’s Black Panther Annual. This is very much a done in one story. For now. But, like a vibranium mine, its too rich, too tantalising a story not to dig into at some future date, I imagine. Just don’t go leaving it another ten years, Reggie, please.




Ken Lashley on art duties packs a lot into these pages, with a future in which Panther and Storm were still married and tried to unite not only the world but Mutant kind, too. Although, like many other wars of the past, at a very human cost. Who needs Old Man Logan when surely Marvel will soon be working on an Old Man T’Challa series once this book drops on February 21st and fans, like myself, will call for more!

So, as you make your way to your local cinema or multiplex this weekend, maybe tell that non-comic-buying friend of yours about this top title. A comic that pays homage to the past, looks to a possible future and kicks off the next high octane fueled adventure in the present too. A purr-fect combination and a great jump on point for anyone wanting more of Wakanda, T’Challa and Black Panther. And, like LL Cool J, you too can walk with a panther!




Black Panther Annual #1 is out Wednesday, the 21st of February from Marvel Comics.

http://www.comicon.com/2018/02/14/advance-review-the-black-panther-annual-is-a-purr-fect-combination-of-past-present-and-future/
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Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #521 on: February 15, 2018, 12:25:48 pm »
You are a national treasure, Ture.
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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #522 on: February 15, 2018, 11:07:38 pm »
You are a national treasure, Ture.

Much appreciated Supreme Illuminati. The art on the preview pages is outstanding. Looks like the Macks are going to give us something to talk about.
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Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #523 on: February 17, 2018, 03:33:25 pm »
Chris Claremont Thinks Black Panther's Marriage to Storm Was a Bad Idea, and He's Right
Charles Pulliam-Moore



Because comic books are basically just illustrated soap operas with much more realistic plot lines (fight me), superhero weddings are always something of a Very Big Deal™—the sort of big to-dos that get turned into semi-major events. Take, for example, the marriage between the X-Men’s Ororo Munroe and T’Challa, the king of Wakanda.

Storm and T’Challa tied the knot in Reggie Hudlin, Scot Eaton, Kaare Andrews, and Klaus Janson’s Black Panther #18 from 2006—and as you might expect, the entire ceremony was a spectacle. Everyone who was anyone from across Marvel’s comics universe travelled to Wakanda to watch as the mutant weather goddess made an honest man out of T’Challa and, all in all, the wedding was... as outsized and garish as you might expect a superhero wedding to be.

Obviously, the team working on Black Panther at the time wanted you to believe that Storm and T’Challa had found their happily ever after in matrimonial bliss with one another, but because comic books are basically just illustrated soap operas, there was no chance in hell their union was ever going to last. Eventually, Storm got swept up in the events of Avengers vs X-Men—an event that saw a large swath of Wakanda obliterated thanks to a giant wave created by Namor—which in turn led to T’Challa deciding to unilaterally annul their marriage in front of the whole country.



It was a messy and abrupt ending to a relationship that was billed as being one for the ages and honestly? It felt... wrong. It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly what felt weird about Storm and T’Challa’s relationship, but from Chris Claremont’s perspective, it all boils down to the fact that each of them is too big a personality to pair up. When we spoke with him recently, he was candid about his general feeling that the two of them probably shouldn’t have tied the knot:

Well, the problem I have with it is, who gets top billing?

Because that’s the function of a king’s wife is to produce little princes and pricessees, right? The first thing that Charles and Diana did was have a child.

Their job was to have babies and be guarded and I think the challenge with any marriage relationship in comics—but especially a marriage of leading characters in comics—is answering the question: “What comes next?” Does Ororo become a supporting character in T’Challa’s book? Does T’Challa become a supporting character in Ororo’s book? How do you strike a balance between them? What do you do five years down the line? Because the practical reality is that the audience gets older, the creator gets older, but the characters can’t get older and the moment you bring a child into it, that automatically marks time.

Claremont makes a very, very good point. Though Storm and T’Challa are no strangers working with one another from time to time, their respective duties as heroes on different teams most often have them on opposite ends of the globe (if not the universe), dealing with all manner of reality-threatening events. Storm’s mainly concerned with the fact that mutantkind seems to nearly go extinct every other month, while T’Challa’s been busy trying to hold Wakanda together in the midst of an a political uprising.

Put simply, Storm and T’Challa both lead lives far too action-packed and time consuming to even entertain the idea of a casual fling with a nearby teammate, let alone a full-blown marriage. As difficult as it was to watch the two of them fall apart, it was almost certainly for the best.

https://io9.gizmodo.com/chris-claremont-thinks-black-panthers-marriage-to-storm-1822598048

This demonstrates the extreme lack of vision for the union of Black Panther and Storm. Two big? Who gets top billing? Ridiculous. In the comic book world, marriage can be whatever the writer conceives it to be. Teaming up big names is no problem... ever hear of Beyonce and Jay Z; Will and Jada. How about World's Finest? Matter of fact team books pride themselves putting together the most popular A listers.

The real questioned asked is should be who is blocking Storm's top billing in X-Men?

Maybe Evans could write a Storm and Black Panther romance...
Rise of the Black Panther 2...Tempest.

Yea, T'Challa gets top billing.




As usual, Brother Ture, your vision is piercingly accurate.

Ole dude's arguments who wrote this article are...garbage. And Westernized and insecure. "who gets top billing"? This isn't a COMPETITION it's a COMBINATION, genius. Who gets top billing between peanut butter and jelly in a PBJ sandwich? NOBODY, YOU IDIOT. THEY'RE COMBINING TO MAKE A SANDWICH.

Well, when you have a King and Queen-Wife? What do you have? THE NUCLEUS OF A NEW FAMILY. GENIUS.

Claremont's bias against T'Choro is because he's a racist prick. With bondage flavor fetish fantasies, etc. You like bondage fetishes? Fine. But keep your grubby racist ideas and fingers away from T'Challa, Storm and any other POC.
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Offline Battle

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Re: WORLD WAR WAKANDA : Prelude to the Future - Black Panther Annual #1
« Reply #524 on: February 17, 2018, 04:04:12 pm »





Claremont's bias against T'Choro is because he's a racist prick. With bondage flavor fetish fantasies, etc. You like bondage fetishes? Fine. But keep your grubby racist ideas and fingers away from T'Challa, Storm and any other POC.





Supreme, I've been doing some extensive research on SMBD lately and you may onto something.

I don't have a conclusion yet but my initial impressions of this category of sex is unquestionably a by-product of America's slave era as well as contain elements of world history's dark ages.

SMBD is an extremely bizarre, strange & creepy world that borderlines on criminal activity and can spin out of control if hooked up with the wrong individual.

Storm's attire during the Claremont/bryne/Austin run is damning evidence of your observation considering that I was around 11 - 14 years old at the time of that X-Men run.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2018, 04:06:26 pm by Battle »