Author Topic: This Week at NASA  (Read 2093 times)

Offline Magic Wand

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1635
    • View Profile
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." --Aristotle, Greek philosopher

Доверяй, но проверяй

Offline Magic Wand

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1635
    • View Profile
Re: This Week at NASA
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2010, 06:34:20 pm »
CSExtra includes reports on space policy developments and new scientific discoveries about the Earth’s climate, the moon and the universe using NASA spacecraft. In an interview, NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station say the outpost has returned to normal after a cooling system problem. A former NASA astronaut faces a discharge from the Navy.

1. From Spacepolitics.com: The Planetary Society has written key members of the House and Senate with concerns about pending legislation affecting NASA’s future. The Society finds legislative planning for NASA incomplete on several fronts. Concerns include a lack of specific exploratory goals and endorsement of a heavy lift rocket without prior investments in new technology.
http://www.spacepolitics.com/2010/08/19/the-planetary-societys-concerns-about-nasa-legislation/

2. From the AP via the Washington Post: Accelerated plant growth attributed to global warming from 1982 through 1999 has reversed over the past decade. However, global temperatures continue to rise. Scientists who make the finding using NASA satellites say drought-like conditions are to blame. The outcome may affect the production of food and bio fuels.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/19/AR2010081904984.html

3. From the New York Times: The moon has shrunk over the last one billion years, according to scientists associated with NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. However, its by a small amount and the moon will not shrink from view.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/20/science/space/20nasa.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=NASA&st=cse

A. From Space.com: The evidence for lunar shrinking is evident in photos exposing previously unnoticed fault lines.
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/shrinking-moon-new-lunar-photos-100819.html

4. From Spaceflightnow.com:  In interviews on Thursday, the three U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station say the outpost has returned to normal operations following three spacewalks and other measures to deal with a malfunction of the external cooling system.
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/station/exp24/100819cbs/

A. From the Salem News of Massachusetts: As part of the summer of innovation, students in Massachusetts program spherical robots aboard the International Space Station for a race conducted by astronaut Shannon Walker. MIT sponsored the student involvement.
http://www.salemnews.com/local/x332266689/GOING-OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD

B. From CNN.com: NASA Astronaut Leland Melvin teams with singer Mary J. Blige to encourage young women to excel in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The association is part of NASA’s Summer of Innovation.
http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/08/18/nasa.women.science/index.html?iref=allsearch

5. From NBC and MSNBC: In Jacksonville, Fla., a board of inquiry recommends that former NASA astronaut Lisa Nowak be discharged from the Navy for her part in a stalking incident involving a fellow astronaut and a female romantic rival in 2007.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38779396/ns/technology_and_science-space/

6. From Sky & Telescope Magazine: Astronomers use the Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories to characterize gravitational lensing, a phenomenon in which the gravity of massive objects can bend light. The goal of the study was to refine estimates of the energy density of the universe.
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/101095989.html

7. From the Wall Street Journal: Twenty one museums from around the country are scrambling to obtain one of NASA’s three space shuttle orbiters as they retire.  No one can recall as much enthusiasm for the display of an aircraft since the supersonic Concorde airliner was retired.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703321004575426803336067316.html
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." --Aristotle, Greek philosopher

Доверяй, но проверяй

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11056
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: This Week at NASA
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2019, 07:44:07 am »
Sunday, 15th December 2019

12 New Moons




Astronomers searching for signs of a large planet far beyond Pluto have stumbled across 12 previously undetected moons orbiting Jupiter, pushing the giant planet's total to a record 79, the Carnegie Institution reported Tuesday.

Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11056
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: This Week at NASA
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2021, 11:52:32 am »
Saturday, 15th May  Twenty One
China has landed a spacecraft on Mars for the first time
by Morgan McFall-Johnsen








China has landed its first spacecraft on the surface of Mars, according to Chinese state media.

The mission, called Tianwen-1, or "questions to heaven," is the first to send a spacecraft into the planet's orbit, drop a landing platform onto the Martian surface, and deploy a rover all in one expedition.

If everything went according to plan, a gumdrop-shaped landing capsule separated from the Tianwen-1 orbiter on Friday evening and fell toward Mars.

With the lander and rover safely tucked inside, the capsule plummeted through the Martian atmosphere, friction heating the material around it to temperatures exceeding 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

High above the red-dust Martian surface, a supersonic parachute had to deploy to slow the capsule's fall.

As the lander neared its destination, thrusters should have fired downward to help it decelerate.

Then it should have lowered itself to the surface on a set of legs to absorb the impact.

China has not released details about the state of the lander or rover.

But if everything is in good shape, the landing would make China the third nation to ever successfully put a robot on the Martian surface.

It's the first non-NASA Mars landing since the Soviet Union's rover touched down in 1971.

Tianwen-1 launched in July 2020 and the spacecraft slipped into orbit around Mars in February.

Landing was "the most challenging part of the mission," the CNSA previously said.

Only half the spacecraft that have ever attempted a Mars landing have succeeded.

Now, China's first Mars lander and rover are sitting in the middle of Utopia Planitia, a vast field of ancient volcanic rock that may have extensive reserves of water ice beneath its surface.

If space agencies like NASA someday send humans to Mars, water would be a crucial resource because it can both sustain astronauts and get broken down into hydrogen and oxygen for rocket fuel.

It's unlikely Mars-bound spaceships could carry enough water, oxygen, and hydrogen for the entire journey there and back.

If all goes well, the lander will deploy a two-track ramp for the six-wheeled rover to roll down onto Martian soil.

The rover is called Zhurong, named for ancient Chinese mythology's god of fire, according to the CNSA.

It's set to explore the region and search for its water ice with ground-penetrating radar.

The mission is also intended to help China prepare for a future attempt to return Martian rocks or dirt to Earth in the late 2020s.

"Landing safely on Mars is a huge challenge, especially for China's first soft landing attempt," Long Xiao, a planetary scientist at the China University of Geosciences, told National Geographic ahead of the attempt.

"But it is a necessary step for Mars and deep-space exploration."

At 530 pounds, Zhurong is about the size of the Spirit and Opportunity rovers NASA landed on Mars in 2004.

It could take more than a week to deploy the lander's ramp and roll the rover onto Martian soil, journalist Andrew Jones reported for IEEE Spectrum.

Then it will open its butterfly-wing solar panels to soak up the sunlight and charge its batteries.

Once the rover is on the ground, it has about 90 days to study Mars.

That's its official mission timeline, but Spirit and Opportunity had the same three-month window and ended up exploring Mars for six and 14 years, respectively.

The Tianwen-1 orbiter will continue circling the red planet for one Martian year (two Earth years), relaying data to Earth and taking photos.

Its main goal is to "perform a global and extensive survey of the entire planet," according to a journal article by Tianwen-1 scientists.

This will involve charting Mars' geology, surveying its climate, and measuring its electromagnetic and gravitational fields.





















Offline Battle

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 11056
  • M.A.X. Commander
    • View Profile
Re: This Week at NASA
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2021, 03:26:48 am »
Tuesday, 27th July  Twenty One
Jeff Bezos Offers to Waive $2 Billion for NASA Moon Contract
by Benjamin Katz




Jeff Bezos offered to waive $2 billion in fees over the next two years to win his space company, Blue Origin LLC, a joint contract for the NASA lunar-lander program that was awarded solely to Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

The billionaire founder of Amazon.com Inc. said the National Aeronautics and Space Administration should return to an original plan to dual source its Artemis program that aims to return U.S. astronauts to the moon’s surface this decade.

The agency awarded SpaceX the contract after opting to go with a single supplier due to budget constraints.

In an open letter Monday to Bill Nelson, NASA’s administrator, Mr. Bezos said his fee-waiving offer would remove those constraints.

“I believe this mission is important. I am honored to offer these contributions and am grateful to be in a financial position to be able to do so,” Mr. Bezos said.

He added that Blue Origin would be able to achieve a human moon landing in 2024.