Author Topic: JOHN LEGEND....  (Read 10164 times)

Offline jefferson L.O.B. sergeant

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2010, 08:15:09 pm »
Reform

Fiscal Equity- Every state should have a fiscal equity law which requires all public schools to be funded at the same rate. Here in NYC the verdict was in favor of fiscal equity and yet chancellor Joel "Manifesto" Klein and Emperor Bloomberg haven't enforced it.

Educators lead- No principals without a minimum of 15 years experience. No superintendents without a minimum of 20 years experience. Chancellors must have been educators at least 15 years in the state in which they are going to hold office.

Civil Rights enforcement- There have never been fewer Black and Latino teachers in the history of NYC. Children seeing a reflection of themselves in the classroom has been proven as a means of raising achievement. There has to be a mandatory level of teachers of color in relation to the student population.

Curriculum- Black Males are the highest achieving students before the 4th grade... and then it collapses. There has to be a revamping of the curriculum to hold the interests of 21st century students.

Decentralization- Schools should be governed at the local level. There should also be monthly public meetings on all school related activities.

Clean stats- No more in-house grading. No more state specified tests. No more data entry firms. The NAEP test is the only test given to every child in the country.

I can get behind pretty much all of these. 

Why decentralization?

With decentralization there is a name and a face you can hold directly accountable for the state of your local schools. The district office won't be downtown or even more outrageously in my neighborhood; in another borough.

Hiring would be directly affected by this model as well.

Black and Latino teachers are nearly non-existant in our local schools. If communities had control of hiring this circumstance would no longer exist.

Offline moor

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #31 on: October 25, 2010, 09:50:26 pm »
Is there a real difference in the way a 21st-century student learns math or science, as opposed to a 20th century student?  Seriously.

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #32 on: October 26, 2010, 07:25:05 am »
Is there a real difference in the way a 21st-century student learns math or science, as opposed to a 20th century student?  Seriously.

Do you mean "Is there a difference in practice?" or "Should there even be a difference?"

For the first question, probably not. For the second, oh yeah. There is a qualitative difference between an abacus and modern computers. The difference in tools shifts the methods and the frontiers of the subject matter for quantitative reasoning. The notion of data mining, for instance, is pretty new. Non-linear systems that can't be calculated can be simulated.

The basics are, of course, the same but new applications are unfolding all the time demanding a better and somewhat different foundation. Math and science need to be viewed as disciplines of inquiry, not a set of facts to memorize. The methods and techniques are more important than the results. I think that requires a shift in teaching.

Frankly, in my experience, not only are too many math and science teachers not doing this, but they don't even understand what I'm talking about. Nor are they familiar with research and discoveries in cognitive science on how we learn math and quantitative reasoning. It seems to me that cognitive science should be to teaching what biology is to medicine.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline Reginald Hudlin

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #33 on: October 26, 2010, 12:58:37 pm »
Is there a real difference in the way a 21st-century student learns math or science, as opposed to a 20th century student?  Seriously.

Do you mean "Is there a difference in practice?" or "Should there even be a difference?"

For the first question, probably not. For the second, oh yeah. There is a qualitative difference between an abacus and modern computers. The difference in tools shifts the methods and the frontiers of the subject matter for quantitative reasoning. The notion of data mining, for instance, is pretty new. Non-linear systems that can't be calculated can be simulated.

The basics are, of course, the same but new applications are unfolding all the time demanding a better and somewhat different foundation. Math and science need to be viewed as disciplines of inquiry, not a set of facts to memorize. The methods and techniques are more important than the results. I think that requires a shift in teaching.

Frankly, in my experience, not only are too many math and science teachers not doing this, but they don't even understand what I'm talking about. Nor are they familiar with research and discoveries in cognitive science on how we learn math and quantitative reasoning. It seems to me that cognitive science should be to teaching what biology is to medicine.

Whew, you dropped a bar on this one!

Offline moor

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #34 on: October 26, 2010, 10:09:27 pm »
Thanks, Curtis.. that was one of the most comprehensive answers I've ever seen explaining the reason for this education "gap", and it really has less to do with funding and resources than I realized.

I'ma shutup and listen now... :D

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #35 on: October 27, 2010, 06:58:44 am »
Thanks, Curtis.. that was one of the most comprehensive answers I've ever seen explaining the reason for this education "gap", and it really has less to do with funding and resources than I realized.

I'ma shutup and listen now... :D
Thanks, moor but don't do that. Well, OK, listen, but don't shut up. Education is potentially the biggest transformative issue out there.

There are plenty of problems to tackle. It really is all of the above. The disparities and dysfunction within our education "system" are significant and need to be addressed. But ultimately the goal posts have been moving for a while now. Even the best schools are not adequately preparing children for life and careers in the 21st century. We need a rethink of the whole approach starting with the goals. The current system was designed for the Industrial Age that has come and gone. Even if that system was working well, it's no longer good enough.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."

Offline Curtis Metcalf

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Re: JOHN LEGEND....
« Reply #36 on: November 19, 2010, 01:10:14 pm »
Here's a more extensive answer to moor's question. I just discovered this and it resonates with me.
"Seek first to understand, then to be understood."
"Be hard on systems, but soft on people."