Author Topic: PRECIOUS  (Read 22158 times)

Jenn

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2009, 02:35:54 pm »
Da f$ck?

Apparently "molested" is too hard for manly men like Crouch to say.

Offline Catch22

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2009, 03:03:21 pm »
I think I'll pass on this one.  Personally, I go to the movies to be entertained...and I like to check my brain at the door when I do it most times.  I'm in the minority here, but IMO, there's enough F'd up stuff to deal with in real life that I don't want to pay $19 to sit through something that's gonna depress the hell out of me. 

Offline Redjack

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2009, 07:02:08 pm »
There is no way, whatsoever, under any circumstances in this life or the next that I will ever see this film.
Soon you will come to know. When the bullet hits the bone.

Jenn

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2009, 08:04:49 pm »
I've been asleep all day (note: NEVER take sleeping pills after four consecutive days w/no sleep!), and our theater is showing it at 12:01 a.m. Since I'm right up the street and chances are that I'll be awake in two hours, I'll go see it and report how things go.

*edit* Apparently 12:01 Thursday means 12:01 FRIDAY. Freaking bastards.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2009, 10:41:51 pm by Jenn »

Jenn

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2009, 12:26:34 am »
Saw it this morning. Wasn't a bad movie. Wasn't a good movie. Last 15 minutes destroyed two hours of any good will I had. Mo'Nique is still a hack, but she'll get an Oscar anyway.

Offline BmoreAkuma

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2009, 05:37:08 am »
Saw it this morning. Wasn't a bad movie. Wasn't a good movie. Last 15 minutes destroyed two hours of any good will I had. Mo'Nique is still a hack, but she'll get an Oscar anyway.
the problem with mo'nique is she fits the ghetto hood fat chick too well at times in some of these roles.
With these choices, I felt that the American black man only needed to choose which one to get eaten by; the liberal fox or the conservative wolf because both of them will eat him.

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2009, 10:24:02 am »
glad u liked it for the most part jenn.
monique definitely deserves to be nominated.


Listen to my entertaining radio show, "The Takeover: Top 20 Countdown" at www.top20takeover.VVCRadio.com.

Right on to the real and death to the fakers!  Peace out!

Jenn

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2009, 11:44:41 am »
monique definitely deserves to be nominated.

For WHAT? Sitting around in that Jokerface makeup? The mom from "The Loneliest Runner" was scarier than her - and far more poignant.

*edit* And now I remember why I see movies alone and as early as I can whenever I can. All the laughing and talking last night drove me NUTS!!!
« Last Edit: November 13, 2009, 11:49:59 am by Jenn »

Offline BmoreAkuma

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #23 on: November 13, 2009, 02:38:44 pm »
I agree with Jenn why should another black actress have to literally be a strong image of negativity to get an Oscar nod?
With these choices, I felt that the American black man only needed to choose which one to get eaten by; the liberal fox or the conservative wolf because both of them will eat him.

Jenn

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2009, 02:50:30 pm »
I agree with Jenn why should another black actress have to literally be a strong image of negativity to get an Oscar nod?


Oscar loves hysterical, crying black women - the fatter, the better. But that's not the problem here. The problem is that Precious (the movie) promotes itself as one thing but turns out to be another. Contrary to what we see in the trailers and the commercials, Precious is NOT some abused, retarded puppy that gets kicked around, complete with a hangdog look on her face. She IS smart and funny. She's not stupid by any means. But that's not good enough for promotions, so we only see Precious in the promotions as quiet and crying and with her head down. I also hate how Mary (the mother) is such a one-note character. Mo'Nique's delivery at the end was so forced and pathetic that I whipped out my phone and started texting in the middle of all the laughter. I couldn't even take anything she was saying seriously for the simple fact that I didn't believe a single thing she was saying. Hello? Welfare cheats have a tendency to lie about sh*t. (In this case, I mean Mary was *literally* cheating the system, not that she's a cheat because she's on welfare.) IMO, the welfare slant was the worst part of the entire film. These people speak WAY too freely for those who are supposed to be flying under the radar. A girl as old as Precious would have NEVER told a complete stranger that she'd been impregnated twice by her father. Precious would've had a lie memorized front, back and sideways, mainly because she would've already told this lie 40 billion times to every teacher, social worker, counselor who asked. (Remember, she already has one child and they were on the system.) Precious wasn't even caught off-guard or anything! And Mary's "confession" at the end? Complete bullsh*t. (Additionally, any competent social worker knows to never jump on a point like that. And last I checked, a social would've been required by law to turn Mary in to the police, making a good chunk of this story irrelevant anyway.)

I'm getting really sick of people pulling the Black Stereotype Card, though. Ask black folks, and the ONLY stories that can be hold are where we uplift and overcome as noble Negroes. There was far, FAR too much familiar territory in this film - as flawed and hackneyed as it is - for me to take anybody seriously who gets upset at the NERVE of showing incest and abuse in a black household. Far too many people (especially black people) are angrier at the concept of rape than rape itself. Rather than being mad about these kinds of households, we're mad at the people who show them. Get an effing grip, please.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2009, 03:05:35 pm by Jenn »

Offline BmoreAkuma

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2009, 04:04:14 pm »
Oscar loves hysterical, crying black women - the fatter, the better. But that's not the problem here. The problem is that Precious (the movie) promotes itself as one thing but turns out to be another. Contrary to what we see in the trailers and the commercials, Precious is NOT some abused, retarded puppy that gets kicked around, complete with a hangdog look on her face. She IS smart and funny. She's not stupid by any means. But that's not good enough for promotions, so we only see Precious in the promotions as quiet and crying and with her head down.


I like how they focused on the negatives but I guess if she came out to smart it wouldn't be "controversial"  ::)



I also hate how Mary (the mother) is such a one-note character. Mo'Nique's delivery at the end was so forced and pathetic that I whipped out my phone and started texting in the middle of all the laughter. I couldn't even take anything she was saying seriously for the simple fact that I didn't believe a single thing she was saying. Hello? Welfare cheats have a tendency to lie about sh*t. (In this case, I mean Mary was *literally* cheating the system, not that she's a cheat because she's on welfare.) IMO, the welfare slant was the worst part of the entire film. These people speak WAY too freely for those who are supposed to be flying under the radar. A girl as old as Precious would have NEVER told a complete stranger that she'd been impregnated twice by her father. Precious would've had a lie memorized front, back and sideways, mainly because she would've already told this lie 40 billion times to every teacher, social worker, counselor who asked. (Remember, she already has one child and they were on the system.) Precious wasn't even caught off-guard or anything! And Mary's "confession" at the end? Complete bullsh*t. (Additionally, any competent social worker knows to never jump on a point like that. And last I checked, a social would've been required by law to turn Mary in to the police, making a good chunk of this story irrelevant anyway.)

Well put out and that i do agree with you that your average teen girl wouldn't just flat out admit that their father has abused them so willingly. Also when you are caught lying on a government subsidy you have to pay it back or you will lose it. So are you saying that wasnt addressed as well?

I'm getting really sick of people pulling the Black Stereotype Card, though. Ask black folks, and the ONLY stories that can be hold are where we uplift and overcome as noble Negroes. There was far, FAR too much familiar territory in this film - as flawed and hackneyed as it is - for me to take anybody seriously who gets upset at the NERVE of showing incest and abuse in a black household. Far too many people (especially black people) are angrier at the concept of rape than rape itself. Rather than being mad about these kinds of households, we're mad at the people who show them. Get an effing grip, please.
The thing that is grinding my gears is that this film is getting the Oscar nod for Mo'nique. Nothing about her character stood out to me that I don't see differently at times where I work. One thing I do agree about being mad at the households. I'll admit that at times so many of these households is an embarrassment to not only black families but all American families in general. When a person comes in and is complaining about why "their rent is too high" but it is at $175 a month boggles my mind at times. These would be the same one where 2 adults living in 4 bedroom house with a basement and wondering why they have a high utility bill and the only income is child support. Even with the Utility check it still doesn't cover it all. 
With these choices, I felt that the American black man only needed to choose which one to get eaten by; the liberal fox or the conservative wolf because both of them will eat him.

Jenn

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2009, 08:08:01 pm »
Well put out and that i do agree with you that your average teen girl wouldn't just flat out admit that their father has abused them so willingly. Also when you are caught lying on a government subsidy you have to pay it back or you will lose it. So are you saying that wasnt addressed as well?

Not at all. In fairness, this was before welfare "reform". But last I checked, learning that a girl has two babies by her father still warrants police intervention. That bullsh*t "up by the bootstraps" ending could've at least been salvaged w/the police walking into the welfare office as Precious was walking out of it.

Offline Emperorjones

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2009, 05:16:17 pm »
Just saw this. I got mixed feelings about it. I thought it was a well written and well acted film. I thought Monique did a good job, playing the role of the heavy (pun intended) and most of the other actors did pretty good as well, though I'm not sure I can include Lenny Kravitz in that. He was just sort of there. But I guess it's nice he's stretching his wings too.

I felt the movie went a little too far in kicking Precious when we learned she was HIV positive. Damn, that was too much of a pile on. And I felt the ending was just there. I thought there should've been more. I wanted to see more of a resolution. The end didn't inspire or uplift me, it just made me feel more depressed. Now she's HIV positive, with two kids, and still has an uncertain future.

My major issues with the film perhaps aren't necessarily about the film itself, but the whole light is good and dark is bad. Even though Precious is a dark skinned woman, her fantasy self is white, her fantasy boyfriend is light skinned, and pretty much every adult who cares or tries to help her is white or light skinned. It just reinforces this idea, and the film never challenges it or turns it on its ear. There was also the size issue, with Precious's saviors all being trim, in contrast to Precious-who had severe body-image problems, Monique, that other welfare mom, and the largely unsympathetic Sherri Shepard (at least I thought that was Shepard as the school's receptionist).

The movie was like a list of black pathologies, or should I say so-called black pathologies. I know there are black people like this in the world, but it seems like this small group gets their story told a lot more than other black people and it creates the impression IMO that the nightmarish world of Precious is the norm and not the exception. The film Precious alone doesn't do that, but when coupled with various movies, TV shows, books, and music about hood life it all becomes too 'representative' of what being 'black' is, and I think this kind of negative self-image is killing us. I don't believe in censorship, but I would like to see more stories than Precious out there. I would like to see a wider range of the black experience.

I do think Precious will net some Oscars because it allows Hollywood liberals to score diversity points while showing black people at their worst or most tragic again.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 02:08:52 am by Emperorjones »

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: PRECIOUS
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2009, 07:06:06 am »
Here's a review from the Christian Science Monitor:

Review: 'Precious: Based on the Novel "Push" By Sapphire'
Sixteen-year-old Precious illiterate, overweight, and pregnant again is a study in quiet courage despite her nightmarish family life.
By Peter Rainer | Film critic of The Christian Science Monitor
from the November 6, 2009 edition


"Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' By Sapphire" is an ungainly title for a powerfully ungainly movie. Boxers like to say that a punch hurts less if you see it coming. I saw just about every punch coming my way in "Precious" and yet it still packs a hurtful wallop. It melodramatizes everything and yet its overall effect is something more than melodrama.

Gabourey Sidibe plays Claireece "Precious" Jones, a 350-pound near-illiterate 16-year-old who is pregnant for a second time by her father, who turns out to be HIV positive, and lives with her nightmarishly abusive single mother Mary (Mo'Nique) in a dingy two-floor apartment in Harlem.

This litany of woe is laid on awfully thick. Director Lee Daniels and his screenwriter Geoffrey Fletcher periodically showcase Precious's fantasies of dancing with a studly beau at the Apollo, or gazing into the mirror and seeing the reflection of a slim, blonde, white girl. You can cut the pathos with an Exacto knife. Much more egregious is how Daniels intercuts Precious being raped by her father with shots of eggs being fried in bubbly grease. Here is a filmmaker who does not trust his material to speak for itself.

What rescues "Precious" is that Daniels also has a sharp documentarian's eye for realism. As overblown and coercive as his movie often is, it also has admirable feel for the workaday struggles of its people, especially Precious's. It's a bizarrely bifurcated movie, alternately realistic and garishly hyperbolic.

Both Tyler Perry and Oprah Winfrey came on board as executive producers after the film won awards and standing ovations at Sundance (a response duplicated in Cannes and Toronto). It's easy to see what appealed to them: The heartbreak in this movie is never so abject that it cannot be overcome.

But this inspirationalism is what I liked least about "Precious."

Making Precious an Everygirl whose struggle becomes an advertisement for uplift feels false to the mood and tragedy of the piece. The horrors in this movie are not so easily dispelled. (It opens with the onscreen words "Everything is a gift of the universe." Some gift, some universe.)

Sidibe is an untrained actress but in some ways this works to the film's advantage. Her flat line readings and inexpressive features carry the conviction of someone who has closed herself off from empathy. Thrown out of school for being pregnant, Precious is nevertheless intelligent enough to realize she won't survive without an education, so she enrolls, much against her mother's boozy protestations, in an alternative school. Her rowdy classmates become friends, perhaps her first, and a teacher with the improbable name Blu Rain (Paula Patton) becomes a kind of surrogate mother. (At least she wasn't named Blu Ray, but then again, the film is set in 1987.)

Ms. Rain is in a long line of movie "teachers-who-just-won't-give-up," and her angelic gumption is the movie's most conventional trope. Compare her with Mo'Nique's Mary, who is like no one else I've seen in the movies. This monster is fiercely, intensely human, which only serves to heighten the monstrousness. Known as a bawdy comic, Mo'Nique once again proves the truism that comic actors have the ready-made chops for drama. (Think of Bette Midler in "The Rose.")

Mary is unfathomable, and when she delivers her big self-justifying monologue at the end to Precious's social worker (an almost unrecognizably dour Mariah Carey), she only seems more so. Mo'Nique doesn't go in for a lot of special pleading. She plays it hard right to the finish, so much so that the upbeat addendum that closes out the film seems, unintentionally, like a good-time fantasia.

Precious moves from a girl who refers to herself as "ugly black grease to be washed from the street" to a young woman who becomes the mother she never had. In the rush of overheated praise for this movie's power, would I be a spoilsport to ask what the sequel might look like? From the looks of it, Precious is en route to "Oprah." Grade: B+ (Rated R for child abuse including sexual assault, and pervasive language.)
 
 
 

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Byron Crawford on Precious
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2009, 07:13:08 am »
Here's a review (well, really a critique of the whole PRECIOUS phenomenon without actually seeing the film) by the always hilarious Byron Crawford:

November 24, 2009
Where should I see Precious?

Because I'm constitutionally incapable of trying hard, I live about equal difference from both white and black movie theaters. Where should I go see Precious?

I usually try not to support anything associated with either Oprah Winfrey or Tyler Perry, and Precious is somehow associated with both of them. But I knew I'd have to see it, when I read in Armond White's much-discussed review of the film that it includes a scene where the title character steals and eats an entire bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Lee Daniels, the teh ghey coke-sniffer who directed Precious, is obviously just a troll, out to shock people. Like a black, less talented Lars von Trier. Daniels is the same guy who brought us Halle Berry's Oscar-winning turn in Monster's Ball - and god bless him for it!

Seeing Precious in a theater full of black people would be sweet, because you know black people aren't gonna shut the f*ck up during a movie, and this might be the rare occasion when the unwarranted call and response actually adds to the experience. Like at a horror movie. It's not like I need to concentrate on the subtle themes and visual motifs. One time I made the mistake of seeing Dreamgirls at a white theater (two mistakes, really), and the only three black women there kept standing up and clapping every time Jennifer Hudson got done singing. It was embarrassing to watch. I had to slouch down in my seat a little bit. And lord knows a man of my size struggles just to sit like regular people.

I'm sure I hardly even need to list the downsides of seeing Precious at a black theater, to you racist sacks of sh*t. But I will anyway, for my own personal amusement. First of all, there's the fact that someone's gonna show up 15 minutes after the movie (not the previews, mind you) already began. And it's not just gonna be one person - it's gonna be a church group, who all want to sit together, and they're gonna have the sheer balls to ask someone else, probably you, if you could move down a few seats. And then you know how, any time more than two black women are in the same room it starts to reek of black hair care products. I'd suggest science get to work on afro sheen that doesn't smell like my grandma's funeral, but I think that's part of the appeal for some people. Finally, there's always the outside chance someone will get shot. Precious doesn't necessarily seem like that kind of movie, but lest we forget, last year someone got shot at the Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

Going to a white theater, as I usually would anyway, would resolve many, if not all of these issues. Only thing is, there wouldn't be that added benefit of people shouting at the screen. White people won't say sh*t during a movie, regardless of what happens on screen. A white man could see his own mother getting rape-raped on film, and he'd save it for the ride home. White people are courteous like that. They might lack any and all concern for human suffering (as long as it's not a dog), but they know better than to ruin another person's filmgoing experience. That's why you don't hear about white women going to jail for 15 years for cutting in line at Wal-Mart.

I've spent enough time watching movies with white people to know that the best way to find out what they thought about a movie is to catch them in the lobby outside the movie, or in the john (nullus), once it's over. Several years ago, I had the hilarious experience of seeing the movie Closer, one of the best movies of all time (of all time!) in a theater with no one but a couple of white people, their young kids, and their elderly parents. As they were exiting the theater, I overheard the mother say that was the worst movie she'd seen in her life. She probably went home and fired off an angry letter to Julia Roberts.

Similarly, I can only imagine how white people will react to Precious. And you know, regardless of what they think about it, they're not gonna tell you. You'd have to catch them right when they're exiting the theater, when they're too offended to maintain their usual sense of decorum. That's a lot of work, just to witness white people express their disgust with black pathological behavior. But the payoff might be worth it. We already know how black people are gonna respond to Precious. Black people would yell at Twilight. Hmm... Maybe I'll watch Precious in a black theater, then drive to a white theater, stand in the lobby and compare and contrast people's facial expressions with that time I saw the Pianist at Plaza Frontenac. Nhjic.