Author Topic: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh  (Read 1308 times)

Offline Hypestyle

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The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« on: March 13, 2019, 05:01:05 pm »
https://www.theweek.in/news/world/2019/02/05/desi-women-democrat-neomi-rao.html

i Rao | Wikimedia Commons
Two leading Indian-American women have led the Democratic party's move to oppose the nomination of fellow community legal luminary Neomi Rao for the prestigious and powerful US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, citing her "excuses" for sexual assault and "hostility" to civil and human rights as reasons.

US President Donald Trump had announced Rao's nomination in November while celebrating Diwali at the White House. Trump had nominated her in place of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who in October was sworn in as a Supreme Court judge.

"Neomi Rao made excuses for sexual assault, blocked women's access to reproductive health and would allow healthcare providers to deny care to LGBTQ patients," said Indian-American Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal.

"This is simply not appropriate for someone who wishes to serve on a federal bench," said Jayapal, the first Indian-American woman ever elected to the House of Representatives. Senate Judiciary Committee "should reject" Rao, she said on Monday.

Now considered as among the leading Democratic lawmakers, Jayapal was recently re-elected for her second consecutive term to the US House of Representatives.

If confirmed by the United States Senate, Rao, 45, would be the second Indian-American after Sree Srinivasan in this powerful court, which is considered a step below the US Supreme court.

However, unlike the nomination process of Srinivasan, wherein the entire Indian-American community was united and campaigned aggressively for his confirmation, Indian-Americans are a bitterly divided lot this time.

"Her controversial writings set the stage for the damage she has done as President Trump's administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), where she has led the Trump administration's aggressive regulatory agenda to undermine civil rights and public protections," said Vanita Gupta, a leading Indian-American legal luminary.

"Rao's demonstrated hostility to the civil and human rights of all should disqualify her from a lifetime appointment on the federal judiciary. We urge all senators to reject her nomination," Gupta said in a strongly worded statement.

She alleged that Rao had already proven that she is incapable of serving as a fair and impartial judge on the federal bench.

"Her past is her prologue," said Gupta, who currently is president and the CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.

Rao is slated to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee for her confirmation hearing on Tuesday.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2019, 05:04:48 pm by Hypestyle »
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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2019, 05:02:58 pm »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neomi_Rao

Neomi Jehangir Rao (born March 22, 1973) is an American jurist and former academic and law professor who serves as a United States Circuit Judge-Designate of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, appointed by President Donald Trump. She is a former administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs.[1]

Rao was born in Detroit, Michigan, to Indian immigrant parents. After graduating from Detroit Country Day School, she attended Yale University and then the University of Chicago Law School. She earned a one-year clerkship with Justice Clarence Thomas on the U.S. Supreme Court, then entered private practice as an associate at the British law firm Clifford Chance. She worked for the U.S. government during the latter half of George W. Bush's presidency, then became a professor of law at George Mason University's Antonin Scalia Law School. Her research and teaching focused on constitutional and administrative law, and she founded the school's Center for the Study of the Administrative State.[2]


Contents
1   Education and legal career
2   Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs Administrator
3   Nomination to court of appeals
4   Personal life
5   References
6   Selected publications
7   External links
Education and legal career
Rao was born in Detroit, Michigan, to mother Zerin Rao and father Jehangir Narioshang Rao, both Parsi physicians from India,[3] raised in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and was educated at Detroit Country Day School.[4] After graduating from high school, Rao attended Yale University, graduating in 1995 with a Bachelor of Arts cum laude in ethics, politics & economics, and philosophy with highest distinction. Rao then attended the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a member of the Order of the Coif and graduated in 1999 with a Juris Doctor with highest honors. She was the comment editor of the University of Chicago Law Review, and executive editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy for the Symposium edition. Rao clerked for Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit from 1999 to 2000, then for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas from 2001 to 2002.[5]

After her clerkships, she practiced public international law and arbitration at British law firm Clifford Chance in London, United Kingdom. During the second term of the presidency of George W. Bush, Rao worked in the White House counsel's office and as a staffer on the Senate Judiciary Committee.[5] Later, she became a professor at George Mason University School of Law (subsequently renamed the Antonin Scalia Law School, a change she advocated),[5] where she received tenure in 2012. In 2015, she founded the Center for the Study of the Administrative State.[6][5]

She is a member of the Administrative Conference of the United States and the governing council of the American Bar Association's Section of Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice, where she co-chairs the section's regulatory policy committee.[1][7] She is a member of the Federalist Society.[8]

Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs Administrator
On April 7, 2017, President Donald Trump nominated Rao to become the administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) within the Office of Management and Budget. Former OIRA Administrator Susan Dudley (who served under President George W. Bush) described Rao as "an excellent choice to lead OIRA...In addition to a sharp legal mind, she brings an openness to different perspectives and an ability to manage the competing demands of regulatory policy."[9] Legal commentator and law professor Jonathan H. Adler wrote that "Trump's selection of Rao suggests the administration is serious about regulatory reform, not merely reducing high-profile regulatory burdens."[1] Rao was confirmed to the position by the United States Senate on July 10, 2017.[10]

Nomination to court of appeals
On November 13, 2018, President Donald Trump announced that he would nominate Rao to the seat Justice Brett Kavanaugh previously occupied on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.[11] Her nomination was sent to the Senate later that day.[12] On January 3, 2019, her nomination was returned to the President under Rule XXXI, Paragraph 6, of the United States Senate. On January 23, 2019, President Trump announced his intent to renominate Rao for a federal judgeship.[13] Her nomination was sent to the Senate later that day.[14]

A hearing on her nomination before the Senate Judiciary Committee was held on February 5, 2019. Rao was asked by several Senators about her college writings, some of which they viewed as sexual assault victim blaming. Rao responded that "A victim of a horrible crime is not to blame and the person who commits those crimes should be held responsible."[15] Democrats expressed concern that rules Rao worked to repeal in her role as administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs could face legal challenges and wind up before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, which is considered the second most powerful appeals court. Rao said she would "look carefully at the standards for recusal, consult with her colleagues and follow the precedent and practices of the D.C. Circuit."[15] On February 28, 2019, her nomination was reported out of committee by a 12–10 vote.[16] On March 13, 2019, the Senate voted to confirm Rao by a 53–46 vote. She is currently awaiting her judicial commission.
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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2019, 03:19:47 pm »
Tuesday, 23rd July 2019
Former judge dragged out of courtroom following own sentencing

by Amanda Woods




A stunned-looking former Ohio judge was dragged limp out of a courtroom following her own sentencing for improperly passing on confidential documents to her brother, footage of the chaotic scene showed.


Tracie Hunter, who worked as a juvenile court judge, was sentenced to six months in jail Monday following a contentious hearing presided over by Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Patrick Dinkelacker, local station WLWT 5 reported.

Following Dinkelacker’s ruling, one of Hunter’s supporters — wearing a “Justice for Hunter” shirt — was stopped and taken into custody as she appeared to charge to Hunter’s defense.


Then Hunter fell limp into the arms of a deputy, who hauled her away — hands under her arms, with Hunter’s feet dragging across the floor — as her supporters yelled that she was being treated “like an animal.”

In July 2013, Hunter’s brother, Stephen Hunter, who worked as a youth corrections officer, allegedly struck a teen offender on the job — prompting his boss to recommend his firing, NBC News reported.

So Tracie Hunter improperly demanded and obtained documents about the teen and handed them over to her brother, prosecutors said, according to the report.

But Tracie Hunter, who was elected in 2010 — marking the first African American elected to the county’s juvenile court — has repeatedly argued that her prosecution was politically motivated, the network reported.

“What she wants is to control the facts,” Scott Croswell, a special prosecutor during Hunter’s 2014 trial, said Monday, according to WLWT.

“What she wants to do is write the law.”

But Hunter’s attorney, David Singleton, argued that his client has suffered enough already.

“She’s lost everything almost,” Singleton said.

“She lost her job as a judge, her law license, her ability to earn an income. She’s lost peace of mind.”

Dinkelacker received multiple letters and recommendations urging him not to place Hunter behind bars — but ultimately, he was unfazed.

Hunter is being housed at the Hamilton County Justice Center’s medical facility, likely because of the effects of a car crash from three decades ago that caused severe injuries, the local station reported.

Hunter will be evaluated to determine if she can participate in early release programs, according to the report.









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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2019, 03:30:55 pm »
From the comments section of YouTube in the article above:



Facts.

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2019, 12:57:26 pm »








More facts.

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2019, 05:44:46 pm »


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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2019, 05:55:10 pm »

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2019, 06:28:13 pm »

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2019, 07:09:30 pm »

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2019, 07:45:08 pm »

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2019, 07:51:40 pm »

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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2019, 07:34:05 am »
Oh...   

---and that Ohio judge who was dragged out of a courtroom during her own sentencing...?

She's doing just fine!  :)


See? 

Nearly forgot to post her prison mugshots. :-[


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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2019, 06:32:52 pm »


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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2019, 11:41:19 am »
Thursday, 15th August 2019
Two ex-prosecutors' law licenses suspended for covering up St. Louis police beating

by Robert Patrick





(ST. LOUIS, MO) — The Missouri Supreme Court on Tuesday suspended the law licenses of two former St. Louis prosecutors for covering up a police beating of a handcuffed suspect in 2014.

In a unanimous opinion, the court suspended Katherine Anne “Katie” Dierdorf and Ambry Schuessler.

Dierdorf cannot apply for reinstatement for three years.

Schuessler will be suspended for at least two years.

The court’s ruling cited “the severity of Ms. Dierdorf’s misconduct as a result of her dishonesty and instruction of others to conceal information about the incident” and Schuessler’s “repeated dishonesty during and interference with the federal prosecution of the police detective” in their decision.

In an emailed statement, Dierdorf lawyer Michael Downey called the suspension “inconsistent with the facts, its own precedent, and what is appropriate to protect the public and maintain the integrity of the judicial system in this case.”

He said Dierdorf had “promptly and repeatedly attempted to remedy her earlier misstatements but was rebuffed by her supervisors” and that she voluntarily produced thousands of text messages to the FBI.

The incident that started it all was the beating of a handcuffed suspect, Michael Waller, by then-St. Louis police Officer Thomas A. Carroll on July 22, 2014.

Carroll’s daughter’s car had been broken into, and Waller was found with her stolen credit card.

Waller said he had found the card.

The next morning, another prosecutor and Carroll’s close friend, Bliss Barber Worrell, told Dierdorf and an intern that Carroll had beaten Waller, the opinion says.

Dierdorf did not report the incident to supervisors.

Carroll described the beating to Worrell and Schuessler by speakerphone later that morning, saying he punched and kicked Waller, hit him with a chair and stuck his gun in Waller’s mouth, the opinion says.

Schuessler responded with what the court called a “racist and homophobic comment about the suspect’s assault,” bringing laughter from Carroll and Worrell.

Schuessler and another prosecutor, Lauren Collins, learned Waller had been charged with a felony for fleeing custody, and became concerned that he could go to jail for a crime he did not commit, the opinion says.

A reluctant Schuessler went with Collins to a supervisor, the opinion says, telling that supervisor that Worrell might have filed false charges.

When called in front of supervisors, Dierdorf withheld some of what she knew about the incident, the opinion says, then told Schuessler,

“I told them I don’t know anything. You don’t tell them you know anything either.”

Schuessler failed to tell supervisors that she heard Carroll describe the assault, and failed to tell them that he said he used a gun.

The next day, Schuessler told police internal affairs investigators that she’d only heard Worrell’s half of the July 23 call, failing to tell them that Carroll was on speakerphone.

Dierdorf resigned July 28 rather than face termination.

She was interviewed twice by the FBI and a federal prosecutor, Hal Goldsmith.

It wasn’t until the second interview that she admitted knowing about the beating on the morning of July 23, describing the incident to others, overhearing a phone call between Worrell and Carroll about the investigation and lying to supervisors about when she learned about the assault.

The court said that prosecutors “are held to a higher standard given the nature of their work to protect the public.”

Dierdorf’s conduct undermined the public’s confidence in Missouri prosecutors, and her “repeated dishonesty … shows a pattern of protecting herself and her friends over the duties she assumed when she became an assistant circuit attorney,” the opinion says.


Schuessler initially blamed Carroll for the racist and homophobic joke and said she didn’t hear the speakerphone call, but admitted the truth in a second interview with federal investigators, the opinion says.

That hampered the prosecution of Carroll, they said.

Goldsmith believed the joke was relevant because it bolstered prosecutors’ claims that Carroll put his gun in Waller’s mouth during the attack, which carried an enhanced potential prison sentence.

Carroll had denied the use of the gun during his criminal case.

“The violation was particularly egregious given the circumstances in which the racist and homophobic comment was made,” they said.

Schuessler violated the public trust by failing to report the assault and joking about it.

But she did go with Collins to report the incident and sought counseling, the opinion says.

As a result of the federal investigation, Carroll got 52 months in prison; Worrell was sentenced to 18 months of probation and 140 hours of community service.

The opinion rejects a disciplinary hearing board’s recommendation of a reprimand for each and supports the suspension requested by the Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel, which investigates lawyer misconduct.

The panel, formed to hold a hearing and issue recommendations, dismissed the case against Caroline Anne Rutledge, a former intern.

Rutledge’s attorneys and attorneys for the disciplinary counsel agreed with that recommendation.

Rutledge was not a lawyer at the time of the incident, and her filings say she did not lie but could have been “forthcoming.”

Her lawyer, Maurice Graham, previously told the Post-Dispatch that there was an unprofessional culture in the office.

Rutledge was a lawyer in St. Louis County family court until January, and now works for a nonprofit, a court spokeswoman said.

Dierdorf is a public defender in Denver, Colorado. Schuessler had been working for a Clayton law firm.

Waller won a a $300,000 settlement over the incident, but recently died, his lawyer said.










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Re: The Judge Who Replaced Brett Kavenaugh
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2019, 08:50:42 am »
Monday, 9th September 2019
Dallas County DA’s Office Disqualified From Austin Shuffield Case
by CBS Dallas Fort Worth







(DALLAS, Tx) — A district judge has disqualified the Dallas County District Attorney’s office from a case that caught national attention earlier this year amid allegations of bias.

In a statement released by former Deep Ellum bartender Austin Shuffield’s attorneys, Scott Palmer and Rebekah Perlstein said they filed a motion to disqualify the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office due to the “bias” shown during the prosecution of the case.

"Due to the bias the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office has shown in the prosecution of this case, the defense filed a motion to disqualify the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office.

The District Attorney’s Office has demonstrated that their office is unable to make objective decisions on this matter by their actions of clearly intending to enforce laws only when it benefits their cases.

District Judge Lela Mays granted the motion and former Dallas County Prosecutor Russell Wilson has been assigned as a special prosecutor.

The motion to disqualify was granted by District Judge Lela Mays.

Former Dallas County Prosecutor Russell Wilson has been assigned as a special prosecutor.

Mr. Wilson will now take over the case and the presentation of charges to the grand jury.

It is our sincere hope that Mr. Wilson will not be swayed by public pressure and will seek justice, rather than a conviction by any means necessary, as is required by law."

Shuffield, 30, was arrested on March 21, after a brutal assault over parking in Deep Ellum was caught on camera.

The video showed Shuffield and the victim, 24-year-old Daijohnique Lee, in a heated argument.

Initially, Shuffield was arrested on three misdemeanor charges — assault, interference with 911 and public intoxication.

But after activists began to demand the DA’s office to increase his charges, command staff reclassified Shuffield’s charge to a felony, making it a high-profile case.

Almost two weeks later on April 2, DPD issued a warrant for Lee for the destruction she caused to Shuffield’s car the night of the assault.

Before the warrant issued, Lee admitted to damaging Shuffield’s car after he provided documentation that the damage was over $3,000.

That same day, activists protested the decision to prosecute Lee.

One day later, District Attorney John Creuzot made the decision not to prosecute Lee for the felony offense.


















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