Author Topic: Get Out (and see this movie)  (Read 312 times)

Offline Tanksleyd

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Re: Get Out (and see this movie)
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2017, 06:36:51 pm »
Get Out was revolutionary because it forced you to face things as a Black person you never really noticed you were afraid of and gave voice to them. Things like that uncomfortable feeling you get when you're the only one in a sea of white folks, the responsibility to your race that entails and the dread at having to be the sole representative for your culture. Deep stuff like that but then simple things too, like how rural areas remind you of slavery and lynchings and the disorientation you feel from the lack of urban touchstones that give you comfort. Then there's the annoying task of having to decipher the hidden meanings behind the seemingly innocuous statements made to you for the racism that lies underneath. Are you crazy? Are you being too sensitive, or is this motherf#@%er really trying to come for you?

Im never going to see this movie because I don't like horror movies so i just wanted to see waht it was abouit

but holy sh*t, this is the realest paragraph I've seen in a long time lol.

I am biracial and NEVER experienced this with the white half of my family. Ever. I can't remember a single comment my whole life that made me pause and go, "wait a minute." but, I may have gotten lucky that they (at least the ones I was around often) were left leaning despite mostly being from tiny towns.

But on my wifes side (she is white)... this hits 100% home. Throughout school, whether undergrad or chiro... same thing. I felt like every moment I was with them, I was constantly being judged as, "so how black are you?"

(whats weird is I feel the same way surrounded by all black people with the same feeling... "how black are you")

Hell, I am from a medium sized town but up north. When I moved down to the "South..." just the sight of plantations and cotton fields made me feel uneasy

The people who got Anne Frank
They had no majority
Just a plurality
The Horror
Of it all

Offline TripleX

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Re: Get Out (and see this movie)
« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2017, 05:44:27 pm »
Thank bruh, I'm glad that resonated with you.  I copied and pasted it on facebook and got crickets. lol

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: Get Out (and see this movie)
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2017, 05:25:03 pm »
Took me so doggone long to finally see the movie, but even with all the hype, it still lives up to the buzz.

Quite frankly, GET OUT is a revolutionary masterpiece.  And the fact that has the reviews and the box office to back it up says so much about how good the movie is and how far our country has come. 

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: Get Out (and see this movie)
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2017, 05:15:45 am »
While I do agree that the film is revolutionary, I don't think its a gauge of how far we've come. Heck, when you look back at the original Night of the Living Dead, with its black protagonist, that was a major step forward, but can we say that society stepped as majorly as that film did?

For me, it depends on what different groups of people are seeing when they see the film. Are they seeing themselves? Are they inspired to go out and learn the history and the persisting issues that the film addresses? Or do they see the film as a release valve for their own anxieties and frustrations, some about Trump, and the movie as a symbol of the amorphous "Resistance" that is about style as much as substance? Do they focus on the comedy of Rod's character and not exactly what he was saying? Or do they see it merely as a good movie or funny movie and that's it? The horror-comedy format made the film accessible but at the same time it also might be not taken as seriously as say The Birth of a Nation or Malcolm X. And I can't help but look at Get Out's success in light of how Nate Parker's film has all but been erased from the memory of Hollywood. Rotten Tomatoes wouldn't even put a certified fresh sticker on the man's DVDs/Blu-Rays. I chalk up Get Out's success to it being a good movie, but also to whites' comfort with Jordan Peele. They likely weren't expecting a film like that from him. I know I wasn't. And can whites merely write off the white characters in the films as aberrations, which is something whites have shown a great ability to do for a long time. That various white malefactors are not symptomatic of their entire race or their cultures (i.e. all those white serial killers and mass shooters) unlike black criminals who are often portrayed as representing cultural/racial traits endemic to black people.

I see it as Get Out communicating two things to blacks and whites and arguably other people of color who would be attuned to feeling like an outsider. Though it should be noted that Peele did include a person of color amid those who were bidding on Chris. Now, I don't see it as revolutionary to acknowledge that blacks have been treated bad in the past and that are being treated bad now. It can be revelatory for some but not revolutionary if you see it and then just go about your business and not figure out how can you be a part of changing it.

So in "short", I'm not jumping the gun on this film's power to effect social change. Hopefully it can get some self-reflection and conversations going though.

Offline Tanksleyd

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Re: Get Out (and see this movie)
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2017, 06:22:35 am »
While I do agree that the film is revolutionary, I don't think its a gauge of how far we've come. Heck, when you look back at the original Night of the Living Dead, with its black protagonist, that was a major step forward, but can we say that society stepped as majorly as that film did?

For me, it depends on what different groups of people are seeing when they see the film. Are they seeing themselves? Are they inspired to go out and learn the history and the persisting issues that the film addresses? Or do they see the film as a release valve for their own anxieties and frustrations, some about Trump, and the movie as a symbol of the amorphous "Resistance" that is about style as much as substance? Do they focus on the comedy of Rod's character and not exactly what he was saying? Or do they see it merely as a good movie or funny movie and that's it? The horror-comedy format made the film accessible but at the same time it also might be not taken as seriously as say The Birth of a Nation or Malcolm X. And I can't help but look at Get Out's success in light of how Nate Parker's film has all but been erased from the memory of Hollywood. Rotten Tomatoes wouldn't even put a certified fresh sticker on the man's DVDs/Blu-Rays. I chalk up Get Out's success to it being a good movie, but also to whites' comfort with Jordan Peele. They likely weren't expecting a film like that from him. I know I wasn't. And can whites merely write off the white characters in the films as aberrations, which is something whites have shown a great ability to do for a long time. That various white malefactors are not symptomatic of their entire race or their cultures (i.e. all those white serial killers and mass shooters) unlike black criminals who are often portrayed as representing cultural/racial traits endemic to black people.

I see it as Get Out communicating two things to blacks and whites and arguably other people of color who would be attuned to feeling like an outsider. Though it should be noted that Peele did include a person of color amid those who were bidding on Chris. Now, I don't see it as revolutionary to acknowledge that blacks have been treated bad in the past and that are being treated bad now. It can be revelatory for some but not revolutionary if you see it and then just go about your business and not figure out how can you be a part of changing it.

So in "short", I'm not jumping the gun on this film's power to effect social change. Hopefully it can get some self-reflection and conversations going though.

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: Get Out (and see this movie)
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2017, 09:42:42 am »
I think reaction to a film is not changing society, but is a measure of where attitudes are.  So yes, the reaction to the end of NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD did reflect a positive change  And the reaction to the themes and ending of GET OUT do the same.  It's also a tribute to the filmmaking that he takes ideas that seems too radical for mainstream movies and making them pop accessible.