Author Topic: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.  (Read 127340 times)

Offline sinjection1

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #30 on: April 24, 2010, 08:04:16 pm »
After reading the third installment of Doomwar I found myself drawn back to my first post "Epitomizing the Black Panther." Though the writing may be satisfactory the ineptitude displayed in the personalities (if such can even be said to exist) of Tchalla and Storm is deplorable. Tchalla lacks poise and confidence as Storm does depth and purpose. Both could be removed from the story and not be missed. The depiction  of Wakanda is unforgivable. It possesses no mystique, majesty, magic or uniqueness. It has all the depth of a "third world" country. Its populace is soulless and dimensionless. The writer may be trying to infuse so called contemporary Afrakan politics and sensibilities into the story but it leaves me thinking he lacks the rectitude to envision an unconquered futuristic Afrakan nation. The title of this comic is correct, this is not a Black Panther comic it is a Doom comic.


Ture, your post is simply brilliant. While a member of the CBR, I ruffled more than a few feathers discussing what I defined as "white writer's choice" and "white reader's preference". Your strong observations go straight to the very heart of the concept I tried to convey back then.

During such exchanges, it was clear from the responses I received that the T'Challa/Storm/Wakanda portrayed in DOOMWAR was considered by those fans as being the more realistic, more entertaining. Hudlin's T'Challa was "arrogant" and "too perfect". Storm was a "broodmare" and little more than T'Challa's "doormat" or "stepping stone" to A-List status. Wakanda was racist, xenophobic and boring. Today, some of those fans are celebrating Doom's brilliance in how he has so completely "handed T'Challa his butt. They are making cases for Doom being a noble anti-hero and actually rooting for Doom to emerge the victor from this battle. Conversely, I've no doubt that if those same members were discussing Bishop and his battle against Cable and Hope, Bishop would be reviled as the villian.

Is the Doom of DOOMWAR the same Doom who battled Doctor Voodoo? I wonder how Doom's DOOMWAR fans might answer this question. I happen to think Maberry is writing a good story, a very entertaining story. I understand the frustration of Black Panther fans and especially those Storm fans with how the story is going and how those characters have been depicted. I do believe that through all that has happened, T'Challa has maintained a nobility that has been untouched by Doom's despicable onslaught. Shuri has emerged as a strong character in my opinion. Storm has not been written in character and that needs to be corrected asap.
Mr. MajestiK, I like your style. You are the wiser, calmer, more articulate second coming of sinjection to "that other place". You do me proud.

Offline Vic Vega

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #31 on: April 25, 2010, 08:58:25 am »
Wecome back, Sinjection! ;D

Whassup!

@ Everybody: there's more than one kind of A-list.

Everybdy knows who Blade is now. They might not know there is a comic book about the character, but they know about Blade as a multimedia entity. To me that's actually a bigger deal than being a-list in the bizarro world of comic book fans.

Storm has her own ride at Great Adventure, girls and women dress up as her every holloween but she struggles to get speaking time in the several books she appears in. 

The world is about to be introduced to War Machine in Iron Man 2 and even if the character is as well recieved as I think he going to be (has Don Chedle EVER been bad in a movie?) I won't be holding my breath waiting to see him get more shine from Marvel outside of being(at best) Steve Roger's second in command in the Secret Avengers.

You can't make the 100,000 odd aging fanboys open thier minds. Just go around them I say.

Offline Ture

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #32 on: April 25, 2010, 12:33:06 pm »
Thank you, Sinjection1. Though my first attempt may have been confusing and misleading due to my cumbersome approach, I think  the modifications I made help to clarify my position. Sinjection1 you and I are definitely in sync.

The reasons go beyond the typical black and white issues of race. Those arguments were constructed to fail and self destruct. The complexity lies in the contextualizing of Afrakan people's culture in fiction. The depth of this understanding is what distinguished Reggie's and Priest's Black Panther from many other writers' interpretations.

There are often comparisons made between Reggie's BP and Priest's BP,when in actuality they are more akin than dissimilar, flip sides of the same coin. Priest gave the Panther mystique, presence and formidability. Reg gave the Panther strength of family, a sense of community and historical context. Both gave the necessary cultural ties that helped to authenticate the character. 

If any differences need pointing out they would be in their approach to writing. Reg writes with the eloquence of a seasoned screen writer. For evidence of such compare Who is the Black Panther comic with Who is the Black Panther cartoon. The prose may appear a little light in the comic (leaning to the fact that I wanted to read more) but they are flawless in the animated feature. Priest writes like the veteran comic book writer he is. His strong points (dialogue, continuity, pacing) lend themselves to that medium.
 
In my opinion both Panthers have their strengths that compliment the character and should be viewed as a composite.

In fairness I would be remiss if I neglected to mention Don McGregor, who did attempt to apply the above mentioned concept. Others like Stan Lee may get some mention but I was focusing on ongoing series.

I don't think Mayberry is writing a great story as of yet. He is writing a great Doom however. A great story needs both a great antagonist and a great protagonist, and Black Panther simply isn't measuring up. Insult becomes added to injury when we witness the abysmal portrayal of Storm.

Great story telling would have given us a Tchalla who used sign language known only to he and Storm to communicate. Great story telling would have shown Tchalla ordering Wakandan sorcerers to capture the spirit of Dooms mother (or physically capture her if she is alive), with a smirking Tchalla remarking: "You took something of great value from me. I now return the favor."  Great story telling would show the pendulum swaying with each move and counter move. A masterpiece of a figurative chess match between two masters.

Great story telling would have the conversation between the Panther spirit and Doom go a little like this: "You have assaulted my followers, even corrupted some of my children. For this you have earned the enmity of Bast. In this game you are playing know that the consequences will be most dire for you. Know you are playing a master, a master who you cannot conquer. A master who is betroved to one who will stop at nothing short of your death."

Instead we get this....



...a Panther god ready to lick Doom's naked ass!


Holla at ya boy Jenn.







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Offline Mastrmynd

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2010, 09:58:30 am »
The read of Flag of our Fathers and the past year of stories of black panther is like night and day. Marvel soo needs a black man writing a black book. Since Cage is out of the main Avengers book, I have not read anything from Marvel except for Fof.


I want to greet my brothers after so long a time away; the iridescent, irrerepressible Mastrmynd and the one, the only, the inimitable Supreme Illuminati.

What?!
Sinjection is back!!
Woohoo!!
Welcome back bruh!


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Right on to the real and death to the fakers!  Peace out!

Offline sinjection1

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #34 on: April 26, 2010, 10:32:00 am »
Vic!

As always, it's good to be back.

And right off the bat, I've have the pleasure of reading and re-reading your fine comments, attempting to gather as many pearls of wisdom to be found there...certain to be enriched in my personal opinions through the perspective you bring to the given topic. And there's the ever-steady, ever-sensible Daoud as well. I see you there, Daoud.

Vic, your evaluation of Maberry's run being a product of "writing to his strengths" rather than a deliberate intent on his part to "castrate" the characters hit squarely on the nail head IMO and yet, I am completely empathetic with those who might suspect otherwise. Afterall, our heroes were so off-balance and confused...so completely fooled by Doom and "the Broker" that Shuri was convinced Namor was responsible for the near-fatal attack on T'Challa, a mistake that certainly would have cost Shuri her life if not for the timely intervention of Reed Richards. After Reed saved the day, we Panther/Storm fans had to sit through Richards explaining to our heroes and Namor how they had both "been played." Reed then said he could prove conclusively that Namor was not attacked on his island. Shuri asked how this could be possible as N'iix had run the video files through Wakanda's "most sophisticated equipment." Reed's reply: "No offense to you, Princess, or to you, Professor N'iix, but I daresay I have better equipment." When N'iix begins to take issue..."Wakandan technology is second to...", Ben and Johnny quickly pipe up and basically tell N'iix that Reed ain't braggin'. Reed has a "brain the size of a planet."  More brain power than exists in all Wakanda I would suspect. Ouch.

Upon the heels of Reed's flat-out statement that his equipment was "better" than that of the Wakandas, Ben and Johnny took it upon themselves to very gently (Johnny Storm prefaced his statement with "Hate to say it, friend..."), school Wakanda's Chief Of Security about the ease with which highly-skilled superhero types could circumvent/outwit even the mightiest of armies after Zakar had stated how Wakanda's vibranium was under it's powerful military's protection. By now, we know that it's likely both Shuri and T'Challa were aware of the dire straits Wakanda was in, but that didn't stop Ben from reminding Zakar that he couldn't put his trust in the loyalty of his army asking Zakar the question: "Haven't you been watchin' your own TV news? Wakanda's a boilin' pot on a high flame." Ouch, two times.

Lastly, Doom has had T'Challa's number from the get-go in this whole affair. It would seem that "mano e mano", Doom has proved himself to be the better "mano". T'Challa and Shuri have had to scramble around trying to muster up as much help as possible to do something that T'Challa couldn't seem to do by himself, defeat Doom. So, I agree with you, Vic. I wouldn't say Maberry has castrated T'Challa, Storm, Wakanda...even Bast, but it does appear that at times, Maberry is holding the snipping scissors in one hand and the requisite genitalia of our not-yet-castrated heroes in the other. Still, I'm optimistic about T'Challa's newfound powers and technological advances while still anticipating that in the end, T'Challa will put a whuppin' on Doom the MU won't ever forget.

And as you say Vic, there is more than one kind of A-List. It is a popularity - a universal recognition transcending the comicbook medium - enjoyed by certain comicbook characters.  Unfortunately, this popularity has yet to manifest itself in the "bizarro world of comic book fans" - and I quite agree with your characterization - where Blade and the Black Panther are concerned. Black Panther, a splendid character and beloved by his niche audience, continues to languish because the majority demographic of that "bizarro world" is able to vote for their favorite characters with their buck$. And for a few - thankfully it would seem, a very few - denizens of that "bizarro world of comic book fans", they would sooner cast their vote for someone like the Irredeemable Ant-Man, than for a character who rules a xenophobic, "racist" African nation, who also happens to share his name with that of the Black Panther Party and who although they may consider him to be a cool character, they cannot identify with.
Mr. MajestiK, I like your style. You are the wiser, calmer, more articulate second coming of sinjection to "that other place". You do me proud.

Offline sinjection1

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #35 on: April 26, 2010, 12:22:09 pm »

Great story telling would have the conversation between the Panther spirit and Doom go a little like this: "You have assaulted my followers, even corrupted some of my children. For this you have earned the enmity of Bast. In this game you are playing know that the consequences will be most dire for you. Know you are playing a master, a master who you cannot conquer. A master who is betroved to one who will stop at nothing short of your death."

Instead we get this....



...a Panther god ready to lick Doom's naked ass!


 ;D YES!!!  Say it plain, Ture!   :D

Having seen my fair share (and then some), of the anti-Hudlin/anti-Hudlin's Black Panther posts - some of them from our own Yoda - I had no trouble discerning your fine post for exactly what it was. You're right, Ture. This is not simply and solely a black/white racial issue. "Those arguments were constructed to fail and self destruct". As many times as I have experienced this very thing, I've no doubt but that you are correct. On the other hand, there's bluezulu saying something I have posted myself more than once: "Marvel soo needs a black man writing a black book". Realistically, a black man writing a black book is not the panacea some of us might like to think. Still, bluezulu expresses a frustration I suspect most of us are able to relate to on some level.

For instance, in my view, too many white Marvel Comics fans having too little knowledge of the Black Panther and Wakanda will always dismiss the character as a perennial B-list product. What they know of Wakanda is that it's a xenophobic, racist nation. And yet, a white man - Horatio Walters a.k.a. Venomm - came to Wakanda as an invader, a lieutenant to Killmonger. After befriending Taku, Walters had a change of heart and to my knowledge, never left Wakanda but remained there evidently living there as a Wakandan citizen. I do remember seeing Venomm leading a column of Wakandan troops marching against the Jabari tribe during Priest's run. Priest, a black writer, chose to show Venomm, a white character, in what appeared to be a position of prominence and command over what many white fans might say were racist Wakandan troops.

Like bluezulu, I have "fallen away" from purchasing the traditionally strong Marvel Comics titles. The characters no longer seem to appeal to me as much as they once did. The culture of the books have changed as well and not always to my liking. In recent months, I'd been purchasing Doctor Voodoo which as we all know has been cancelled. I purchased Black Panther, now cancelled. I picked up the Cloak and Dagger one-shot; Cloak is my favorite character. Presently, I'm buying Flags Of Our Fathers and DOOMWAR. That's it. I mention this because I had no idea that the Wakandan X-Man Nezhno was bi-racial until recently.

Apparently, Kyle Yost, a white writer, chose to create (or to re-create), Nezhno as a bi-racial character. I remember a CBR discussion started by the member Magneto X. He was questioning why it was the Wakandan mutant Nezhno was rendered in one illustration having brown eyes, but in another identical illustration having blue eyes. As I recall, the issue of Nezhno's bi-racial heritage was not once mentioned in that exchange and I'm assuming Nezhno's racial heritage wasn't mentioned because at the time of that exchange, Nezhno may not yet have been bi-racial.

If that is the case and Nezhno's bi-racial heritage is a recent development I have to ponder the question why. I had been a proponent of Nezhno leaving the X-Men and returning with Storm to Wakanda. Through bits of information here and there, I've learned that Nezhno did in fact return to Wakanda and wanted very much to fit in. The story as written by Kyle Yost, had Nezhno being rejected by every Wakandan including his own mother. Nezhno saves the life of his brother - whom I'm assuming he didn't know he had until that very moment - and was recognized by his mother who rejected Nezhno on the spot. How could it be that this xenophobic, racist Wakandan woman could put aside those attitudes long enough to allow herself to become inseminated by a Russian, an "outworlder"? Further, how could this Wakandan woman be so cold and heartless to reject the son she carried to term and gave birth to? Why didn't she simply abort Nezhno if she hated him so? How could she love the Russian father, but hate her Russian/Wakandan son?

Because Kyle Yost wanted it that way. He wanted to write a story about how a willing Nezhno returned to Wakanda hoping to find acceptance and a home there, but instead was rejected even by his own mother. So Nezhno, having experienced bitter rejection and hostility from the Wakandans began to yearn for the X-Men and the life he shared with them. This is the sort of situational writing, the creation of circumstances, I am trying to call attention to when I mention white writer's choice/white reader's preference. The way I see it, the white writer chose to write Nezhno's story so that it could not possibly conclude any other way except that to be expected and possibly preferred by the predominant X-Fan readership, many of whom probably couldn't care less if Nezhno ever appeared in another X-book just so long as the character wasn't ever accepted in Wakanda as a Wakandan.

By the way, I'd always believed it was the female mutant who carried and passed on the mutant gene. In Nezhno's case, it appears he received his mutant gene from his Russian father. Is this so?








Mr. MajestiK, I like your style. You are the wiser, calmer, more articulate second coming of sinjection to "that other place". You do me proud.

Offline Catch22

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #36 on: April 26, 2010, 12:46:17 pm »
I picked up DoomWar #3 and I still haven't finished it yet.  The whole scene with Doom and Bast just made me mad.  I know in all types of fiction, gods can be indifferent towards humanity...but a god that is the protector of and is worshipped by a single group just lets an outsider come in, humiliate his worshippers and steals their sacred property...bullsh1t. 

Offline 4sake

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #37 on: April 26, 2010, 01:19:43 pm »

Great story telling would have the conversation between the Panther spirit and Doom go a little like this: "You have assaulted my followers, even corrupted some of my children. For this you have earned the enmity of Bast. In this game you are playing know that the consequences will be most dire for you. Know you are playing a master, a master who you cannot conquer. A master who is betroved to one who will stop at nothing short of your death."

Instead we get this....



...a Panther god ready to lick Doom's naked ass!


 ;D YES!!!  Say it plain, Ture!   :D

Having seen my fair share (and then some), of the anti-Hudlin/anti-Hudlin's Black Panther posts - some of them from our own Yoda - I had no trouble discerning your fine post for exactly what it was. You're right, Ture. This is not simply and solely a black/white racial issue. "Those arguments were constructed to fail and self destruct". As many times as I have experienced this very thing, I've no doubt but that you are correct. On the other hand, there's bluezulu saying something I have posted myself more than once: "Marvel soo needs a black man writing a black book". Realistically, a black man writing a black book is not the panacea some of us might like to think. Still, bluezulu expresses a frustration I suspect most of us are able to relate to on some level.

For instance, in my view, too many white Marvel Comics fans having too little knowledge of the Black Panther and Wakanda will always dismiss the character as a perennial B-list product. What they know of Wakanda is that it's a xenophobic, racist nation. And yet, a white man - Horatio Walters a.k.a. Venomm - came to Wakanda as an invader, a lieutenant to Killmonger. After befriending Taku, Walters had a change of heart and to my knowledge, never left Wakanda but remained there evidently living there as a Wakandan citizen. I do remember seeing Venomm leading a column of Wakandan troops marching against the Jabari tribe during Priest's run. Priest, a black writer, chose to show Venomm, a white character, in what appeared to be a position of prominence and command over what many white fans might say were racist Wakandan troops.

Like bluezulu, I have "fallen away" from purchasing the traditionally strong Marvel Comics titles. The characters no longer seem to appeal to me as much as they once did. The culture of the books have changed as well and not always to my liking. In recent months, I'd been purchasing Doctor Voodoo which as we all know has been cancelled. I purchased Black Panther, now cancelled. I picked up the Cloak and Dagger one-shot; Cloak is my favorite character. Presently, I'm buying Flags Of Our Fathers and DOOMWAR. That's it. I mention this because I had no idea that the Wakandan X-Man Nezhno was bi-racial until recently.

Apparently, Kyle Yost, a white writer, chose to create (or to re-create), Nezhno as a bi-racial character. I remember a CBR discussion started by the member Magneto X. He was questioning why it was the Wakandan mutant Nezhno was rendered in one illustration having brown eyes, but in another identical illustration having blue eyes. As I recall, the issue of Nezhno's bi-racial heritage was not once mentioned in that exchange and I'm assuming Nezhno's racial heritage wasn't mentioned because at the time of that exchange, Nezhno may not yet have been bi-racial.

If that is the case and Nezhno's bi-racial heritage is a recent development I have to ponder the question why. I had been a proponent of Nezhno leaving the X-Men and returning with Storm to Wakanda. Through bits of information here and there, I've learned that Nezhno did in fact return to Wakanda and wanted very much to fit in. The story as written by Kyle Yost, had Nezhno being rejected by every Wakandan including his own mother. Nezhno saves the life of his brother - whom I'm assuming he didn't know he had until that very moment - and was recognized by his mother who rejected Nezhno on the spot. How could it be that this xenophobic, racist Wakandan woman could put aside those attitudes long enough to allow herself to become inseminated by a Russian, an "outworlder"? Further, how could this Wakandan woman be so cold and heartless to reject the son she carried to term and gave birth to? Why didn't she simply abort Nezhno if she hated him so? How could she love the Russian father, but hate her Russian/Wakandan son?

Because Kyle Yost wanted it that way. He wanted to write a story about how a willing Nezhno returned to Wakanda hoping to find acceptance and a home there, but instead was rejected even by his own mother. So Nezhno, having experienced bitter rejection and hostility from the Wakandans began to yearn for the X-Men and the life he shared with them. This is the sort of situational writing, the creation of circumstances, I am trying to call attention to when I mention white writer's choice/white reader's preference. The way I see it, the white writer chose to write Nezhno's story so that it could not possibly conclude any other way except that to be expected and possibly preferred by the predominant X-Fan readership, many of whom probably couldn't care less if Nezhno ever appeared in another X-book just so long as the character wasn't ever accepted in Wakanda as a Wakandan.

By the way, I'd always believed it was the female mutant who carried and passed on the mutant gene. In Nezhno's case, it appears he received his mutant gene from his Russian father. Is this so?








No either the mother (Storm, Cable & Wolverine all are mutants because of there mothers) or father (Siryn, Namor, all 3 of Max/Magneto living kids, Beast are all mutants because of their father) & sometimes both can carried the x-gene (Guthries {Cannonball Husk & etc.}, Rasputins {Mikhail, Colossus &Magik} & Nightcrawler are mutants because of both parents) can carries the x-gene... Yes Nez got his x-gene from his dad..

Also I agree he could had atleast one Wakandan (other than the Royal Fam.) instead of showing everyone either dislike him or was just indifferent to him.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 04:37:43 pm by 4sake »
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Offline Open palm

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #38 on: April 26, 2010, 04:20:56 pm »
I picked up DoomWar #3 and I still haven't finished it yet.  The whole scene with Doom and Bast just made me mad.  I know in all types of fiction, gods can be indifferent towards humanity...but a god that is the protector of and is worshipped by a single group just lets an outsider come in, humiliate his worshippers and steals their sacred property...bullsh1t. 

Oh come on.  ::) He passed the guidelines of the test. Of course, neither Ra nor his son Horus would have allowed it. But that's not the point. Mortals shouldn't 2nd guess gods.
Do you prefer a hero who will confirm your deepest fears? Or a hero who will inspire faith in humanity and goodness?

Offline KIP LEWIS

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #39 on: April 26, 2010, 04:29:55 pm »
The PG was just happy that Doom didn't just steal his powers like he stole the Beyonders. 

Offline Francisco

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #40 on: April 26, 2010, 04:35:57 pm »
Arrogance.. So much arrogance.. I think it will come back later to bite Doom in the ass.
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Offline Open palm

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #41 on: April 26, 2010, 04:36:36 pm »
Of course, the Beyonder has better mojo than the Panther God.
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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #42 on: April 26, 2010, 10:13:44 pm »
Sinjection1 you demonstrate a clarity that make your posts a pleasure to read. In the same vein as your views on Nezhno I had similar feelings about the whole Kasper Cole situation. I remember someone saying they wanted a Vin Diesel type, a racially ambiguous character. His race however ambiguous was often referred to. Instead they could have focused on someone like Night Thrasher. He could have had a Wakandan bloodline and would have made an excellent protege. Since he was already trained this would have been an excellent opportunity to show the superior training of the worlds greatest warriors, the Wakandans.

I feel that both Priest and Reggie's BPs really set a precedence  that is often disconcerting and to some even offensive.  This demonstrates what you, Bluezulu, Emperor Jones and myself are in complete understanding of. Afrakan (insert Black if need be) writers that are politically, historically and culturally informed and unashamedly and unapologetically Afrakan need to write Afrakan characters.

I did not forget you Catch 22. You said in three sentences what took me several paragraphs to say. Every time I see the Panther god's face that I posted I hear your one word epithet..."bullsh*t."




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Offline Daoud

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #43 on: April 27, 2010, 02:40:02 am »
@ Everybody: there's more than one kind of A-list.

Everybdy knows who Blade is now. They might not know there is a comic book about the character, but they know about Blade as a multimedia entity. To me that's actually a bigger deal than being a-list in the bizarro world of comic book fans.

Storm has her own ride at Great Adventure, girls and women dress up as her every holloween but she struggles to get speaking time in the several books she appears in. 

The world is about to be introduced to War Machine in Iron Man 2 and even if the character is as well recieved as I think he going to be (has Don Chedle EVER been bad in a movie?) I won't be holding my breath waiting to see him get more shine from Marvel outside of being(at best) Steve Roger's second in command in the Secret Avengers.

You can't make the 100,000 odd aging fanboys open thier minds. Just go around them I say.

Exactly Vic.

f*ck their "A" list!

I can only be but so concerned about other peoples negative opinions before I lose interest.

T'Challa is already "A" list as far as I'm concerned.  I trust that the business end of Marvel knows that they have to diversify their product.
Catering to the current dominant comic buyers is actually an impediment to the growth of the American comic industry.

Marvel Executives have repeatedly stated that Storm is their most franchised female character but compare the number of her appearances in comics to Wolverine's.  As a reader I just want her appearances to be good to me, but as a business, what is Marvel doing with the character?  Why can't they translate the characters overall popularity to the inbreed fringe that is comicdom? (OK that is rhetorical. ;D)'

I'm not interested in reading Black Panther interact wth the larger Marvel U if it entails denigrating and diminishing the character and his mythos.


Excelsior!

Daoud

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Re: Doomwar and the many "mistakes" of Reginald Hudlin.
« Reply #44 on: April 27, 2010, 02:49:51 am »
I don't think Mayberry is writing a great story as of yet. He is writing a great Doom however. A great story needs both a great antagonist and a great protagonist, and Black Panther simply isn't measuring up. Insult becomes added to injury when we witness the abysmal portrayal of Storm.

Great story telling would have given us a Tchalla who used sign language known only to he and Storm to communicate. Great story telling would have shown Tchalla ordering Wakandan sorcerers to capture the spirit of Dooms mother (or physically capture her if she is alive), with a smirking Tchalla remarking: "You took something of great value from me. I now return the favor."  Great story telling would show the pendulum swaying with each move and counter move. A masterpiece of a figurative chess match between two masters.

Great story telling would have the conversation between the Panther spirit and Doom go a little like this: "You have assaulted my followers, even corrupted some of my children. For this you have earned the enmity of Bast. In this game you are playing know that the consequences will be most dire for you. Know you are playing a master, a master who you cannot conquer. A master who is betroved to one who will stop at nothing short of your death."

Instead we get this....



...a Panther god ready to lick Doom's naked ass!



Great story ideas Ture!

I will say I was really dissapointed at the portrayal of the Panther God after the way she/he been shown lately.

I picked up DoomWar #3 and I still haven't finished it yet.  The whole scene with Doom and Bast just made me mad.  I know in all types of fiction, gods can be indifferent towards humanity...but a god that is the protector of and is worshipped by a single group just lets an outsider come in, humiliate his worshippers and steals their sacred property...bullsh1t. 


Exactly Catch22!


Excelsior!

Daoud
« Last Edit: April 27, 2010, 02:51:52 am by Daoud »