Author Topic: GOOD HAIR review  (Read 14366 times)

Jenn

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2009, 12:14:20 pm »
(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

You don't call that triangle fro Vanessa was wearing a natural?  :P

Offline Magic Wand

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2009, 12:31:32 pm »
Just a few days ago, I was pretty weave naive.
Well today, I observed a real tumble-weave!

 ;D
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." --Aristotle, Greek philosopher

Доверяй, но проверяй

Jenn

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2009, 12:33:42 pm »
Weaves ain't all bad, you know. Sometimes they can be very useful!

Offline Vic Vega

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2009, 12:34:17 pm »
(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

You don't call that triangle fro Vanessa was wearing a natural?  :P

Decorative shapes ainít natural. See also Larry Blackmon circa 1986. ;D

Jenn

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2009, 12:41:42 pm »
See also Larry Blackmon circa 1986. ;D


OWWWWWW!!!

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2009, 03:15:52 pm »
(and if Bill Cosby had wanted any of his fictional brood to rock naturals they would have).

You don't call that triangle fro Vanessa was wearing a natural?  :P

Decorative shapes ainít natural. See also Larry Blackmon circa 1986. ;D

You can't win this one, Vick.

I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.

Oh, and the shapes do count! You can't rob Mr. Cameo from his pop-culture hairstyle.

Offline Mastrmynd

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #36 on: October 17, 2009, 05:34:55 pm »
i.loved.good hair.

wife and i had a black dbl feature (black dynamite then good hair).
i enjoyed good hair better than BD!


Listen to my entertaining radio show, "The Takeover: Top 20 Countdown" at www.top20takeover.VVCRadio.com.

Right on to the real and death to the fakers!  Peace out!

Jenn

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2009, 12:25:34 pm »
I love people who debate confidently without knowing what they are talking about.  

I've seen the movie now, and somebody owes me $9.50 and 90 minutes of my life back. Next time I'm 100% right, just tell me so.

Does he come to any conclusions at the end besides "black hair is good business?"

Nope! Unless you consider "black bitches are conceited as sh*t and dumb as bricks" to be a conclusion.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2009, 12:42:19 pm by Jenn »

Offline Tahdigga

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2009, 12:51:17 am »
I love people who debate confidently without knowing what they are talking about.  

I've seen the movie now, and somebody owes me $9.50 and 90 minutes of my life back. Next time I'm 100% right, just tell me so.


I'm so glad I followed my mind and kept it movin.


I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.


I think the twists and dreads styles are still relevant. Many of my friends have them. Plus I rock em  ;)

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #39 on: October 27, 2009, 08:18:34 pm »
[

I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.


I think the twists and dreads styles are still relevant. Many of my friends have them. Plus I rock em  ;)

I like the way you rock the dreads, Tah. 8)


Now you and your friends can make the response movie to GOOD HAIR.

Namely, OUR HAIR.

Offline Tahdigga

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #40 on: October 30, 2009, 09:20:46 pm »
[

I remember here in NYC that the neferteri, twists and dreds took off from 87 to at least 93 for Black women.

I don't know what brought it to an end though.



I think the twists and dreads styles are still relevant. Many of my friends have them. Plus I rock em  ;)




I like the way you rock the dreads, Tah. 8)


Now you and your friends can make the response movie to GOOD HAIR.

Namely, OUR HAIR.


Thanks JS...I'll have to look into getting a backer to distribute the flick ;)

It'll have to wait, this weekend I'm gonna rock a wig for Halloween   ;D

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: GOOD HAIR review
« Reply #41 on: November 01, 2009, 06:07:19 am »
An open letter to African-American women about "Good Hair"
Syndicated columnist

An open letter to African-American women:

It's about the need to be beautiful, I know.

As goals go, that one is neither extraordinary nor gender-specific. But it's different for women, isn't it? A man's sense of self worth is seldom endangered by crow's feet. On him people will say they convey "character." On a woman, they convey wear.

And if it's different for women, it's different and then some for women like you, saddled not just with the need to be beautiful, but also with 400 years of racial baggage, 400 years of ginormous Jemimas, shrill Sapphires, ugly Aunt Esthers and angry Angelas seared into the public mind, 400 years that say you "cannot" be beautiful if your lips are too proud, or your skin too dark or you don't take that nappy hair God gave you and make it look like the hair he gave somebody else.

As you may have guessed, our subject is "Good Hair," Chris Rock's new documentary on the industry of African-American hair care. The comedian has called it the "blackest" movie he's ever made. Truth is, it may well be the blackest movie "anybody's" ever made.

That's not to say other people would not get the jokes or the thesis: that in the search for "good hair" ó i.e., hair that is straight and fine like white people's ó black women burn their scalps with corrosive chemicals, buy thousand-dollar weaves on teachers' salaries, and support, according to Rock, a $9 billion industry of which black folks own virtually nothing.

But being black, having been inculcated with that sense of lowered worth they feed you right along with your strained peas, will enable you to nod knowingly when Rock recounts the moment one of his young daughters asked him why she doesn't have "good hair." It will allow you to laugh in recognition when women describe the elaborate rituals of protecting their hair once it has been straightened or weaved. It will require you to wince in pain when Rock tries to sell black hair at a weave shop (weaves are often human hair from India) and is refused because "nobody" wants that kinky African stuff.

The very notion of "good hair" springs from that same wellspring of self-denigration that offers the N-word as a fraternal greeting and once filled our newspapers with ads for skin-lightening creams. It suggests the difficulty of loving oneself when one uses as a yardstick of worth another culture's physical standards. As in an old episode of "M-A-S-H" where a Korean boy wanted the doctors to fix his eyes and make them look "American."

But of course, there was nothing at all wrong with his eyes. And "good hair" ó I preached this to my curly-haired son who grew up mystified that his hair fascinated so many people ó is any hair that covers your head.

Unfortunately, saying this is like shouting in a hurricane. A million media images tell us beauty looks like Paris Hilton ó and "only" that.

So go on, sister, do what you do. I ain't mad at'cha. But neither am I fooled by your chemicals and weaves.

I am your brother, your father, your husband and your son. I've seen you in church with big hats on, giving children the evil eye. And at the jail on visiting day, shoring up that wayward man. And at the bus stop in the rain on your way to work. And at the dining table with pen and paper, working miracles of money. When I was a baby, you nursed me, when we were children, I chased you through the house; when we were dating, I missed half the movie, stealing sugar from you. I saw you born; I took you to your prom; I glowed with pride when you went off to school. I have married you and buried you. I love your smile. A million times, you took my breath away.

You are the rock and salvation of our people, the faith that remains when all hope is gone. So if it's about the need to be beautiful, maybe it's time somebody told you:

You already are. You always were.

Miami Herald columnist Leonard Pitts Jr.'s column appears regularly on editorial pages of The Times. His e-mail address is: lpitts@miamiherald.com

2009, The Miami Herald