Author Topic: #SiliconValleySoWhite  (Read 509 times)


Offline Battle

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Re: #SiliconValleySoWhite
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2020, 05:40:03 am »
Tuesday, 11th February 2o2o
Google's HR head to step down amid tension among employees
by Jennifer Elias





Naughton, who has held various roles at the company since 2006, will step down later this year and will move into another position.

She has been Vice President of Google's People Operations since 2016.

Under her watch, employees have protested many moves at the company, including the handling of executives accused of sexual misconduct and plans to provide AI technology to the U.S. Defense Department.

Google human resources chief Eileen Naughton is stepping down from her role amid growing tensions between employees and management.

Naughton, who has held various roles at the company since 2006, has led the company's human resources department as the vice president of people operations since 2016.

The news was previously reported by Fortune.

Employee headcount has doubled since 2016, when Naughton took the helm, as it's added more than 70,000 employees.

The company has faced considerable tension with employees over the last several years, including a November 2018 employee walk-out after employees learned the company had paid departing Android chief $90 million despite credible claims of sexual misconduct, as well as protests over the company's plans to work with the Defense Department on artificial intelligence technology and a plan -- since abandoned -- to create a censored version of its search engine for China.

In November 2019, the company fired four employees who allegedly shared internal information.

CNBC recently reported that in 2019, the company rolled out an overhaul to how its human resources department responds to complaints.

Instead of each person reporting to their own human resources contact in their organization and location, there's essentially a ticketing queue, workers said.

That's become a problem for some who feel their needs are now outsourced to people who don't have prior knowledge or understanding of the situation.

Naughton's departure comes in the midst of a slow-rolling executive shakeup over the last several months.

In December, founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin stepped down from their roles as the CEO and President of Google's holding company, Alphabet.

Sundar Pichai, who had already been Google's CEO for several years, took the helm.

The company's long-time chief legal officer David Drummond retired at the end of January.

All four executives are named on a shareholder lawsuit that alleges senior execs mishandled claims of sexual misconduct at the company.

CNBC reported in December that Alphabet received a two-month extension to provide a response to the shareholder lawsuit.

In that extension, the company said it concluded its investigation into executives and will seek mediation.

The company said Naughton is departing her role to move to New York, and she is still in the "early" stages of the process to move away, the company said in a statement to CNBC.

The company declined to say when her last day in the role will be.

A Google spokesperson confirmed Naughton will be taking another role within the company, but declined to provide any details on what that would be.

She'll work with Pichai and Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat to find another leader to fill her role.

"Over the past 13 years, Eileen has made major contributions to the company in numerous areas, from media partnerships, to leading our sales and operations in the UK and Ireland, to leading our People Operations team through a period of significant growth -- during which over 70,000 people started their careers at Google," Pichai said in a statement the company sent to CNBC.

"We're grateful to Eileen for all she's done and look forward to her next chapter at Google."















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Offline Emperorjones

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Offline Battle

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Re: #SiliconValleySoWhite
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2020, 05:53:33 am »
Thursday, 10th July 2o2o
Black and Hispanic Job Seekers Still Face Wage Gap in Tech
by David Uberti





Racial disparities in technology-industry salaries persist despite promises made by many companies to seek out and elevate diverse talent, according to a new survey from Hired Inc.

Job seekers who identified as black or Hispanic tended to both expect and receive lower salary offers than their white and Asian peers over the past year, according to the recruitment marketplace.

It was the fourth year in a row the company’s reporting found such gaps, Hired Chief Executive Mehul Patel said in an email.

“Ultimately, it’s going to take an industrywide commitment from all companies to achieve truly equitable salaries for all,” Mr. Patel said.

Hired’s report compiled data from 10,000 companies and 98,000 candidates for roles that include software engineering, product management and data science.

The analysis estimated that salaries for front-line tech workers grew in every major market in the U.S. last year, averaging $146,000 annually.

But black candidates’ average pay came in below that of their peers.

Job seekers who identified as black on Hired expected a $129,000 salary on average, with eventual offers averaging $134,000.

White job applicants sought and received $138,000 and $144,000, respectively, while the figures for Asian candidates were $140,000 and $145,000.

The wage gaps are emblematic of broader power imbalances within corporate offices and U.S. culture that have come under closer scrutiny since the killing of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis last month, said Peter Beasley, executive director for Blacks in Technology, a professional organization.

“You know to ask for less, because that’s your only option,” Mr. Beasley said. “It’s learned. It’s been taught.”

Mr. Beasley expressed cautious optimism that more aggressive recruitment and career development programs could help narrow such gaps over time.

Average salaries offered to black tech workers surveyed by Hired increased by $10,000 since last year.

Job seekers who identified as Hispanic saw similar gains, the survey found, with average salary offers growing to $141,000 this year from $128,000 in 2019.

But the number of people who identify as black or Hispanic in many roles still lags behind Census Bureau estimates of the population, according to 2019 data analyzed by the Computing Technology Industry Association.

African-Americans, which make up a 13.4% slice of U.S. residents, hold 7.8% of information technology roles, according to the trade group.

Despite 18.3% of the population identifying as Hispanic, people from the demographic group hold 7.3% of information-technology jobs.

Ron Gonzales, president and chief executive of the Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley, said that current efforts to seek out diverse candidates, and to retain employees from underrepresented groups and elevate them into higher roles hasn’t matched many companies’ highflying public statements.

“Based on the current pace of change, it literally would take decades to get this issue corrected,” said Mr. Gonzales, whose nonprofit provides education and scholarships for students seeking degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Improving salary transparency would be a key first step for companies to address pay gaps, said Chloé Rice, co-founder of We Build Black, a nonprofit organization focusing on empowering black technologists.

Deep-pocketed firms that often point to the difficulty of finding diverse talent also should invest in creating it, she said.

“If these companies really want to fix their pipeline problem, they need to start by creating that pipeline and really putting their money where their mouth is,” Ms. Rice said.





















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Offline Emperorjones

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