Author Topic: The End Of Gayle King and Oprah Winfrey  (Read 458 times)

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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The End Of Gayle King and Oprah Winfrey
« on: February 09, 2020, 02:57:55 pm »
There are moments where you can exactly pinpoint a seismic shift in popular culture.

The interview with Gayle King and Lisa Leslie and its aftermath is one of them.

The attacks on Black men through the use of Black women acting as proxies has reached a point of critical mass through the King interview. Unlike, Dr. Cosby, Kobe Bryant's celebrity coalesced perfectly with the age of mass media, social media, and the incalculable passion attached to sports fandom. The level of support Bryant has now will translate to all those associated with prior attacks on Black men being the focal point of dissent along with King and Oprah.

They made one attack too many and now they are paying the price for it.

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: The End Of Gayle King and Oprah Winfrey
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2020, 06:22:10 pm »
There are moments where you can exactly pinpoint a seismic shift in popular culture.

The interview with Gayle King and Lisa Leslie and its aftermath is one of them.

The attacks on Black men through the use of Black women acting as proxies has reached a point of critical mass through the King interview. Unlike, Dr. Cosby, Kobe Bryant's celebrity coalesced perfectly with the age of mass media, social media, and the incalculable passion attached to sports fandom. The level of support Bryant has now will translate to all those associated with prior attacks on Black men being the focal point of dissent along with King and Oprah.

They made one attack too many and now they are paying the price for it.

I agree with a lot of what you say here, though I'm too cautious to say that this is a complete shift. I think the unexpectedness of Kobe Bryant's death, being still a young man in his prime, and along with his daughter Gianna, and the other people on that helicopter really shook people. Oprah and King have been more careful about who they've selected, or whoever is telling them what to do has, in the past. Michael's been gone a decade and it's hard to rally for Bill Cosby and R. Kelly. But Bryant and the tragic circumstances around his death brought out an outpouring of love and sympathy from our community and others as well. They picked the wrong person, at the wrong time. When I think about Bryant's career and life he touched three generations, and we saw him growing up and flourish into one of the greatest basketball players of all time. We saw his prom with Brandy, and then followed his NBA career, and the ups and downs of his life, and it felt to me like he could have been a son/grandson for Boomers, a sibling or best friend for Generation X, and then a father, mentor, or role model for the Millennials or maybe Generation Z even. Bill Cosby was more of a Boomer and Generation X icon, and he had frittered away a lot of the community's respect when he started wagging his finger at black folks in ways that he should've not done, or done differently, and that left him with less support from the community.

Michael was a different situation than Cosby and that's why Leaving Neverland never took hold. They can give that documentary all the awards they want, but the Jackson family pushed back, and radio stations have not canceled Michael Jackson's music and I think there's going to be a Broadway show about him, focusing on his music and not the accusations/charges. And for the first time, Oprah got criticized for her role in that, and it's like it was the first time criticism of Oprah in our community was more widespread and accepted. People weren't automatically maligned for voicing disagreement with Oprah's actions. Also, 50 Cent played a role in getting Oprah to back out of the hit job documentary about Russell Simmons.

I think a lot of people knew something wasn't right with R. Kelly but they listened to his music anyway. But once his creative output dropped off, he wasn't as valuable and he could be now be touched again. So I was looking at how they started building up the case against him with the whole 'sex cult' stuff and smelling that blood in the water, they went all in, with that documentary. That was to be used to try to say black men 'enabled' Kelly and that black men have/support a 'rape culture'. Ashley Judd tried that years ago and had to back off. She might have, but they decided to go another route. Of course, the whole black men 'enabling' Kelly ignores how much black females have supported his music over the years or how the white media embraced, even if mockingly, his "Trapped in a Closet" videos, and before that, they were fine with his Chocolate Factory album, etc.

They were salivating over Robin Roberts interviews with Nate Parker and Jussie Smollet, Terry Crews being made to apologize to Gabrielle Union over America's Got Talent, Leaving Neverland, the Russell Simmons' documentary, Cosby's imprisonment, Cuba Gooding Jr.'s travails, Surviving R. Kelly and King's interview with Kelly which he stupidly, and perhaps desperately, agreed to. And I can imagine King thought sandbagging Bryant would be another feather in her hat, but man was she wrong and I'm so glad for that. The media, and white liberal media in particular, were nibbling at Bryant's legacy a bit but they hadn't been able to really go there, so in comes King to give them cover against any racism charges. And even more twisted, King sought to use gender/sisterhood to get Lisa Leslie to crap on Bryant, but Leslie was not playing that game.

So far, I have been very proud of everyone that I've read or listened to who has spoke against what King did and I do hope they/we keep it up. Because Snoop was right, as was 50 Cent before him, and I'll throw in Lil'Boosie, Rickey Smiley, and the women on Sister Circle and the black women on the show Daily Blast Live as well (I heard that Ari Lennox and Vivica Fox have also spoken out, but I haven't heard what they said), that there is a double standard and King, and Oprah, both have been going after black men while barely saying anything, or nothing, about white sexual predators, accused, alleged, charged, or otherwise.

I am concerned that after this dies down that we might go back to sleep again, or that King's defenders in the media will shift the narrative to King being the 'victim', falling right back on the negative stereotypes about black men being violent brutes to shame and bully Snoop, etc. into silence or try to compel an apology from him, or others. It was these kind of stereotypes that King, Oprah, and others have already used to drum up media and legal lynch mobs against other black male celebrities, which leads to non-famous black males, and they are attempting to do so again. I just really hope that more and more people see through Oprah and King and also don't close their eyes by next month to what they are. That the next time they try this, and there will be a next time, they will be challenged and debated.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2020, 06:41:15 pm by Emperorjones »

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: The End Of Gayle King and Oprah Winfrey
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2020, 07:57:27 am »
http://variety.com/2020/tv/news/gayle-king-snoop-dogg-viacomcbs-tv-news-1203499084/

Of course Variety is going to back King. But I did find some things of interest here:

The twist: Both King and Snoop Dogg work for the newly-merged ViacomCBS.

Snoop Dogg and home-arts guru Martha Stewart are partners in “Martha and Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party,” and stand among the coterie of reality-show luminaries that stock the schedules of VH-1 and MTV, two of the best-known cable networks in the Viacom lineup. King, meanwhile, has been charged with helping to revive “CBS This Morning” in the wake of ratings declines it suffered after the ouster of Charlie Rose. When Viacom merged with CBS a few weeks ago, King was one of the company staffers who stood alongside CEO Bob Bakish as he rang the opening bell at the Nasdaq to celebrate the deal.



Snoop Dogg in a video Saturday tried to walk back his comments about King, saying: “I don’t want no harm to come to her.”

That isn’t likely to soothe a legion of veteran TV-journalists and producers who have come out to support King. Over the weekend, Mika Brzezinski from MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” actively called upon ViacomCBS to respond. Two former lead producers of “CBS This Morning” – Chris Licht and Ryan Kadro – took to Twitter to stand alongside their former co-worker. Both continue to work with or for CBS. And an array of prominent CBS News anchors, ranging from “CBS This Morning” co-anchor Tony Dokoupil to CBS News correspondent David Begnaud to “Face The Nation” moderator Margaret Brennan, made their ire at Snoop Dogg’s attack well known via Twitter.


Mika has spewed before, dismissing concerns about Rick Perry's "Niggerhead Ranch", fulminating against Tiger Woods after his cheating scandal, and also attempting to blame that racist fraternity chant on hip-hop a few years back (which she had to apologize for). I haven't seen any smoke Mika had for Alison Morris after her "LA Nakers" debacle.

If ViacomCBS executives are doing any math in their heads, the numbers would appear to favor King. It’s easier to tie “CBS This Morning” to revenue and profit than it is to link Snoop Dogg’s program to the advertising and subscriber revenue generated by VH1. And King’s presence across the company could grow. She has already done primetime specials for CBS, and CBS News President Susan Zirinsky recently told Variety that she’s in the midst of discussing ideas about how CBS News content could be used on Viacom’s cable networks, noting that “several of them could involve our morning news talent.”

For Variety it isn't a question of right or wrong, of course, but one of money. They reason that CBS Morning News does and will make more money for the company so they should chose King over Snoop. It goes to show how venal the media/entertainment industry is. I think this is a rosy prediction of King's future here. Because what she did cost her trust in the black community and that's a large reason why she's there. She can use the trust from the black community to better divide the community. Without that she's of little value. Why would a news corporation make a woman almost 70-years-old, a black woman, at that, if she has little usefulness, if she can no longer do her #1 job. It's not like replacing her would produce a massive social media reaction in support of her now. I do see this blowing over, I see the powers that be either getting an apology from Snoop or more clarifications (I don't see what he has said to be 'walking back' anything, but more so a clarification because he knows how the media will spin it to play into stereotypes of the scary black man; just like none of these same folks are calling on Susan Rice to apologize for her open threat to him), and taking whatever other clarifications he makes as an apologize, declaring victory and vindication for King and moving on. I could even see Snoop doing an interview with King down the road, perhaps at Viacom's behest.

But the most important thing here is that the bloom has been taken off the rose when it comes to Oprah and King and they can't move with the absolute impunity that they once did. So even if they do somehow get Snoop and others to apologize (unfortunately Ari Lennox has already backed down), they have still taken a loss here.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 08:03:58 am by Emperorjones »