Author Topic: Cardi B on Tomi Lahren  (Read 544 times)


Offline Emperorjones

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Offline stanleyballard

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Re: Cardi B on Tomi Lahren
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2019, 08:53:38 am »
Sad that we have allowed other races to take over all our music (jazz, rock and roll, blues, r & b, etc) and we think mulatto people are on our side when most times in our long history going beyond America they hated us.  Check our history in "The Destruction of Black Civilization" by Chancellor Williams to know more facts and even in the history here in early America in the 1700s mulatto people clearly hated Blacks and purposely sought to exterminate us.

In the Haitian revolution with Louverture if the leader under him had not removed the mulatto people and house negroes first then there would not have been a revolution - research the information.

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: Cardi B on Tomi Lahren
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2019, 12:38:12 pm »
Sad that we have allowed other races to take over all our music (jazz, rock and roll, blues, r & b, etc) and we think mulatto people are on our side when most times in our long history going beyond America they hated us.  Check our history in "The Destruction of Black Civilization" by Chancellor Williams to know more facts and even in the history here in early America in the 1700s mulatto people clearly hated Blacks and purposely sought to exterminate us.

In the Haitian revolution with Louverture if the leader under him had not removed the mulatto people and house negroes first then there would not have been a revolution - research the information.
This post is strangely striking to me. So many questions...

First of all, I'm genuinely curious about your perspective here. No offense intended and I hope none will be taken.

The music genres you list strike me as fusions of multiple influences. Certainly shaped principally by the experience of Africans in the Western Hemisphere as documented in many books (Blues People and The Creation of Jazz to name two. Quick summary, it's not an accident that New Orleans is the birthplace of jazz.

So I'm not sure what you mean when you say, "allowed other races to take over all our music". Can you develop that thought a little bit?

Next question, who is "we" and who do you mean by "mulatto people"? Is that notion the same now as it might have been in the 1700s?

The reason I ask is the music opinion alongside the field negro vs. house negro trope surprises me a little bit.
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