Author Topic: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws  (Read 3226 times)

michaelintp

  • Guest
Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« on: September 21, 2010, 11:19:38 pm »
Exodus 14:21 explicitly states, "And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the Lord led the sea with the strong east wind all night, and He made the sea into dry land and the waters split." A strong eastern wind as described in the new study (see below) is exactly in line with scripture. This finding serves as evidence for the veracity of the Biblical account of the Exodus. How would ancient human authors know precisely what would be needed physically to split a sea and be sure to include that in the Pentateuch? The fact that the Bible so long ago itself provides an account in line with how a physical parting of the sea would take place lends credence to the idea that such a parting did in fact take place.

A secularist might claim that perhaps the parting of the sea, and the Exodus, did take place, but this proves it was all an accident, a big coincidence. However, according to Jewish tradition, even in the performance of miracles, the Almighty conforms as much as possible to the "laws" of nature.

Parting of Red Sea Jibes With Natural Laws
LiveScience.com
9/21/10

Mother Earth could have parted the Red Sea, hatching the great escape described in the biblical book of Exodus, a new study finds.

A strong east wind, blowing overnight, could have swept water off a bend where an ancient river is believed to have merged with a coastal lagoon along the Mediterranean Sea, said study team member Carl Drews of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. While archaeologists and Egyptologists have found little evidence that any events described in Exodus actually happened, the study outlines a perfect storm that could have led to the 3,000-year-old escape.

"People have always been fascinated by this Exodus story, wondering if it comes from historical facts," Drews said. "What this study shows is that the description of the waters parting indeed has a basis in physical laws."

Drew and his colleagues used models that showed that a wind of 63 mph (101 kph), lasting for 12 hours, would have pushed back waters estimated to be 6 feet (1.8 meters) deep. This would have exposed mud flats for four hours, creating a dry passage about 2 to 2.5 miles (3.2 to 4 kilometers) long and 3 miles (4.8 km) wide.

To match the account in the Bible, the water would have to be pushed back into both the lake and the channel of the river, creating barriers of water on both sides of newly exposed mud flats, which is exactly what the models show could have happened.

As soon as the winds stopped, the waters would come rushing back. Anyone still on the mud flats would be at risk of drowning.

As the Bible story goes, Moses and the fleeing Israelites were trapped between the Pharaoh's advancing chariots and a body of water that has been variously translated as the Red Sea or the Sea of Reeds. In a divine miracle, a mighty east wind blew all night, splitting the waters and leaving a passage of dry land with walls of water on both sides. The Israelites were able to flee to the other shore. But when the Pharaoh's army attempted to pursue them in the morning, the waters rushed back and drowned the soldiers.

"The simulations match fairly closely with the account in Exodus," Drews said. "The parting of the waters can be understood through fluid dynamics. The wind moves the water in a way that's in accordance with physical laws, creating a safe passage with water on two sides and then abruptly allowing the water to rush back in."

A similar phenomenon is found on Lake Erie near Toledo, Ohio, where water will recede several feet when a strong wind blows through, Drews told OurAmazingPlanet.

The research shows how strong and persistent winds can affect water depths, and will also help with understanding storm surges, Drews said.

By pinpointing a possible site south of the Mediterranean Sea for the crossing, about 75 miles (121 km) north of the Suez reef, where other groups have focused, it also could be of benefit to experts seeking to research whether such an event ever took place.

The study is detailed in the online journal PLoS ONE.


Offline Kristopher

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1229
    • View Profile
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2010, 08:52:40 am »
Kool!

Offline Reginald Hudlin

  • Landlord
  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 9884
    • View Profile
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2010, 09:12:54 am »
Doesn't proving that it could have occured naturally undermine it as religious doctrine?

Offline Magic Wand

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 1635
    • View Profile
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2010, 12:56:04 pm »
Doesn't proving that it could have occured naturally undermine it as religious doctrine?
;D
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." --Aristotle, Greek philosopher

Доверяй, но проверяй

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2010, 06:33:42 pm »
Doesn't proving that it could have occured naturally undermine it as religious doctrine?

As I noted above, the Almighty works within the "laws" of nature. To claim it is a coincidence ignores the timing. The splitting of the sea happened just in time to let the Hebrews through, then to kill the pursuing Egyptians. What is the probability of that happening by pure chance?

Also refutes the secular "Bible critics" who claim the Bible was written centuries later, creating fables unfounded in fact. If the event didn't happen, there is no reason in the world a writer centuries later would write about the "East Wind," a fact that would seem irrelevant to the story (until modern science now explains to us the reason).

michaelintp

  • Guest
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2010, 09:48:36 am »
For a classic presentation of the view that God acts through natural processes, refer to the Book of Esther (Megillat Esther), where no "unnatural" miracles occur and God's name is not even mentioned. Yet, through a series of seeming coincidences and "natural" events, one occurring atop another, the Jews are saved from a genocidal plot. This is what the holiday of Purim is all about ... "pur" refers to the casting of lots, to seeming pure chance. The point of the book is that this seeming pure chance is in truth not chance at all.  All the events, from beginning to end, were under Divine direction and control.

Traditional Jews believe that God is hidden behind all the events of the Megillah. Rabbis referred to God's role as הסתר פנים (hester panim, or "hiding of the Face", which is also said to be hinted at in a word play (Megillat Hester) regarding the Hebrew name for the Book of Esther, Megillat Esther—literally, "revelation of [that which is] hidden"). Although Jews believe that everything turned out for the best as a direct result of Divine intervention (that is, a series of miracles), the Book of Esther lacks any mention of God's name, and the events described in it appear to have been nothing more than a result of natural occurrences. On the other hand, Jewish philosophers and scriptural commentators believe that God's name is omitted to emphasize the very point that God remained hidden throughout the story, but was nonetheless present and played a large role in its outcome.

FYI: The holiday of Purim will occur on March 20th next year. Part of the tradition includes dressing up in costumes (as in the "hiding" of the true reality behind a mask).  It is a very joyous holiday.

There are also Talmudic references to miracles, even overt miracles, occurring in a manner that is as close as possible to natural processes.  So the article above is really not inconsistent with the fact that the Splitting of the "Red Sea" was a miracle.

Offline Wise Son

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 3297
  • "intelligent and slightly Black. I'm from the 80s"
    • View Profile
    • My website
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2010, 12:32:16 am »
What is the probability of that happening by pure chance?
Astronomically greater than it being caused by supernatural intervention. I'm just saying.
Yet, through a series of seeming coincidences and "natural" events, one occurring atop another, the Jews are saved from a genocidal plot. This is what the holiday of Purim is all about ... "pur" refers to the casting of lots, to seeming pure chance. The point of the book is that this seeming pure chance is in truth not chance at all.
That's a particularly human way of looking at it though. We always find it hard to believe that things that have happened by pure chance, whether good or bad, are caused through the deliberate intervention of someone or something. We are naturally wired to seek patterns and meaning in things, which has served us well over human history, but does also sometimes make us ascribe causes where there may well be none.

"Children, if you are tired, keep going; if you are hungry, keep going; if you want to taste freedom, keep going."
-Harriet Tubman
http://yo

Offline Curtis Metcalf

  • Honorary Wakandan
  • *****
  • Posts: 4499
  • One never knows, do one?
    • View Profile
Re: Parting of the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) Jibes with Natural Laws
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2010, 07:13:41 am »
We are naturally wired to seek patterns and meaning in things, which has served us well over human history, but does also sometimes make us ascribe causes where there may well be none.

Or sometimes different causes than we imagine.
"Not only is the universe stranger than we imagine, it is stranger than we can imagine."

Nevertheless, IAWWS wholeheartedly.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."