Author Topic: Virginia (Race) Riot  (Read 13968 times)

Offline Battle

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #60 on: June 20, 2020, 04:26:09 am »
Saturday, 20th June 2o2o
Memorials to the racist former owners of the Washington Redskins and Minnesota Twins are removed
by Paul P. Murphy





A monument to the former owner of the Washington Redskins and a statue of the former owner of the Minnesota Twins were removed Friday because of the men's racist pasts, the Washington sports authority and the Twins organization said.

The Minnesota Twins removed a statue honoring Calvin Griffith from outside the team's ballpark.

In Washington, DC, the city's convention and sports authority, Events DC, removed a monument to Redskins franchise founder George Preston Marshall from outside Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium.

The Redskins played at RFK Stadium before moving to FedEx Field in Prince George's County, Maryland.

"This symbol of a person who didn't believe all men and women were created equal and who actually worked against integration is counter to all that we as people, a city, and nation represent," Events DC Chairman Max Brown, President and CEO Greg O'Dell and their Board of Directors said in a statement.

"Removing this statue is a small and an overdue step on the road to lasting equality and justice."

CNN has reached out to the Washington Redskins and the NFL for comment on Marshall's monument being removed.

The team and the league have been criticized for years by Native American groups and others for continuing to have "Redskins" in the name.













Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/19/us/memorials-racist-major-league-owners-removed-trnd/index.html

https://sports.mb.com.ph/2020/06/20/memorials-to-racism-linked-nfl-mlb-owners-removed-from-venues/

https://www.sportingnews.com/us/nfl/news/redskins-twins-owners-statues-removed-racist-history/1w3lte21qszhb1p812a2q23t7c

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #61 on: June 27, 2020, 11:41:37 am »
Saturday, 27th June 2o2o



Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns says the United States is “in the middle of an enormous reckoning” and called for the removal of statues of confederate soldiers and the renaming of military bases during a discussion with CNN’s Chris Cuomo.





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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #62 on: June 27, 2020, 01:37:16 pm »
Saturday, 27th June 2o2o
Princeton to Remove Woodrow Wilson Name from University
by Associated Press






(PRINCETON, New Jersey) — Princeton University has announced plans to remove the name of former President Woodrow Wilson from its public policy school because of his segregationist views, reversing a decision the Ivy League school made four years ago to retain the name.

University president Christopher Eisgruber said in a letter to the school community Saturday that the board of trustees had concluded that “Wilson’s racist views and policies make him an inappropriate namesake” for Princeton’s School of Public and International Affairs and the residential college.

Eisgruber said the trustees decided in April 2016 on some changes to make the university “more inclusive and more honest about its history” but decided to retain Wilson’s name, but revisited the issue in light of the recent killings of George Floyd and others.

Wilson, governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913 and then the 28th U.S. president from 1913 to 1921, supported segregation and imposed it on several federal agencies not racially divided up to that point.

He also barred Black students from Princeton while serving as university president and spoke approvingly of the notorious domestic terrorist group, ku klux klan.

Earlier in the week, Monmouth University of New Jersey removed Wilson’s name from one of its most prominent buildings, citing efforts to increase diversity and inclusiveness.

The superintendent of the Camden school district also announced plans to rename Woodrow Wilson High School, one of the district’s two high schools.

“Wilson’s racism was significant and consequential even by the standards of his own time,” Eisgruber said, adding that the former president’s segregationist policies “make him an especially inappropriate namesake for a public policy school.”

The trustees said they had taken what they called “this extraordinary step” because Wilson’s name was not appropriate “for a school whose scholars, students, and alumni must be firmly committed to combatting the scourge of racism in all its forms.”

The school will now be known as the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, he said.

Princeton had already planned to close Wilson College and retire its name after opening two new residential colleges currently under construction but will change the name to First College immediately.

Eisgruber said the conclusions “may seem harsh to some” since Wilson is credited with having “remade Princeton, converting it from a sleepy college into a great research university,” and he went on to become president and receive a Nobel Prize.

But while Princeton honored Wilson despite or perhaps even in ignorance of his views, that is part of the problem, Eisgruber said.

“Princeton is part of an America that has too often disregarded, ignored, or excused racism, allowing the persistence of systems that discriminate against Black people,” he said.

Four years ago, a 10-member committee gathered input from Wilson scholars and more than 600 submissions from alumni, faculty and the public before concluding that Wilson’s accomplishments merited commemoration, so long as his faults were also candidly recognized.

The committee report also said using his name “implies no endorsement of views and actions that conflict with the values and aspirations of our times.”
















Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.snopes.com/ap/2020/06/27/princeton-to-remove-woodrow-wilson-name-from-school/

https://thehill.com/homenews/news/504848-princeton-board-votes-to-remove-woodrow-wilsons-name-from-public-policy-school

https://www.nj.com/news/2020/06/princeton-university-will-remove-woodrow-wilsons-name-from-school-dorm-building.html

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #63 on: June 27, 2020, 02:40:13 pm »
Saturday, 27th June 2o2o
Mississippi House just voted to remove confederate symbol from flag
by Britanny Shammas





Mississippi lawmakers on Saturday took the first step toward changing the state flag, after nationwide protests of racial injustice refocused attention on the last in the country to continue featuring a confederate emblem.

Applause broke out when the House of Representatives voted 85 to 35 to suspend rules and allow consideration of a bill creating a new design free of Confederate iconography.

Ahead of the historic vote, Speaker Pro Tem Jason White (R) argued forcefully against keeping the old flag, saying that it had come to be viewed as a symbol of hate.

“By changing our flag, we don’t abandon our founding principles,” he said.

“We embrace them more fully by doing what is right. We’re not moving further away from our founding fathers’ visions. We’re moving closer to them. We’re not destroying our heritage; we’re fulfilling it.”

Earlier in the day, Governor Tate Reeves (R), who had long insisted voters alone should decide whether to abandon the state’s flag, said for the first time Saturday that he would sign a bill on the issue if one is sent his way.

“The legislature has been deadlocked for days as it considers a new state flag,” he wrote in a fakebook post.

“The argument over the 1894 flag has become as divisive as the flag itself and it’s time to end it. If they send me a bill this weekend, I will sign it.”

A debate has raged this week over the state flag, the last in the country to feature the confederate battle flag in its design.

The symbol, with 13 white stars atop a blue X with a red background, appears in the Mississippi flag’s upper-left corner.

Adopted more than 30 years after the end of the Civil War, the banner has continued to fly despite years of criticism over its symbology, including previous attempts to change it.

In 2001, Mississippians voted 2-to-1 to keep the 1894 design.

But amid a heightened focus on confederate symbols across the nation, Mississippi legislators and institutions have in recent days come out against the flag.

Among those now opposing the flag are multiple legislators from both parties, the Mississippi Historical Society, Walmart and the Mississippi Baptist Convention.

A state lawmaker told CNN Friday there now might be enough votes to remove it.

Reeves went from saying Wednesday that there was “an effort underway across the country to erase our nation’s history” and that a veto “would be pointless” to his Saturday statement that it was time “resolve that the page has been turned” and “find a way to come together.”

“We should not be under any illusion that a vote in the Capitol is the end of what must be done — the job before us is to bring the state together,” Reeves said in his Saturday statement,

“and I intend to work night and day to do it.”








Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/06/27/mississippi-flag-vote/

https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/26/us/mississippi-confederate-flag-change-trnd/index.html

https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/06/27/mississippi-state-flag-change-reeves-will-sign-bill/3269788001/

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #64 on: June 27, 2020, 05:21:34 pm »
Saturday, 27th June 2o2o

Coming Down Soon...



Black Lives Matter

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #65 on: June 28, 2020, 06:05:58 am »
Sunday, 28th June 2o2o
Spanish colonial monuments fuel race strife in US Southwest
by Russell Contreras






(RIO RANCHO, New Mexico) — Statues of Spanish conquistador Don Juan de Oñate are now in storage after demonstrators in New Mexico threatened to topple them.

Protesters in California have pulled down sculptures of Spanish missionary Junipero Serra, and now schools, parks and streets named after Spanish explorers are facing uncertain futures.

As statues and monuments associated with slavery and other flawed moments of the nation’s history come tumbling down at both the hands of protesters and in some cases decisions by politicians, the movement in the American Southwest has turned its attention to representations of Spanish colonial figures long venerated by some Hispanics but despised by Native Americans.

Protesters say figures such as Oñate, who led early Spanish expeditions into present-day New Mexico, shouldn’t be celebrated.

They point to Oñate’s order to have the right feet cut off of 24 captive tribal warriors after his soldiers stormed Acoma Pueblo.

That attack was precipitated by the killing of Onate’s nephew.

They say other Spanish figures oversaw the enslavement of Indigenous populations and tried to outlaw their cultural practices.

Some Hispanics who trace their lineage to the early Spanish settlers say removing the likenesses of Oñate and others amounts to erasing history — a complicated history both marred by atrocities against Indigenous people and marked by the arduous journeys that many families made for the promise of a new life or to escape persecution in Spain.

That history remains tightly woven into New Mexico’s fabric as many Native American Pueblos still are known by the names given to them by the Spanish and many continue to practice Catholicism — something even Pueblo leaders acknowledge.

“New Mexico is a special place for all of us. We are all neighbors. We share food, we work together, and in many cases, our family relations go back generations,” said J. Michael Chavarria, chairman of the All Pueblo Council of Governors and governor of Santa Clara Pueblo.

Earlier this month, demonstrators tried to tear down an Oñate statue outside an Albuquerque museum using chains and a pickax.

A fight that broke out resulted in gunfire that injured one man.

The next day, Albuquerque removed the statue and placed it in storage.

Another Oñate statue was removed by Rio Arriba County officials ahead of a planned protest that sought its removal, drawing praise from activists and some Pueblo leaders.

Albuquerque City Councilor Cynthia Borrego, who is Hispanic, acknowledged the sordid aspects of history during a city-sponsored prayer and healing event prompted by the protests.

“We also have to remember, those were times of war ... but we can’t go back 500 years,” she said.

Daniel Ortiz, 58, a retired financial adviser in Santa Fe, can trace his family’s roots over 14 generations.

He said the statues’ removals amount to anti-Hispanic sentiment and a dismissal of Hispanics’ unique contribution to area.

“This is the work of a small, radical Native American group, not our Pueblos,” Ortiz said.

“They’ve hijacked the Black Lives Matter movement and our Anglo leaders are too scared to stand up to them.”

Ortiz is leading a online petition calling for the monuments’ return.

Others have taken to social media to call the vandalism an act of “Hispanicphobia,” linking it to anti-immigrant sentiment.

Even the Spanish Embassy in the U.S. has weighed in, saying that defending the Spanish legacy is a priority and educational efforts will continue for “the reality of our shared history to be better known and understood.”

Spanish explorers were the first Europeans to set foot in the present-day American Southwest.

It started with expeditions in the 1540s as the Spanish searched for the fabled Seven Cities of Gold.

Decades later, colonization ramped up and Santa Fe was established as a permanent capital in 1610.

Spanish rule over the New Mexico territory lasted for about two centuries until the area briefly became part of the Republic of Mexico before it was taken over by the U.S.

Spain’s enduring hold over the territory made it unlike other areas in the Southwest and opened the door for memorializing the Spanish influence.

Some scholars say the phenomenon of commemoration is linked to efforts that originated more than a century ago as Hispanics tried to convince white members of Congress that New Mexico should become a state.

During the 19th Century, white people moved into the territory and held racist views toward the region’s Native American and Mexican American population, according to John Nieto-Phillips, author of “The Language of Blood: The Making of Spanish-American Identity in New Mexico, 1880s-1930s.”

“They derided particularly the Mexican population as mongrels and mixed-blood who were incapable of governing themselves,” said Nieto-Phillips, the diversity and inclusion vice provost at Indiana University.

As a result, Nieto-Phillips said elite Hispanics in the region took on a solely Spanish American identity over their mixed heritage as a means to embrace whiteness.

Some Hispanics adopted notions about “pure” Spanish blood as part of the eugenics movement that peaked in the 1920s and ’30s to argue they were racially different than other ethnic Mexicans in Texas and California, he said.

It’s an identity that continues today.

The conquistador image has appeared on university emblems, moving truck companies, and once was the mascot of Albuquerque’s minor league baseball team.

Meanwhile, Latinos in other southwestern states often identify as Mexican American or mestizo, a mixture of Spanish and Native American ancestry.

Yet, in recent years, the Spanish conquistador and all the effigies connected to it have seen intense criticism thanks to a new politicized coalition of Native American and Latino activists. Protests have forced the cancellation of Santa Fe’s annual “Entrada” — a reenactment of when the Spanish reasserted themselves following the Pueblo Revolt.

In California, people have been defacing Serra’s statues for years, saying the Spanish priest credited with bringing Roman Catholicism to the western United States forced Native Americans to stay at the missions after they were converted or face brutal punishment.

Protesters in Los Angeles and San Francisco recently brought down statues of Serra.

The recent violence in New Mexico has forced some elected officials to consider removing public art and renaming schools linked to Spanish conquistadors.

Vanessa Fonseca-Chávez, who grew up in Grants, New Mexico, and is the author of an upcoming book on colonial legacies in the Southwest, said she understands how Hispanics can be excited about being able to trace their history to early New Mexico settlements that predate even the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

But along with those prideful reflections should come a critical examination of colonial legacy and the anger spurred by those monuments.

“These incidents didn’t happen in a vacuum,” said Fonseca-Chávez, an assistant English professor at Arizona State University. “This has been building for more than 20 years ... people are really getting frustrated at the lack of historic and social consciousness about New Mexico’s history.”







Would You Like To Know More?
https://apnews.com/ea5516d25f301833a5709e8e455333eb
« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 08:30:32 am by Battle »

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #66 on: June 28, 2020, 10:03:30 am »
Sunday, 28th June 2o2o

In front of the Executive Mansion, the andrew jackson monument:


Almost there...

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #67 on: June 28, 2020, 07:37:46 pm »
Sunday, 28th June 2o2o



According to Kristen Clarke on Twitter, "BREAKING: After 126 years, Mississippi’s state flag bearing Confederate battle emblem REMOVED."

“I can’t believe it. I am so emotional. Medgar’s wings must be clapping.” —Myrlie Evers, widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers.

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #68 on: July 07, 2020, 10:36:55 am »
Tuesday, 7th July 2o2o
J.E.B. Stuart statue removal in Richmond, Virginia
by Gabrielle Harmon






(RICHMOND, Virginia) - Crews removed the J.E.B. Stuart monument, on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Tuesday morning.

Hundreds of people gathered to watch the removal, which began around 8 a.m. and ended just before 11 a.m.

Stuart, a Confederate general, is one of more than a dozen statues Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney ordered removed from city property last week.


Statues to Confederate General Stonewall Jackson and Matthew Fontaine Maury were removed from Monument Avenue last week and taken to an undisclosed location.

A statue to Confederate president Jefferson Davis was pulled down off its monument by protesters last month.

The Robert E. Lee Monument is located on state-owned property and could be removed once legal challenges to its removal make their way through court.

The Stuart statue, erected in 1907, is the first monument Stoney promised would be removed following the holiday weekend.

The mayor said it would cost $1.8 million to remove the statues.

He said the money would come from the Department of Public Works and be reimbursed by a private fund.

While city attorney Haskell Brown told Richmond City Council that Stoney did not have the power to remove statues, Stoney said he believed he is on sound legal ground to remove the statues using his emergency powers as the Emergency Management Director.

"That's in our Emergency Operations Plan. That is also the part of the governor's declaration of emergency that I'm the emergency manager," said Stoney.

"And also, the City Council spoke to this in June 8th, when they passed a resolution ordinance that gave me such powers."


Stoney said over the course of the last several weeks, thousands have gathered in the city and there have been more than 139 calls of service along the Monument Avenue corridor.


The mayor said failing to remove the statues presented a severe, immediate and growing threat to public safety.

Stoney said the removed statues will be placed in temporary storage while Richmond enters a 60-day administrative process during which the city will solicit public input while determining the fate of the statues.












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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #69 on: July 08, 2020, 04:28:02 am »
Wednesday, 8th July 2o2o
4 Monuments Should Be Honored
by Russell Contreras









Activist and towns in the United States are left wondering what to do with empty spaces that once honored historic figures tied to racism and monuments fell in June 2020. A few suggestions:



1. Former slave and abolitionist, Olaudah Equiano sits on display at the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, England, Britain.

The Equiano sculture has been suggested as a replacement.




2. An abandoned gas station in Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico, is shown with graffiti honoring the 1967 courthouse raid in the town by armed Mexican American land grant activists.




3. U.S. Representative Barbara Jordan, the first African-American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction and the first Southern African-American woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives sits at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in Austin, Texas.

Jordan is another figure who activists say needs to be honored.




4. A sign with Mexican Revolutionary hero Emiliano Zapata demanding,

"Tierra o Muerte, Zapata Vive" translated means "Land or Death, Zapata Lives", sits at the entry of Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico, the site of the 1967 courthouse raid by armed Mexican American land grant activists, which helped spark the Chicano Movement.




« Last Edit: July 08, 2020, 07:09:31 am by Battle »

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #70 on: July 12, 2020, 02:48:52 pm »
Sunday, 12th July 2o2o
Plans underway to remove andrew jackson statue from City Hall
by Ross Adams





(JACKSON, Mississippi) — Plans are in the works to remove a statue of President Andrew Jackson from City Hall.

The Jackson City Council approved the proposal Tuesday to remove the statue.

The proposal passed with a vote of 5-1.

Councilman Ashby Foote voted in favor of keeping the statue in its current location.

"I think it’s a bad direction to go of tearing down or trying to erase our history," Foote said.

"I think it’s counterproductive to an open society that needs to hear all voices."

According to Andrew Jackson's Hermitage, the former president's homestead in Nashville, Tennessee, Jackson owned 150 slaves at the time of his death.

Jackson also signed the Indian Removal Act, which forced Native American tribes out of the South, including Mississippi, on a march known as the Trail of Tears.

Thousands of Native Americans died.

"I don’t think moving forward (that) it’s healthy to celebrate someone who was brutal and someone who was abusive. Someone who was the leader of mass genocide across this country," said City Council President Aaron Banks.

The mayor’s office is now considering when to remove the statue and where it will be located in the future.

“Statues do not only reflect history. They are meant to be monuments demonstrating that a society reveres the person for which the likeness represents. Andrew Jackson is guilty of one of the most heinous acts of genocide that this nation has ever seen. He was also known as one of the most brutal slave owners throughout slavery. And so, as we build a city focused on progress and unity, we must make certain that we display images which reflect those aspirations,” said Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba.

There’s discussion at City Hall about replacing Jackson’s statue with one honoring civil rights martyr Medgar Evers.

Gov. Tate Reeves said Wednesday that he does not believe cities should remove monuments.

"In fact, to those who are doing it, I just want to remind everyone that there is a state law which places guidelines on what you can and cannot do," Reeves said.

"Actually, I would argue that they haven't read far enough in the state law," Lumumba said.

"The state law says any war monument would have to be maintained in a public place unless the governing authorities determine that there is a more appropriate public place to place it."

















Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.wapt.com/article/jackson-councilman-proposes-moving-andrew-jackson-statue/33239926

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #71 on: July 13, 2020, 02:20:31 am »
Monday, 13th July 2o2o
Redskins to retire team name Monday
by Les Carpenter and Mark Maske





The Washington Redskins plan to announce Monday morning that they will change their team name, three people with knowledge of the situation confirmed Sunday night.

The team is not expected to reveal a new name until a later date.

Monday’s anticipated announcement comes after the organization released a statement July 3rd saying it would be undertaking what it called a “thorough review” of the team’s name; multiple people familiar with the process have said that it would result in the name being changed.

In an interview July 4th, Coach Ron Rivera — who is working with owner Daniel Snyder to choose a name — said he hoped the new name would be in place by the start of the 2020 NFL season.

Others have said it will be revealed as soon as within two weeks.

Two people with knowledge of the team’s plans said Sunday that the preferred replacement name is tied up in a trademark fight, which is why the team can’t announce the new name Monday.

Sports Business Journal was first to report Sunday night that the announcement of the existing name’s retirement would come Monday morning.

In the July 4th interview, Rivera said he and Snyder had come up with two names that Rivera really liked.

He did not reveal the names but said he wanted to confer with Native American and military organizations to make sure that the new name properly honored both.

The decision to change the nearly 87-year-old team name comes amid mounting pressure on the franchise from corporate sponsors and the broader nationwide discussion of race.

Snyder had previously said he would never change the controversial Redskins name, which is considered to be a slur against Native Americans.

But Rivera said he and Snyder began discussing a possible change near the end of May.

On July 2nd, FedEx — one of the franchise’s top sponsors and the holder of its stadium’s naming rights — released a statement asking the team to change its name, and it sent a letter to Snyder last week saying it would take the company’s name off FedEx Field if he did not change the team name.

Other sponsors, including PepsiCo, Nike and Bank of America, also made similar demands.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2020, 08:36:57 am by Battle »

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #72 on: July 13, 2020, 11:31:58 am »
Monday, 13th July 2o2o

Next up: Texas Rangers name change


The historical Texas rangers routinely engaged in:

  • Rounding up runaway enslaved people
  • Intimidating NAACP members in the 1950s
  • Refusing to protect black schoolchildren from white mobs angry over school integration

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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #73 on: July 14, 2020, 10:00:47 am »
Tuesday, 14th July 2o2o


According to NowThis News, Frederick Joseph received death threats after he walked around NYC wearing a shirt that says 'Caucasians,' as a parody of the offensive Redskins logo.

Here's how people reacted:





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Re: Virginia (Race) Riot
« Reply #74 on: July 14, 2020, 04:27:38 pm »
Tuesday, 14th July 2o2o
Mississippi University removes confederate statue
by Aljazeera





A confederate monument that has long been a divisive symbol at the University of Mississippi was removed Tuesday from a prominent spot on the Oxford campus, just two weeks after Mississippi surrendered the last state flag in the US with the confederate battle emblem.

The marble statue of a saluting confederate soldier will be taken to a Civil War cemetery in a secluded area of campus.

Students and faculty have pushed the university for years to move the statue, but they say their work is being undermined by administrators' plan to beautify the cemetery.

A draft plan by the university indicates that the burial ground will eventually feature a lighted pathway to the statue and that headstones might be added to confederate soldiers' graves that have been unmarked for decades.

"Moving the monument should be a clear stand against racism, not another embarrassing attempt to placate those who wish to maintain the university's connection to confederate symbols," faculty members from the university's history department wrote in a joint statement last month.

University Chancellor Glenn Boyce said the new site is not intended to glorify the soldiers.

The University of Mississippi, known as "Ole Miss", was founded in 1848, and the statue of the soldier was put up in 1906 - one of many confederate monuments erected across the South more than a century ago.

Critics said the statue's location near the university's main administrative building sent a signal that Ole Miss glorifies the confederacy and glosses over the South's history of slavery.

The state College Board on June 18 approved a plan to move the monument.

The decision happened amid widespread debate about confederate symbols as people across the US and in other countries marched loudly through the streets to protest against racism and police violence against African Americans.

The statue at Ole Miss was a gathering point in 1962 for people who rioted to oppose court-ordered integration of the university.

In February 2019, a rally by outside pro-confederate groups at the monument prompted Ole Miss basketball players to kneel in protest during the national anthem at a game later that day.

Student government leaders voted two weeks later for a resolution asking administrators to move the monument to the cemetery, where confederate soldiers killed at the Battle of Shiloh are buried.

One of the student senators sponsoring that resolution was Arielle Hudson of Tunica, Mississippi, who graduated this year and has been selected as a Rhodes scholar.

She told The AP on Thursday that her joy at knowing the statue was moved has been tempered by concerns about the university's elaborate cemetery plan.

As a student, Hudson gave tours to prospective students through an "ambassador" programme.

She said ambassadors were generally told to avoid the confederate statue, but she once ended up near it.

"Those conversations were hard, especially as a Black student trying to convince other Black students and their families that they belong here," Hudson said Thursday.

"You're standing a few feet away from an object that tells them that space wasn't made for them."

The University of Mississippi has worked for more than 20 years to distance itself from confederate imagery, often amid resistance from tradition-bound donors and alumni.

The nickname for athletic teams remains the Rebels, but the university retired its Colonel Reb mascot in 2003 amid criticism that the bearded old man looked like a plantation owner.

In 1997, administrators banned sticks in the football stadium, which largely stopped people from waving confederate battle flags.

The marching band no longer plays "Dixie."

Because of a student-led effort, the university in 2015 stopped flying the confederate-themed Mississippi flag.

A groundswell of support from business, religious, education and sports leaders recently pushed legislators to retire the flag.





















Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/07/mississippi-university-removes-prominent-confederate-statue-200714185542317.html

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/university-mississippi-removes-confederate-statue-heart-campus-n1233782

https://wtop.com/national/2020/07/confederate-statue-being-moved-at-university-of-mississippi/