Author Topic: Africa Speaks to You.  (Read 79775 times)

Offline Stringer

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2007, 06:09:41 am »
Africans must fix their own problems
Ali Mufuruki
Published: 12-JAN-07
 
Save for a few exceptions — namely South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Angola and Mozambique — the overwhelming majority of African countries emerged from centuries of colonialism more than four decades ago.

Children born to African parents during those times, that were full of hope and great expectations are well in their 50s today or, like me, are quickly getting there.

So we have not only come of age, we have actually grown old.

We should be asking ourselves how well-equipped this and future generations of Africans are to deal with the leadership challenges that we face.

In a speech delivered to the Corporate Council on Africa’s Attracting Capital to Africa summit at Chatilly, Virginia, in 1997, Thabo Mbeki, who was then deputy president of South Africa, spoke of a hopeful African generation that “carries with it an historic pride which compels it to seek a place for Africans equal to all the other peoples of our common universe … A generation that knows and is resolved that, to attain that objective … it must resist all tyranny, oppose all attempts to deny liberty by resorts to demagogy, repulse the temptation to describe African life as the ability to live on charity, engage in the fight to secure the emancipation of the African woman, and reassert the fundamental concept that we are our own liberators from oppression, from underdevelopment and poverty, from the perpetuation of an experience, from slavery, to colonisation, to apartheid, to dependence on alms.

“It is this generation whose sense of rage guarantees Africa’s advance towards its renaissance.”

Nine years later, I look around and see a continent whose ability to liberate itself has greatly diminished. I see the meltdown in Zimbabwe; I see the African woman being violated in front of television cameras in Darfur, northern Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Côte d’Ivoire; I see African leaders excelling in the art of begging for economic aid, for famine relief, for AIDS drugs, for military assistance to put down the wars that we are so good at starting.

I see us being pretty good at telling the story that Africans are unable to solve their own problems; and the outside world, ever so sympathetic, is becoming very good at believing this blatant lie.

I wonder which generation exactly Mbeki was referring to in his speech. Which of the current four African generations has that sense of rage that will guarantee Africa’s advance towards its renaissance?

In his book The Shackled Continent, Robert Guest quotes Chinua Achebe speaking on his homeland, saying that “the trouble with Nigeria is simply and squarely a failure of leadership. There is nothing basically wrong with the Nigerian character. There is nothing wrong with the Nigerian land or climate or water or air or anything else. The Nigerian problem is the unwillingness or inability of its leaders to rise to the responsibility, to the challenge of personal example which are the hallmarks of true leadership.”

Africa has come up with a story to explain why, in the past 30 years, while people in Europe, America, Asia and Australia have become incredibly rich and more peaceful, Africa has actually managed to shrink the size of its economy, drive its best educated elite into political and economic exile, reduce the life expectancy of its people, and create more wars and social unrest than the rest of the world combined.

We have blamed the Sahara desert for its inhospitable climate, although most of us don’t live there and those who do — such as Egyptians — seem to be doing fine.

We have blamed the tropical climate for its effects on our health, but rarely do we talk of its overwhelming positives, such as the abundance of naturally growing trees, medicinal plants, food crops, an abundance of rivers and natural springs, wildlife and endless white beaches.

We continue to blame slavery and colonialism when more than 80 percent of Africa’s population does not know what life was like during colonial times, other than back then citizens’ letters to the government were answered.

We complain about unfair global trade yet we make no effort to create attractive tradable goods.

We blame Europe and America for closing their markets to our exports and yet we steadfastly refuse to trade with our next-door neighbour, our African neighbour.

We complain about visa restrictions imposed by Britain and the US, yet we imposed the harshest entry restrictions on African visitors to African countries.

In the same 1997 speech quoted above, Mbeki said: “Still, outside our continent, the perception persists that Africa remains, as of old, torn by interminable conflict, unable to solve problems, condemned to a netherworld.”

In the past decade, the excuse game has taken on a whole new dimension, with world-famous scholars, international leaders and celebrities coming up with theories explaining why Africa is a special case and why its people must be helped out of their misery.

We have localised and globalised the idea of Africa as a hopeless place. It is no longer a perception held by those outside the continent, it is a message you hear ever so often from your local MP, your government minister or president: “We are searching for donor funds to build that road.” Or for technical assistance to understand this or that problem, or for donor funds to replace that bridge on the road that yet another donor helped build five years ago.

Africa’s problems are many, and very complex. Fixing them will not be easy. But it is certainly doable. And, as always, we are going to need a special form of outside help this time round — not millions of dollars, but some honest truths. Our development partners could be helpful if they could look us straight in the eye and say: “In the entire history of mankind, no country has ever developed by outsourcing its own development work. Just because the Indians are very good at mathematics and computer science and they can do loads of work for a few cents an hour, does not make it right that you outsource your child’s computer science homework to India.

“By the same token, Africa must not expect to improve the living conditions of its people by asking foreign taxpayers for charity.”

Not so long ago, people in Europe endured living conditions that were much more difficult than those prevailing in most of Africa today. Yet nobody came to their rescue.

The Europeans, Americans and Asians did what they had to do to rid themselves of poverty and hardship; they invested in machines and travelled long distances looking for sources of raw materials.

They did what they had to do, including some bad things, in order to survive. This is the simple truth. It is the truth about our unwillingness to invest in our people, our obsession with everything that is foreign, our neglect of research and development, and our dislike of success in general and fear of talent in particular.

The excuse game must stop.

Having gained their independence from Great Britain in 1949, Indians are today the third-biggest investors in Great Britain, second only to the British and Americans. And remember that Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand and Ireland were colonised too.

If your excuse is civil war, liberation war or any other kind of war, then compare your country’s experience with that of Vietnam, and explain why this country has risen to become a top economy, overtaking all coffee producers, to become second only to Brazil.

If your excuse is bad weather, then compare your fate with that of the Arabs living on a desolate piece of desert called Dubai — a vibrant and thriving metropolis of global proportions. While that was happening, why has the economy of your country managed to shrink to only a small fraction of what it was three decades ago?

If your excuse is living too far away from seaports or navigable waters, how do you explain that landlocked Botswana is doing so well, when ideally located Somalia teeters on the brink of self-destruction? We have to ask what role we have played in keeping our continent behind the rest of the world, despite the best efforts of many to change the status quo.

We must ask our development partners to replace their polite demeanour with honesty, and tell us not what we want to hear but what we need to know: Africans must fix their own problems.

We have many pressing priorities, but I am convinced education is the best place to start. With it, we will leave a proud legacy for our children, and create a generation that does not only have the sense of rage, but also the necessary tools to guarantee Africa’s advance towards its renaissance. -Business in Africa Magazine



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Things to do:
We should encourage our children to take up mathematics and science subjects.
We should set up and properly fund patent registration and management programmes.
We should reward talent through appropriate incentives, knowing very well that today and in the future, good people have the whole world as their playground.
We should protect through legislation the intellectual property created by our people.
We should deliberately encourage free movement of skilled labour across our borders.
We should deliberately encourage people with rare skills to immigrate into Africa, again through appropriate incentives.
We should move to encourage Africans in the Diaspora to come back and work in Africa.
We should recognise and reward talent through better pay and other incentives.

Offline Stringer

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2007, 06:12:02 am »
What’s really needed?
David Christianson
Published: 17-JAN-07
 
There was a robustness to the debate. Much more forthright than in previous years, the tone was set during the opening plenary session addressed by three prominent African political leaders: President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda and ex-president Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia. During question time Nigerian Ndidi O Nwuneli, founder of leadership training NGO LEAP Africa, asked about the succession issue. Addressing her question to President Museveni, recently re-elected for a third term after necessary changes to the constitution of Uganda, she pointedly stated that one of the things great leaders do is create a succession. In Nigeria there had been popular mobilisation against the idea that President Obassanjo should stand for a third term. Some of it had been facilitated by the new electronic media, including SMS petitions. What possible justification could there be, she asked, for hanging onto office?

The question was characteristic of the robust nature of much of the debate. Many delegates had decided what points to make and were determined not to hold back.

For the most part, the high-profile political leaders dealt with issues with more circumspection than many delegates. But President Museveni, in response to the question, did ultimately speak bluntly. After talking about how the presidential succession in Uganda “is guided by politics and strategy … what programme the party wants to push and who can best champion it”, he did state that he “does not agree with term limits”. “After all”, he argued, “programmes are not limited in terms of time so why should political terms of office be?”

After President Museveni’s robust statement, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda spoke diplomatically. He referred to the need for institution-building and how, in the leadership context, “you (have to) develop others to be part of the processes that are taking place”. But despite his diplomatic language, it was ultimately clear that President Kagame did not agree with President Museveni’s position. He placed an emphasis on institutions because “ultimately you don’t want to emphasise individuals” and concluded that “in Rwanda, we want to see leaders come and go”.

The director of Johannesburg’s Gordon Institute for Business Science (GIBS), Prof Nick Binedell, suggested afterwards that views on leadership in Africa are shifting. Museveni’s position, he implied, is becoming outdated and less popular. “Museveni has done a great deal for Uganda,” he argued. “In the context of what has needed to be done over the last 20 years, he has indeed been a great leader.”

Museveni is indeed a huge historical figure and one that needs to be accounted for in any assessment of leadership in Africa. But as a number of delegates pointed out, he may have done his reputation a disservice “by hanging on too long”.

In terms of the overall conference, the “term debate” was something of a diversion from the issues that most concerned delegates. It did not come up again in a strong way after the first plenary. What did emerge though was a thorough discussion of the choices facing Africa’s leaders. A very distinctive private sector view on Africa’s problems came through clearly over the course of the conference. Bill Egbe, Coca-Cola’s East and Central Africa president might have been summing things up when he said in the opening session: “There is no question that there is a role for governments in African development. But there is also a role for the private sector.”

It was in the course of discussion about the interface of these two sectors that some of the most animated debate was heard.

Ali Mufuruki, Chairman of Tanzania’s Infotech Group, argued strongly that “there is no excuse” for Africa’s relative underdevelopment. He examined each of the popular excuses — the colonial legacy, a history of civil war, climate, the absence of connections to the global economy — and using comparative examples (Korea, India, Vietnam, Botswana) proceeded to reject each of them. He said Africans “need to examine our role in keeping our continent behind”. Also criticised were the “development partners” of African government — multilaterals and corporates — for being too “polite”.

Dr. Matthews Chikoanda, a former head of both the Treasury and Reserve Bank in Malawi, and now head of the country’s biggest private sector enterprise, Press Corp, traced the historical development of business corporations in this context. Originating as pure profit maximisers, corporates tended to become restructured to realise shareholder value and then, later, move on to a Corporate Social Investment view of the world. He made it clear that this was a sort of democratisation of big business. But what is the appropriate role of these corporate businesses? Chikoanda says that in the compilation of Malawi’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP), it became apparent that growth was necessary for poverty reduction and that the private sector alone was an adequate ‘engine’ for the realisation of that ambition. The same insight applies to the whole continent, he implied.

Perhaps not surprisingly for a business leadership conference, there was little dissent from this view. The consensus included Presidents Museveni and Kagame, who both made robust statements in favour of private- sector-driven development. President Kagame argued that “the private sector has to take the lead”. He went on to point out that “things have to be viewed in an integrated way. Development cannot move ahead (very) fast, unless government puts certain things in place. However President Museveni, on the same point, appeared to step away from a pure market approach. “There may be a need to intervene to kick-start things,” he said. “You can always privatise later.”

Lynette Chen of Nepad pointed out that 9 out of 10 jobs in Africa are located in the private sector, if it is accepted that family farms and household economies fall into this category. She presented the case for private-sector-driven development in its starkest form. “Corporate citizenship can easily become a matter of box ticking,” she argued. “The most important thing business can do is business.” Chen stressed that the primary pre-requisites were, first, a good investment climate, which meant private-public cooperation in tackling the ‘binding constraints’, second, investment in infrastructure, and third, the elimination of the constraints on intra-African trade.

Chen was certainly not dismissive of the virtues of corporate social investment. But she clearly made the point that many conventional aspects of CSI can more appropriately be seen as business initiatives — supplier development, capacity building and treating the continent’s poor as “value-conscious consumers” rather than charity cases.

The limits of government policies were repeatedly emphasised by delegates. In this regard, these could have been the views of any group of businesspeople, anywhere in the world, presented with an opportunity to speak not only to each other but also to government leaders. Dr Chikoanda remarked on how easy it is to advocate a leading role for business but how difficult it could be to deal with obstacles in practice. He used the example of intermittent electrical supply — a very topical problem in drought-stricken East Africa where water shortages mean that hydro-electrical schemes cannot run at full capacity — and spoke of the operational chaos this factor had induced in a bottling plant operated by his company in Malawi. South African Mahadi Buthelezi, a property entrepreneur, spoke of a problem that is widespread and much less widely remarked on: the impact on business cashflows of slow payments from government. Alex Banful, the managing director of Ghana Social Marketing Foundation International remarked that this was a problem that would have its heaviest impact on smaller, indigenous businesses.

Banful pointed to a line of cleavage that perhaps did not emerge clearly enough at the conference: between large corporates, many but not all of them internationally owned, and local small and medium enterprises. He pointed out that the SME sector is a “distinctive challenge for Africa’s growth agenda”. A vibrant SME sector is an effective mechanism for mobilising savings and creating employment, he argued. The problem in much of Africa though is that most governments offer preferential treatment, not to smaller, but to larger enterprises. Subsidies are offered for large scale investment, for instance, frequently accompanied by tax concessions. The result, argues Banful, is the extensive use of inappropriate capital intensive technologies which restrict job creation.

Banful zeroed in on a field that was perhaps not adequately discussed at the conference — the sheer weight of regulation that inhibits smaller enterprises in Africa. The topic of leadership, as dealt with by delegates, tended to be leadership in government and the corporate sector. Delegates spoke of course from personal experience and raised the issues closest to their hearts. But the voicelessness of SMEs could not have been more dramatically demonstrated.

This, perhaps surprisingly, was the case even when the topics of entrepreneurship and the development of talent were discussed. The personal attributes of the successful entrepreneur were discussed extensively. Entrepreneurship expert Brian Hattingh made the perfectly valid point that it was not necessarily appropriate to see small business owners as synonymous with entrepreneurs. He favoured Richard Branson’s definition of entrepreneurship as “setting out to do something better or something no-one has ever done before, and in so doing to make a profit”. He did go on to point out that in a world where life expectancy is rising, an increasing number of people — perhaps a majority — are likely to work in the informal sector, if only because their pensions will not carry them through their entire lives. “Africa needs to develop a substantial SME entity in each country,” he concluded.

But Hattingh was something of an exception. Few delegates ventured down the SME development path that he opened up. South African leadership expert Reuel Khoza argued that equity — in corporates — should be transferred to youth in order to encourage shareholder activism. Coca Cola’s West African head Larry Drake II argued that the challenge was not to train young leaders but to retain them — again a concern especially from a corporate perspective. Dr Manu Chandaria, chairman of Kenya’s Comcraft Group, spoke of leadership as the ability to “create an environment of shared values, to take decisions and to believe in them”. All of these points were appropriate. But speakers made it clear that they were approaching the topic from a corporate perspective.

The emphasis on corporate experience relates directly to Ali Mufuruki’s earlier criticism that development partners tend to be “too polite”. Corporates especially, as self-interested institutions, are concerned to get ahead with establishing and running operations. In their interactions with government, they will almost invariably be reticent about any business environment issue apart from those that impact directly on their bottom lines. Even in these cases, criticism will be circumspect.

This is another of those ‘missing middles’ that bedevils the continent. While political leaders might now have a better grasp of the concerns of corporate business leaders than ever before, there is a massive information gap when it come to the problems of their own citizens trying to run their indigenous enterprises. This was demonstrated in the contrast between President Museveni’s comments and those of Alex Banful. Banful — as reported above — had argued that capital-intensive investment is decidedly limited in terms of local impact. President Museveni on the other hand, criticised investment as not being capital and technology intensive enough. This is surely an argument impossible to sustain for any leader who is in touch with the needs and conditions faced by his or her own domestic SME sector.

It became apparent that the African diaspora is a major concern of the continent’s business leaders. There is undoubtedly a visceral sense of disturbance at the idea that many of the continent’s brightest and best feel compelled to seek greener pastures elsewhere.

On the evidence of these two days, a healthy — indeed robust — exchange of opinions between the continent’s political and business leaders, is not only useful but characterised by a willingness from both sides to engage. There was not much evidence of polite reticence at the conference. It has to be suggested that getting high profile political leaders together with business leaders creates the conditions for a worthwhile and potentially valuable debate. -Business in Africa Magazine

Offline Open palm

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #32 on: January 20, 2007, 10:21:46 pm »
BBC profile of Dr. Asha Rose:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6247789.stm

Interesting woman, she is. Hmmmm?

Asha-Rose Migiro, 50, becomes the first black woman and first African to hold the position of deputy UN secretary-general, a post created in 1998. When she made history last year, becoming Tanzania's first woman foreign minister, some people started referring to her as the "Condoleezza Rice of Tanzania". But Mrs Migiro, a seasoned human rights champion, preferred the title "Dr Asha-Rose of Tanzania".

She is a Muslim, has a law doctorate from Germany, and is described as hardworking, modest and a down-to earth politician. Married to a Christian, a university lecturer with whom she has two children, she rose to prominence 10 years ago after acquiring a ruling party parliamentary seat reserved for women.

No ivory tower

Despite her former career in academia - she headed the law faculty at the University of Dar es Salaam - Mrs Migiro is a person who likes to be in touch with the grassroots. Unlike some of her learned colleagues in the political arena she addresses ordinary Tanzanians in Kiswahili without using English words. When she is in rural areas, she does not demand urban hospitality - eating what her hosts eat and chatting with them as if she was not a prominent political leader. This way, she believes, people will open up and talk freely. Two year's ago, women's organisations urged Mrs Migiro to seek the nomination as the ruling party's presidential candidate. However, she turned the request down saying that she was waiting for the right time.

Baptism of fire

Some have questioned her appointment saying that she is not a career diplomat. Others argue that the fact that she has only held the foreign affairs portfolio for a year does not give her enough experience to work at the UN secretariat. But her supporters say she has proved she can take the heat. In fact, Mrs Migiro had a baptism of fire last year as her appointment as foreign minister came as Tanzania took over the presidency of the UN Security Council and she had to preside over its frequent meetings in New York . And while Dr Asha-Rose may be quiet and unassuming, she is certainly a lady who stands out in the crowd. This is exemplified by her wardrobe - a fashionable mixture of African, Western and even Asian styles, but without clashing colours.


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Offline Open palm

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #33 on: January 20, 2007, 10:25:58 pm »
More kidnappings in Nigeria:


Saturday, January 20th, 2007

Six Filipino workers have been kidnapped from a cargo ship in Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta region, security sources say.
They say the six were seized as the ship headed to the port of Warri. Militants seeking a greater share of the region's oil wealth have been targeting foreign oil facilities and their workers since early 2006. Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo has denounced the spate of kidnappings as the work of criminals.

In recent months attacks by the militants have escalated, causing oil multinationals to evacuate thousands of workers from the western side of the region. Five Chinese telecommunications engineers were released on Thursday after being kidnapped from the Niger Delta region on 5 January. The instability in the region has cut Nigeria's oil production by at least 20%, costing the country some $4.4bn (£2.2bn) last year, according to the government.

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Offline Open palm

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #34 on: January 29, 2007, 05:46:43 pm »
Pan-Africanism that works:

Yesterday, Sudan failed to gain the chairmanship of the African Union. It has instead been given to Ghana, a country that will be celebrating its 50th anniversary of independence this year. The decision to choose Ghana was done by consensus , 'a very traditional African way of resolving disputes' according to CNN.

http://edition.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/africa/01/29/africa.summit.ghana.reut/index.html
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Offline Open palm

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2007, 06:42:11 pm »
Earlier this week Bush signed off on plans to place a U.S. military command in Africa. China's president Hu is finishing off his tour of the continent. African critics have worried about a neo-colonial presence by China, but China is not deploying troops in the continent. Would you worry more about foreigners with guns, claiming to bring security and peace? Or would worry about cheap foreign goods?
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Offline Hypestyle

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #36 on: February 27, 2007, 03:12:36 pm »
The "khat" trade is boosted with widows of slain Africans..

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6398311.stm


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khat
« Last Edit: February 27, 2007, 03:15:16 pm by Hypestyle »
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Offline Open palm

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2007, 05:50:56 am »
There's a new treatment for malaria in Africa. It's directed at children to build their resistance. I was amazed at the comment made on free distribution as opposed to selling it.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6407891.stm
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Offline Wise Son

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #38 on: March 01, 2007, 06:01:58 am »
I was amazed at the comment made on free distribution as opposed to selling it.
Damn. Maybe this is the consequence of all the anti-Western propaganda from the likes of Mugabe and the Sudanese government to cover up their human rights abuses - maybe people genuinely would distrust any free medication from the West, and assume they were being experimented on or something. I hope that's not the case. This should be good news.

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Offline Magic Wand

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #39 on: March 04, 2007, 09:35:43 am »
Hu Jintao Visits Sudan, Supports Darfur Genocide
By Cao Changqing - Observe China Magazine | The Epoch Times
March 04, 2007

Western commentators are wondering what China's new foreign policy is, in light of communist leader Hu Jintao's recent visits to eight African countries.

Willy Lam, currently a CNN commentator on Chinese issues said that Hu's visit to Africa is an indication that he had abandoned Deng Xiaoping's attitude to "bide our time and focus on building ourselves." Instead he intends to be the leader of a rising superpower. In Lin's opinion, the destruction of a satellite last month by the People's Liberation Army was also a sign of Hu's change in foreign policy.

Recently the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has adopted a very aggressive policy towards African countries. Hu visited Africa twice within a year. Just three months ago, China invited 48 African leaders to attend a forum on China-Africa relations in Beijing and generously wrote off 33 African countries' debts with China in a bid to win them over.

Before Hu's visit to Africa, at a press conference, the CCP's Ministry of Foreign Affairs stressed that the main purpose of Hu's visit was to encourage the peaceful development of Africa. At that time, the U.S. media had high hopes that Hu's trip might be able to stop the genocide in Sudan. New York Times reporter Howard French published an article from Shanghai titled "Chinese Leader to Visit Sudan For Talks on Darfur Conflict."

However, Hu actually went to Sudan to reward the Sudanese president who advocates genocide and promised to help him build a presidential palace. Washington Post columnist Sebastian Mallaby wrote a column on Feb. 5 titled "A Palace for Sudan—China's No-Strings Aid Undermines the West." In this article, Mallaby considered that it wasn't coincidental that Hu agreed to finance a palace for the Sudanese president since, in recent years, China had never agreed to build a presidential palace for any country. Hence the decision to choose Sudan was a deliberate act against the Western world.

In recent years, the Sudanese government has received much criticism from Western society for its suppression of the independent movement in the Darfur region. According to human rights organizations, in the past four years, more than 200,000 were killed in this genocide. Western countries including the U.S. have discontinued aid to Sudan and requested the U.N. to impose economic sanctions. Beijing opposed this decision and even threatened to veto it. On Hu's visit to Sudan, not only did he not censure the government for carrying out genocide, instead he agreed to give the brutal dictator 140 million yuan (US$18 million) in aid to build a presidential palace, condoning and rewarding the Sudanese dictator.

China even plans to double its aid to African countries in the next three years, offering them $3 billion in low-interest loans and $2 billion in export credits. Western critics say China is throwing its silver dollars into Africa with total disregard of the fact that 600 million people in China continue to earn less than $2 a day and 5 percent of the Chinese population (60 million) still live below the U.N.'s poverty line. Hence the CCP's African policy is an inhuman policy. It overlooks the 200,000 deaths in the genocide in Sudan and does not care whether its Chinese citizens live or die. It only cares for ideology not human lives.

Read the complete article:    http://en.epochtimes.com/news/7-3-4/52359.html
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Offline Cheirel

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #40 on: March 05, 2007, 01:03:47 pm »
Most recent study found that washing with fresh water and soap was EQUALLY as effective in decreasing the spread of AIDS as circumcision. They are planning  mass circumcisions for the villagers instead :-\

Offline Open palm

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #41 on: March 06, 2007, 01:43:14 am »
In Africa, a recent scientific report was release to debunk claims that special herbs can cure AIDS. The President of Gambia made headlines when he claimed he could cure infected patients with special herbal treatment.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2007, 01:48:11 am by Open palm »
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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #42 on: March 06, 2007, 01:52:28 am »
Aside from this year's Oscar winners, Africa celebrated its own African Film Festival , called Fespaco, in Burkina Faso. Most of its films are not widely distributed. The winner for best film went to a Nigerian film entitled "Ezra", which is about a child soldier in Sierra Leone.
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Offline Magic Wand

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #43 on: March 14, 2007, 06:52:45 am »
Friends, South Africa has announced that it has a pachyderm population problem. The good news is, the nation's elephant population isn't shrinking--conservation efforts have borne fruit. The bad news is, the elephants are being too fruitful--multiplying at a rate that will quickly outpace their resources.

Faced with elephant overpopulation, South African officials are searching for ways to curb their herds. They've even raised the specter of culling. Everyone agrees that should be a last resort, but few dispute the problem is real. Neighboring Botswana, where roughly a quarter of Africa's 500,000 wild elephants now live, faces similar issues.



"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." --Aristotle, Greek philosopher

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Re: Africa Speaks to You.
« Reply #44 on: March 14, 2007, 01:27:51 pm »
GIVE 'em to the zoo.


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Right on to the real and death to the fakers!  Peace out!