Author Topic: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - Recast or The Two Killings of T'Challa the Black Panther  (Read 555472 times)

Offline Marvell2100

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3270 on: October 15, 2020, 02:13:06 pm »
This is the type of movie poster I want to see for Black Panther 2.




THE BLACK PANTHER 2 RICH IN ESPIONAGE, A POLITICAL THRILLER.


FIGHTING AND OUT THINKING SUPER VILLAINS!


WARRING AGAINST HIGH TECH MILITIA.




PUSHING HIMSELF TO THE LIMIT AND BEYOND!



BLACK PANTHER 2 WAR OF THE SUPREMACIST!
This is what happens when you let the world know how powerful you are. BP2 in theaters everywhere.


Loving every bit of this!  8)
Black Panther. Bane of the Unfans.

Offline Booshman

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. *
« Reply #3271 on: October 16, 2020, 11:16:38 pm »
Wow, Ture, Coates actually did something positive for the BP mythos?


I had no idea of this, either. Can someone list the POSITIVE things that Coates has done with BP.

Coates did something positive for BP?



The only positive thing he could do for BP is leaving the book. Maybe retconning everything he did as being some sort of what-if computer scenario.

Offline A.Curry

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3272 on: October 17, 2020, 08:56:12 am »
Has anyone brought up John David Washington (Denzel’s son) for recasting T’Challa?  I think he’d be fantastic in the role after seeing Tenet.  Dude has star power, has a legacy behind him, and can act.  No disrespect, but I even think he’d equal or arguably surpass Chadwick in the role.


Offline supreme illuminati

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3273 on: October 17, 2020, 02:18:28 pm »
Has anyone brought up John David Washington (Denzel’s son) for recasting T’Challa?  I think he’d be fantastic in the role after seeing Tenet.  Dude has star power, has a legacy behind him, and can act.  No disrespect, but I even think he’d equal or arguably surpass Chadwick in the role.


Whaaasssuuuuup, Curry! Where you been?

And YES. Not only has JDW been brought up, but the HEF board has pretty much unanimously agreed that JDW is the best pick to recast BP...if recasting is needed. I personally think that recasting not only should happen, but that T'Chadwick himself definitely wanted such a thing to happen. He wanted T'Challa to outlive him and all of the rest of us, while trailblazing more openings in the huge moviemaking industry.
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Offline A.Curry

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3274 on: October 18, 2020, 10:38:43 am »
Has anyone brought up John David Washington (Denzel’s son) for recasting T’Challa?  I think he’d be fantastic in the role after seeing Tenet.  Dude has star power, has a legacy behind him, and can act.  No disrespect, but I even think he’d equal or arguably surpass Chadwick in the role.


Whaaasssuuuuup, Curry! Where you been?

And YES. Not only has JDW been brought up, but the HEF board has pretty much unanimously agreed that JDW is the best pick to recast BP...if recasting is needed. I personally think that recasting not only should happen, but that T'Chadwick himself definitely wanted such a thing to happen. He wanted T'Challa to outlive him and all of the rest of us, while trailblazing more openings in the huge moviemaking industry.

Hey Supreme! I’ve been around.  I check in on here every now and then just haven’t felt like responding to much.

Yeah, okay cool.  I’ve been hoping to see some article posting that there’s interest in JDW but haven’t seen any.  Just more about Shuri. I certainly won’t be interested in seeing her be Black Panther as I’ve never cared much for the character in the comics nor in the MCU. Never thought he needed a sister and it was a mistake when Hudlin invented her.  One of the reasons of course is that I knew eventually some would be clamoring for her to take his place.  Hopefully they will not go this route but we will have to see...
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 10:52:57 am by A.Curry »

Offline JRCarter

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3275 on: October 18, 2020, 12:17:35 pm »
5 Reason Why John David Washington Should Become The New Black Panther

https://www.t3medias.com/post/5-reason-why-john-david-washington-should-become-the-new-black-panther

Offline Ture

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3276 on: October 18, 2020, 01:32:52 pm »
The Two Killings of T'Challa the Black Panther.

The first killing occurred unceremoniously and dare I say unnecessarily in Avengers Infinity War and with the tragic passing of Chadwick Boseman there is now  talk of killing T'Challa the Black Panther a second time. NY Times bestselling author Steven Barnes wrote an impassioned article entitled Long Live The King: The Case For Recasting “Black Panther”. Here is his post.

Long Live The King: The Case For Recasting “Black Panther”
By Steven Barnes

I feel only the deepest sympathy for Chadwick Boseman’s family, and while it might seem precipitous to discuss “what comes next?” for the Black Panther franchise, I think it inevitable that the Internet has already been flooded with opinions. The two major choices seem to be: Shall we recast the role? Or promote his brilliant sister Shuri to that role, as happened in the later comics? (After 40 years of T’Challa tales).

I don’t know what Chadwick thought on his deathbed. Or what his spirit might think of the question now. I can only say that if it were me, and I had seen the sheer delirious pleasure felt by Black Americans experiencing King T’Challa’s ascendance…I would want to separate the myth from the man: all men die, but the myths must live on. To start that flame was the honor. Others can now feed it, keep it alive. Carry it to victory.

And I want to give my thoughts on why recasting is, from my perspective, the best of non-optimal choices. NO MATTER WHAT is done here, the results will be bittersweet at best. But they can also be transcendent, triumphant. The King is dead. Long live the King.

The “Black Panther” comic character was created in July 1966 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, in specific answer to the question: where are the black superheroes? While there had been some minor creations before that point, having Marvel’s flagship characters The Fantastic Four dazzled by the prince of Wakanda, a mysterious figure with Captain America’s physical prowess and Tony Stark’s intellect and stupendous wealth, was world-shattering for me.



I’d literally never seen anything like it. The character was an instant hit, although he had difficulty sustaining his own comic book. But when the MCU burst to life, and he was brought to cinematic life in 2016’s CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR, he hit the screen like a grenade. I saw that movie in a Black neighborhood, sitting in an audience who had, of course, seen Blade, and Falcon, and Iron Patriot. But when we caught the first glimpse of T’Challa at that United Nations conference, excitement rippled through the audience.

And when he kissed his father T’Chaka’s ring, his father, King of Wakanda cupping his cheek fondly, I cried. I had NEVER seen such a gesture of affection between two powerful Black men. When he vowed vengeance for his father’s death, I FELT that. It felt like Muhammad Ali’s “I’m the greatest!” lifted to the Nth power.



Black men simply hadn’t been allowed to have that kind of pride in self. Heavyweight champion John L. Sullivan had been famous for stalking into a bar, slamming his fist down and roaring “I can whip any goddam sonofabitch in the world!” and white America LOVED him for it.

Ali’s “I’m the Greatest” was anathema. He was a MAN, unapologetically, with the same pride and arrogance celebrated in heroes from Achilles to Bond…but that pride and power, that “if you touch my family I’ll rip your throat out” clarity celebrated by all world cultures through all time (and now, of course, sometimes demonized as “toxic masculinity”) was specifically part of what was stripped away from African males during slavery. The most aggressive and strong were killed. The others were broken if possible, forced to accept their roles as something not quite human. Unable to protect their women’s chastity or prevent their children from being sold away.

And while every group of IMMIGRANTS brought with them their mythologies, languages, religions, cultures, languages, and history…ALL of that was stripped away in the slave trade, homogenized. Imagine stripping all programs from a human computer and installing “Slave 1.0” software. Then after 250 years you reluctantly install “Freeman 1776” on that computer while never quite erasing the original software, and employing another century and a half of Sharecropping, Sundown Laws, Jim Crow, and Segregation malware, all the time piously denying any of that was happening. “The playing field is level — the problem is YOU.”

Might you expect some software conflicts? Some crashing?Our hardware is great. But frankly, some of our software, installed by a society that does not love us…sucks. It is one thing to mug someone. Another to knock them to the ground and piss on them. As vile as that is, it is an entirely different and deeper level of evil to mug them, knock them down, break their legs, urinate on them and then say “look at that smelly, broke bum. He must have been BORN with broken legs. He must ENJOY laying in the gutter.” That…that is beyond mere animal predation. That is evil. That is what happened to us, and what we’ve struggled against for generations.

There is a very real reason that I’ve spent my entire adult life creating myths and stories: I was denied them as a child. I watched stories of heroes, and when people who looked like me appeared, they were secondary, or criminal, stupid, cowardly. Or Disposable: I can list well over a hundred films in which EVERY Black character, or Black man died. Every one. The vilest are when they die protecting white people, or dying to motivate their white friends to righteous anger, sob sob.
And I’d just bet you can’t name A SINGLE AMERICAN FILM in which EVERY white character (anyone with a line of dialogue) died, if any POC survived. (I can. After years of searching I finally found one. Needless to say, it is little known and got no distribution. And no, I’m not telling you the title.)

I remember when I wrote my first solo science fiction novel, starring a character described as being as black-skinned as a Zulu. They put a white guy (maybe a touch of Asian) on the cover. NO ONE at the publishing company would take responsibility. My poor editor was in tears. The editor in chief said it was the fault of the art department. The art department blamed the marketing department. The marketing department blamed the TRUCK DRIVERS who would put the book on the shelves. If they thought it was “Shaft In Space” you see, they wouldn’t give it a good position…
No one could or would take responsibility.



You know, I remember reading about the British Army. If someone broke into the kitchen and stole food and no one confessed, it was assumed the entire company was at fault, covering for the culprit. It was the entire CULTURE, the entire unit that was punished, until someone stepped forward and confessed.
If no one confessed, then everyone was guilty.

So I developed a theory: that this was a low-level racism pervading the entire culture. A very few INDIVIDUALS would admit it, but there weren’t enough allies to reverse the aggregate impact. Everyone just contributes a tiny push, a tiny flinch of personal aversion. But the cumulative effect is massive. If a million people line up, and each of them just slaps you lightly once, by time the last of them march by, every bone in your face would be crushed, and you are going to be DEAD.
It’s nowhere. So…its everywhere.

But I saw the risk in seeing that: was I demonizing white people? If racism is “the differential attribution of capacity or worth based on race or ethnicity” as I have held all my life, wasn’t I being PRECISELY what I abhorred if I thought such a thing?
Take a step back from the precipice. What if this was a universal human trait? Most humans seem to be tribalistic. That’s born in the “My mommy is the prettiest, my dog the smartest, my daddy the strongest” thing that all kids have, and most grow out of. (Well…my Mom WAS the prettiest…)

Just to help you understand, the way I think about it: “Tribalism” is cheering for the home team. “Racism” is actually thinking the other team are bums, and virulent “bigotry” is knee-capping their quarterback. There are gradations. I looked out at the world as a young writer, and realized that I’d walked into hundreds of bookstores and seen countless thousands of SF books, and the covers on all of them could be reduced to “white people and their imaginary friends.” I watched movies like WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE and saw George Pal neglect to save a single Black person. We all died. No one even noticed.

And I realized, sick to my stomach, that I had a real, genuine problem. Like anyone with a healthy ego, I protected myself from fear of failure with bravado. I had ambitions as high as the sky. But literally NO ONE with my skin color had ever accomplished what I sought to do. And I had reason to believe this was not an accident. Not a statistical fluke. I was running into a real barrier. Should I quit? Give up? I refused. And looking at the curve of social change, I reckoned, back in about 1985, that it would take another generation or so until there was enough progress for me to even have a whisper of a chance of success. I literally had to wait for another generation or two of bigots to die off, figuring that their grandchildren would have less motivation to defend lies and hold the line
.
One measure was “Network hour long drama with a black lead (person whose name comes first in the credits) lasting over two seasons.” That finally happened with 2006’s THE UNIT, starring Dennis Haysbert. One measure was “Black man having a love scene in a movie that earns over $100 million domestic.” That line was finally crossed in 2015’s CREED.

And of course, Barack Obama’s election was another indicator that things were moving in the right direction. In other words, the 21st Century was finally kicking in. And since that time we’ve seen some serious cultural change…including push-back. I believe that is what we are experiencing in our political arena, at this very moment: people who believe “Obama made race relations worse” were simply finally forced to admit to what WE had seen and experienced for centuries. When I wrote for the 1980’s version of TWILIGHT ZONE and OUTER LIMITS I wrote black characters who were changed to white by the producers. The OUTER LIMITS people actually told me they COULDN’T cast black, because there weren’t any black people in Vancouver BC where they filmed, and they’d have to import Negroes…Honest. They said that.

So if I could hunker down, and somehow survived emotionally without becoming embittered, I reckoned that somewhere after 2000 my time would come. And while there are still massive problems, including those stemming from 400 years of oppression and persistent denial, the smartest, strongest, and best of my brothers and sisters are finding their way in. Sammy Davis Jr. had to be a quadruple threat to be allowed to stay in hotels where he performed. The “you have to be twice as good to get half as far” thing.

Now? I’d estimate you only have to be 50% better to get similar results. Twenty years ago, my wife Tananarive Due and I pitched her novel THE GOOD HOUSE in Hollywood with Forest Whitaker and Blair Underwood. And executives loved it. But rejected it after asking: “Do the characters have to be black?” I remember the pride of looking around at my allies at that table, Blair and Forest and producers Nia Hill and D’Angela Proctor …and realizing we were going to walk out of that room without a check…but with our pride intact. Tananarive and I were hurting for money. But we would not betray our trust.


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Offline Ture

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3277 on: October 18, 2020, 01:33:04 pm »
Long Live The King: The Case For Recasting “Black Panther” Part 2
By Steven Barnes

So…back to CIVIL WAR. When Winter Soldier kicked Captain America’s butt (without his shield) that was impressive. But…T’Challa made Bucky RUN. WHAT??? They let a black man, by inference, be better than Captain America…? As Dr. Seuss might have said, every Black man in that darkened theater grew three sizes that day. The Black women in the audience, most of whom seemed to have reluctantly been dragged to yet another comic book movie by their boyfriends, saw Florence Kasumba look coldly at Black Widow and say “Move. Or you will be moved.”


They CHEERED. Cheered. Had never seen a Black woman stand up like that to a white superwoman…and make us wonder what would have happened if those two had actually thrown down. It was a revelation. And at the end of the film we saw T’Challa, seeking vengeance for a beloved father who had died only days ago, demonstrate more maturity and control than Tony Stark after DECADES of grief processing and a half-billion dollars in therapy.That was indeed one amazing, spectacular human being. And in the post-credit sequence we finally got a glimpse of Wakanda, and when T’Challa was told the world would come against him and he said: “Let them come.”


I got chills. Never, in my entire life, had I seen anything like that. I was actually STUNNED. Remember: Marvel movies had not been kind to Black men. While there were secondary characters like Falcon and Rhodey, they got their powers and took their orders from white men and frankly followed them obediently.

The X-Men franchise at Fox was the absolute nadir. While there WAS Storm, she was isolated, with no relationships or human connections, existing only to serve the white people around her. And Black men? Don’t get me started. EVERY Black man in an X-Men movie has died. EVERY SINGLE ONE. Over more than a decade and ten movies. EVERY ONE. And so far as I can determine, not a single white fan had even NOTICED.

And the executives, of course, say it’s all a misunderstanding. We noticed, though. And we swallowed it. As I once said about my willingness to swallow the racist tropes of Tarzan and Conan: “I sacrificed my melanin on the altar of my testosterone.” Like other young men, I needed the image of masculine power just to try to understand what I was. And accepted the poison to get it.

When BLACK PANTHER was announced, and Ryan Coogler, who had directed the historic CREED was signed… I was thrilled. He could handle action. He grasped the “inwardness” of his black characters. If he could surround himself with the right talent…Game On.



I remember the images of little Black kids dancing on their table-tops with sheer ecstacy at the prospect of seeing BLACK PANTHER . No, they didn’t dance like that for BLADE, although Wesley Snipes was cold as ice. We enjoyed seeing Falcon, and Rhodey…but again, nobody danced on their desks.

T’Challa was different. He had, SPECIFICALLY, what had been taken from us, what every immigrant who came here voluntarily brought form the home country, a theft so colossal that, frankly, most white people cannot even grasp it. They think my name “Barnes” represents my people. No. It represents the white men who raped my grandmothers and crippled my grandfathers and tried to blame me for the damage they’d done.

T’Challa doesn’t exist in relation to white people, or Europe. T’Challa would have been T’Challa if Europe had been hit by an asteroid. He had his name, religion, agency, history, culture, mythology, EVERYTHING. And he was, while not precisely sexual, at least sensual and romantic.

In his flirtation with Nakia, there was the promise of dynasty, the continuation of life. The reproductive family, the basic unit of human existence, without which the tribe dies in a single generation. We saw an entire culture of proud, strong, brilliant people. Connected at last with our past, we could own our present, and see our future shining brightly.



And no, it wasn’t just about Da Guys. In truth, there were only two good, strong Black male characters: T’Challa and M’Baku. There were FOUR badass female characters front and center: Nakia, Ramonda, Shuri, and the amazing Okoye. Not to mention the rest of the Dora Milaje. He was almost overshadowed in his own movie!

We saw something we’d never seen onscreen: a globe-trotting sophisticated warrior, James Bond to the max, with black skin and being. Presented with so much talent that even standing in a cultural hole, it TOWERED. Transcended the barriers its predecessors had faced to the point of earning over a billion dollars worldwide. It broke through.


Art has that power. And I waited eagerly for INFINITY WAR (or as it was known in my house prior to release, “Black Panther 1.5.”) And…by half of the way through, I realized something was wrong. Wakanda was not a land of brilliant philosopher/warriors, but just a game board for a badly designed battle, without the sense to have air support or entrenched artillery. What? Years after witnessing the Battle of New York in Avengers, this “warrior nation” had learned NOTHING? Really?
I actually saw racists LAUGHING at this, mocking the “stupid Wakandans” for their ineffective and frankly amateur battle tactics.

And when the “snap” happened, and T’Challa and Falcon died (the diminished Rhodey stumbling through the carnage crying “Where you at?”), I had a seriously bad feeling. Thor’s Heimdall had been the first to die…protecting a white man. T’Challa and Falcon died, leaving only M’Baku and the disabled Rhodey. And the LAST to die? Nick Fury, who had been sidelined for years, and brought back only to die pointlessly for our entertainment.(And by the way…all the white heroes had had relationships. None of the black MEN with the exception of T’Challa had ever so much as TOUCHED a woman. Make of that what you will.)

I ground my teeth. ALL of the original Avengers survived. All the Black WOMEN survived. But a glaringly disproportionate percentage of the Black men…dead. Sure, I knew they’d come back in the sequel, but I’ll be honest: I watched the light go out of my son’s eyes. The light that had gone on when he saw BLACK PANTHER. . I remember the heartbreaking question he’d asked me when he was about ten: “Daddy…why do they kill the black men so much?”

BLACK PANTHER had opened his heart, made him TRUST and hope. And this…shut him down. And you know what? I talked about this on Facebook, and the very same people who had mocked Trayvon Martin and demonized BLM mocked my son’s tears. Ridiculed me for caring. And no…it is not possible for me to disconnect those factoids. They didn’t understand. They didn’t WANT to. Or…they DID understand, and LIKED it.

Ugly thoughts.


SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME came out, and Fury was in it again…not terribly effectual, but we found out at the end that the “real” Fury had been vacationing on a spaceship, slumping around in fuzzy slippers and a robe. This is the same man who had the gravitas to give orders to Thor and Stark? Really?


Even worse, a couple months earlier we’d had Captain Marvel, which, taking place in the 70’s, gave us a de-aged Fury. Maybe now we’d finally see the bad-ass! (And remember, those of you who will try to defend their choice by saying Sam Jackson was too old for action, I assume you didn’t see The Hitman’s Bodyguard..?) Fury was depicted as a clown, stopping to play with a kitty-cat in the middle of a world-risking SHIELD operation.

Remember in WINTER SOLDIER when he said that the last time he trusted someone, he lost his eye? Sounded like a bad-ass soldier’s story didn’t it? Well, we found out he lost that eye because the cat scratched him and he was too stupid to go to the emergency room. THAT was a genuine WTF moment.

It almost felt like someone had said: “Oops! We gave these black folks too much agency and power. Let’s slap ’em down, shall we?” No one, of course, would take responsibility for such thoughts…but wouldn’t that explain things elegantly, if uncomfortably?


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Offline Ture

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Re: BLACK PANTHER MEDIA - *FIGHT THE A.G.E.N.D.A. * - Recast T'Challa!
« Reply #3278 on: October 18, 2020, 01:33:18 pm »
Long Live The King: The Case For Recasting “Black Panther” Part 3
By Steven Barnes

So…I, we, ALL looked forward to BLACK PANTHER 2.. And the Pandemic pushed things back and back, but that hope remained. If all else was tainted, by some miracle the right director, and the right actor, and the right property, and the right moment in social history had come, with the streets filled with BLM protestors and the “herd of cats” psychology of the Progressive wing seemed to be aligning for a fabulous moment in cinematic history. Rumors about the sequel included a battle with Atlantas and a marriage to African demigoddess Storm. Wow. Just…wow.

And then…tragedy. The amazing, fantastic, extraordinary man and actor Chadwick Boseman died after a four-year battle with cancer. THAT is a hero — he gave the last of his life energy to creating images that blazed off the screen with integrity and power, inspiring millions, lifting and opening hearts around the goal with a magnificent dream: What might we have been? What might these people have been, if not crushed by a technology and social organization only a blink more advanced in terms of a million years of human history, but catastrophic in terms of the last thousand years..? We might have been Wakanda. We were kings and queens. Warriors and technological wizards.



That kind of dream awakens the slumbering giant within a child’s heart. It makes oppressed people believe in themselves. It opens the doorway to taking stress and turning it into magic: heat and pressure make diamonds, if those lumps of carbon can survive.

An extraordinary man created an extraordinary myth at precisely the moment we needed it, and the world was ready for it. And the avalanche of grief accompanying his death is totally understandable. But we cannot forget that that grief exists in the same world that minimized, killed and emasculated for 400 years. We cannot allow that grief to haul water for those who laughed at the destruction of Wakanda in INFINITY WAR, or never noticed the genocidal X-MEN pattern.

What to do? How do you respect the legacy of the man? I cannot speak for anyone but myself, but my sincere belief is that if it were me, I would want the legend to continue, even if the man dies. That I would go to my rest best feeling that the crowning jewel of my life had been maintained by another worthy, like an injured quarterback in a winning game handing off the ball so that the TEAM can win…even if he never lives to see the victory parade.

The grief is real. The indelible impression Chadwick Boseman created is real. And I wish only to honor those emotions, and have nothing to say against them. But to those who say they are reacting from logic, that Shuri was passed the mantle in the comics, and so that is the best course of action now, I will not argue. I will only express my attitude clearly.

And ask you to let me ask you a question. If the issue is uplifting Shuri, or Black women, a simple proposal: Give her her own movie. Make her the most powerful being in the Marvel Universe, 10X as powerful as Thor, or anything on that continuum.
But don’t kill T’Challa to do it. Don’t strip his power. We want her to be an established character: Hell, kill Peter Parker. Let her take Iron Man’s armor. Anything you want. But do NOT kill the only fully human and self-owning Black superman in cinematic history.



Need her to become Black Panther? Give T’Challa two more movies. Spider-Man, Iron Man, Hulk, Thor…all of them have had multiple movies. Need her to become Black Panther in the next film? Then give her the powers. Let there be TWO of them: or is that too much? Is that too threatening to have TWO such beings? Is there NOTHING that will satisfy you other than T’Challa’s death? Does the fact that countless white heroes have been played by multiple actors mean nothing to you? Will only his death or demasculinization satisfy you? Then I suggest that it is not about lifting Shuri up. It is about tearing T’Challa down. Mr. Boseman’s death is just the excuse you are using to do it. You’re playing Colonizer Chess.

That sounds hard, I know. But I’m thinking about those children, dancing on their desks. So overjoyed to finally, FINALLY see what little white children see a dozen times a day. I remember hearing women cheering Diana’s “No Man’s Land” sequence in the terrific WONDER WOMAN. n. “I didn’t even know I needed to see that” was a common comment. Well…EVERY scene of Black Panther was like a non-stop “No Man’s Land” for us. And yes, we knew we needed it. We just didn’t believe we’d ever see it. After 400 years.

From the bottom of my heart, I want whatever the best decision FOR THE COMMUNITY to be the one made. I believe I have expressed my opinion on what that decision should be. I cannot swear that I am correct. But I swear I’m speaking my truth as clearly and honestly and usefully and kindly as I can.

Recast.

The King is Dead. Long Live the King.

Namaste,

Steve

(P.S.. — and as for potential actors to carry the torch…lets just say I’d not be angry about John David Washington, Denzel’s son. Not at all.)

https://stevenbarnes-87684.medium.com/long-live-the-king-the-case-for-recasting-black-panther-9f59f6ce1b3e

Steven Barnes is a NY Times bestselling author, ecstatic husband and father, and holder of black belts in three martial arts.
www.fiveminutelifehacks.com




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« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 01:37:22 pm by Ture »
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Offline BlindWedjat

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Admittedly I haven't been as easily on the recast bandwagon as some of you others have, but that was a beautiful read and it has done a little convincing for me.

I guess for me it is about who gets picked as the recast. I mean it as no post-mortem exaggeration when I say I don't think there are many young Black actors in Hollywood like Chadwick Boseman. Not just to match his talent but his persona. He brought a certain prestige to the role, and I think that's due to his theatre background but also because he was starting to make a name for himself playing other Black icons and heroes. It may seem trivial but as someone who really was a fan of his before Black Panther and loved his portrayal of T'Challa, I think it may be harder for me at least to see someone else in the role if they're lacking in that regard. Not to mention all that he did for his community, and the fact that he was in his 40s (but looked a decade younger) means there was a certain maturity he brought to it too.

I can see how John David Washington is an appealing choice: he's a rising star, has led a major action film in Christopher Nolan's Tenet, and is the son of one of the greatest actors to ever exist (who was also a mentor of sorts and clear inspiration to Chadwick). But I think I'm one of the few people not completely sold by his abilities as an actor yet, but maybe he could get picked and prove me wrong in the process. Plus he's spoken about Chadwick as being the "only one true king" which may or may not complicate things.

I used to think I would have wanted Mahershala Ali if anything were to ever go wrong, but that was way before Chadwick passed and before he got cast as Blade. I also got a little convinced about Aldis Hodge recently (he's got a similar charisma Chadwick had, albeit more youthful) but he got cast as Hawkman over at DC as well. There's Atandwa Kani, young T'Chaka from the film and Dr John Kani's (Older T'Chaka) son who bears some similarities to Chadwick and would be a pretty decent choice as an African actor and MMA practitioner. I just don't know how good of an actor he is, and he doesn't really have a name for himself.