Author Topic: 2010 FIFA World Cup  (Read 8155 times)

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #15 on: November 29, 2006, 09:38:19 am »
Stofile blames racism for negativity over 2010

November 27, 2006, 18:30

Makhenkesi Stofile, the sports minister, says racism is the reason some countries and individuals have cast doubt on South Africa to host a successful 2010 World Cup.

Stofile, who was briefing members of the Eastern Cape Legislature about the preparations for the 2010 soccer World Cup, was reacting to claims that Australia is ready to step in should the World Cup be taken away from South Africa. Stofile told the Eastern Cape Legislature that South Africa was way ahead in its preparations for the 2010 soccer World Cup. He echoed what Sepp Blatter, the FIFA boss, has been saying all along.

He blamed South Africans living in Australia and their negative sentiments towards South Africa. Stofile says they do not like the fact that South Africa is run by a black government "the racism in them is just as bad as the racism in those spectators in England who were brandishing the flag of the old South African flag when they should be supporting their national team."

Yesterday Eric Bost, the new US ambassador to South Africa, was quoted in an interview that few would attend the 2010 World Cup in the country if crime continued at current levels. Stofile said plans are afoot to upgrade the security systems in the country. He says in the end they will be defeated like apartheid was strong and is still strong in some elements but it was defeated and will never come back again. He added that a successful 2010 World Cup depended on a unified South Africa.

Offline Wise Son

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2006, 02:10:58 am »
He blamed South Africans living in Australia and their negative sentiments towards South Africa. Stofile says they do not like the fact that South Africa is run by a black government
Working in my Dad's bar the other week I heard a group of young South African ex-pats talking about politics 'back home', and they were saying that the ANC government 'didn't like White people', and were targetting them in a manner similar to Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and how this was goign to ruin the country. I don't know how accurate that is, but I did wonder if some biterness and resentment might have shaped their opinions.

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Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2007, 02:15:52 pm »
Nigeria Can Win 2010 WC - Utomi

 
Daily Champion (Lagos)

January 10, 2007

The African Democratic Congress (ADC) Presidential Candidate, Prof. Pat Utomi says Nigeria can win the FIFA World Cup to be hosted by South Africa in 2010.

Utomi told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) Forum in Lagos on Tuesday that an ADC government would provide a focused leadership to facilitate the victory.
 
"Even FIFA by the current 9th ranking of Nigeria knows Nigeria's capability.

"An ADC government will ensure that Nigeria goes very far in the World Cup," he added. On Technical Adviser for National team, Utomi said that a foreigner would be hired while local coaches would be encouraged.

"Most of our good players play abroad and are used to foreign coaches. It will be better to have them coach them here.

"The psychology of our players is tuned to working with foreign coaches, so it will be natural to continue the trend."


Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2007, 10:46:09 pm »
Sports boycott helped to overcome apartheid in South Africa
Jan 16, 2007 - 2:06:53 PM   

  'So from that point of view the political influence in sport played a tremendous role in bringing across to people that society is far broader than simply the question of where you stay and what you are allowed to do. 

By Peter Auf der Heyde, [RxPG] Johannesburg, Jan 16 - There is probably no better argument for the close connection between politics and sport than the apartheid in South Africa. Not only were they intrinsically entwined in the country, sport was then also used as a vehicle to rid the country of its apartheid policy.

Apartheid was fundamentally a policy designed to keep economic, political, social and sporting power in the hands of the white population, which constituted a minority of the overall population. Blacks were denied the most basic human rights, including the right to vote.

For many years - the policy of apartheid notwithstanding - South Africa participated at the Olympics and at world championships and several South African athletes achieved excellent results in these competitions.

All of that changed though in 1960 when the British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan made his famous 'Wind of Change' speech in South Africa.

There had, of course, been protest both internally and externally against the racist sports policies of the South African government before 1960, but as more African countries gained independence from their erstwhile colonial masters in the 1960s, this pressure increased dramatically.

South Africa was formally expelled from the International Olympic Committee in 1970 - 10 years after last competing at the showpiece of international sport.

The country was suspended from football's world controlling body FIFA in 1961. After a visit to the country by the English president of FIFA Stanley Rous, the suspension was lifted a short while later and South African football officials suggested they send an all-white team to the 1966 World Cup in England and an all-black one to Mexico four years later.

Not surprisingly, this idea was rejected and the suspension re-imposed. In 1976, after police shot and killed unarmed school pupils protesting against the use of Afrikaans in schools, FIFA expelled the white Football Association of South Africa.

Thereafter the pressure on the South African government increased on all levels - sport being one of them.

Internally the non-racial South African Council on Sport - led the protest, while externally it was the exiled South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee - that was in the forefront of organising resistance to the racist sports policies of South Africa.

The main form of resistance used was an international sports boycott, which became an international rallying point for anti-apartheid activists worldwide. Internally, the protest consisted of demonstrations and the refusal to have any contact with those involved in racist sport. Together these measures comprised the so-called sports struggle.

To counter this pressure, the South African government introduced a number of superficial changes that allowed sporting contacts between races within strict parameters set down by the government.

As pressure grew for fundamental change in South Africa, sport was more and more 'normalised' by the government, but within the framework of a racially divided country. SACOS quickly countered these changes by adopting the slogan: 'No normal sport in an abnormal society.'

In an interview with DPA former SACOS president Joe Ebrahim acknowledges the role the sports boycott had in finally ridding the country of apartheid. 'It was one of those areas that was auxiliary to the political struggle.

'I don't think one can place sport in such a high category as to say that it was instrumental in bringing about change, but I think what it did, it focused people's attention on the fact that we couldn't live almost a dual life in terms of which in everyday society we were denied basic rights, we were denied the opportunity to exercise our universal rights and then go and play sport as if it was a normal world.

'So from that point of view the political influence in sport played a tremendous role in bringing across to people that society is far broader than simply the question of where you stay and what you are allowed to do.

'It has also to deal with interaction between human beings and you can't be accepted to a certain extend being an equal on the weekend when you play sport but then for the rest of the week you are treated as being unequal.'

Offline Wise Son

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2007, 02:42:23 am »
The country was suspended from football's world controlling body FIFA in 1961. After a visit to the country by the English president of FIFA Stanley Rous, the suspension was lifted a short while later and South African football officials suggested they send an all-white team to the 1966 World Cup in England and an all-black one to Mexico four years later.
I'm sorry, i just find that hilarious and sad at the same time.

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Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2007, 06:58:46 am »
FIFA President deems taking FIFA World Cup™ to Africa to be “moral obligation”


FIFA President Joseph S. Blatter and his CAF (Confederation of African Football) counterpart, FIFA vice-president Issa Hayatou addressed African heads of state and government today (29 January 2007) at the 8th African Union Summit in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

The African Union confirmed the launch of the International Year of African Football to coincide with this year’s 50th anniversary of CAF’s foundation in 1957.

In a speech that focused on the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ in South Africa and the “Win in Africa with Africa” initiative, the FIFA President emphasised that “for FIFA and the whole world, taking the FIFA World Cup to Africa is practically a moral obligation to African football and to the African people.”

He also appealed to African governments and the international community to get behind the development of Africa and proposed football as the vehicle for educational, social and health initiatives and as a tool in the fight against discrimination so as to reinforce national unity.

For his part, CAF President Issa Hayatou paid homage to all those who have fought for African football in the past 50 years in order to secure it the place it deserves.

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2007, 03:46:33 pm »
'Africa to benefit from 2010 World Cup'

Addis Ababa - South African President Thabo Mbeki pledged on Monday to ensure the first ever World Cup to be staged on African soil would benefit the whole of continent.
"We have to make absolute certainty that 2010 will benefit Africa and the African diaspora," Mbeki said in a speech at the African Union summit in Addis Ababa.
Countries close to South Africa are hoping to reap significant dividends from the 2010 tournament, both from tourists and teams looking for training bases ahead of the finals.
Interest in football, already the most popular sport in Africa, is also likely to accelerate in the countdown to the big kick-off.
Mbeki said the tournament should leave Africa as a whole better off, and he expressed the hope that it would lead to other countries on the continent staging the world's biggest sporting event.
"We should have this African legacy, we are working on a systematic manner so that it has a lasting legacy," he said before delegates at the summit which included Fifa president Sepp Blatter.
"As we proceed on our way towards 2010, the continent and the African people will be better than they are today thanks to the role of football."
Blatter said Africa had fully earned the right to stage the tournament. South Africa controversially lost out to Germany to host the 2006 event, but bounced back with its follow-up bid.
"Africa has provided the world with so many players and coaches," said Blatter. "We had legitimate joy when South Africa won the rights to host the World Cup in 2010.
"We are optimistic that football can make things smooth and Africa can be looked upon with respect rather than being patronised."
African football has made huge strides in the last two decades and players such as Barcelona's Cameroon striker Samuel Et'o and Chelsea's Ivorian forward Didier Drogba, are gracing the top leagues in Europe.
Issa Hayatou, the head of the Confederation of African Football (CAF), said the decision to hand the continent five places at the next World Cup was a signal of growing respect.
"We will see that we have to prove ourselves after we have been handed five places," he said.
Hayatou echoed Mbeki with his desire for the whole continent to benefit from 2010.
"I want to tell you that the World Cup should be for the entire continent, not only for South Africa," he said.
"We have differences but we should be together from north to south and west to east. Who could have thought about this 20 years ago?" Sapa-AFP



   



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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2007, 01:56:30 am »
First woman ref can play with the best
Lumka Oliphant
April 28 2007

As a little girl, Deidre Mitchell, South Africa's first woman soccer referee, wanted to become a police officer.

Never in her wildest dreams did she think she would one day clinch the title of South Africa's first woman referee. Last weekend she officiated in the Santos versus Kaizer Chiefs match in her hometown of Port Elizabeth.

Mitchell came from a sports-mad family, although they were never keen on soccer.

"My mother played tennis, while my father and my uncles were interested in rugby. I never grew up in a soccer environment."

'I never grew up in a soccer environment'
The 31-year-old from Schauderville was introduced to the sport by a friend who played for Portville FC, a women's club, in 1994 and has never looked back.

"I used to go (to soccer matches) with a friend and started developing an interest in the sport," explained Mitchell.

In 1996 she saw an advert for beginners' courses in refereeing in her area.

"I enrolled, and passed both the fitness and theoretical tests. The next thing I was on the Fifa international referees' list," she said.

But it hasn't been an easy ride.

"The training is very thorough and one has to be very fit to be able to do such a job. I started this in 1996 and only after 11 years was I able to officiate a big game such as the one last week."

She said she became a star overnight and her community was very proud of her.

"Everywhere I go people are congratulating me, my mother is also getting a lot of compliments from people around the neighbourhood. The response has been overwhelming and I have been doing interviews back to back. It's unbelievable," she said.

Mitchell has no children yet but she has a long-term boyfriend, Mervyn Zealand, with whom she has been involved for the past five years. "He has been very supportive, and watched me last weekend. He is very proud of me," she said.

This article was originally published on page 12 of The Star on April 28, 2007

Offline Stringer

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2007, 07:06:25 am »
BLATTER CONFIRMS 2010 CONTINGENCY PLAN

FIFA president Sepp Blatter says a string of countries are lined up to take over the hosting of the 2010 World Cup should South Africa be unable to fulfil their commitments.

Although South African officials have dismissed concerns over preparations for the tournament – insisting the event will take place as planned – there have been worries some venues will be ready in time.

Speaking to BBC TV, Blatter said nations including the US, Spain, Japan, UK and Mexico could all step in to host the event if needed – although he remained confident South Africa would be all set come kick-off.

Blatter said: “Definitely we have a possibility to go somewhere else if something happens. It was the same case in Germany. Something can happen. A natural catastrophe or whatever, a big change in society - everybody against football.

“But for the time being the plan B is South Africa and the plan C we definitely must have a possibility to go somewhere else, but it must be a natural catastrophe.”

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Re: 2010 FIFA World Cup
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2007, 07:13:14 am »
South Africa/Zimbabwe: Fifa Concerned About 'Mugabe Factor'
Business Day (Johannesburg)
Lesley Stones


POLITICAL pressure to end the crisis in Zimbabwe could get an unexpected kick from Fifa, as officials organising the 2010 World Cup are anxious to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe on SA's border.

The "Mugabe factor" could harm the smooth running of the Soccer World Cup, so Fifa would be urging SA's government to intervene and help to resolve the crisis, said former footballer Gary Bailey.

The World Cup could also be the catalyst that finally spurs the government to face up to crime in SA, he said yesterday at the Internetix conference, staged by technology company Internet Solutions.

The 2010 tournament was a chance to "rebrand" the country, said Bailey, a former Kaizer Chiefs player and goalkeeper for England. He was an ambassador for SA's World Cup bid.

"The rest of the world doesn't see us as world class. T hey are very Afro-pessimistic. The World Cup is an incredible opportunity to reposition SA. What's holding us back isn't the infrastructure, it's crime and security."

The government tenders, worth R410bn, were being issued to overhaul SA's infrastructure, said Bailey. "(President Thabo) Mbeki has put R410bn behind it - now we have to force him to deal with crime."

Police statistics released earlier this month showed robberies at residential premises had risen 25,4% for the year to March. That could affect visitors who stayed in bed and breakfast accommodation, Bailey warned. "Every single news organisation will be in SA and we can't say we only have five murders a week, not 10, because that will fill up their pages."

Bailey said he had met Police Commissioner Jackie Selebi after the statistics were issued and came away optimistic.

Selebi promised that 35000 new police would be on the roads by 2010, new centres would be built to process criminal cases, and 55000 more paid reservists should be recruited.


The World Cup would be a success, Bailey said, but the question was how local companies would capitalise on the massive opportunities presented by "the biggest business opportunity ever to reach SA ".

Analysts at Grant Thornton estimate that R51,1bn will be pumped into the economy as a direct result and foreign visitors are expected to spend R15bn on travel, accommodation, food and entertainment.