Author Topic: Public Enemy's Public Drama  (Read 454 times)

Offline Hypestyle

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Public Enemy's Public Drama
« on: March 02, 2020, 10:40:50 am »
sigh... "First the Fat Boys break up, now this...."


https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/public-enemy-flavor-flav-bernie-sanders-960272/?fbclid=IwAR0kDAWyta-533ggWI0NCvFYex8r27qWoE6L912ESckj9VsFOGinq_GHUo0

Public Enemy announced Sunday they are permanently "moving forward" without Flavor Flav.

Mark Allan/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

Public Enemy announced they are permanently “moving forward” without Flavor Flav, firing one of hip-hop’s most memorable hypemen after more than 35 years. The abrupt dismissal comes just two days after the rapper sent a cease-and-desist letter to Bernie Sanders over Chuck D’s concert at the campaign’s Los Angeles rally Sunday.

“Public Enemy and Public Enemy Radio will be moving forward without Flavor Flav,” the hip-hop legends said in a brief statement Sunday. “We thank him for his years of service and wish him well.”

The group reiterated that Public Enemy Radio — a Chuck D-led offshoot featuring DJ Lord, Jahi, and the S1Ws — would still perform at the free, livestreamed Sanders rally gig at 6 p.m. PST at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

The cease-and-desist letter, sent to Sanders Friday by Flavor Flav’s lawyer Matthew Friedman, accused the campaign of using the hypeman’s “unauthorized likeness, image, and trademarked clock” to promote the rally, even though Flavor Flav “has not endorsed any political candidate.”

“Flav … has not endorsed any political candidate in this election cycle.… The continued publicizing of this grossly misleading narrative is, at a minimum, careless and irresponsible if not intentionally misleading,” Friedman added in the letter. “It is unfortunate that a political campaign would be so careless with the artistic integrity of such iconoclastic figures in American culture.”

In a handwritten note at the bottom of the cease-and-desist, Flavor Flav wrote to Sanders, “Hey Bernie, don’t do this.”

Prior to Flavor Flav’s firing — and after the hypeman accused Sanders of using his “unauthorized likeness, image, and trademarked clock” to promote the rally — Chuck D said of his bandmate of more than three decades, “Flavor chooses to dance for his money and not do benevolent work like this. He has a year to get his act together and get himself straight or he’s out.”

A lawyer for Chuck D added, “From a legal standpoint, Chuck could perform as Public Enemy if he ever wanted to; he is the sole owner of the Public Enemy trademark. He originally drew the logo himself in the mid-80s, is also the creative visionary and the group’s primary songwriter, having written Flavor’s most memorable lines.”

Taking to Twitter Sunday afternoon, Chuck D clarified that the Sanders issue was not the only reason the group fired the hypeman. “My last straw was long ago,” he wrote. “It’s not about BERNIE with Flav … he don’t know the difference between [former NFL running back] Barry Sanders or Bernie Sanders. He don’t know either. FLAV refused to support Sankofa after Harry Belafonte inducted us. He don’t do that.” Sankofa, a grassroots organization founded by Belafonte, aims to, as they note on their site, “focus on issues of injustice that disproportionately affect the disenfranchised, the oppressed, and the underserved, which left unaddressed will continue to impact the lives of too many individuals and remain a scar on our nation’s moral character.” 
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Offline Hypestyle

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Re: Public Enemy's Public Drama
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2020, 10:43:29 am »
In the lawsuit, Flavor Flav claimed that he and Chuck D had a long-established agreement that profits from their music, merchandise, and concerts would be split between them. Despite that alleged arrangement, Flavor Flav claimed that Public Enemy’s business management firm Eastlink had not been sending the earnings he is owed, which have “diminished to almost nothing, and Drayton has been refused accountings, even on the items bearing his likeness,” according to the lawsuit.

“Flav will be OK. TMZ Drama is beneath me considering our age,” Chuck D tweeted at the time, blaming Flavor Flav’s “new management” for the lawsuit. “It’s low entertainment, but I definitely like to find those 50 songs he wrote.”

Per court records, the suit against Chuck D was dismissed in January 2019. A judge dismissed Flavor Flav’s case against Eastlink in April 2019 after the rapper’s legal team missed a filing deadline, though the hypeman appealed the judgment. (The case is currently working its way through the United States Court of Appeals – Ninth Circuit, per court records.)

Public Enemy’s statement added that Public Enemy Radio would release a new album in April; last December, Chuck D’s previous project Prophets of Rage dissolved following news of Rage Against the Machine’s reunion.

Chuck D @ Twitter:

Spoke @BernieSanders rally with @EnemyRadio. If there was a $bag, Flav would’ve been there front & center. He will NOT do free benefit shows. Sued me in court the 1st time I let him back in. His ambulance lawyer sued me again on Friday & so now he stays home  & better find REHAB
« Last Edit: March 02, 2020, 02:32:42 pm by Hypestyle »
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Offline Battle

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Re: Public Enemy's Public Drama
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2020, 09:18:54 am »
Saturday, 31st October 2o2o
‘I don’t think old folks should be leaders’
by James McMahon



I have a great memory, but it’s complicated. I can recall events, occasions – I surprised my mother the other day by sketching out the apartment we lived in when I was a one-year-old. But I have a terrible memory for lyrics. It’s caused problems for almost 40 years.

Hip-hop rerouted my life. I wanted to be an artist and I came out of university highly skilled, but hip-hop music bit me in 1979 and I immediately knew where I had to take my art and my politics and my attention.

Me and hip-hop have grown up together. I’m from New York, Long Island, and when I was a teenager hip-hop was in the air – but the air was low enough to grab. Rap is here forever. It’s not a music. It’s a vocal. You can rap across any kind of music. Saying rap won’t be here forever is like saying singing is going to stop.

I never thought Public Enemy would achieve what they have. I just made a plan, worked hard to achieve it and then moved on. A human being is always in constant evolution and movement. You wake up, your lungs are moving, you keep on going until they don’t.

Visiting Africa changed me. In 1992, I went to Ghana, with stops in Nigeria and Egypt. It made me realise that I was standing where the world began. And that culture was as organic as sweat coming out of one’s skin. Everything I heard, saw and smelled has influenced me ever since.

I prefer the term Black to African American. You can be Charlize Theron, who’s from South Africa, and be African American. Black covers the whole gamut. Black is all over the planet. Black is the antithesis of white supremacy, which tells us that white is pure and the ideal and everything else is diseased.

I support Black Lives Matter. I think it’s a strong organisation and speaks to now. I think it’s important in this age of Individual-1 that organisations come together, put aside micro-differences and collectively work to make him sit down.

I can walk into a room and my skin can be louder than hell. Discussions about race in places that are institutionalised are controversial. Even if you just breathe and smile, it’s going to be controversial. Public Enemy were confrontational – but how could we not be, especially back then?

I don’t think old folks should be leaders. I think old folks should be there to give advice and counsel. I firmly believe in a retirement age of 65 for those in government. I’m 60 now – I’m what you call Triple OG – and I’m here for advice and counsel, not to lead.

There is too much gadgetry between our souls. I believe we live in a time where people listen too much with their eyes. I think listening can be much more useful than talking.

Try to do as many positive things in life as you can. I’m at a stage where I know I’ve got more behind me than ahead of me. I have no time for worrying. You’ve got to get up and do things.


Public Enemy’s album What You Gonna Do When the Grid Goes Down? is out now