Author Topic: Arizona no like Latinos  (Read 34631 times)

Offline Afro Samurai

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 243
  • THE BLACK MAN IS GOD!!!!
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #75 on: May 04, 2010, 01:40:15 pm »
Watch more latins start acknowledging their black race cause of this......
INTERRACIAL RELATIONSHIPS IS A SIN!!!!!! YOU'LL DIE QUICKER AND ALSO BURN IN HELL. THOSE ARE THE FACTS, BITCHES!!!!!!!!!

Offline Vic Vega

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 4148
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #76 on: May 04, 2010, 02:07:57 pm »
Why just investigate black and brown people? Why don't just investigate anyone who wants to work for you? Everyone.. Black, white, Asian, Latino male or female. If you can't prove you're a citizen or legal immigrant you can't have a job. The employers could be given a certain amount of time to make sure the person they hired isn't an illegal immigrant just in case fake documentation is provided. If after that certain amount of time the employer hasn't done anything in his power to make sure the new guy isn't an illegal immigrant he or she should be fined or jailed.

Oh I forgot that the only undesirable illegal immigration is that one practiced by non-whites. ::)

My only point was that since the vast majority of illegal aliens are Hispanic and employers concerned about severe civil and criminal sanctions will therefore be inclined to more closely scrutinize Hispanic employees and potential employees (as that is where their greatest exposure is), even while following the procedures for all employees. So there is the potential for engendering discrimination even in a pure "employer sanctions" regime.  

I don't think anyone would deny that focusing only on the demand side of the equation (by going only after employers) would be less effective in stemming illegal immigration that by focusing on both the demand and the supply sides (by also going after the illegal aliens as well).  It appears that the Arizona law does both.  The issue is whether this can be done in a manner that will not descend to harassment of Hispanic citizens and legal residents.  I imagine this would depend on the circumstances where persons are allowed to be "carded" by the police.  In normal arrests or citations, people are already required to provide their identification.

Of course any system of laws aimed at stemming the tide of illegal immigration will disproportionately impact Hispanics, given the demographics of most illegal aliens in Arizona.  That is just a statistical fact.  This does not mean that foreign nationals here illegally who are "brown" are inherently better or worse that illegal aliens who are of any other race.

An unspoken issue, not articulated on this thread so far, is that there are a lot of people (some in business and some in the Latino activist community, among others) who really do not want our immigration laws to be enforced at all. There is big money involved, for some businesses, for nations such as Mexico (which get remittances from their nationals), and (in the aggregate) for the illegal aliens themselves. Perhaps the primary concern here is not really "racism" but rather that Arizona is determined to see that our immigration laws are enforced.  Potentially drying up the $$$ well, for those here illegally and the busineses who hire them and those who benefit from their being here.  But of course phrasing the concern this way would not garner the same degree of sympathy, particularly when American workers are unemployed and struggling to make ends meet.

Well, look at it this way: There is no way in heck that say, produce farmers are going to start paying minimum wage to pick lettuce.

Watch more latins start acknowledging their black race cause of this......


It'll take quite a bit of deporting for that to happen in some cases. :-\
« Last Edit: May 04, 2010, 02:11:15 pm by Vic Vega »

Offline BlackRodimus

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 831
  • You got me straight trippin', boo.
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #77 on: May 04, 2010, 02:22:53 pm »
Watch more latins start acknowledging their black race cause of this......

It'll take quite a bit of deporting for that to happen in some cases. :-\

LOL Basically. Since some Latinos are as dark as black people, though, that's why I expect black people to be scooped up right along with this nonsense. And like Reggie predicts (and I'm sure he hopes he's wrong, as do I), "and his attempts to explain his identity being taken as backtalk and his head being split open by a cop's billy club to teach him a lesson" might start happening as well.

Again, going by looks is b.s. If Luis Miguel was a lettuce picker, he wouldn't get carded cause they'd assume he's white. LOT of Mexicans look white (surprise surprise), so what about them? That's what I meant by my "can't assume they all look like Juan Valdez comment". I hate the convo keeps getting shifted AWAY from that.
"don't fight the power, be the power" - Reginald Hudlin

Offline Cheirel

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 863
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #78 on: May 04, 2010, 02:45:43 pm »
Well I think this might be a good summer to go check out the grand canyon. Didn't they build a new platform? no more having to ride a damn burro. >:(

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #79 on: May 05, 2010, 07:06:17 pm »
As you may have heard, the Arizona law was revised to clarify: "A law enforcement official or agency of this state or a county, city, town or other political subdivision of this state may not consider race, color or national origin in implementing the requirements of this subsection except to the extent permitted by the United States or Arizona Constitution."

In a news release issued after signing the changes to the law, Gov. Brewer said, "These changes specifically answer legal questions raised by some who expressed fears that the original law would somehow allow or lead to racial profiling. These new amendments make it crystal clear and undeniable that racial profiling is illegal, and will not be tolerated in Arizona. I am proud that the Arizona Legislature has listened carefully to everyone's concerns, and, in a gesture of statesmanship, acted swiftly and appropriately to lay to rest questions over the possibility of racial profiling."

As to whether this law will stand up in court, I've been doing some more thinking on the subject. Unlike laws that have been struck down in other states that attempted to add restrictions not found in Federal Law, the Arizona statute parallels Federal Immigration Law.  There is therefore a strong argument that the State has the inherent power and the right to enforce Federal Law and to work hand in hand with Federal Law Enforcement. This occurs in myriad contexts. The Arizona law adds nothing that is not already in Federal Law.  This includes, by the way, the requirement for legal immigrants to carry proof of their legal status.  So I believe that the opponents of the law will have some heavy legal hurdles to overcome.  Though, from what I'm reading now in the Media, it looks like the legal challenges, proposed referendum, etc ... may be more delaying tactics (to delay implementation of the law) rather than legitimate legal challenges.

Reginald, I found the little blurb you posted "just for fun" amusing.  The valid point it makes is that all nations have immigration laws and enforce those laws.  I find the hypocritical stance of the Mexican Government particularly amusing, given that to illegally enter Mexico is a felony punishable by jail time.  In the U.S., there isn't a significant down side for foreign nationals to enter the U.S. illegally.  At the very worst, they will be deported back to their home country, to start all over again.  On the other hand, the up side of illegal entry is significant.  And I'm talking about the people with the best, the most laudable, intentions (which are, of course, most of those who enter the country illegally).  Then, of course, there are the drug smugglers and criminals who have their own reasons for coming to the United States, and who are creating such problems.

On the point made above that the United States was "founded" by illegal immigrants -- I believe this to be untrue. Our nation is largely a "nation of immigrants" but ... most of those who came here historically were legal immigrants (indeed, some were involuntary "legal" immigrants, forced over as slaves, but were here legally from an immigration standpoint).  The other ethnic groups outlined by BmoreAkuma almost entirely came here legally.  As workers, for example, or to flee persecution overseas or just to find opportunity.  I found the citation of "Jews" as primarily being illegal immigrants particularly off base, as Jews were in fact excluded from entering the U.S. in any significant numbers in the 1930s and '40s, and were actively turned away. Those who did immigrate did not sneak over the border illegally, they went through the proper legal immigration channels.  The influx of immigrants in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries was legal immigration.  So yes, we are a "nation of immigrants" but we most certainly are NOT a nation of "illegal immigrants."

Regarding the Arizona statute, the view of the Latino citizens of Arizona would be interesting, but I've not found anything clearly laying this out. A Rasmussn poll of likely voters broke out responses by racial group but surprisingly did not identify Latinos as a distinct group. The racial demographics polled were white, black, and “other,” which presumably encompasses Latinos (30.1 percent of the state’s population as of 2008), Native Americans (4.9 percent), and Asians (2.5 percent). Here’s what he got when he asked respondents if they "favor or oppose legislation that authorizes police to stop and check immigration status" - 63% of the "other" category responded favorably. Given the demographics in the state, most of these non-white non-black respondents had to be Latino. It would not be surprising that Latino citizens, including those who were legally naturalized, would be inclined to have a greater respect for the law and be more concerned about the serious problems caused by illegal immigration, than the illegal immigrants themselves.

Offline Reginald Hudlin

  • Landlord
  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9972
    • View Profile
$90 million at risk in boycott of Arizona
« Reply #80 on: May 11, 2010, 08:32:37 am »

$90 million at risk in boycott of Arizona
Phoenix assesses impact of law on convention business
by Jahna Berry - May. 11, 2010 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic

Metropolitan Phoenix, which already has suffered convention cancellations because of Arizona's new immigration law, risks losing as much as $90 million in hotel and convention business over the next five years because of the controversy, according to city estimates.

The City Council will be briefed on the issue at 2 p.m. today.


The new immigration law requires police to ask for proof of citizenship if they suspect someone is in the country illegally. The law has attracted international attention, as well as calls for tourists and businesses to boycott Arizona.

Phoenix city and tourism officials have compiled a "watch list" of about 20 events, said David Krietor, a deputy city manager tracking the issue.

The list consists of four organizations that have canceled events and more than a dozen others that have booked events but have expressed concerns about the new law.

Those watch-list events would affect city-run venues, such as the Phoenix Convention Center and the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel, as well as hotels and resorts around the Valley.

"We have an image and public-relations problem of what might be unprecedented proportions," Krietor said.

The $90 million figure represents the estimated amount that those groups' members would spend in the region. Some events are scheduled this year. Others are booked as far out as 2015.

People who attend Phoenix Convention Center events alone spend about $350 million each year, officials have said.

Recent cancellations include the oldest African-American Greek-lettered fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., which was supposed to hold a July meeting at the Sheraton. The fraternity's annual convention was expected to draw about 5,000 attendees and as many as 10,000 visitors, a fraternity spokesman said.

Organizers will now hold that event in Las Vegas.

Other cancellations, all for 2012, are the National Association of Black Accountants, the International Communications Association and the National Urban League.

The city did not have attendance estimates for all of the groups, but they represent about 16,000 room nights in local hotels, Krietor said.


Host city?

At today's meeting, the city is likely to discuss strategies to help retain tourism, Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon said.

But he worries that the impact of the immigration debate is already creating a ripple effect.

Some conventions that have decided to stay in Phoenix don't want to publicize that fact because they fear being boycotted themselves, Gordon said.

He also has heard that conventions that have decided to stay in Phoenix are getting fewer attendees and fewer sponsors.

"It's a near economic crisis," Gordon said.

The watch list does not include the Republican and Democratic national conventions in 2012. Phoenix is being considered for both, but both parties are under pressure to avoid metro Phoenix.

Democratic leaders were in Phoenix a few weeks ago, but are in the early stages of the selection process.

Phoenix is one of three finalists for the GOP gathering, along with Salt Lake City and Tampa.

Millions are at stake. The convention where President Barack Obama accepted the Democratic nomination generated $266 million in economic spending in the region, according to a Denver study.

On Wednesday, the 168-member Republican National Committee will hear the selection panel's recommendation, spokesman Jahan Wilcox said.



Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2010/05/11/20100511phoenix-convention-center-boycott.html#ixzz0ndS1plr9

Offline Mastrmynd

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 8172
  • Check my new site www.top20takeover.VVCRadio.com
    • View Profile
    • http://arvellpoe.atspace.com/
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #81 on: May 11, 2010, 12:42:02 pm »

If you cross the U.S. border illegally, you get:

1. A job,
2. a drivers license,
3. a social security card,
4. welfare,
5. food stamps,
6. credit cards,
7. subsidized rent or a loan to buy a house,
8. free education,
9. free health care,
10. a lobbyist in Washington,
11. billions of dollars worth of public documents printed in your language,
12. and the right to carry your country’s flag while you protest that you don’t get enough respect.


(sounding like Nelson from "The Simpson's")  Ha HA!


Listen to my entertaining radio show, "The Takeover: Top 20 Countdown" at www.top20takeover.VVCRadio.com.

Right on to the real and death to the fakers!  Peace out!

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #82 on: May 11, 2010, 08:02:41 pm »
Reginald, as to the article you posted.  Lovely.  An economic Civil War, waged against those who are seeking to do nothing but enforce our existing immigration laws.  Seems just a little excessive. But the hype against Arizona has been enormous. So, sadly, it does not surprise me.

Offline Reginald Hudlin

  • Landlord
  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9972
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #83 on: May 11, 2010, 08:13:53 pm »
Reginald, as to the article you posted.  Lovely.  An economic Civil War, waged against those who are seeking to do nothing but enforce our existing immigration laws.  Seems just a little excessive. But the hype against Arizona has been enormous. So, sadly, it does not surprise me.

When Arizona refused to observe the national Martin Luther King holiday, signed into law by Ronald Reagan, was that hype too? 

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #84 on: May 11, 2010, 08:36:31 pm »
So that's what this is really all about?

Those who opposed MLK day were comprised of three groups: (1) racists/bigots; (2) those who objected to some of his extreme Leftist (some would say "anti-American") pronouncements later in his life before he was murdered; and (3) those who felt national holidays should be reserved for elected officials such as Presidents.

Fine, enjoy your new Civil War. Really, that's what folk on the Left have been itching for, for a long long time now. To tear our country apart.  :P

Offline Reginald Hudlin

  • Landlord
  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9972
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #85 on: May 11, 2010, 08:40:31 pm »
There was a Civil War over the humanity of black people already.  And they LOST.  They keep trying to fight it over and over again, but the results keep ending up the same.  And it's driving them so crazy they run around with tea bags on their hats.

And if you think MLK's comments in any point of his life were anti-American, I can only pity you.

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #86 on: May 12, 2010, 06:47:34 am »
There was a Civil War over the humanity of black people already.  And they LOST.  They keep trying to fight it over and over again, but the results keep ending up the same.  And it's driving them so crazy they run around with tea bags on their hats.

And if you think MLK's comments in any point of his life were anti-American, I can only pity you.

Reginald, many people disagreed with MLK when he diverged from civil rights and started placing greater emphasis on geopolitics and opposition to the Vietnam War, opposition to capitalism, favorably referring to Fidel Castro, advocacy of massive wealth redistribution, and the like. This does not in any way take away from his significant, indeed his unique, contribution in the arena of civil rights. I personally support MLK day, for that reason, and did at the time it was proposed.  But I can understand why, at the time the holiday was proposed, others might not have, for the reasons cited. So ... pity away, if you wish. 

Had King not been assassinated, but rather had died of natural causes as an older man, it is fair to speculate that we would not have a Martin Luther King Day.  In lieu of that, a "Civil Rights Day" would have been a proposal that I would have supported. Because it is the explicit endorsement of the Civil Rights Movement, by the creation of MLK Day, that motivates my support for the holiday. King was a man who accomplished a great deal, though he was not a saint, and reasonable men and women can and did disagree with his positions on matters unrelated to the Civil Rights Movement. That said, his accomplishments and galvanizing role in the Civil Rights Movement justify the holiday. Also, the fact that he was murdered for that role lends reason to honor the man and by so doing condemning that act of racist violence and hatred, as something anathema to American Values.

As to your other comments, they really don't merit a response, since as we have discussed for pages and pages, the Tea Party Movement is focused on economic issues, fiscal responsibility, individual liberty, support for a strong national defense, and the like. Welcoming the participation of everyone who embraces those principles.

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 10386
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #87 on: May 12, 2010, 07:36:58 am »
Say, Mike...

Did you know that the original tea party protestors that dumped crates of tea in the Boston harbor wore blackface and dressed as Native Americans so that they could not be identified by the British?

Guess who took the punishment for their crimes when the British could not catch the culprits?
« Last Edit: May 12, 2010, 07:39:26 am by Battle »

Offline Curtis Metcalf

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 4516
  • One never knows, do one?
    • View Profile
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #88 on: May 12, 2010, 07:47:34 am »
Reginald, as to the article you posted.  Lovely.  An economic Civil War, waged against those who are seeking to do nothing but enforce our existing immigration laws.  Seems just a little excessive. But the hype against Arizona has been enormous. So, sadly, it does not surprise me.

So choosing to spend your money elsewhere is somehow equivalent to committing treason?  ::)
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Arizona no like Latinos
« Reply #89 on: May 12, 2010, 07:48:36 am »
Oh, OK, I see.  Now support for the Boston Tea Party and its opposition to taxation Without representation, and perhaps more broadly support for the American Revolution, is racist?  Sheesh. This really is nuts.