Author Topic: Africa Speaks to You.  (Read 79778 times)

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Africa Speaks to You.
« on: September 16, 2006, 10:14:25 pm »
It's time we re-started this lost thread.

I'll start off with this article from the BBC.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/5350764.stm

China and India 'boosting Africa'

China and India's growing trade and investment in Africa holds great potential for African economic growth, a World Bank report has said.

The study found that, led by China and India, Asia now gets 27% of Africa's exports, triple the amount in 1990.

At the same time, Asian exports to Africa are now growing 18% per year, faster than any other global region.

The study says both China, India and African nations must improve their trade reforms to help boost this trend.

'Best interests'

Entitled Africa's Silk Road: China and India's New Economic Front, the report recommends the elimination of China's and India's tariffs on African exports.

Written by World Bank Africa Region Economic Advisor Harry Broadman, the study further calls for Africa to reform its economies to better "unleash competitive market forces, strengthen its basic market institutions, and improve governance".

It also wants to see African countries improve their infrastructure and customs arrangements.

Taken together it said such changes were "not only in the best interests of Africa's economic development, but in China's and India's own economic fortunes".


This goes in conflict with the reports I've read from South Africa, where consumers complain of the presence of Chinese products overwhelming their markets. But if the African nations do appreciate business with China then it's their decision. India has had economic relations with Africa for many years. The Philippines has enjoyed a strong economic relationship with Gambia. Last year Gambian's govt. offered it free rights to drill for oil in their land. I do wish Brazil could enjoy stronger economic and political relationships with Africa.
Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2006, 01:50:38 am »
This Wednesday on BBC Hardtalk:

The BBC is banned from Zimbabwe and much of our reporting on the situation inside the country comes from Johannesburg in South Africa. In the first of a two-part special, HARDtalk talks to Zimbabwe's former Minister of Information - the man who actually banned the BBC from the country five years ago. Jonathan Moyo was sacked by Robert Mugabe last year and Stephen Sackur talks to  him about the inside story of Mugabe's rule.

It a good opportunity to know what's being censored. And what that Zimbabwe's dictator has done.
Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline Wise Son

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3297
  • "intelligent and slightly Black. I'm from the 80s"
    • View Profile
    • My website
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2006, 03:28:37 am »
Hopes for Darfur rest on African force

Quote
By Stephen Castlein El Fasher, Darfur
The IndependentPublished: 02 October 2006

A beefed-up African peacekeeping force has emerged as the best hope of averting humanitarian catastrophe in Darfur after the Sudanese President defiantly brushed aside pressure to admit UN troops.

In almost two hours of talks, Omar al-Bashir, the President of Sudan, told the European Commission president, Jose Manuel Barroso, that he feared his country would suffer the same fate as Iraq if UN soldiers were to intervene.

Diplomats are now concentrating on proposals to strengthen a 7,000-strong African Union (AU) force already in Darfur. They believe Mr Bashir might allow the addition of some UN components providing there is no American involvement and that control remains in African hands.

The search for a solution was given added urgency by warnings from the World Food Programme (WFP) that 155,000 people have not received food for four months because of an increase in violence.

Although the AU has promised to keep its 7,000 peacekeepers in Darfur for three more months, the force has been unable to provide security in a region racked by three years of bloody warfare.

The latest round of diplomacy exposed the Sudanese leader's hostility to the US. Mr Bashir made no public statement yesterday but his ally, the governor of northern Darfur, Osman Yousif Kibir, said bluntly that UN troops "will not be welcomed by our people".

Mr Barroso struck a pragmatic tone, saying his goal was "not to discuss the format of the mission". Rather than insisting on blue-helmeted peacekeepers, the Commission president said the UN has to be present "in a more effective way".

Saturday's meeting with Mr Bashir included a 50-minute, one-to-one session with Mr Barroso. Afterwards the European Commission president said the Sudanese leader "keeps his position opposed to it [the UN force]" but added: "I really believe he was listening to us. I think he understood that it is not in the interests of Sudan to come back to a situation of complete isolation."

Mr Barroso, who was involved in the Angolan peace negotiations, will meet African leaders at a summit in Addis Ababa today to consult them over their approach to an expanded AU force.

Since the conflict in Darfur began more than 200,000 people have died and 2 million have been displaced. A peace agreement signed in May has prompted an increase of violence because only one of the warring militias signed it.

Fear of fresh humanitarian disaster prompted a UN resolution calling for a 20,000-strong contingent of peacekeepers. But last week the UN's Sudan envoy, Jan Pronk, conceded that instead of applying pressure for such a force, "the international community should instead push for the African Union's mission to be prolonged and reinforced".

That contrasted with a statement from the US Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice, who warned Sudan that it had a choice between co-operation and confrontation.

On the ground the AU force lacks equipment and has proved difficult to co-ordinate. Most soldiers do not speak Arabic and have struggled to engage with refugees in camps dotted around main settlements. Officers complain of having strict rules of engagement and say their mission was poorly prepared.

In Darfur, aid agencies reported difficulties in dealing with the humanitarian crisis because of poor security, despite the presence of the AU soldiers. In a WFP compound in El Fasher, a spokesman, Simon Crittle, pointed to a food delivery truck which had been hijacked by militia. "There is an incident every couple of weeks," he said. "Drivers are stopped, dragged out of their vehicles and beaten up. There are certain roads we won't go down."

The WFP delivered 500,000 tons of aid last year and aims to feed 2.7 million people. It reached 2.4 million of them in August.

Sara Caimi, of the Italian NGO Cooperazione Internationale, said the main problem was the shifting balance of power in Darfur as rebel groups take over new chunks of land.

"We can be dealing with the government and then, tomorrow, we have to deal with someone else," she said.

This seems to have good and bad, the bad being obvious. The good is the discussion of a beefed-up AU force. It really does seem the best option for Darfur, and similar situations in Africa, to have an African-based military / peace-keeping force, rather than waiting for the Beuaracracy of international organisations to get around to it (of course, the beuracracy of the AU can be just as bad, but hopefully there's more chance of getting something done).

"Children, if you are tired, keep going; if you are hungry, keep going; if you want to taste freedom, keep going."
-Harriet Tubman
http://yo

Offline Wise Son

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3297
  • "intelligent and slightly Black. I'm from the 80s"
    • View Profile
    • My website
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2006, 03:32:28 am »
Pride of a continent: Africa's gifts to the world
Quote
This article is from the ( RED ) edition of The Independent of 21 September 2006, guest-designed by Giorgio Armani. Half the revenue from the edition will be donated to the Global Fund to Fight Aids.

From music through literature to politics and science, men and women who have battled tough upbringings are now leaders in their fields. By Jonathan Brown and Jerome Taylor
Published: 21 September 2006
Music: Youssou N'Dour

When the credibility of last year's Live8 festival threatened to be undermined following accusations that the concerts for Africa were excluding those they were meant to help, Bob Geldof could point with some relief to the participation of Youssou N'Dour.

Although he may only have come to the attention of white audiences when he started recording with the likes of Peter Gabriel, Kate Bush and Neneh Cherry in the 1980s, N'Dour was a star in his native Dakar from the age of 12. Fusing traditional Senegalese pop or mbalax, with his own distinctive style, the Grammy-winning singer has become a beacon for West African musical culture - which embraces musicians like fellow Senegalese Baaba Maal or Malian guitarist Afel Bocoum.

But N'Dour, who wrote the official music for the 1998 football World Cup, has deployed his fame to highlight issues from human rights to political prisoners. His Project Joko aims to link Senegalese communities across Africa and around the world through a network of internet cafes.

Literature: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie; Ngugi Wa Thiong'o

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's second novel, Half of a Yellow Sun, is already earning the 29-year-old Nigerian comparisons with Africa's best writers. Despite having lived in the United States for the past decade, she continues to draw her inspiration from her home country. Her latest book, published last month, is set before the devastating Biafran war. Adichie made it to the final of the Orange Prize in 2004 with her first novel Purple Hibiscus.

The world has waited 20 years for the novel from Ngugi wa Thiong'o, 68. The former professor, political dissident, prisoner and exile did not disappoint critics. Wizard of the Crow was published to strong reviews in the US in August where it was translated from his once-banned language of Gikuyu into English by the author. Set in a fictional African country, Ngugi describes a land "of crooked roads, robberies, runaway viruses of death, hospitals without medicine, rampant unemployment without relief, daily insecurity, epidemic alcoholism."

Politics: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf; Joaquim Chissano

Hopes are high in Liberia that Africa's first democratically elected black female president can deliver reform to a country long ravaged by civil war. Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, a 68-year-grandmother of six, has already earned the nickname "Iron Lady" and, according to Forbes, is the 51st most powerful woman in the world.

A role model for the former Citibank accountant is the one-time Frelimo guerrilla Joaquim Chissano, who led his country for nearly two decades. After fighting against the Portuguese in the 1970s he became one of Africa's most powerful voices for peace, reconciling factions in Mozambique and his party, winning multi-party elections in 1994 and 1999 before stepping down from office in 2005. This year he will collect the second annual Chatham House Prize to mark his achievements, not only in delivering political and military stability but for turning Mozambique into an economic success story with an impressive growth rate.

Religion: John Sentamu: Fr Matthew Kukah

Born in a village outside Kampala, the sixth of 13 children, John Sentamu has risen to become the second most powerful man in the Church of England, the mother church of a family of 38 churches. A former High Court judge who, at the age of 24, defied the Ugandan despot Idi Amin with his staunch independence, his enthronement at York Minster was accompanied by African singing and dancing. The archbishop played the drums. In August a vigil of prayer and fasting for peace in the Middle East generated international media coverage.

Meanwhile, Father Matthew Kukah, a Nigerian, has been acclaimed as an "extraordinary" moral leader in the fight for freedom and democracy in his own country. He is currently playing a leading role in attempts to reconcile the late Ken Saro-Wiwa's Mosop organisation with Shell Petroleum in the Niger Delta.

Fashion: Alek Wek; Waris Dirie

A member of the Dinka tribe from Sudan, Alek Wek has used her profile as one of the world's most famous models to advance her causes. Forced to flee her native land during the bloody civil war, she has become an advocate for refugees wordwide.

Waris Dirie, once voted the most beautiful woman in the world, has also used her profile as a model for good causes. Her experiences as a child growing up in Somalia drove her to become an advocate for women's rights. Having undergone female genital mutilation at the hands of a desert gypsy, she has campaigned against the practice, becoming an ambassador for the UN secretary general, Kofi Annan, in the process.

Arts: Romuald Hazoumé: El Anatsui

The young sculptor has successfully exported his African vision to an international audience. Born in Porto-Novo, he continues to live and work in the Benin Republic. His experiments with plastic jerry cans, which began in the mid-1980s, were inspired by the way fuel is transported dangerously on the streets of Africa. He works in a diverse range of media, employing found objects, photography, video and sound installations - even using smells - to explore themes of corruption and resistance. Hazoumé has exhibited at the Hayward Gallery, London, the Pompidou Centre in Paris, and the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo. His contribution of jerry can "masks" to an exhibition of African art at the Smithsonian last year was hailed by the Washington Post's art critic as "haunting... terrifying".

El Anatsui, from Ghana, hails from an older generation of artists. Now based in Nigeria he has been working and exhibiting since the 1970s but has been building a growing following in recent years, both in London where his work is now represented in the British Museum and in America, where he recently staged his first solo show in New York.

Environmental: Wangari Maathai; Boureima Wankoye

The Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Maathai won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004. She campaigns on a wide range of issues from deforestation to women's rights. Having challenged Africa's overwhelmingly male leaders to put an end to the wars that blight the continent, this month she accused the Kenyan government of failing to halt settlement in its threatened forests. Since her Green Belt Movement was formed in 1977, it has trained 30,000 women and planted 30 million trees.

Boureima Wankoye joined the UN Environment Programme's Global 500 Roll of Honour in 2003 for his work encouraging the sustainable development of the Niger's deteriorating wetlands through the mass planting of gum arabic for export. He is also president of the African Industrial Association in Brussels.

Business: Dr Titilola Banjoko; Strive Masiyiwa

Around 250,000 physicians and scientists of African descent work in the US alone. The loss of skills and know-how is seen as an impediment to development. One women who is doing something about it is Dr Titilola Banjoko, managing director of AfricaRecruit, which aims to solve Africa's skills crisis with the use of African labour.

Meanwhile, one of the men fuelling Africa's mobile phone boom is Strive Masiyiwa, not that the authorities in his native Zimbabwe made it easy for him, battling all the way to the Supreme Court before they would grant him the first mobile licence. There are now some 35 million mobile phone connections in Africa and it is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the continental economy. Mr Masiyiwa's company, Econet, is one of the five biggest, operating in eight countries and boasting annual revenues of £159m.

Sport: Dikembe Mutombo; Samuel Eto'o

Voted the NBA's best defensive player for three years out of four, the 7ft 2in Congolese basketballer became one of the most famous and highly paid players in America. However, he has not forgotten the conditions of people at home in Kinshasa. His charitable foundation, Mutombo, has donated $18.5m (£9.8m) to build two medical centres in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Cameroon footballer Samuel Eto'o is one of the most feared strikers in the game. Three times African Footballer of the Year, since moving to FC Barcelona from Real Madrid he has been a top scorer for both club and country, helping his team to become European Champions.

Science & Medicine: Florence Mirembe; Peter Mugenyi

One of Uganda's leading doctors, she has spent her life trying to improve conditions for mothers giving birth. The facts are stark: about 585,000 mothers die a year in the developing world in childbirth - more than one a minute. Her work was recognised by the World Medical Association which named her as one of its Top 60 Caring Physicians. Dr Mirembe also set up Save the Mothers, a charity that fosters partnerships between scientists in the developed and developing world.

Peter Mugyenyi is one of Africa's most prominent scientists working to combat HIV/Aids. He is director of the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda and was a guest of Laura Bush's during the President's State of the Union address in 2003.

"Children, if you are tired, keep going; if you are hungry, keep going; if you want to taste freedom, keep going."
-Harriet Tubman
http://yo

Offline Stringer

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 93
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2006, 06:43:15 pm »
Get your slice of the 2010 cake

October 23 2006 at 05:01PM 
 
By Sivuyile Mangxamba

South Africa's 2010 World Cup is not just about football - it is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for entrepreneurial South Africans to dream up ingenious schemes to make a fast buck.

From winemaking and media products to restaurants and accommodation, many locals are working feverishly on finding a way to profit from 2010.

"There are innumerable opportunities for everyone, from large corporations or the SMME sector," says the director of UCT's Graduate School of Business Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Mike Herrington.

'There are innumerable opportunities for everyone'
There is money to be made in formal businesses involved in infrastructural development, communication and manufacturing, but Herrington reckons that chefs, barmen, African theme restaurants and the selling of South African memorabilia are also in line for a slice of the 2010 cake.

"You are going to need all these people, small bus operators, food vendors and more tour operators," said Herrington.
"The concern is not whether 2010 will create opportunities, but the challenge will be how to sustain these opportunities beyond the world cup," added Herrington.

The 2010 soccer showpiece will be the first time the event is held on the African continent and according to Herrington, visitors want to take a part of their African experience home.

In the race to cash in on the world's single-sport biggest showpiece, Herrington warns that people have to start planning now otherwise opportunities would be lost.

Start planning now otherwise opportunities would be lost
"Entrepreneurs need to contact municipalities and provincial government authorities now - not in 2009," says Herrington.

Already the Cape Argus has been inundated with inquiries, from the townships to suburbia, about making contact with key Fifa decision-makers contracting for accommodation.

A vineyard and media centre producing 2010 TV programmes is high on television personality and amateur winemaker Erald Felix's agenda.

"It's not just about soccer, its about opportunities and it must leave an indelible footprint in our lives," said Felix.

The budding winemaker, who comes from Manenberg originally, wants to put his wine on the shelves by 2010. Already he makes his own range of wines but by 2010, Felix wants to plant his own grapes and press them.

Epaph Mbesi, of Khayelitsha, is one of the restaurant owners looking to make bucks during the 2010 World Cup.

The iKhaya restaurant owner exchanged his pen for an apron last year, positioning himself well in advance for the tournament.

For Herrington, Cape Town is going to be the perfect place to cash in on 2010 opportunities. "There is no doubt in my mind that people would watch some games in Gauteng, but will come to Cape Town for the experience," said Herrington.

Offline Stringer

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 93
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2006, 09:49:52 pm »
Roar of the Asian tiger: How China bought up Africa*

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/asia/article1945762.ecew_*

More than 40 African nations will be represented at a summit in Beijing this week, a very public indication of the huge investment
one of the world's fastest-growing economies has made in the world's poorest continent. Clifford Coonan reports

The Sphinx, a herd of elephants and the lions of the Serengeti look down from billboards overhung with construction cranes on to Beijing's ring roads, teeming with cars, cement mixers and other symbols of a booming economy. Sharp-suited African politicians discuss oil, timber and precious metals with equally well-tailored Chinese officials in the lobbies of Beijing's top hotels.


More than 40 African heads of state are in Beijing for this weekend's China-Africa forum to discuss the growing importance of trade between the world's fastest-growing economy and the world's poorest continent. China's trade with Africa is set to exceed ?7bn this year and the intense discussions bear out the fact that this is a congress of real import.


The Sino-African summit is the biggest international gathering Beijing has hosted for many years. All told, 48 African countries will send delegations, most of them top leaders, for the ministerial summit which starts on Friday.


The forum marks an astonishing publicity coup for China, and is proof that in this modern-day "scramble for Africa" China is streets ahead when it comes to winning influence in the mineral-rich but often politically unstable continent.


"China is opening itself up to Africa, coming with assistance. We have nothing to lose but our imperialist chains," said Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe, who is attending the summit.


The Chinese have cleverly taken advantage of the fact that Africa has not been a diplomatic priority for leaders in Washington or the capitals of Europe for many years now. Beijing has actively wooed African nations to boost its diplomatic muscle on the continent, win contracts for Chinese companies and help to meet its ever-growing energy needs.


Traditionally these meetings are "cultural" events, marked by people wearing traditional dress sitting around banqueting tables discussing poetry in regional dialect. But this summit has an edge as sharp as the delegates' suits.


Africa is rich in oil and other natural resources, while China is the world's second-biggest consumer of oil and petrol after the United States. Its factories need iron ore and copper to keep churning out the industrial goods fuelling the country's economic boom, and China has been unstinting in its efforts to maintain good relations, investing ?bn in Africa this year alone.


The giant billboards welcoming the African delegates are written in English, French and Chinese. One sign seems to feature a tribesman from Papua New Guinea, but let's not quibble about details. Beggars have been taken off the streets, the airport touts offering overpriced taxis are gone, and the schools are being let out early to keep traffic moving. Police leave has been cancelled, and commuters are being told to take the bus instead of driving. Beijing city authorities view the congress as a dry run for hosting the 2008 Olympics.


In many ways, the congress marks the culmination of China's 21st-century quest for influence in Africa, which is reminiscent of the undignified scramble in the 19th century when leading European colonial nations fought for their places on the continent. The current scramble is one in which China has played a strong diplomatic hand, backed by its growing economic clout and its increased political flexibility.


China has been busy in recent years wooing African nations to boost its influence on the continent. But Beijing has been criticized for ignoring human rights and environmental standards and failing to attach demands for transparency and accountability to offers of aid, loans and investment to Africa.


Chairman Mao Zedong always dreamt of China leading a Third World alliance of non-aligned nations in a crusade against the capitalist running dogs. But where the poverty of Maoism failed to deliver that sought-after role, socialism with Chinese characteristics, which translates as Chinese capitalism, may yet deliver this alliance.


Back during the Cold War, when everything was simpler, China and Soviet Russia fought for influence among African states. China has steadily built up its influence in Africa since the 1960s and 1970s when it offered its support to newly independent African states, especially Communist ones, and backed independence movements. Beijing has always operated a "no strings attached" policy of economic aid, unlike Western donors, which demand that African countries pledge to fight corruption and improve human rights.


Its enthusiasm for building economic ties with some of the worst human rights offenders in Africa, such as Sudan, has earned it widespread international criticism. However, increasingly reliant on Africa's resources, China defends its economic links with governments accused of civil rights abuses.


"Chinese investment has promoted economic growth in African countries, increased job opportunities, brought technical applications to African countries and improved living standards for African people," the deputy commerce minister, Wei Jianguo, has said.


China has diplomatic relations with 49 African nations, and in the 10 years between 1995 and 2005 trade between China and Africa has multiplied tenfold, from ?bn to nearly ?0bn.


With oil from Nigeria, Angola and Sudan, iron ore and platinum from South Africa, timber from Cameroon, Congo-Brazzaville and Gabon, China's shopping list in Africa is a long one.


This week's meeting will focus on trade and economic development rather than more contentious issues such as arms sales to Angola.


"China is the biggest developing country and Africa is a continent where the most developing countries are situated," said He Wenping, an Africa expert at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. "They need each other."


China has been generous with its aid. Last year the country lent Angola ?bn to repair infrastructure wrecked during the civil war. The following month, China gave Kenya more than ?0m in aid to modernise its state-run utilities.


Africa's trade with China accounts for some 10 per cent of its total trade, but the figure is growing as trade with the European Union decreases.


The human rights group Amnesty International says China's secret arms exports to Sudan are fuelling human rights violations and helping to sustain conflict there.


The World Bank president, Paul Wolfowitz, has accused China and its banks of ignoring human rights and environmental standards when lending to developing countries in Africa. He was referring to the Equator Principles, which have been adopted by Western banks in an attempt to ensure lending is ethical, sustainable and in accord with environmental and human rights principles, but which Mr Wolfowitz believes may be disregarded by Chinese banks.


Mr Wei said he had not heard of cases of Chinese firms destroying the environment in Africa, but promised tough action if they do. "We will mete out severe punishment ... and revoke their licence to operate anywhere outside China," he said. "The Chinese government attaches great importance to the responsibility of Chinese enterprises when they operate in Africa. When approving possible projects, we would not agree to those projects which have the potential to have these effects on the environment."


Popular resentment in Africa has been building, with some countries complaining about the flood of cheap manufactured goods from China, which they say is damaging local industry. There has also been unrest over labour standards at Chinese-invested companies. Zambia has been an ally for many years, but China became an issue in the September presidential election, when the opposition candidate questioned the benefit from Chinese investment, prompting a miffed reaction from Beijing. In July, scores of African workers at a Chinese-owned Zambian mine rioted over low wages.


Analysts say that a combination of China's hunger for raw materials and its manufacturing strength could choke efforts by African nations to diversify from being commodity exporters. Chinese clothing and textiles, plastics and electronics are flooding the markets in Africa and local companies have little chance of competing.


Angola overtook Saudi Arabia this year to become China's largest supplier of crude oil, and the Chinese state energy company Sinopec has offered big bonuses for oil exploration and production contracts in Africa.


On a tour of Egypt, Ghana, Congo, Angola, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda earlier this year, the Prime Minister, Wen Jiabao, offered Luanda a ?bn credit line.


China has also come under fire for investing in oil-rich Sudan, whose President, Omar Hassan al-Bashir, was expected to attend the summit. The assistant foreign minister, Zhai Jun, said Mr Bashir and Chinese leaders would discuss the situation in Darfur, where three years of fighting has killed more than 200,000 and forced 2.5 million from their homes. "We believe the humanitarian situation should be improved and we support an active role for the UN in this," Mr Zhai said.


However, he also intoned the long-held Chinese mantra that human rights issues were a domestic problem and not for foreign governments to meddle in. "It is never our view that a country should interfere in another country's internal affairs and human rights," he said.


Many African nations like the Chinese model of single-party rule with a firm grip on key industries and companies.


This summit is all about showcasing Beijing, which has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past few years as it gears up for the Olympics. The world's leading architects have been brought in to help bring about a metamorphosis. Whole swaths of the city have been demolished, with ancient courtyard houses replaced by shiny glass skyscrapers and huge dual carriageways criss-crossing the medieval city.


It is not just about oil and aid. A conference for 1,500 entrepreneurs from both sides will be held on the sidelines, which will examine co-operation on agriculture, water projects, construction, energy, transportation and pharmaceuticals. There will also be an African product exhibition.


China also invited rival Taiwan's diplomatic allies in Africa - Burkina Faso, Swaziland, Malawi, Gambia, and S鉶 Tom?and Principe - to attend, although it is not clear whether they have taken up the offer or not.


China has also said it wants to strengthen its ties with Africa by promoting high-level military exchanges between the two sides.


Beijing's Communist Party Secretary, Liu Qi, has called for "all-out efforts to create a seriously friendly atmosphere for Sino-African relations". The grass around the airport and the conference venues is being painted green. But don't make the mistake of thinking this summit is just for show

*Ramsey E. Makhuli, MPH** *


Offline Wise Son

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3297
  • "intelligent and slightly Black. I'm from the 80s"
    • View Profile
    • My website
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2006, 03:58:42 am »
"China is opening itself up to Africa, coming with assistance. We have nothing to lose but our imperialist chains," said Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe, who is attending the summit.
...Yeah, and trade them in for brand new shiny chains! You twat, Mugabe.
The Chinese have cleverly taken advantage of the fact that Africa has not been a diplomatic priority for leaders in Washington or the capitals of Europe for many years now.
I read this article the other day, adn it's true. When our leaders either don't care, or are avoiding dealing with these countries out of a rarre burst of principle, China (and Russia) are taking their chances.
In many ways, the congress marks the culmination of China's 21st-century quest for influence in Africa, which is reminiscent of the undignified scramble in the 19th century when leading European colonial nations fought for their places on the continent. The current scramble is one in which China has played a strong diplomatic hand, backed by its growing economic clout and its increased political flexibility.
Exactly. The more things change, the more they stay the same.
China has been busy in recent years wooing African nations to boost its influence on the continent. But Beijing has been criticized for ignoring human rights and environmental standards and failing to attach demands for transparency and accountability to offers of aid, loans and investment to Africa.
Repeated for importance. This is a good article, I wish I'd thought to post it. :P

"Children, if you are tired, keep going; if you are hungry, keep going; if you want to taste freedom, keep going."
-Harriet Tubman
http://yo

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2006, 05:44:28 pm »
I'm not that worried. The West hasn't done any better and I doubt they ever will. This is why I think it's better that Brazil and Africa should have stronger relations with each other than America and Africa.
Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2006, 05:34:03 pm »
ASSOCIATED FREE PRESS:
Europe must target African development like China: Merkel

BERLIN : German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the European Union would make African development a priority in 2007 and not leave it up to China, which has just signed massive trade deals with the continent.

"We cannot leave this up to China alone," Merkel said on the sidelines of a defence forum, referring to 16 agreements worth 1.9 billion dollars (1.5 billion euros) Beijing inked with 10 African nations at a historic summit last weekend.

Merkel said after Berlin takes over the rotating presidency of the EU in January, it would lay the groundwork for a summit grouping African and European leaders.

The summit will however be staged during the second half of 2007 when Portugal holds the presidency of the bloc.

The conservative German chancellor said the EU would focus on African development and "a new partnership" with the continent and not merely hand out aid to poverty-stricken African countries.

"Our involvement must not amount to charity," she said.

Germany is also preparing to table a blueprint on African development at the G8 summit it will host in June in the eastern German resort of Heiligendamm.

It proposes that each member of the Group of Eight, which includes the world's industrialized powers and Russia, signs a partnership agreement with an African state.

The deals that China signed with African leaders include agreements to build an aluminium production plant in Egypt, upgrade a highway in Nigeria and develop a copper project in Zambia.

Analysts have predicted that the package of deals will give the Asian giant more leverage against the West.

But China has faced accusations that it fuels repression and human rights abuses in Africa through support of countries such as Sudan and Zimbabwe in a cynical drive to increase access to African oil and other resources.

Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Africa NOT Speaking to YOU?
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2006, 10:03:27 pm »
The BBC is broadcasting a four part series on the cultures around the Saharan region. British entertainer, Michael Palin, is the host who travels and brings us to the different people living. However, a BBC website notes that North America will not be receiving this programme. So that really sucks for you guys who will miss out on another wonderful adventure by famous Python veteran.  :( Here's what's left to watch:

11th November: Destination Timbuktu

Leaving the desert behind, Michael Palin briefly savours the delights of cosmopolitan Senegal: jazz clubs, wrestling competitions, dance troupes and the Queen of the Senegalese soaps, Marie-Madeleine, as he continues his trek.

Joining the so-called “Bamako Express”, he endures two days and nights on the train but, in the process, gets to know a school mistress who is nothing if not forthright about the disadvantages of polygamy.

In Bamako he finds renowned kora player Toumani Diabate and delights in a masterclass before heading off to Dogon country. The Dogon people have one of the most distinctive and celebrated cultures of West Africa and they nearly kill him with a combination of excessively complex origin myths, an exploding flintlock and a boiling hot millet.

Palin celebrates the Muslim “Tabaski” feast in the beautiful city of Djenne with a man called Pygmy and secures a passage on a cargo boat with a Norwegian missionary called Kristin. The rest of the journey down the Niger River to Timbuktu seems plain sailing until the boat runs aground a day away from its destination.


18th November: Absolute Desert

Michael reaches the legendary city of Timbuktu, along with a camel train carrying the giant salt blocks that made the city one of the greatest centres of Islamic learning up until the 16th century. He wanders through the rubble that is 21st-century Timbuktu to find the Imam who shows him original astronomical textbooks that predate Galileo’s discoveries by 200 years.

After visiting one of the city’s most famous addresses, the home of Alexander Laing, the Scottish explorer who had his throat slit for not converting to Islam, Michael heads east to the land of the Wodaabe. These nomadic herders are some of the last true pastoralists of the African continent – famous as much for their male beauty pageant as their stylish cattle. Living in the bush with them, Michael watches the complex rituals surrounding the extraordinary annual pageant, the Gerewol, in which the girls get to choose the prettiest boy.

It is the season after the rains, a time of relative plenty for the nomads, and Michael’s Wodaabe family, led by the English-speaking Doulla, travel to Ingall for the Cure Salee – a gathering of clans that takes place every year. Amidst the chaos of camel races, shopping and general mayhem, Michael meets up with a group of Tuareg for the next leg of his journey: a camel train across the Tenere Desert to Algeria.

Omar, “the cameleer’s cameleer”, introduces Michael to the delights and vicissitudes of life on the move in the most desolate landscape on the planet. Walking 12 hours a day, eating the odd sheep that has tagged along, and learning the rudiments of Tamashek, the language of the Tuareg, Michael finally gets a feeling for the heart and soul of the desert. The going is tough, like the sheep, but the sense of comradeship with both the other cameleers and the camels, who are their lifeline, is palpable. When the time comes to leave Omar and his retinue, the tears are not all crocodile ones.


25th November: Dire Straits

Michael arrives at the border of Niger and Algeria, the most desolate crossing in the world, where banditry is a way of life in the absence of law and order. This was where Mark Thatcher famously got lost, but the country has a harsh beauty. Turning north, Michael passes through the dramatic mountains of the Hoggar massif before he pauses in the oil and gas fields of central Algeria.

At this point he makes a brief diversion into Colonel Gadaffi’s Libya to attend the very last reunion of the Desert Rats of Tobruk, before turning west along the North Coast past stunning and deserted classical sites at Apollonia, Cyrene and Leptis Magna. Crossing into Tunis, Michael takes the Maghreb Express to the dangerous city of Algiers.

Just along the coast is Ceuta, a Spanish enclave on Morocco’s coast, a little chunk of Fortress Europe in Africa, and so a magnet for Africans. Michael talks to would-be immigrants before returning to his original starting point - Gibraltar. En route he learns of the terrible fate that has engulfed so many Saharan men, women and children who attempt the eight-mile crossing in search of a better life.


Hey! Did any one you guys catch the Africa Open for Business special? I posted about it before this website got hacked months ago. It should have aired this fall in America on PBS or something.

http://www.africaopenforbusiness.com/web/index.html
Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline Stringer

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 93
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2006, 05:11:40 am »
Al Jazeera comes to Africa
By L. MUTHONI WANYEKI
The latest buzz in the media community is the opening of Al Jazeera’s African offices, one of them right here in Nairobi.

For media professionals, there is the expectation of well paying jobs as well as an alternative customer for independent journalists working in the region. For media consumers, there is the expectation of having more attention paid to the specific interests of Muslim communities in Africa.

Indeed, given Al Jazeera’s coverage of the American and British backed war in Iraq — especially of events missed out entirely by the so-called embedded journalists — there is the widely held perception that Al Jazeera provides an important counter-portrayal of the concerns of Muslims worldwide.

This is, of course, partly true. Al Jazeera has not only offered an alternative to satellite television broadcasting from the West. It has also, in some instances, also offered critical coverage of governments within the Maghreb and Mashreq — leading, for instance, to the withdrawal of the Tunisian government’s diplomatic mission from Qatar, the host and backer of Al Jazeera, for the manner in which it challenged the Tunisian government’s human-rights record.


The rest:  http://www.nationmedia.com/eastafrican/current/Opinion/opinion2011067.htm

Offline Stringer

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 93
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2006, 01:42:09 pm »
News from the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)
Africa - The Fastest Growing Region

Madrid/Algiers, 21 November, 2006/eTN - In 2006, Africa will be for the second consecutive year the fastest-growing region in international tourist arrivals, UNWTO has supported the development of African tourism destinations as a means to contribute to the economic and social development.

"Africa as a whole is at the heart of the UNWTO's concerns", UNWTO Secretary-General Francesco Frangialli said during the opening of the 79th UNWTO Executive Council in Algiers.

The development of African tourism relies not only on well-established destinations. Likewise, growth in emerging markets on the continent's tourism map make an important contribution, led by Algeria along with Botswana, Ethiopia, Mali, Nigeria and Senegal.

Algeria, for example, is now the fourth-ranking destination in Africa as it received nearly 1.5 million foreign visitors in 2005, growing 17% over the preceding year, according to UNWTO figures. As an oil-rich country, Algeria is an example for how tourism "can ensure the distribution of wealth throughout the society, promote the development of poor rural areas and create employment for young people and women who need it", Mr Frangialli added.

UNWTO is committed to contribute to the welfare of the people in Africa and the satisfaction of the travellers visiting the continent. Work in progress and recent initiatives include:

" UNWTO's specific programme for sub-Saharan destinations, now entering its second phase.
" The ST-EP initiative for poverty reduction.

" "Windows on Africa", a strategic alliance with Microsoft, aiming at promoting African destinations through electronic means.

" Taking the opportunity of the 2010 World Football Cup in South Africa, UNWTO has liaised with FIFA to enhance the image of Africa as a whole.

After 1983, the UNWTO Executive Council is meeting for the second time in Algeria.

Offline Stringer

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 93
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2006, 11:58:57 pm »
South Africa: Premier Says Sport Can Boost Economic Growth
 
BuaNews (Tshwane)
December 1, 2006
Silindiwe Dube
Durban

KwaZulu Natal Premier S'bu Ndebele says sport can play an important role in growing South Africa's economy.

Mr Ndebele was speaking at the Premier's Sport Awards 2006 held at the International Convention Centre in Durban yesterday.

"Between 1997 and 2000 sport and recreation contributed between 1.9 to 2 percent of the country's Gross Domestic Product. This represented a net worth of more than R15 billion," said premier Ndebele.

He said South Africa would be getting ready for the second largest international sports spectacle after the Olympic Games - referring to the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup

The event, Mr Ndebele said, would contribute to the socio-economic challenges South Africans were facing and push the country's economic development.

"2010 Fifa Soccer World Cup will provide golden opportunities to boost our tourism, sport industry and push our economy."

He said the event would also give other countries an opportunity to learn about South Africa's strengths and opportunities and those that exist in the African continent.

The Premier's Sport Awards is an annual function started eight years ago by the Department of Sport and Recreation to acknowledge the talent and achievements of the most outstanding sporting personalities in the province.

Mr Ndebele emphasised that sport also played a role in the development of the youth.

He said sporting activities also provideed the most appropriate ways in which young people could be kept away from unhealthy and anti-social activities such as gangsterism, alcohol and drugs.

"Sport also unites people, helps us to accelerate the process of building a non-racial society and improving the society," he said.

Among the nominees were a former Olympic swimming Gold medalist, an All Africa Boxing Champion and a young football team that brought honours not only to KwaZulu-Natal but to the country as the Under 15 World Football Champs.

"We are also proud to acknowledge our junior sports persons who have put KwaZulu-Natal on the world map in Surfing circles, and for being included in the Springbok Rugby side, " the premier said.
 
He congratulated the junior women's football player for her 48 goals in the Vodacom Womens' League.

"Besides our athletes, we can also boast of the achievements of our administrators who amongst them hold top executive positions in their National Sports Federations, " Mr Ndebele said.

He also saluted community builders who work tirelessly to lay the foundation from which talented athletes were identified.

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2006, 06:28:54 pm »
Here are some news updates as we approach Year's End.


Mbeki warns on China-Africa ties

Africa must guard against falling into a "colonial relationship" with China, South African President Thabo Mbeki has warned the continent.

His comments come as fast-growing China is continuing to increase its push for raw materials across Africa.

Mr Mbeki said African nations must strive for their relationship with China to be based on equal trade.

Last month, China hosted an Africa summit attended by 50 African leaders including Mr Mbeki.

His warning about the risk of a colonial relationship with China was given to a student congress in Cape Town.

'Condemned'

Mr Mbeki said that if Africa just exported raw materials to China while importing Chinese manufactured goods, the African continent could be "condemned to underdevelopment".

He said that this would simply mean "a replication" of Africa's historical relationship with its former colonial powers.

China, which expects annual trade with Africa to total $100bn (£53bn) by 2010, has long said that it wants its growing trade relationship with Africa to equally benefit both sides.

In addition to its growing trade with Africa, China has promised $5bn (£2.5bn) in loans and credit for African nations.

However, critics have said China is too happy to support repressive African regimes.

Mr Mbeki's latest comments appear to be a hardening of his position on the subject.

On a recent visit to Beijing he said he understood that the Chinese leadership recognised Africa's concerns about its increasing trade relationship with China, and wanted to help lift the continent out of poverty.


This has been of some concern before. But don't think those Africans are suckers.

Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline Open palm

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2006, 06:39:36 pm »
Kalahari Bushmen may return - under strict conditions.

By a 2-3 High Court decision, Botswana's bushmen may return to land they were evicted from. However, strict conditions have been imposed on how they may live in what is a national game reserve. This covers hunting, building, and water access. It's not ideal and doesn't make it a complete victory for the Basarwa people. This is another chapter in Africa's struggle between tradition and modern progress.  :(

Check out the details here.
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/africa/12/14/bushmen.ap/index.html
Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?