Author Topic: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem  (Read 85895 times)

Offline KIP LEWIS

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme... BLACK PANTHER'S QUEST
« Reply #735 on: February 28, 2019, 05:28:51 am »
So, how much time has passed between the final two episodes of this season?

Offline Redjack

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme... BLACK PANTHER'S QUEST
« Reply #736 on: March 12, 2019, 08:11:28 pm »
several weeks to a couple months.
Soon you will come to know. When the bullet hits the bone.

Offline JRCarter

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme... BLACK PANTHER'S QUEST
« Reply #737 on: March 19, 2019, 03:16:06 pm »
Whether or not we get another season featuring T'Challa, let's appreciate the one we did get.

Offline Ture

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme... Coates by the numbers
« Reply #738 on: March 26, 2019, 10:50:32 pm »
2016- Present

Black Panther 1 $4.99 Marvel 253,259( Good Lord)
Black Panther 2 $3.99 Marvel 77,654
Black Panther 3 $3.99 Marvel 75,037
Black Panther 4 $3.99 Marvel 72,302
Black Panther 5 $3.99 Marvel 83,756
Black Panther 6 $3.99 Marvel 58,746
Black Panther 7 $3.99 Marvel 60,857
Black Panther 8 $3.99 Marvel 43,451
Black Panther 9 $3.99 Marvel 39,123
Black Panther 10 $3.99 Marvel 38,741
Black Panther 11 $3.99 Marvel 35,492
Black Panther 12 $3.99 Marvel 37,612
Black Panther 13 $3.99 Marvel 30,509
Black Panther 14 $3.99 Marvel 27,287
Black Panther 15 $3.99 Marvel 25,466
Black Panther 16 $3.99 Marvel 29,593
Black Panther 17 $3.99 Marvel 25,609
Black Panther 18 $3.99 Marvel 27,285

Black Panther World of Wakanda 1 $4.99 Marvel 57,073
Black Panther World of Wakanda 2 $3.99 Marvel 45,009
Black Panther World of Wakanda 3 $3.99 Marvel 25,248
Black Panther World of Wakanda 4 $3.99 Marvel 17,454
Black Panther World of Wakanda 5 $3.99 Marvel 15,847
Black Panther World of Wakanda 6 $3.99 Marvel 14,547

Black Panther Crew 1 $3.99 Marvel 35,604
Black Panther Crew 2 $3.99 Marvel 18,183
Black Panther Crew 3 $3.99 Marvel 14,634
Black Panther Crew 4 $3.99 Marvel 13,050

Black Panther 166 $3.99 Marvel 55,314
Black Panther 167 $3.99 Marvel 23,784
Black Panther 168 $3.99 12/27/17 Marvel 22,492
Black Panther 169 $3.99 01/24/18 Marvel 21,321
*Black Panther 170 LEG WW $3.99 02/28/18 Marvel 28,143
Black Panther 171 $3.99 03/28/18 Marvel 24,304
Black Panther 172 $3.99 04/18/18 Marvel 26,345

Rise of Black Panther 1 $3.99 01/03/18 Marvel 40,897
*Rise of Black Panther 2 $3.99 02/07/18 Marvel 19,709
Rise of Black Panther 3 $3.99 03/07/18 Marvel 18,055
Rise of Black Panther 4 $3.99 04/04/18 Marvel 19,289
Rise of Black Panther 5 $3.99 05/02/18 Marvel 18,787
Rise of Black Panther 6 $3.99 06/06/18 Marvel 18,487

Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 1 $3.99 10/24/18 Marvel 44,533
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 2 $3.99 11/28/18 Marvel 26,204
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 3 $3.99 12/19/18 Marvel 24,357
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 4 $3.99 01/30/19 Marvel 21,176
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 5 $3.99 02/27/19 Marvel 19,699

Black Panther 1 $4.99 05/23/18 Marvel 122,358
Black Panther 2 $3.99 06/27/18 Marvel 34,891
Black Panther 3 $3.99 08/22/18 Marvel 35,093
Black Panther 4 $3.99 09/26/18 Marvel 30,951
Black Panther 5 $3.99 10/31/18 Marvel 31,254
Black Panther 6 $3.99 11/28/18 Marvel 26,220
Black Panther 7 $3.99 12/12/18 Marvel 27,548
Black Panther 8 $3.99 01/16/19 Marvel 22,670
Black Panther 9 $3.99 02/27/19 Marvel 23,052

*Black Panther Annual 1 $4.99 02/21/18 Marvel 20,972
*Black Panther Sound and Fury 1 $3.99 02/07/18 Marvel 20,136

Black Panther Prelude 1 $3.99 Marvel 8,475
Black Panther Prelude 2 $3.99 Marvel 6,991

* released in the month of Black Panther movie


courtesy of CBR's Killerbee911







courtesy of CBR's MindofShadow
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Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme... Coates by the numbers
« Reply #739 on: March 29, 2019, 07:43:53 pm »
2016- Present

Black Panther 1 $4.99 Marvel 253,259( Good Lord)
Black Panther 2 $3.99 Marvel 77,654
Black Panther 3 $3.99 Marvel 75,037
Black Panther 4 $3.99 Marvel 72,302
Black Panther 5 $3.99 Marvel 83,756
Black Panther 6 $3.99 Marvel 58,746
Black Panther 7 $3.99 Marvel 60,857
Black Panther 8 $3.99 Marvel 43,451
Black Panther 9 $3.99 Marvel 39,123
Black Panther 10 $3.99 Marvel 38,741
Black Panther 11 $3.99 Marvel 35,492
Black Panther 12 $3.99 Marvel 37,612
Black Panther 13 $3.99 Marvel 30,509
Black Panther 14 $3.99 Marvel 27,287
Black Panther 15 $3.99 Marvel 25,466
Black Panther 16 $3.99 Marvel 29,593
Black Panther 17 $3.99 Marvel 25,609
Black Panther 18 $3.99 Marvel 27,285

Black Panther World of Wakanda 1 $4.99 Marvel 57,073
Black Panther World of Wakanda 2 $3.99 Marvel 45,009
Black Panther World of Wakanda 3 $3.99 Marvel 25,248
Black Panther World of Wakanda 4 $3.99 Marvel 17,454
Black Panther World of Wakanda 5 $3.99 Marvel 15,847
Black Panther World of Wakanda 6 $3.99 Marvel 14,547

Black Panther Crew 1 $3.99 Marvel 35,604
Black Panther Crew 2 $3.99 Marvel 18,183
Black Panther Crew 3 $3.99 Marvel 14,634
Black Panther Crew 4 $3.99 Marvel 13,050

Black Panther 166 $3.99 Marvel 55,314
Black Panther 167 $3.99 Marvel 23,784
Black Panther 168 $3.99 12/27/17 Marvel 22,492
Black Panther 169 $3.99 01/24/18 Marvel 21,321
*Black Panther 170 LEG WW $3.99 02/28/18 Marvel 28,143
Black Panther 171 $3.99 03/28/18 Marvel 24,304
Black Panther 172 $3.99 04/18/18 Marvel 26,345

Rise of Black Panther 1 $3.99 01/03/18 Marvel 40,897
*Rise of Black Panther 2 $3.99 02/07/18 Marvel 19,709
Rise of Black Panther 3 $3.99 03/07/18 Marvel 18,055
Rise of Black Panther 4 $3.99 04/04/18 Marvel 19,289
Rise of Black Panther 5 $3.99 05/02/18 Marvel 18,787
Rise of Black Panther 6 $3.99 06/06/18 Marvel 18,487

Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 1 $3.99 10/24/18 Marvel 44,533
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 2 $3.99 11/28/18 Marvel 26,204
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 3 $3.99 12/19/18 Marvel 24,357
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 4 $3.99 01/30/19 Marvel 21,176
Black Panther Vs. Deadpool 5 $3.99 02/27/19 Marvel 19,699

Black Panther 1 $4.99 05/23/18 Marvel 122,358
Black Panther 2 $3.99 06/27/18 Marvel 34,891
Black Panther 3 $3.99 08/22/18 Marvel 35,093
Black Panther 4 $3.99 09/26/18 Marvel 30,951
Black Panther 5 $3.99 10/31/18 Marvel 31,254
Black Panther 6 $3.99 11/28/18 Marvel 26,220
Black Panther 7 $3.99 12/12/18 Marvel 27,548
Black Panther 8 $3.99 01/16/19 Marvel 22,670
Black Panther 9 $3.99 02/27/19 Marvel 23,052

*Black Panther Annual 1 $4.99 02/21/18 Marvel 20,972
*Black Panther Sound and Fury 1 $3.99 02/07/18 Marvel 20,136

Black Panther Prelude 1 $3.99 Marvel 8,475
Black Panther Prelude 2 $3.99 Marvel 6,991

* released in the month of Black Panther movie


courtesy of CBR's Killerbee911







courtesy of CBR's MindofShadow


Thank you very much, MoS and Ture! I can't STAND Coates. I hope his triflin butt gets kicked right off of BP this year. Immediately right now this second isn't soon enough.
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Offline Ture

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme
« Reply #740 on: April 10, 2019, 05:30:29 pm »
A perfect follow up...

Legendary 'Black Panther' Writer Reginald Hudlin Picks His Favorite Marvel Comics of the 1970s
BY BEN MORSE

Each week, the Best of the Decade column honors Marvel's 80th anniversary by spotlighting a single issue from the House of Ideas beloved by the best in the business!

Before he was counted among the elite in the entertainment business, Reginald Hudlin would go to great lengths when it came to acquiring Marvel comics in the 1970s.

“By the time I was in middle school, I was buying comics pretty regularly,” Hudlin says. “The drug store near our house that sold comics on a spinner rack had closed down, but I was taking the bus home from a middle school in St. Louis, which mean I was in downtown, where the only place you could buy comics were these storefronts that sold comics in the front but sold [adult magazines] in the back behind a curtain! I don’t think my parents knew that’s where I was shopping. But we were kids that were only interested in the comics."

Years later, Hudlin would go on to write a landmark run on BLACK PANTHER from 2005 to 2008, putting his adolescence scouring town for comics to good use. And, as he recalls, he wasn't the only one. “Jim Lee, also from St. Louis, told me he was shopping at the same shady stores as a kid,” he adds. “This was before the era of dedicated comic book shops.”




Marvel.com: What are you first memories of reading Marvel comics?

Reginald Hudlin: My older brothers were very serious comic collectors. I remember them coming home with the original runs of the Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, X-Men—everything. They had complete runs from the first issue. So I grew up reading comics voraciously.

Finally I was old enough to buy my own books. My mom gave me enough money to buy one book. I bought a Monkees comic because I liked the TV show. My brothers were disgusted with me “wasting” money on a book like that. I could have bought one more book they couldn’t afford, but I stuck with my choice.

But I quickly transitioned into [Super Hero] books, including Marvel.

Marvel.com: What sets Marvel comics of the 1970s apart from other eras?

Hudlin: I define '70s Marvel as post Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. My impression [was] that Stan wasn’t writing monthly books anymore, he was now more management. And Kirby had left for DC. So the next generation of creative talent stepped up and took the line in a new direction, while continuing the Marvel tradition of reflecting the cultural trends of the era. Luke Cage had the Blaxploitation vibe. Shang-Chi and Iron Fist reflected the popularity of kung fu movies. Captain America’s SECRET EMPIRE [and] NOMAD storylines reflected the Watergate crisis.

Also, characters finally started being based in other cities besides New York. Daredevil moved to San Francisco. Son of Satan was set in St. Louis!

Marvel.com: In your mind, who were the most important and memorable characters in the evolution of black Super Heroes in 1970s Marvel?

Hudlin: You are talking about Luke Cage, Storm, Blade, and Misty Knight—I had the four of them team up with Black Panther and Monica Rambeau in one of my BLACK PANTHER story arcs, but there’s more to be done with them individually and as a group. What I like about them is that they are all very different personalities and none of their backgrounds are alike, reflecting the diversity of black experiences in the real world.

Marvel.com: What titles stood out to you as favorites from that decade?

Hudlin: The AVENGERS/DEFENDERS WAR! DOCTOR STRANGE by Frank Brunner! Paul Gulacy on Shang-Chi! Jim Starlin’s original Thanos Saga and Adam Warlock! And of course, when Jack Kirby returned to Marvel and did THE ETERNALS and CAPTAIN AMERICA.

What about the oversized magazines like SAVAGE SWORD OF CONAN with the Red Nails story by Barry Windsor-Smith? Or those beautiful painted covers by Neal Adams for INSIDE KUNG FU?

Marvel.com: If you had to pick one story or issue from the '70s as your absolute favorite, what would it be?

Hudlin: Tough, tough choice but it would be between the original Silver Dagger story in DOCTOR STRANGE and the Madbomb story in CAPTAIN AMERICA. Those are two of the best comic book storylines ever.

Marvel.com: What specifically makes them stand out?

Hudlin: The Silver Dagger story featured a great villain with a smart plan. The hero tries to stop him and fails at every turn. The villain succeeds at his goal, but the conflict is resolved without a big final fight. A really smartly told tale.

Madbomb is Kirby once again predicting the future with perfect accuracy. America’s elites decide to overthrow democracy and return to a monarchy. The method of achieving this is the Madbomb, which drives people crazy and they attack each other, allowing the wealthy and powerful to take total control.

Relive Reggie’s historic BLACK PANTHER tenure on Marvel Unlimited right now! Then relive more House of Ideas history on the 80th anniversary hub page!


https://www.marvel.com/articles/comics/legendary-black-panther-writer-reginald-hudlin-picks-his-favorite-marvel-comics-of-the-1970s
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Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline Battle

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A Monkees comicbook!


How 'bout that! ;D

Would that book be the one published by Charleston?


Offline Ture

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‘Black Panther’ Goes From Tentpole To Cultural Milestone: No. 2 In 2018 Most Valuable Blockbuster Tournament
By Anthony D'Alessandro



When it comes to evaluating the financial performance of top movies, it isn’t about what a film grosses at the box office. The true tale is told when production budgets, P&A, talent participations and other costs collide with box office grosses and ancillary revenues from VOD to DVD and TV. To get close to that mysterious end of the equation, Deadline is repeating our Most Valuable Blockbuster tournament for 2018, using data culled by seasoned and trusted sources.

THE FILM

Following the the embarrassment of #OscarsSoWhite four years ago, Black Panther incentivized the film industry beyond wishes, opening the doors to more inclusive storytelling while further demonstrating there’s a strong business in four-quad tentpoles featuring actors of color. T’Challa aka Black Panther was a deeper Marvel Universe character and was introduced in 2016’s Captain America: Civil War alongside the fractured Avengers. With Disney and Marvel’s full might, emerging superstar director Ryan Coogler, a cast of the best and brightest black actors, and the best reviews of any Marvel superhero movie fueling it, Black Panther became a cultural milestone at the global box office as well as the Oscars, with seven nominations including Best Picture and three wins for original score, production design and costume design. Many African American movies do not mirror their domestic performance overseas, but Black Panther drew a nearly equal result abroad at $646.8 million to its $700 million U.S./Canada ticket sales. Black Panther may have notched the sixth-best opening weekend of all time with $202M at the domestic box office, but in regards to its four-day launch over the Presidents Day weekend it is third with $242.1M behind Star Wars: The Force Awakens ($288M) and Avengers: Infinity War ($282.4M). Black Panther is the third highest-grossing film of all time at the domestic B.O. after Force Awakens ($936.6M) and Avatar ($760.5M). Worldwide, the pic grossed $1.34B.

THE BOX SCORE
Here are the costs and revenues as our experts see them:
See it here.

https://deadline.com/2019/04/black-panther-goes-from-tentpole-to-cultural-milestone-no-2-in-2018-most-valuable-blockbuster-tournament-1202587563/

THE BOTTOM LINE

Between global film rentals, TV revenues and streaming, and DVD video revenues, Black Panther earns close to a $1 billion. Subtracted from that is slightly more than a half billion in costs including P&A, global video, interest and $45M of participations. This puts Black Panther‘s net profit at $476.8M, an amount that surpasses last year’s No. 1 profit winner in our B.O. tournament, Star Wars: The Last Jedi ($417.5M).




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Special Black Panther Edition and more

Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: Black Panther - Sovereign Supreme
« Reply #743 on: April 21, 2019, 08:56:53 am »
A perfect follow up...

Legendary 'Black Panther' Writer Reginald Hudlin Picks His Favorite Marvel Comics of the 1970s
BY BEN MORSE

Each week, the Best of the Decade column honors Marvel's 80th anniversary by spotlighting a single issue from the House of Ideas beloved by the best in the business!

Before he was counted among the elite in the entertainment business, Reginald Hudlin would go to great lengths when it came to acquiring Marvel comics in the 1970s.

“By the time I was in middle school, I was buying comics pretty regularly,” Hudlin says. “The drug store near our house that sold comics on a spinner rack had closed down, but I was taking the bus home from a middle school in St. Louis, which mean I was in downtown, where the only place you could buy comics were these storefronts that sold comics in the front but sold [adult magazines] in the back behind a curtain! I don’t think my parents knew that’s where I was shopping. But we were kids that were only interested in the comics."

Years later, Hudlin would go on to write a landmark run on BLACK PANTHER from 2005 to 2008, putting his adolescence scouring town for comics to good use. And, as he recalls, he wasn't the only one. “Jim Lee, also from St. Louis, told me he was shopping at the same shady stores as a kid,” he adds. “This was before the era of dedicated comic book shops.”




Marvel.com: What are you first memories of reading Marvel comics?

Reginald Hudlin: My older brothers were very serious comic collectors. I remember them coming home with the original runs of the Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, X-Men—everything. They had complete runs from the first issue. So I grew up reading comics voraciously.

Finally I was old enough to buy my own books. My mom gave me enough money to buy one book. I bought a Monkees comic because I liked the TV show. My brothers were disgusted with me “wasting” money on a book like that. I could have bought one more book they couldn’t afford, but I stuck with my choice.

But I quickly transitioned into [Super Hero] books, including Marvel.

Marvel.com: What sets Marvel comics of the 1970s apart from other eras?

Hudlin: I define '70s Marvel as post Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. My impression [was] that Stan wasn’t writing monthly books anymore, he was now more management. And Kirby had left for DC. So the next generation of creative talent stepped up and took the line in a new direction, while continuing the Marvel tradition of reflecting the cultural trends of the era. Luke Cage had the Blaxploitation vibe. Shang-Chi and Iron Fist reflected the popularity of kung fu movies. Captain America’s SECRET EMPIRE [and] NOMAD storylines reflected the Watergate crisis.

Also, characters finally started being based in other cities besides New York. Daredevil moved to San Francisco. Son of Satan was set in St. Louis!

Marvel.com: In your mind, who were the most important and memorable characters in the evolution of black Super Heroes in 1970s Marvel?

Hudlin: You are talking about Luke Cage, Storm, Blade, and Misty Knight—I had the four of them team up with Black Panther and Monica Rambeau in one of my BLACK PANTHER story arcs, but there’s more to be done with them individually and as a group. What I like about them is that they are all very different personalities and none of their backgrounds are alike, reflecting the diversity of black experiences in the real world.

Marvel.com: What titles stood out to you as favorites from that decade?

Hudlin: The AVENGERS/DEFENDERS WAR! DOCTOR STRANGE by Frank Brunner! Paul Gulacy on Shang-Chi! Jim Starlin’s original Thanos Saga and Adam Warlock! And of course, when Jack Kirby returned to Marvel and did THE ETERNALS and CAPTAIN AMERICA.

What about the oversized magazines like SAVAGE SWORD OF CONAN with the Red Nails story by Barry Windsor-Smith? Or those beautiful painted covers by Neal Adams for INSIDE KUNG FU?

Marvel.com: If you had to pick one story or issue from the '70s as your absolute favorite, what would it be?

Hudlin: Tough, tough choice but it would be between the original Silver Dagger story in DOCTOR STRANGE and the Madbomb story in CAPTAIN AMERICA. Those are two of the best comic book storylines ever.

Marvel.com: What specifically makes them stand out?

Hudlin: The Silver Dagger story featured a great villain with a smart plan. The hero tries to stop him and fails at every turn. The villain succeeds at his goal, but the conflict is resolved without a big final fight. A really smartly told tale.

Madbomb is Kirby once again predicting the future with perfect accuracy. America’s elites decide to overthrow democracy and return to a monarchy. The method of achieving this is the Madbomb, which drives people crazy and they attack each other, allowing the wealthy and powerful to take total control.

Relive Reggie’s historic BLACK PANTHER tenure on Marvel Unlimited right now! Then relive more House of Ideas history on the 80th anniversary hub page!


https://www.marvel.com/articles/comics/legendary-black-panther-writer-reginald-hudlin-picks-his-favorite-marvel-comics-of-the-1970s


NUMBER TWO?!! I feel insulted? Who was Number 1?
I AM THAT WHICH GODS,DEMONS,IMMORTALS AND ANGELS FEAR.I AM THAT WHICH PERFECTION ITSELF ASPIRES TO BE
BLACK PANTHER FANFIC:
http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline Ture

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Re: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem
« Reply #744 on: May 31, 2019, 12:28:15 am »
YA ISIPHO  HIYO NI BASA KEM
 
Once upon a time there was a group of comic book characters that went to the movies. And they were each assigned very specific duties. But representation threatens to take them away from all that and now they work for inclusion. Its real name is ethnic gender and cultural dissolution.

For the sake of clarity I will designate the group of comic book characters into the following categories. White male centered, Afrakan centered and Woman centered. With Black Panther and Captain Marvel being the all too obvious exceptions all other MCU films were white male lead.

Inclusion and representation are the stepchildren of integration who was birthed by assimilation and as such inclusion and representation are being used as tools to force behaviors and ideologies unnecessarily into a given narrative. This is most prevalent with the LGBTQ attempts to influence the MCU.



Take for example Captain Marvel. It seems that her narrative centered on women empowerment and was ideologically grounded in feminism. It could be interpreted as distracting to make her lesbian or bisexual as the message may read that it is the lesbian or bisexual woman that is powerful and centered. Marvel, I think understood this and avoided this conundrum.

Such is even more the case with Black Panther a character who posits an Afrakan centered Afro-Futurism. This films greatest and most necessary achievement was the irrevocable display of an unconquered, never-colonized, never enslaved, non- impoverished, highly technologically advanced, traditional ancestral spirituality practicing, capable of protecting themselves Afrakan people. This is something the Afrakan world wanted to see and wholeheartedly embraced.

The LGBTQ agenda of inclusion while quickly shoehorned into the comic book for referential validation did not make it into the film. The aesthetic of the Dora Milaje did not need the obfuscation of being identified as lesbian and that being their single, most salient quality. To further elucidate, one may argue that Professor X represent people with disabilities however Charles Xavier is better recognized as a telepath and not a wheelchair user. The Dora Milaje above all else needed by design to be seen first and foremost as powerful and purposeful Afrakan women with an Afrakan centered standard of beauty. Marvel got it.



There was talks of Wakandans speaking with British accents; T'Challa being a sanitation worker who finds a magical panther amulet; and other such nonsense. Marvel did the intelligent thing and listened to the fans and enthusiasts of Black Panther. We made it clear that occidental cultural immersion induces the cessation of non western cultural expressions. Marvel heard us and put together a great production team, writers, actors/actresses, costumer, musicians and one hell of a director.

It is thus that we received Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem. The gift that is Black Panther.

The LGBTQ would better serve the cause of inclusion if they focused on those characters that were created to represent them. Why the LGBTQ  does not talk of North Star (the first openly gay character) being bought to the big screen is a mystery. Why talk about Cap and Bucky being in a relationship that is not organic to them when there is Midnighter and Apollo ready and willing to go all in?

Then, as my tale began with three categories, there can be four. Shang Chi makes five. Kamala Khan makes six. Add the White Tiger for Hispanic representation, Red Wolf for Native American representation. I'm sure Daimon Hellstrom has a demographic to rep. I could go on but you get my point. Marvel is inclusive and representative without the push.
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Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem
« Reply #745 on: May 31, 2019, 03:05:38 pm »
YA ISIPHO  HIYO NI BASA KEM
 
Once upon a time there was a group of comic book characters that went to the movies. And they were each assigned very specific duties. But representation threatens to take them away from all that and now they work for inclusion. Its real name is ethnic gender and cultural dissolution.

For the sake of clarity I will designate the group of comic book characters into the following categories. White male centered, Afrakan centered and Woman centered. With Black Panther and Captain Marvel being the all too obvious exceptions all other MCU films were white male lead.

Inclusion and representation are the stepchildren of integration who was birthed by assimilation and as such inclusion and representation are being used as tools to force behaviors and ideologies unnecessarily into a given narrative. This is most prevalent with the LGBTQ attempts to influence the MCU.



Take for example Captain Marvel. It seems that her narrative centered on women empowerment and was ideologically grounded in feminism. It could be interpreted as distracting to make her lesbian or bisexual as the message may read that it is the lesbian or bisexual woman that is powerful and centered. Marvel, I think understood this and avoided this conundrum.

Such is even more the case with Black Panther a character who posits an Afrakan centered Afro-Futurism. This films greatest and most necessary achievement was the irrevocable display of an unconquered, never-colonized, never enslaved, non- impoverished, highly technologically advanced, traditional ancestral spirituality practicing, capable of protecting themselves Afrakan people. This is something the Afrakan world wanted to see and wholeheartedly embraced.

The LGBTQ agenda of inclusion while quickly shoehorned into the comic book for referential validation did not make it into the film. The aesthetic of the Dora Milaje did not need the obfuscation of being identified as lesbian and that being their single, most salient quality. To further elucidate, one may argue that Professor X represent people with disabilities however Charles Xavier is better recognized as a telepath and not a wheelchair user. The Dora Milaje above all else needed by design to be seen first and foremost as powerful and purposeful Afrakan women with an Afrakan centered standard of beauty. Marvel got it.



There was talks of Wakandans speaking with British accents; T'Challa being a sanitation worker who finds a magical panther amulet; and other such nonsense. Marvel did the intelligent thing and listened to the fans and enthusiasts of Black Panther. We made it clear that occidental cultural immersion induces the cessation of non western cultural expressions. Marvel heard us and put together a great production team, writers, actors/actresses, costumer, musicians and one hell of a director.

It is thus that we received Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem. The gift that is Black Panther.

The LGBTQ would better serve the cause of inclusion if they focused on those characters that were created to represent them. Why the LGBTQ  does not talk of North Star (the first openly gay character) being bought to the big screen is a mystery. Why talk about Cap and Bucky being in a relationship that is not organic to them when there is Midnighter and Apollo ready and willing to go all in?

Then, as my tale began with three categories, there can be four. Shang Chi makes five. Kamala Khan makes six. Add the White Tiger for Hispanic representation, Red Wolf for Native American representation. I'm sure Daimon Hellstrom has a demographic to rep. I could go on but you get my point. Marvel is inclusive and representative without the push.



This is one heck of a post. I'll try to get back to this tomorrow or next week, as time allows.
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Offline Ture

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Re: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem
« Reply #746 on: June 01, 2019, 07:25:29 pm »
YA ISIPHO  HIYO NI BASA KEM
 
Once upon a time there was a group of comic book characters that went to the movies. And they were each assigned very specific duties. But representation threatens to take them away from all that and now they work for inclusion. Its real name is ethnic gender and cultural dissolution.

For the sake of clarity I will designate the group of comic book characters into the following categories. White male centered, Afrakan centered and Woman centered. With Black Panther and Captain Marvel being the all too obvious exceptions all other MCU films were white male lead.

Inclusion and representation are the stepchildren of integration who was birthed by assimilation and as such inclusion and representation are being used as tools to force behaviors and ideologies unnecessarily into a given narrative. This is most prevalent with the LGBTQ attempts to influence the MCU.



Take for example Captain Marvel. It seems that her narrative centered on women empowerment and was ideologically grounded in feminism. It could be interpreted as distracting to make her lesbian or bisexual as the message may read that it is the lesbian or bisexual woman that is powerful and centered. Marvel, I think understood this and avoided this conundrum.

Such is even more the case with Black Panther a character who posits an Afrakan centered Afro-Futurism. This films greatest and most necessary achievement was the irrevocable display of an unconquered, never-colonized, never enslaved, non- impoverished, highly technologically advanced, traditional ancestral spirituality practicing, capable of protecting themselves Afrakan people. This is something the Afrakan world wanted to see and wholeheartedly embraced.

The LGBTQ agenda of inclusion while quickly shoehorned into the comic book for referential validation did not make it into the film. The aesthetic of the Dora Milaje did not need the obfuscation of being identified as lesbian and that being their single, most salient quality. To further elucidate, one may argue that Professor X represent people with disabilities however Charles Xavier is better recognized as a telepath and not a wheelchair user. The Dora Milaje above all else needed by design to be seen first and foremost as powerful and purposeful Afrakan women with an Afrakan centered standard of beauty. Marvel got it.



There was talks of Wakandans speaking with British accents; T'Challa being a sanitation worker who finds a magical panther amulet; and other such nonsense. Marvel did the intelligent thing and listened to the fans and enthusiasts of Black Panther. We made it clear that occidental cultural immersion induces the cessation of non western cultural expressions. Marvel heard us and put together a great production team, writers, actors/actresses, costumer, musicians and one hell of a director.

It is thus that we received Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem. The gift that is Black Panther.

The LGBTQ would better serve the cause of inclusion if they focused on those characters that were created to represent them. Why the LGBTQ  does not talk of North Star (the first openly gay character) being bought to the big screen is a mystery. Why talk about Cap and Bucky being in a relationship that is not organic to them when there is Midnighter and Apollo ready and willing to go all in?

Then, as my tale began with three categories, there can be four. Shang Chi makes five. Kamala Khan makes six. Add the White Tiger for Hispanic representation, Red Wolf for Native American representation. I'm sure Daimon Hellstrom has a demographic to rep. I could go on but you get my point. Marvel is inclusive and representative without the push.




This is one heck of a post. I'll try to get back to this tomorrow or next week, as time allows.


Looking forward to some feedback.
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Re: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem
« Reply #747 on: June 11, 2019, 09:04:01 pm »
Why Everyone Wants Michael B. Jordan to Be the Next Superman
Dirk Winifred

British actor Henry Cavill has been playing Clark Kent/Superman since 2013, though his status as the famed superhero is now up in the air and it seems unlikely that he will return to the big screen in another DC movie. While a lot of fans are understandably disappointed at the thought of Henry Cavill not being Superman anymore, others are already looking forward to seeing who could be the next actor to portray the iconic character.

Michael B. Jordan is currently at the top of many people’s list for being the next Superman and there are good reasons for that. The actor has stated that he would not mind joining the DC Universe to play Superman. However, it is important to note that he does not want to be Clark Kent.

“There is a huge upside to it,” Jordan told Oprah Winfrey in response to rumors about him being Superman, “but being under that microscope, being picked apart and compared to so many different versions of Superman… I would rather do something original. I’ll be Calvin Ellis.”


Calvin Ellis is a version of Superman on Earth 23. The character debuted in 2009 and is based on President Barack Obama, so aside from fighting bad guys like Superman, Ellis is also a President of the United States. It’s definitely an interesting way for Jordan to play a legendary role while also keeping him from being compared to past actors who have been Superman.


Why?



When one could opting for this and the creation of a new superhero universe.

« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 09:12:16 pm by Ture »
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Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem
« Reply #748 on: June 12, 2019, 09:19:02 am »
Why Everyone Wants Michael B. Jordan to Be the Next Superman
Dirk Winifred

British actor Henry Cavill has been playing Clark Kent/Superman since 2013, though his status as the famed superhero is now up in the air and it seems unlikely that he will return to the big screen in another DC movie. While a lot of fans are understandably disappointed at the thought of Henry Cavill not being Superman anymore, others are already looking forward to seeing who could be the next actor to portray the iconic character.

Michael B. Jordan is currently at the top of many people’s list for being the next Superman and there are good reasons for that. The actor has stated that he would not mind joining the DC Universe to play Superman. However, it is important to note that he does not want to be Clark Kent.

“There is a huge upside to it,” Jordan told Oprah Winfrey in response to rumors about him being Superman, “but being under that microscope, being picked apart and compared to so many different versions of Superman… I would rather do something original. I’ll be Calvin Ellis.”


Calvin Ellis is a version of Superman on Earth 23. The character debuted in 2009 and is based on President Barack Obama, so aside from fighting bad guys like Superman, Ellis is also a President of the United States. It’s definitely an interesting way for Jordan to play a legendary role while also keeping him from being compared to past actors who have been Superman.


Why?



When one could opting for this and the creation of a new superhero universe.




I bet it's because zero major studios would get behind the notion of ICON as a movie...at least right now.
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http://archiveofourown.org/works/663070
Sub my YouTube with the world's first and only viral "capoeira" gun disarm technique: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5F_qg2oFw

Offline Ture

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Re: BP - Sovereign Supreme - Ya Isipho Hiyo Ni Basa Kem
« Reply #749 on: June 12, 2019, 10:26:07 am »
Why Everyone Wants Michael B. Jordan to Be the Next Superman
Dirk Winifred

British actor Henry Cavill has been playing Clark Kent/Superman since 2013, though his status as the famed superhero is now up in the air and it seems unlikely that he will return to the big screen in another DC movie. While a lot of fans are understandably disappointed at the thought of Henry Cavill not being Superman anymore, others are already looking forward to seeing who could be the next actor to portray the iconic character.

Michael B. Jordan is currently at the top of many people’s list for being the next Superman and there are good reasons for that. The actor has stated that he would not mind joining the DC Universe to play Superman. However, it is important to note that he does not want to be Clark Kent.

“There is a huge upside to it,” Jordan told Oprah Winfrey in response to rumors about him being Superman, “but being under that microscope, being picked apart and compared to so many different versions of Superman… I would rather do something original. I’ll be Calvin Ellis.”


Calvin Ellis is a version of Superman on Earth 23. The character debuted in 2009 and is based on President Barack Obama, so aside from fighting bad guys like Superman, Ellis is also a President of the United States. It’s definitely an interesting way for Jordan to play a legendary role while also keeping him from being compared to past actors who have been Superman.


Why?



When one could opting for this and the creation of a new superhero universe.




I bet it's because zero major studios would get behind the notion of ICON as a movie...at least right now.

A studio would be wise to invest in such an IP, especially in this market. Studios are looking for franchises and tent poles. If one of the Afrakan (so called Black) studios were to invest in such an endeavor it could yield some substantial profits. 

Prior to Marvel taking their "black" superheroes seriously in cinema and streaming, with few exceptions most notably Blade, the vast majority of so called Black superheroes ranged from low budget sci fi lite (M.A.N.T.I.S.) and comedies (Meteor Man); to very poorly executed iterations (Steel) and insultingly bad parodies (Blankman).

The real challenge is to get the audience to think of the Milestone characters in their own right and not as some "black/people of color" take on established white characters because in many cases that's what they are. Again this is why Marvel is so ahead of the curve, for the most part their "black" characters are not perceived as analogs to their white characters.
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