Author Topic: 2010 FIFA World Cup  (Read 8606 times)

Offline Stringer

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2010 FIFA World Cup
« on: October 24, 2006, 06:48:43 pm »
2010: Skills shortages in IT
By INet-Bridge, 24 October 2006
 
South Africa's information technology industry (IT) will need 115 000 professionals ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup with Microsoft Certified System Engineers (MCSE) in critical short supply, a local IT group said on Tuesday.
 
IT Intellect's Cape Town branch manager, Shaun Quin, said the mind-set that the IT industry was flooded with MCSE's was wrong as many of them were never re-skilled on new software and technology that were introduced over the past five years.

"It is arguably true that five years ago there was an over supply of MSCE graduates but now, I believe there is a shortage," he said.

He added that software engineers who received MSCE certificates five years ago, were way behind the technology curve as Microsoft had since launched version 2000, version 2003 and soon there would be version 2005.
 

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2006, 06:50:58 pm »
South Africa: Soccerex to Bring Business Onside

Business Day (Johannesburg)

October 24, 2006
Posted to the web October 24, 2006

Mninawa Ntloko
Johannesburg

GAUTENG has fought off stiff competition from several European and Middle East rivals to win the rights to host the world's largest soccer exhibition, Soccerex, from 2007 to 2009.

The three-day annual event -- often described as the meeting between business and football -- will be first held in November next year in Sandton and is expected to bring more than $100m into the economy, as well as provide media coverage estimated at billions of rands.

Gauteng finance MEC Paul Mashatile said yesterday the expected 5000 visitors from around the world would make a substantial injection into the South African economy and the event itself would create numerous job opportunities.

"Many jobs will be created in the tourism industry and the visitors will spend money while making their deals," he said.

Previous host cities of the event include London, Paris, Los Angeles and this year's host, Dubai.

Mashatile said SA had about 7-million visitors last year and the tourism industry expected Soccerex to help the figure to grow to 10-million in the years leading up to the 2010 Fifa World Cup.

Soccerex is the only business convention for football and includes festivals, global exhibitions and conferences for stakeholders in the sport.

Soccer legends, the world's top clubs and soccer-playing nations are regular participants at the event, where an estimated R5bn worth of business deals were negotiated last year in Dubai. Soccerex estimates that about R7bn worth of deals will be negotiated when the event comes to Sandton.

Legends such as Eric Cantona and Franz Beckenbauer are expected to attend as part of a long list of the sport's royalty.

Soccerex chairman Tony Martin said he was confident that the 2007, 2008 and 2009 events would be the biggest yet.

"About 75% of the spending on sport is on football and the wealthiest and most influential businessmen from around the world will be coming to SA," Martin said yesterday.

South African football has a long association with Soccerex that dates back to 1996.

Frequent South African attendees include the Premier Soccer League (PSL), the South African Football Association, top-flight sides Kaizer Chiefs, Orlando Pirates and Mamelodi Sundowns.

 
Chiefs chairman Kaizer Motaung and his Pirates counterpart Irvin Khoza, 2010 World Cup local organising committee CEO Danny Jordaan, PSL CEO Trevor Philips and even SA Tourism CEO Moeketsi Mosola have all addressed the Soccerex conference.

In fact, the PSL brand was officially launched to the international soccer fraternity at Soccerex 2004 in Dubai and Phillips used the opportunity to set up a foundation that he said at the time would allow the product to be taken to a global audience through television.

The PSL boss said Soccerex was a perfect platform to host the brand as some of the sport's most influential figures were attending.

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2006, 03:34:10 am »
Is South Africa ready to welcome the world?

No, it's not the Charleroi compensation case — which has the possibility of being the next Bosman ruling — nor is it the pending election for the presidency of UEFA. It's not even the upcoming FIFA elections, at which Joseph "Sepp" Blatter may face a challenge for the first time since 2002.

The biggest issue on the world soccer horizon right now is the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. It's an issue that has dominated global discussion since this summer, and is likely to be a major factor in how FIFA does business for the next year and a half.

Simply put, the question is this: Can South Africa successfully host a World Cup when it lacks the infrastructure required to deliver water and electricity, transport goods and services, and ensure the safety of its own citizenry?

The statistics out of South Africa are shocking to say the least.

According to the United Nations, South Africa is ranked second out of all nations for assault and murder per capita. Fifty murders a day, on average, occur in the nation, and South Africa apparently suffers as many assaults per day as a country in a state of war. Monday, the Catholic archbishop of Johannesburg, Buti Tlhagale, echoed many when he said that "violent crime is becoming part of the landscape of South Africa."

The UN's Development Program also ranked South Africa low on its latest HDI (Human Development Index): 120 out of 177. According to the CIA, 21.3% of the adult population of the nation is infected with HIV and 50% of the country lives below the poverty line.

Transportation in the country is a major issue, with aging minibuses forming a shaky spine. Tuesday, in conjunction with a workshop on the World Cup, the leading financial newspaper, Business Day, published a scathing editorial on the situation, writing that there is "clear evidence" that the road, rail and bus networks "are rapidly deteriorating."

 
South African President Thabo Mbeki (R) receives the FIFA flag from FIFA executive comittee member Amos Adamu at the 2010 FIFA World Cup "Kick-off" workshop at a conference center in Cape Town. (GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/Staff / Getty Images)

"The test should be whether a foreigner will be able to ride safely on a Metrorail train, or in a minibus taxi," wrote the paper in an unsigned leader. "At the moment, that tragically is often not even the case for South Africans."

Partly because of the fact that its own money is on the line, Blatter has taken an unusually hard line in public against the political bloc he rode to power. In September, Reuters quoted him as saying that he had "yet to see the pickaxes and spades needed to start the work."

Such criticism is unusual for Blatter, who is typically the consumate politician. Instead, others are making the case that South Africa can work. Aside from a brief statement of support, other FIFA pols are out in front, and in the trenches. Tuesday, Dr. Amos Adamu of Nigeria, who is one of the most controversial sports ministers in Africa, expressed confidence that South Africa could get it done.

However, the chatter remains, and it isn't going away: most recently, Franz Beckenbauer said that 2010 was "beset by big problems." Some African delegates at the 2006 World Cup also expressed private concerns over the continent's image should a World Cup fail in South Africa.

And, to be sure, there is some considerable old-line, racist pressure being brought to bear. One high-ranking FIFA executive told us there was opposition from some who didn't want to see a "black World Cup."

That said, there have also been a number of behind-the-scenes meetings to "feel out" a substitute site in case South Africa has to pull out. According to reliable sources, the parties involved in those talks are Australia, Mexico and the United States.

This weekend, U.S. Soccer Federation president Sunil Gulati, while expressing confidence in SA2010, told Fox Soccer Channel's "Center Circle" program that the USA "is always be ready to help FIFA in any way if needed."

There are two factors that complicate matters, one of them political and one of them being the reality of the sheer amount of time needed to stage an event the size of the World Cup.

The political reality is straightforward: Blatter built his presidency on exploiting the fact that each FIFA member has one vote. This means the Cook Islands' vote has as much weight as one from England or Spain. It is a system that Blatter had visited before to keep ex-president Joao Havelange in power, and then succeed him.

CONCACAF, for example, reliably delivers its bloc of votes to him (35 in 2002; CONCACAF now has 40 member associations) Africa has delivered strongly for Blatter in the past, and helped him to a remarkable victory in 2002 despite his leadership being snared in a public, far-ranging corruption scandal.

Should Blatter take away "Africa's Cup," there surely would be political repercussions, and the prevailing wisdom is, if South Africa is to default, that it would wait until after the general elections to do so.

The time factor, however, is not so straightforward. In the past few months, we've had a number of conversations with people who worked on the 1994 World Cup, and there has been an emerging consensus in our chats that time is running out to get the basics done. By this time in 1990, for example, stadium deals and signage had largely been negotiated, and the USWCOC was deep in negotiations with the U.S. State Department.

If the World Cup were to be relocated, there simply might not be enough time to stage it successfully anywhere.

Part of the problem that the 2010 World Cup faces is of FIFA's own making. In 2006, South Africa was ready and able to host the Cup, and everyone agrees that it would have performed superbly. However, in an infamous incident involving New Zealand's Charlie Dempsey, the Cup was instead awarded to Germany.

Today, South Africa is in a far, far different place than it was four years ago. Arguably, the country may be in a different place by the time 2010 rolls around, but few — save for South Africa's politicians — are so optimistic.

There may be one factor that trumps all, and that is money.

FIFA has made money on each of the last three World Cups and now stands to lose money in Africa if things remain as they stand. For the first time, FIFA is having to almost wholly subsidize this World Cup — instead of just pocketing the TV rights money — and costs associated with the 2010 Cup have ballooned from $300 million to $1.59 billion.

South Africa may just be too big a gamble for an organization that is used to winning.

Contact Jamie at Jamie.trecker@gmail.com . Jamie is assisted by Li Bruno and Jerry Trecker. Please visit Jamie's blog and website at www.jamietrecker.com. Jamie Trecker's new book, "Love and Blood," a story of the 2006 World Cup, will be released in early 2007 from Harcourt Publishing.

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2006, 03:36:26 am »
South Africa warms to idea of having J'can music at World Cup
 
Saturday, October 28, 2006
 
Jamaican Captain Horace Burrell says he has been asked by the Local Organising Committee (LOC) of FIFA South Africa 2010 to lead efforts to formulate a plan to have Jamaican music and culture a feature at football's greatest show.

Burrell, one of 12 FIFA ambassadors appointed for South Africa 2010, said from Cape Town yesterday that he suggested to the LOC to have Jamaica's reggae music and other aspect's of the island's culture on show in a big way at Africa's first World Cup Finals.

"... when I made the suggestion, the response has been simply tremendous and now I have been asked to play my part in putting a plan together," said Burrell, who is in South Africa to participate in the official launch of activities to begin preparation in what is expected to be the greatest football show yet.
Burrell, former president of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) and current executive committee member of CONCACAF, told Sporting World that he plans to take up the issue with all relevant parties as soon as he returns to the island.

"I will be meeting with the music fraternity and all the stakeholders to come up with a plan that will best serve Jamaica's image over here (South Africa)," he said.
The Caribbean Football Union's senior vice-president said that part of the plan for South Africa is to have fun parks set up close to match venues with big screen television for those who can't get in. These parks, he noted, will be the stage for a number of big concerts featuring name artiste from Africa and around the world.

"It was against this background that we decided that it would be a great opportunity for our reggae music to be showcased," Burrell said.
So whether or not the Reggae Boyz will be in South Africa, Jamaica will have a presence there.
Meanwhile, South Africa's leading English-speaking daily, the Cape Times, has reported that the government called a special session of parliament on Thursday to announce the budget for the World Cup which has been put at 15.2 billion rands (US$2.2 billion).

The report claimed that half of that amount will go towards the construction and renovation of stadia.
FIFA, the world governing body of the sport, has committed US$423 million to the massive effort over four years. Some of that money, it is reported, has already been forwarded to the South Africa LOC for start-up activities.


Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2006, 06:26:03 pm »
Highway Africa News Agency (Grahamstown)

November 1, 2006
Posted to the web November 1, 2006

Mongameli Jabavu
Geneva

South Africa's Department of Communications (DOC) has presented its state of readiness to host the 2010 World Cup to its stakeholders on the 31st of October 2006 in Cape Town South Africa. Prominent stakeholders present were the SABC, Sentech and Telkom-SA.

The Soccer World Cup (SWC) is a technology and capital intensive event to the effect that a small glitch with the availability of appropriate technology and capital investment could render the world cup a fiasco.

In anticipation of the 2010 and 2014 Soccer World Cups, the South African government has promised the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) a state-of the art technology and capital driven World Cup. Improvements that will make the World Cup a successful one include the availability of: -enough radio bandwidth frequency spectrum -improvement in access to broadcast coverage of rural areas -ensure excellent project management skills to manage complex and large productions -availability of adequate bandwidth for international demand on various platforms -upgrading of facilities and technology -funding implications -multiple language delivery -convergence and its implications for 2010

According to international football analysts the 2010 World Cup could be used to determine the readiness of the African continent to host international events of such magnitude, considering that it is the first time in the history of FIFA that the World Cup will be held on the African continent. Furthermore, the 2010 World Cup could be a marketing opportunity for the African continent to improve Africa's image abroad.

Central to a successful world cup is the availability of satellite and fibre optic communications facilities for live broadcasts. The availability of broadband Internet facilities in and around FIFA's hotel facilities can break or boost Africa's chances to host another world cup again. So that at stake is not the image of South Africa alone but that of the African continent and its peoples.

Telecommunications infrastructure that must be made available include the transportation of bi-directional broadcast traffic between the venues and the International Broadcast Centre (IBC) at no specific cost to ensure high quality broadcast services. Furthermore, since the World Cup is a world event, data and voice communications form the backbone of a successful world cup and lack of such facilities could shut off a large chunk of soccer lovers around the world.

The world cup is also an opportunity for the host country to modernize its broadcast infrastructure. For example, the South African Broadcasting Corporation stands to benefit enormously with the introduction of High Density Television (HDTV), while South Africa's distributor of analogue radio and television signals, Sentech will use the opportunity offered by the 2010 World Cup to migrate its services from analogue to digital broadcasting. And Telkom South Africa will for the first in its history utilize its fibre optic communications facilities to provide broadcast services to homes in Africa and overseas destinations.

Furthermore, Interactive television, mobile TV, Internet Portal Television (IPTV) and broadband rollout will provide end-users with a shared personal experience. There is no doubt in the minds of many South Africans that, if the event is properly managed South Africans could be its beneficiaries than its losers.

Meetings with FIFA's broadcasting team to determine what other role the SABC will play during the world cup are going on and training of SABC staffers in running a successful soccer event is also taking place. However, the delivery of the SABC's HDTV infrastructure is still to be made, and the SABC is also engaged in assessing the involvement of other local and African broadcasters in the broadcasting of the 2010 Soccer World Cup.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2006, 07:22:10 pm by Stringer »

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2006, 07:14:06 pm »
Fifa wants low season hotel rates for 2010
    Sivuyile Mangxamba
    November 10 2006 at 11:33AM 
 
Hotel groups and guesthouses contracted by Fifa would have to charge a fixed rate for different grades of accommodation during the 2010 World Cup, the soccer governing body's accommodation and ticketing arm told hoteliers in Cape Town on Thursday night.

This did not go down well with some local hotel owners.

Match, the company mandated by Fifa to be responsible for accommodation, ticketing and IT solutions for the tournament in South Africa, was in town as part of its drive to increase the number of hotels contracted for 2010.

"No guest will pay more than the official rate of that season," said Malcolm Gibson, a Match representative.

Match has a mandate to contract 55 000 rooms for Fifa per day during the World Cup and will also use satellite accommodation for host cities without enough rooms for match days. It has already contracted 4 000 rooms in Cape Town.

The official World Cup rate for accommodation for Fifa-contracted rooms will be linked to the seasonal rates - effectively winter rates for Cape Town. The Fifa World Cup rate excludes breakfast.

Match was contracting rooms out using a complex system, taking into account the 2005, 2006 and 2007 CPIX and season rates, before projecting what an establishment would charge in 2010.

In addition, Fifa would only pay 70 pecent of the price to the hotel while the remainder would go to Fifa for its operating margins.

"We do not want to be seen as a high demand time (event)," said Fifa's Adam Brown.

But Federated Hospitality Association of SA chairman Nils Heckscher said: "I would not be happy to put on a low season rate in a highest demand period. I would rather quote you a high season rate."

The tournament is seen as a massive opportunity for hotel groups and B&Bs

Gibson said only graded accommodation was expected to be contracted by Match.

Offline Toya

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2006, 11:51:18 am »
Stringer, I heard that there is a copy and paste virus going around. Becareful buddy.  :)

In addition it is a genius plan to schedule vacations during FIFA seasons. You get the cheap hotel rates without being required to attend a game. Goal!
...Rassclaat.

Offline Wise Son

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2006, 03:12:29 am »
In addition it is a genius plan to schedule vacations during FIFA seasons. You get the cheap hotel rates without being required to attend a game. Goal!
yeah, but you wouldn't want to skip all the games. OK, maybe Lithuania V Canada or something like that, but ifthere's a Brazil V Holland or the like, how could you skip that?

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Offline Toya

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2006, 08:12:52 am »
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son? Oh, and since when is Holland well known for soccer? My friend is from Holland and she never mentioned soccer as a big event over there...or maybe I never asked.
...Rassclaat.

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2006, 11:22:56 am »
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son? Oh, and since when is Holland well known for soccer? My friend is from Holland and she never mentioned soccer as a big event over there...or maybe I never asked.

holland has never win a world cup, but they have played the final 2 times.

in the seventies, their team was considered the best football team of the world, and they called it '' the clockwork orange'' (because their official t-shirts are orange).

the most important teams in there are PSV eindhoven and AJAX. a peruvian player, ''la foquita'' farfan is playing in the PSV right now, he is one of the starts of the team. he makes a lot of goals.

Offline Toya

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2006, 11:34:33 am »
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son? Oh, and since when is Holland well known for soccer? My friend is from Holland and she never mentioned soccer as a big event over there...or maybe I never asked.

holland has never win a world cup, but they have played the final 2 times.

in the seventies, their team was considered the best football team of the world, and they called it '' the clockwork orange'' (because their official t-shirts are orange).

the most important teams in there are PSV eindhoven and AJAX. a peruvian player, ''la foquita'' farfan is playing in the PSV right now, he is one of the starts of the team. he makes a lot of goals.

Thanks for the info.
...Rassclaat.

Offline Francisco

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2006, 01:46:45 pm »
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son? Oh, and since when is Holland well known for soccer? My friend is from Holland and she never mentioned soccer as a big event over there...or maybe I never asked.

holland has never win a world cup, but they have played the final 2 times.

in the seventies, their team was considered the best football team of the world, and they called it '' the clockwork orange'' (because their official t-shirts are orange).

the most important teams in there are PSV eindhoven and AJAX. a peruvian player, ''la foquita'' farfan is playing in the PSV right now, he is one of the starts of the team. he makes a lot of goals.

Holland just like Spain is one the greatest team to have never won a world cup. They both deserve it.
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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2006, 05:35:12 pm »
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son? Oh, and since when is Holland well known for soccer? My friend is from Holland and she never mentioned soccer as a big event over there...or maybe I never asked.

holland has never win a world cup, but they have played the final 2 times.

in the seventies, their team was considered the best football team of the world, and they called it '' the clockwork orange'' (because their official t-shirts are orange).

the most important teams in there are PSV eindhoven and AJAX. a peruvian player, ''la foquita'' farfan is playing in the PSV right now, he is one of the starts of the team. he makes a lot of goals.

Holland just like Spain is one the greatest team to have never won a world cup. They both deserve it.

spain has never reached the finals, not even the semi-finals i think.

holland has had great teams through history, spain has always have a mediocre national team IMO.
(of course , their league is one of the most importants in the world, along with italy and england, but because in the league, there are players from all parts of the world).

toya maybe your friend didn't mention nothing about football, because there are some people, in holland and in every other part of the world, who simply don't care about football.

Offline Wise Son

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2006, 01:27:12 am »
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son? Oh, and since when is Holland well known for soccer? My friend is from Holland and she never mentioned soccer as a big event over there...or maybe I never asked.
Since the 70s. Players they have or have had, like Ruud Gullit, Johann Cruyuff, Marco Van Basten, Edgar Davids, Dennis Bergkamp, Patrick Kluivert, are all big names, and in a couple of cases legends. The Dutch are pretty much recognised as the best country to never win the World Cup, and they had one final they were amazingly unlucky to win against West Germany. They were the creators of the idea of 'total football', the idea that the game should be free-flowing and inspirational, rather than governed by formations. Also, ever since the 80s they've had plenty of brothers in their teams.
Oh, and:
Lol. How can you not like Wise Son?
You can't. It's been tried, but with no success. ;)
« Last Edit: November 16, 2006, 01:30:23 am by Wise Son »

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Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2006, 08:07:02 pm »
Minister asks: is 2010 a race issue?


By Christelle du Toit
JOHANNESBURG – Is security around the 2010 Soccer World Cup being questioned because South Africa has a majority black government?
Addressing the National Community Police Forum in Midrand yesterday, Minister of Safety and Security Charles Nqakula asked why security concerns were never an issue when it came to international “white” sporting events, such as rugby and cricket, being staged in SA.
Nqakula said: “We don’t want to go back to the conflicts of the past” where black and white were pitted against each other, but asked “Do we want people to say it is because it is not the white man’s sport, but soccer, the black man’s sport?”
Nqakula faced an outcry earlier this year after the police annual crime statistics were released.
Some said South Africa was not ready to stage the international showcase for soccer, due to high crime levels.
Yesterday the Minister admitted that levels of violent crime were “unacceptably high”, but pointed out that they had been on the decline since 1995.
At the time the police statistics were released it was suggested Fifa was considering moving the World Cup to Australia.
Regarding such suggestions, Nqakula asked: “Is it because in South Africa the government of the day is a predominantly black one, and in Australia it is a predominantly white government?”
Nqakula joked that “We have lots of psychics” who were “predicting” high crime levels during the 2010 Soccer World Cup. He asked why they could not warn him before a crime took place.
In answer to criticism Nqakula said the restructuring of the police force was intended to allay security fears.
A study done in 2005 at station level into police resources had revealed a serious capacity problem.
“Despite the fact that there are people on the ground with skills, what is lacking is management skills,” said Nqakula.
He emphasised that the community had a central role to play in fighting crime.