Author Topic: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair  (Read 3868 times)

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9728
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2019, 03:41:35 am »
Friday, 27th September 2019
Boys Pin Down Black Classmate, Cut Her Dreadlocks at Virginia School
by NBC Washington Staff






Three sixth-grade boys at a Christian school in Northern Virginia pinned down a black classmate and cut off some of her dreadlocks while telling her her hair was "nappy" and "ugly," she told News4.

Twelve-year-old Amari Allen said the three boys, who she said are white, cut off her hair on Monday.

She's a student at Immanuel Christian School in Springfield, Virginia, where Vice President Mike Pence's wife, Karen Pence, teaches part-time.

"They said my hair was nappy and I was ugly," she said.
 
Amari's grandfather Dewaune Allen said the ambush hurt him.

"My heart just broke," he said.

"I was just paralyzed. I couldn't get myself together."

Though Karen Pence works at the school, the Allens said they did not see any connection between her and the attack.

Head of School Stephen Danish said administrators were "deeply disturbed by the allegations."

"We take seriously the emotional and physical well-being of all our students, and have a zero-tolerance policy for any kind of bullying or abuse," he said in a statement.

Danish said they asked police to conduct a thorough investigation.

Amari — a straight-A student and violin player — said the boys started bullying her at the beginning of the school year.

On Monday, she was at recess and about to go down a slide when one of the boys grabbed her and put a hand over her mouth.

Another boy grabbed her arms. A third boy cut off some of her hair.

The bell rang and the boys ran off laughing.

Scared, Amari told no one. On Wednesday, her grandmother was doing her hair when she noticed long portions of it missing.

The girl started crying and told the whole story.

The family called Fairfax County police, who took a report of the incident.

Immanuel Christian School is an evangelical private school that that explicitly bars its employees from engaging in or condoning "homosexual or lesbian sexual activity" and "transgender identity," as NBC News reported earlier this year.

In January, Karen Pence started teaching art there two days a week after previously working at the school for 12 years.

The office of the second lady did not immediately respond to an inquiry about the incident this week.


















Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Boys-Pin-Down-Black-Classmate-Cut-Her-Dreadlocks-at-Virginia-School-561448661.html

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9728
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair
« Reply #16 on: December 22, 2019, 10:24:15 am »
Sunday, 22nd December 2019
'Crown Act' Now Law in NJ
by David Gialanella




Days after it passed through the Legislature with heavy support, a bill to prohibit discrimination based on hairstyles historically associated with race was signed into law.

Governor Phil Murphy signed the measure, S-3945/A-5564, late Thursday, he announced,

“in order to help ensure that all New Jersey residents can go to work, school, or participate in athletic events with dignity.”

“No one should be made to feel uncomfortable or be discriminated against because of their natural hair,” Murphy said in a statement.

The “Create a Respectful and Open Workspace for Natural Hair Act” or CROWN Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of a hairstyle, type or texture that is attributed with race and amends the Law Against Discrimination accordingly.

Hairstyles named specifically in the legislation are braids, locks and twists.

The effect of the legislation, New Jersey Division on Civil Rights director Rachel Wainer Apter said in a statement, is:


“Employers, housing providers, and places open to the public, including schools, cannot police natural black hairstyles.”

A primary sponsor of the measure, Senator Sandra Cunningham, D-Hudson, said in a statement that she is

“proud to see New Jersey become just the third state in the nation to put an end to this discriminatory practice.”

New York and California also have passed such a law.

“This law will ensure people of color are free to wear their hair however they feel best represents them, whether that be locks, braids, twists or curls.

No one should ever be told it is ‘unprofessional’ to embrace their culture,” Cunningham added.


The legislation was prompted by the case of Buena Regional High School junior Andrew Johnson, who a year ago was told by a referee that he must shave off his dreadlocks in order to participate in a wrestling meet, or else forfeit.


Video of the incident became a national story.

In addition to the legislation, the incident led to suspension of the meet’s referee and the issuance three months ago of the state’s

“Guidance on Race Discrimination Based on Hairstyle."














Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.law.com/njlawjournal/2019/12/19/crown-act-now-law-in-nj/?slreturn=20191122123051

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9728
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2020, 05:06:32 pm »
Thursday, 16th January
Representative Ayanna Pressley Discusses Alopecia for the First Time
by Jessica Moulite & Anne Branigin





Ayanna Pressley loves playing with her hair.

Before she became a Massachusetts Congresswoman Pressley would experiment with different hairstyles and textures, getting a weave and even cutting her own hair.

Lately, she’s been experimenting with lace-front wigs.

“One I call ‘FLOTUS’ because it feels very Michelle Obama to me, [and another] I call ‘Tracee,’ because it feels very Tracee Ellis Ross to me,” Pressley told me in an exclusive interview with The Root earlier this week.

But the wigs are a noticeable departure from her signature Senegalese and bomb twists, which have become synonymous with her political brand and made her the hero of little black girls across the country.

Now, the congresswoman has decided to go public as to her reason why:

She has alopecia.

“I think it’s important that I’m transparent about this new normal,” Pressley said.
 
The American Academy of Dermatology refers to alopecia as the official medical term for baldness.

And according to the National Alopecia Areata Foundation, the autoimmune disorder alopecia areata makes the body attack its own healthy hair follicles,

“causing them to become much smaller and drastically slow down production to the point that hair growth may stop.”

Three of the most common ways alopecia areata presents itself are in the form of patches of baldness (alopecia areata), no hair on the head (alopecia totalis), and complete hair loss on a person’s entire body (alopecia universalis).

These types of alopecia differ from traction alopecia, which happens when hair is stressed at the roots.

And despite limited scientific research about racial disparities in experiencing alopecia, a July 2019 study from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that African Americans experience alopecia areata at a higher rate than other racial groups.

There was even a survey conducted at Boston University of over 5,500 black women that revealed that nearly 48 percent of them dealt with hair loss.

And despite limited scientific research about racial disparities in experiencing alopecia, a July 2019 study from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that African Americans experience alopecia areata at a higher rate than other racial groups.

There was even a survey conducted at Boston University of over 5,500 black women that revealed that nearly 48 percent of them dealt with hair loss.

Representative Ayanna Pressley first became aware of her hair loss last fall while getting her hair retwisted.

Very soon afterward, she was waking up every morning to total hair loss across the scalp.

The hair loss created additional challenges in an already-demanding Capitol Hill schedule, requiring Pressley to creatively conceal her growing baldness in the middle of getting votes, attending committee meetings, and giving press conferences.

The night Pressley lost her final piece of her hair was pivotal, she says.

Not only was it the night before drumphf’s impeachment vote in the House of Representatives, it was the anniversary of her mother’s death.

The sense of loss was manifold.

“I was missing her. I was mourning my hair. I was mourning the state of our democracy. I was mourning my mentor, Chairman Elijah Cummings,” she said.

Pressley had already been accused of being “militant” when she wore her hair in twists, so she knew her bald head, stripped of context, would undoubtedly be viewed as a political message.

So, she immediately sought out options.

She called her friend Angela Rye, who connected her to “hair caregiver” Jamal Edmonds.

Edmonds quickly created a custom wig for the Congresswoman, hours ahead of the time she was scheduled to deliver her vote to impeach the President of the United States.

“When I saw myself in the mirror, he had done a beautiful job, but I did not recognize myself,” she said.

“I was wearing this wig, fully clothed. But in that moment, I couldn’t recall the last time I’d ever felt more naked.”

After voting on the House floor, Pressley left and hid in a bathroom stall, feeling exposed, vulnerable, and embarrassed.

It was at that point that she remembered those same little girls looking up to her—and decided that when she was ready, she’d go public with her condition.

“I want to be freed from the secret and the shame that that secret carries with it,” Pressley said.

Though she’s still in the process of making peace with having alopecia, Pressley added that she’s making progress every day.

“It’s about self-agency. It’s about power. It’s about acceptance.”

And now that she’s public, she wants to experiment with different styles even more and find joy in those options.

For the first time ever, Pressley reveals her fully bald head and shares her very personal black hair journey in the video above.

Take a look.














Would You Like To Know More?
https://theglowup.theroot.com/exclusive-rep-ayanna-pressley-reveals-beautiful-bald-1841039847

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9728
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2020, 12:03:43 pm »
Wednesday, 22nd January 2020
Teen told no graduation because of her hair

by Caitlin O'Kane
 




A Texas school district suspended a black student and told him he would not walk at graduation this spring unless he cuts his dreadlocks — and the controversy erupted at a public meeting on Martin Luther King Day.

The Barbers Hill ISD school board in Mont Belvieu said this is not an issue of race, but many local activists say otherwise, CBS Houston affiliate KHOU reports.

Activists stood by the student, Deandre Arnold, after news of his suspension got out.

"This is a black and white issue," Gary Monroe, with the United Urban Alumni Association, said.
 
"Deandre should not have to — he should not have to go through this. His family should not have to go through this. But I expect it from a board that has zero diversity."

Monroe said if the board doesn't resolve the issue soon, the United Urban Alumni Association will take the case to the federal court.

"The dress code is designed by white people for white people and is damaging to black bodies," Black Lives Matter activist Ashton Woods told KHOU.

Arnold's family hopes his hair does not derail his future, and they have vowed to fight the school district's decision to the end.

"We're here for Deandre, but it's about more than that," his mother, Sandy Arnold, said.

"This is about all the other Deandres that could come through Barbers Hill."

Superintendent Greg Poole said the decision is not about dreadlocks or race, just about the length of the teen's hair.

"There is no dress code policy that prohibits any cornrow or any other method of wearing of the hair," Poole said.

"Our policy limits the length. It's been that way for 30 years."

Some speakers at the school board meeting supported the ruling, but KHOU reports most did not buy the district's explanation.
















Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/teen-told-no-graduation-because-of-dreadlocks/ar-BBZdLGU?li=BBnb7Kz

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9728
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2020, 07:01:52 am »
Saturday, 25th January 2020
Second black Texas teen told by school to cut their hair
by Janelle Griffith





A second teenager at a Texas high school was suspended and told he could not return to class until he cut his dreadlocks to be in compliance with the school's dress code.

Kaden Bradford, 16, a sophomore at Barbers Hill High School in Mont Belvieu in Southeast Texas, has been on at-home suspension since last week, according to his mother, Cindy Bradford.

Kaden's cousin, DeAndre Arnold, is a senior at the school and also wears dreadlocks.

DeAndre was recently told by administrators that he is not allowed in school and cannot walk at his graduation unless he cut his hair, his mother, Sandy Arnold, told NBC affiliate KPRC of Houston.

DeAndre, whose father is from Trinidad, said the men in his family often grow their dreadlocks, and that it is a part of his identity and culture.

Both women, who are sisters, said they will not cut the boys' hair.

Bradford said in an interview Friday that like DeAndre, her son has worn dreadlocks for years and it only recently became an issue at the high school.
 
Last year, Kaden would wear a headband to keep his dreadlocks off his shoulders, his mother said.

The school told her that if Kaden kept his dreadlocks pulled back, he would not be in violation of its hair policy, she said.

But shortly after Christmas break, she said the school's principal, Rick Kana, told Kaden that he would need to cut his hair.

Bradford said she paid last week to have Kaden's dreads cornrowed, or tightly-braided so that they lay flat against his scalp.

But that did not appease administrators, who placed him on at-home suspension because he refused to cut his hair, his mother said.

She said she is now considering taking legal action so he can return to school.

Bradford said she believes the hair policy is racist.

The school district dress code states male students cannot have their hair “gathered or worn in a style that would allow the hair to extend below” the collar, earlobes and eyes when let down.

Barbers Hill High School is predominantly white, according to school district data.


African Americans made up 3.1 percent of the school district's population in the 2017-18 school year.

The principal and Barbers Hill Independent School District superintendent, Greg Poole, did not return multiple requests for an interview.

In a statement posted on its Twitter account, the district said that it does allow dreadlocks.

"However we DO have a community supported hair length policy & have had for decades," the statement said.

"BH is a State leader with high expectations in ALL areas!"

On Friday, Senator Cory Booker, D-N.J., who announced the first federal legislation that would ban hair-based discrimination in December, expressed support for DeAndre and Kaden.

"Natural hair like dreadlocks is a reflection of culture & heritage," he tweeted.

"No one should be punished for expressing who they are. The CROWN Act would end this—hair discrimination is discrimination against black people."


In December, Booker said the Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair Act (CROWN) will make it clear that "discrimination based on natural and protective hairstyles associated with people of African descent" is a "prohibited form of racial or national origin discrimination."

Houston Texans wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins, who has dreadlocks, also tweeted support Wednesday for DeAndre.

"Never cut your locks," Hopkins said.












Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/second-teen-suspended-over-dreadlocks-texas-school-n1122261
« Last Edit: January 25, 2020, 01:09:29 pm by Battle »

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9728
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: School Tells 16-Year-Old to Change Her Natural-Style Hair
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2020, 09:24:43 pm »
Sunday, 9th February 2020
Matthew Cherry Dedicates 'Hair Love' Award to Kobe Bryant
by Carolyn Giardina





Hair Love, the touching story of an African American father learning to do his daughter's hair, claimed the Oscar for best animated short on Sunday.

The award went to its writer/director/producer, former NFL pro Matthew A. Cherry, and producer Karen Rupert Toliver.

Upon accepting the statuette, Cherry dedicated it to late NBA icon Kobe Bryant.

It is the second time in three years that a professional athlete won in the category, as Bryant and animation legend Glen Keane won the best animated short Oscar in 2018 for Dear Basketball.


Cherry said he made Hair Love "because we want to see more representation in animation and to normalize black hair."

“We have a firm belief that representation matters deeply," added Rupert Toliver.

"This was kind of an opportunity, I think, to put a little bit of positivity in animation," Cherry said backstage.

"You know, back when we did the Kickstarter campaign back in 2017, there wasn't a lot of representation in animation. And when I was coming across a lot of these viral videos of dads doing their daughter's hair, they were just so inherently joyful. Our biggest challenge was just to maintain that joy that made people gravitate towards those videos in the first place. So to be here and doing something like this with black hair and black families, it's just, it's literally a dream. And I never would have thought in a million years we would win an Oscar for something like this."


****BONUS ARTICLE!****


Sunday, 9th February 2020
Gabrielle Union, Dwyane Wade Bring Texas Teen Who Refused to Cut His Locked Hair
by Katie Campione








DeAndre Arnold, who was suspended and told he couldn't walk at his graduation unless he cut off his dreadlocks, joined the Hair Love team, including director Matthew A. Cherry, on the 2020 Oscars red carpet Sunday night.

Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade — who are producers on the Oscar-nominated short film — invited the high school senior and his mom to accompany them for Hollywood's biggest night with a video that the stars posted online and originally aired on CBS This Morning.

“When we heard the amazing story of a young black father with long beautiful locs just trying to figure out how to do his daughter’s hair, we knew that we had to support any way we could, we had to get involved any way we could — the same way as when we heard about your story and you just wanting to wear your hair the way you want at school,” Union said in the video.

The Texas teen showed off his natural hair on the carpet, wearing a simple black suit with jewel-tone blue lapels.

Missing from the red carpet were Wade and Union themselves, who attended the Vanity Fair Oscars viewing party Sunday.

Arnold also joined in on the pre-Oscars festivities on Saturday night with Union and Wade, who are producers on the Oscar-nominated short film, Hair Love.

The animated short tells the story of a black father learning to do his daughter's hair for the first time and promotes a message of acceptance for all natural hair types — a message that the team put to action with Arnold's Oscar invitation.













Would You Like To Know More?
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind-screen/hair-love-win-oscar-animated-short-1277941

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/oscars-gabrielle-union-brings-teen-who-refused-cut-dreadlocks-1277951
« Last Edit: February 09, 2020, 09:31:34 pm by Battle »