Author Topic: Invisible Man  (Read 193 times)

Offline stanleyballard

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Invisible Man
« on: March 04, 2020, 10:32:17 am »
One of the very best thriller movies released in a while- unexpected.  A remake that is easily the best movie this year thus far from mainstream. Top notch acting, superior directing skills, tight screenplay, good editing and good cinematography.

A must see movie if you love staying on the edge of your seat- a few jarring scenes.  This one hits on all four cylinders from start to finish like an old Hitchcock film.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2020, 10:36:11 am by stanleyballard »

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: Invisible Man
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2020, 12:58:52 pm »
One of the very best thriller movies released in a while- unexpected.  A remake that is easily the best movie this year thus far from mainstream. Top notch acting, superior directing skills, tight screenplay, good editing and good cinematography.

A must see movie if you love staying on the edge of your seat- a few jarring scenes.  This one hits on all four cylinders from start to finish like an old Hitchcock film.

Saw it yesterday. I didn't like it as much as you did, but I did think it was a good film.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
The few issues I had with it was the fighting the invisible man scenes made the actors look a little silly, particularly Aldis Hodge's character. Also I found it strange that they never explained why Elizabeth Moss's character was staying with Hodge. And the film made sure to show Moss sleeping in the same bed with Storm Reid, to make clear that no hanky panky was going on between Hodge and Moss. At first I thought Hodge was going to be Moss's brother-in-law, but that wasn't the case, so it made little sense to me how he fit into the film except being a magical Negro kind of character that's just there when the white main character needs support. Hodge was in the black best friend/manservant role, the place where enlightened or woke storytellers can envision the non-toxic black male. Hodge's character (not his acting, which was fine) got some demerits from me.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
I did enjoy the invisible suit. That was pretty cool. I also liked the nice twist at the end-which wasn't that unexpected-but that also highlighted how Moss's character was not above using Hodge's.

I also liked how the director did more, with less,
Spoiler (click to reveal)
and Moss did a strong job performing, playing off literally nothing.
So much of this film rested on Moss's shoulders and she carried it with ease. The acting across the board was fine for this film as well.

Offline stanleyballard

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Re: Invisible Man
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2020, 06:14:13 pm »
Actually it was inferred that Aldis Hodge played a character who was a childhood friend to Moss and I respected the fact this movie did not force a swirling agenda and he could be a male friend in one of the best thriller movies around- not that many are this good.

Moss basically carried most scenes and gave a tour de force performance.

And look - real actors dominate with nuances.

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: Invisible Man
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2020, 04:47:30 am »
Actually it was inferred that Aldis Hodge played a character who was a childhood friend to Moss and I respected the fact this movie did not force a swirling agenda and he could be a male friend in one of the best thriller movies around- not that many are this good.

Moss basically carried most scenes and gave a tour de force performance.

And look - real actors dominate with nuances.

I missed the inference about them being childhood friends. One way to have easily just depicted that was to have them say both wearing the same college sweatshirts to hint that they were old college friends. I'm not pushing for more swirling, though I did find it curious, but not unexpected that a black man and white woman would not be depicted in having a sexual/romantic relationship, going back to those old fears of black male heterosexuality. If Moss had been played by say Kerry Washington or Taraji P. Henson, Zoe Kravitz, and definitely Zoe Saldana, and the Hodge character was played by a white man, I could see a different take on things.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
And with Hodge it's never mentioned what happened to Storm Reid's mother. It's that lack of concern where black characters/relationships are concerned that I see far too much. Not even a line of dialogue to explain things. We are just supposed to accept that black families are fractured.
Now the positives here are that Hodge's character was a caring, loving, responsible parent, while also being a stalwart friend to Moss.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
We don't get to see too many black single dads and so that was good to see that.
Also, that he was one of the 'good ones' (both in terms of male and black) when it comes to the new woke, feminist kind of storytelling. That being said, that acceptability doesn't mean that these black characters are any more fleshed out and developed than they were in the past. It's just their goodness, or worth even, can be determined by how much of a help or hindrance they are to the main white characters.

So, the Hodge character was a mixed bag, but more positive than negative for me.
Spoiler (click to reveal)
One other thing that threw me off, was after Hodge thought Moss had hit Storm Reid, he left (to be fair, Reid did say she wanted to go if I recall) but it was Hodge's house. It would've made more sense for him to tell Moss to leave. But if that had happened we wouldn't have gotten those scenes of her first facing the invisible man.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2020, 04:50:10 am by Emperorjones »